Beginner Guitar Lessons: Guitar Lesson 6 | Guitar Lessons By GuitArmy | Skillshare

Beginner Guitar Lessons: Guitar Lesson 6

Guitar Lessons By GuitArmy, Your personal guitar teacher

Play Speed
  • 0.5x
  • 1x (Normal)
  • 1.25x
  • 1.5x
  • 2x
7 Lessons (27m)
    • 1. Skillshare intro lesson 6

      3:10
    • 2. Notes on the fifth string

      2:56
    • 3. Sight reading on the 5th string

      4:28
    • 4. Rhythm 4

      6:44
    • 5. Strum this open chord progression 2

      2:54
    • 6. Power chord exercise 1

      4:22
    • 7. Learning to play an open D minor chord

      2:06

About This Class

Are you interested in learning how to play the guitar? Then you've come to the right place. This lesson is the 6th lesson in a series of 10 guitar lessons that the Guitar Training Camp will be publishing. This lesson is designed to be your sixth ever guitar lesson. If you've never played guitar before and would like to learn this lesson is perfect for you. 

What will you learn in this lesson?

  • Notes on the fifth string w/PDF chart
  • Sight reading on the fifth string w/PDF chart

  • Rhythm 4 - you will learn to strum a rhythm with guitar tablature in the video and w/PDF chart

  • Learn to strum a chord progression with open chords with guitar tablature in the video and w/PDF chart

  • Learn to play a power chord exercise with guitar tablature in the video and w/PDF chart

  • Learn to play an open D minor chord

Why should you sign up for my lesson?

  • My name is Chris Rupp and I'm the founder of the GuitArmy.

  • I've been teaching guitar full time for over 18 years.

  • I have taught more then 30,000 individual private guitar lessons.

  • I teach guitar students online all over the world.

  • I have a bachelors of music degree from the world renowned Berklee College of Music where I studied with some of the best guitar players on earth. 

  • I created a successful line of guitar instruction DVDs that sold very well and garnered the attention of the "As Seen on TV" folks.

  • I love teaching guitar and helping students become better musicians through the guitar.

  • I will answer your personal questions and help you with learning the material in this lesson.

Why should I take your class and not just learn from YouTube?

You can try to learn guitar from YouTube but eventually you'll figure out there's so many videos out there is very hard to put the information together in a coherent way. I have students come to me all the time that are tired of watching random guitar videos on YouTube and don't know how to put the information together. With this lesson you can get started playing the guitar and follow the next 4 lessons to end up with a full 10 lessons for beginners on guitar. If you missed the first 5 lessons make sure you sign up for those courses also. 

Student Testimonial

Hi Chris, thanks so much for reaching out! I'm about half way through lesson 10 of your Beginner lessons via Skillshare, so I was researching more of your teaching, and what's next... and found your GTC Online! I've gotta tell ya, something about your explanations, your method of teaching, and the detailed resources provided, you've connected so many dots for me -- it's appreciated beyond words! I'm mostly self-taught, regret that I started so late in life, and have tried other online resources, but yours has been the most comprehensive! As a corporate facilitator to adult learners myself, I just wanted to express my gratitude!

Mel

Transcripts

1. Skillshare intro lesson 6: Welcome to beginner guitar lessons. Lesson six. My name is Chris Rope, and I'm the founder of the guitar training camp. If you've never played guitar before or you're a beginner looking to improve your skills than my beginner guitar lessons are for you, this course is going to be 10 lessons in total. I will be releasing each lesson one at a time, so you have the time needed toe work on and learn the material in each lesson. If you like the 1st 6 lessons and you want the next four lessons, make sure you sign up is one of my students. Here's some clips of what you'll be learning in lesson six. 1234123 and four For exercise number two. What we're using. We're using an open G cordoned first measure. You may see a dot beside the first beat, which is 1/4 note. What that does to a note. It adds on half the value of what the note already waas way. Start up here on a If I want a flat that a I just go down one fret lower the pitch down 1/2 step, so this is a flat. The G is on 10. C G flat would be on the night froth way. We want to strum strings. 123 and four. Fourth string is gonna be open. Wear exercise number one. We have straight eights the whole way through and we're going to start with an A minor chord. G Major D major four with a C two beats, then b A B A C for two beats. Some information about May I have a bachelors of music degree from Berklee College of Music , and I've been teaching guitar full time for more than 18