Beginner Guitar Lessons: Guitar Lesson 8 | Guitar Lessons By GuitArmy | Skillshare

Beginner Guitar Lessons: Guitar Lesson 8

Guitar Lessons By GuitArmy, Your personal guitar teacher

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7 Lessons (28m)
    • 1. Lesson 8 Introduction

      3:23
    • 2. Play a C on every string

      5:13
    • 3. Rhythm 6

      4:21
    • 4. Strum this open chord progression 4

      3:16
    • 5. Power chord exercise 3

      5:29
    • 6. Drop D tuning

      2:15
    • 7. Drop D tuning exercise

      3:35

About This Class

Are you interested in learning how to play the guitar? Then you've come to the right place. This lesson is the 8th lesson in a series of 10 guitar lessons that the Guitar Training Camp will be publishing. This lesson is designed to be your eight ever guitar lesson. If you've never played guitar before and would like to learn this lesson is perfect for you. 

What will you learn in this lesson?

  • How to play the note C on every string. It's an important skill to be able to find a specific note on every string. 
  • Rhythm 6 - you will learn to strum a rhythm with guitar tablature in the video and w/PDF chart

  • Learn to strum a chord progression with open chords with guitar tablature in the video and w/PDF chart

  • Learn to play a power chord exercise with guitar tablature in the video and w/PDF chart

  • Learn to tune to Drop D tuning. This is a must know tuning for today's rock
  • Learn to play an exercise in Drop D tuning

Why should you sign up for my lesson?

  • My name is Chris Rupp and I'm the founder of the GuitArmy.

  • I've been teaching guitar full time for over 18 years.

  • I have taught more then 30,000 individual private guitar lessons.

  • I teach guitar students online all over the world.

  • I have a bachelors of music degree from the world renowned Berklee College of Music where I studied with some of the best guitar players on earth. 

  • I created a successful line of guitar instruction DVDs that sold very well and garnered the attention of the "As Seen on TV" folks.

  • I love teaching guitar and helping students become better musicians through the guitar.

  • I will answer your personal questions and help you with learning the material in this lesson.

Why should I take your class and not just learn from YouTube?

You can try to learn guitar from YouTube but eventually you'll figure out there's so many videos out there is very hard to put the information together in a coherent way. I have students come to me all the time that are tired of watching random guitar videos on YouTube and don't know how to put the information together. With this lesson you can get started playing the guitar and follow the next 2 lessons to end up with a full 10 lessons for beginners on guitar. If you missed the first 7 lessons make sure you sign up for those courses also. 

Student Testimonial

Hi Chris, thanks so much for reaching out! I'm about half way through lesson 10 of your Beginner lessons via Skillshare, so I was researching more of your teaching, and what's next... and found your GTC Online! I've gotta tell ya, something about your explanations, your method of teaching, and the detailed resources provided, you've connected so many dots for me -- it's appreciated beyond words! I'm mostly self-taught, regret that I started so late in life, and have tried other online resources, but yours has been the most comprehensive! As a corporate facilitator to adult learners myself, I just wanted to express my gratitude!

Mel

Transcripts

1. Lesson 8 Introduction: Welcome to beginner guitar lessons. Lesson eight. My name is Chris Rock, and I'm the founder of the guitar training camp. If you've never played guitar before or you're a beginner looking to improve your skills than my beginner guitar lessons are for you, this course is going to be 10 lessons in total. I will be releasing each lesson one at a time, so you have the time needed toe work on and learn the material in each lesson. If you like the 1st 8 lessons and you want the next two lessons, make sure you sign up is one of my students. Here's some clips of what you'll be learning in less than eight, 33 4 end In the second measure, we're gonna put our first finger here on the third Fret turns out to be an F five power chord because remember this how you would normally play an F power court. But this note is this string is tuned down a whole step. So this note, this note that was here is now up two frets, which is right here. So we have to wait. So the main point of this power court exercise three is that you're switching back and forth between the fifth string and the six string. So if you take a look first we're gonna start with this. See, here on the six string and on the eighth, Fred. All right, So the rule is that when you go to the next string, you're going to go down. Five frets on the next string. So what I say 12 34 234123 So, for beat number two, what we're doing, it's an eighth note coming in on till. And typically, if you take others to eight votes and you split them up in the 16th notes, you end up with 4/16 notes per beat, and you count those two e and a like one e end to E and a three and a eso. There had to be some information about me. I have a bachelors of music degree from Berklee College of Music, and I've been teaching guitar full time for more than 18 years. I've told more than 30,000 private guitar lessons, so I'm very experienced with what students need to get started on guitar. For more details about the course, check out the course description. I look forward to seeing you inside the course 2. Play a C on every string: in this lesson, I'm going to show you how to find a C note on every strength. It's very important to learn all of the notes on each string. It's also very important to be able to locate the same note or pitch on another string as well, playing the notes see on every string. Normally, what I do is this is an exercise that I have all my students do after they've learned all of all of the notes on each individual string. Then what I haven't do is learn how to play a specific note on every single string. The benefit to that would be if I am playing a song and I'm kind of hanging out down here on, but I need to go to a C. You know, I'm not gonna want to probably jump the whole way up here would make more sense if I just play See here. So in a song, it's good to know you have some options. I could play this. See, here I can play it here, or if I'm playing, listening to a song and it says I'm supposed to play G and I play here. It doesn't sound quite right. It sounds like it's a higher G. The sound of the court is higher than it's good to know that the energy right here you go up here and play this power court up here because maybe they're not playing this one down here. Maybe it's this one up here. It's important to know where all the your Cesaire any note are on the strings. So let's go ahead and take a look. How to play that exercise first. We're going to start with this. See here on the six string on the eighth, Fred. All right, So the rule is that when you go to the next string, you're going to go down. Five frets on the next drink. So when I say down, I mean move your finger over And the countdown five frets 12345 This see right here will be the exact same pitches. This same. So I just start here. I move over a countdown 512345 and we'll find a see the exactly pitch five frets lower on the next string. The next rule is if I move my finger over, I can go up seven, frets. 1234567 And I will come to a CIA's well, but it will be one octave higher than this scene. So I move it over, I slide up seven Friess. Then I come to a CIA's. Well, so, uh, the rule is down five. I consider this down the neck because the picture is going down. So when you move over, I can go down five to a C. That's the same pitch. Or I can go up seven and play a C an octave higher. So I'm just gonna start from this. See? Right here. Right. So from this string, I want to go to the fourth string. I can't get down five, so I'm gonna have to go up seven. So I move over. 1234567 That means this is a see right here. Pitch wise. You can. Here it's the same. All right, so now now, when I go to the third string, I have the option of whether I want to go up. I can go. 1234567 And go to this one. Or if I want, I can get down. Five I want I want to get down five. So I'm just gonna move over and go. 12345 And we have a see right here. Now it's a little different when you go to the second string when you go to the second string because the distance between strings two and three is a major third interval, not 1/4 like all the other strings. So what happens is we don't get down. Five, we get down four. So when of this sea of when I move over to the second string, I count out for 1234 Eso is down four and it's up. It's up eight that instead of seven. So if I move over go 1234567 a. We come to see right here. So the rule is when you go into the second string, it's down four up eight. All right, So we'll we'll work with this right here. So from this one, when I go to the first string again, it is gonna be up. Seven. It's back to the five and seven rule. So if I move over, you just get 1234567 So that is how you can quickly find how to play. Ah, see on each strength. So I'm gonna go ahead and do that again. I'm gonna start here. Get down five to this one. Then I'm gonna go up 72 this. See? They're gonna get down five to this one. That I'm gonna get down four to this Say on. And then I'm going to go up seven to this one here, and you have be saying, Well, what about all appear? There's a bunch of other notes up here on That's true. So you can get through this exercise multiple times, and instead of going down, you can go up up seven or eight, depending on what string you're going to. So you can basically figure out where all the seas are on on the guitar. That is how you find the notes, See on every strength. You want to repeat this exercise with all 12 notes, I would suggest going around the circle of fifths charge to cover all 12 notes, or you can just pick random notes 3. Rhythm 6: you'll be playing rhythm number six. This is how you play Rhythm number six 34 So, in the first measure, what we have is for beat number one. We're gonna play a for 1/4 note. We're gonna play G number two. What we have is an eighth note, followed by 2 16 notes. I wasn't gonna include any 16th notes in this course, but I wanted to put at least at least one rhythm in here that I thought really sounds great like this. Disagreed. Ah, stream. You'll hear on a lot of recordings. Eso I wanted to put in just a really great sounding rhythm that you can use in real life for recordings. So for beat number two, what we're doing, it's an eighth note coming onto and typically, if you take those 2/8 notes and you split them up in the 16th notes, you end up with 4/16 notes per beat and you count those two e and a like one e and Dewey and three and eso. There had to be some way to count it, and how most people counted is they put the number of the beat first, and then you ended with E and, um so it would go won t end to end. So what's happening on beat? Number two is we're coming in with an eighth note that takes up the first half of the beat eso instead of it going to e. And, uh, it just gives to and we put the and up going down up so that beat is going to go to a and gently What I tell people is just drum down, down, listen to how I'm doing it and then match. What I'm doing is gonna go one two and her down, down, down, up. They were gonna repeat that same rhythm for beats three and four. We're going to switch to a D chord, so it's gonna go 34 And so if I go ahead and put that whole measure together is going to sound like 12 and 34 And let's go ahead and take a look at the second measure in the second measure, what I'm using, I'm using a C at nine chord e Don't show you anywhere else in the course how to play this chord, so I'm gonna need to check it out right here. What you're gonna do is it looks just like a g chord. If you take these two fingers and you movinto ire string, you move him over two strings for five to see at nine court because we're adding 1/9 in right here, which is basically a d. We're adding a d instead of playing see like this playing the C we're gonna add this and 1/9 above the reason this is 1/9 because from here, here's the route. 123456789 So this note is 1/9 above this route right here. So we're playing the sea at nine Chord G. C at nine. So the rhythm for that measure it's gonna be the same as the last measure. Except you don't have to change chords. So it's gonna sound like this. 34 one to end 34 And, uh, more time 34 12 and 34 and up. Now go ahead and play the whole thing a couple times. You can practice playing along with me. 34 one more time. 34 That is how you play rhythm number six 4. Strum this open chord progression 4: I think this lesson you'll be strumming chord progressions using chords that you've learned in this course. Let's take a look at the first exercise for exercise number one. We have four measures. We have four different chords is gonna be an e corn a d cordoned on a cord on a C chord. Like all these exercises random chord changes because I didn't try to make a court progression that necessarily sounds good. They're just random cords to kind of force you to do some, maybe some different court changes that you wouldn't normally do in, um, say any major chord progression. All right, so, uh, all we're doing here is we're just warming quarter notes, and so I'm gonna go ahead and play through it. 1234 back to see, uh, you can choose whatever tempo. I'm just picking a random tempo. You can go slower, Faster. Really. You know, it's really up to you. I would do whatever you can comfortably any any temper that you can comfortably change between chords. With this exercise, you don't have a lot of time to go from beat number four to be number one of the next measure I'm gonna go ahead. Play throw more time. 1234 That was exercise number one for exercise number two. We have the courts, a minor E minor D minor G, and we're just playing some quarter notes. Let's go ahead and play through it. 12 34 31234123413 Go and play that one more time. 1234 That was how you play. Exercise that number two. That is how you play open chord progression for 5. Power chord exercise 3: I think this lesson You're going to be playing chord progressions that use power chords based off of the fifth and the sixth strength. This is what exercise number one sounds like. A distortion. So the main point of this power court exercise three, is that you're switching back and forth between the fifth string and the six string. So if you take a look, we're gonna play four different power force. We're gonna play D A C g. No, For each measure, it you're playing eight straight eight notes and we're picking it all down Gold one in two and three and four, and we're gonna get it. Move. We're gonna move over to a on the six string one in two and three and four. And when I say over today, I'm referring to our first finger because when I play this d power cord, I know this is where d is. This finger just kind of comes along for the ride. Technically, this is up a perfect fifth. Um, and you know that you don't bring me found. So does remain. Does know it is up 1/5 You know, it's up 1/5. Uh, on these strings when you go up two frets and over one string So I'm always targeting I'm always focusing on Where does my first finger go? This one just kind of comes along for the ride. So this is a D and this is the note A here. So I just move it over and go one into and three hand for. And next we have a C five power chord. So I know this The notes see here. So then I'm gonna play the power cord here One end to end three and four hand that is going to G. So instead of going away, appear to G. It's gonna be a big jump, especially if you're singing or running around. Uh, it's a lot of user Teoh back and forth from CDG. So if you see it makes sense right over to G, right beside one in two and three and four hand. So now I'll go ahead and play through it cleanly. Sound like this one and two and three and four and one and two and three and four and one and two and three and one and two and three and four hand. Let's go ahead and play through it with some distortion. 12341234 Exercise Number two is going to sound like this. 34 This exercise, I think, is pretty fun for each measure. Your just playing on beat number one, you're playing to eight. That's gone. One man. And then for me, it's 23 and four year at arresting to gonna go one in 234 So that's the first measure. Were playing an E. T. 234 When we get down to the third, fret down here for C T. 234 than g T. 234 and then up to a sharp on the six. Threat 234 I thought they sharp kind of Santa neat sounds kind of remind me a little of Nirvana. It's not really a correct court in the key of E, but I thought it sounded kind of neat. So play that one more time. 1234342343234 Since each measure has rests on beats 23 and four, you have a lot of time to get to the next chord. So a muting and I got plenty of time to get down here. Teoh, where C is 34 Then they get up. There's a shop now Let's go ahead and play through that with distortion. Distortions always just more fun. I put some flan drawn to spice it up a little bit. I hear Ugo 1234 34 Again, that was power cord exercise number three. 6. Drop D tuning: Ah, drop D tuning has been around a long time. It's been used in blues, classical, country, rock in over the last 15 years. It has become very prevalent in the hard rock, alternative and metal genres. The tuning carries a heavier, deeper sound in standard tuning. Ah, lot of bands today use dropped tuning and then tune all the strings down 1/2 step or a whole step, making it sound even deeper and heavier. Dropsy is also a standard modern tuning for guitar. Let's take a look at how to get in to drop D tuning to tune your guitar down into drop d tuning. It's very easy. What we're gonna do is we're just gonna take our six string that we're gonna lower that down from a knee down to a D. So play to see here is gonna loosen it down to a D Go a little lower. That's pretty good right there. Now I'm in drop d tuning. What that means is, um I could still play. You played my regular court. It's just on the six string. It's now this the e is right. Here s so if I want to play power chords this would be an e power cord. Right? Here was what happens is where I would normally play need power for, like, this. This This this note me here is now up here up on the second fret. So to play in the five power forward, I would play right here. If I was gonna play a G power court, I would need to play it up here. This would be, I guess that would be effort here they will be appear. Uh, it's just a lot of fun playing in this tuning because you can just use one finger to play power for its. So it's pretty awesome. So all you have to do is just tune your six string down to a D and you want to leave? Ah, strength one through five. Justin. Standard tune. That is how you tune your guitar to drop d tuning 7. Drop D tuning exercise: I think this lesson we're going to play a rhythm that takes advantage of drop d tuning. Let's take a look at the rhythm for this. Drop the Tooni exercise for the first measure for exercise number one. What we're gonna do is we're gonna play an open power court opened power board by just strumming strings 45 and six. Thing comes in on the quarter note on beat number one and for the rest of ah, it's gonna be, 03 in 112 and three and four for that two and three and four and I'm palm muting all those . That's why if you look on the down below at the tab, you'll see where it says PM That means palm mute. So what I'm doing there is I'm letting my my palm here. It's coming in right above the where the string meets the saddle here. And I'm just going just letting my palm rest on the string. You have to figure out where you want to let your palm rest if you move it up too far. Deadens the noted that sound good to you have to figure out, um and you know, you want to actually touch in the street is going to ring the whole time. So you just have to find where where do you have to put your palms? It gets that nice, hollow sound. So the first measure goes tryingto analytical. 12 and three and four end. All right. In the second measure, we're gonna put our first finger here on the third Fret turns out to be an F five power chord, because remember this how you would normally play an F power court. But this note is this string is tuned down a whole step. So this note, this note that was here is now up to friends, which is right here. So we have to play this F five power chord right here. That may sound like 12 and three and four end. So so far, we have two and three in for T two and three in four, and they were gonna go appear to the A threat. This a sharp and go 12 and three and four and they were gonna move down to the seventh fret for an 85 power chord. U n three n for n. So I'm gonna go ahead and play through this whole exercise Slowly, it's gonna go 12 and three and four and 23 and four to end three for 234 Now I'll go ahead and play through it at full volume. 12341 more time. 1234 That was an example of a typical rock rhythm in drop D tuning. Playing in drop D tuning can be a lot of fun because you can play power forward with just one finger, and that could be very fun and addicting.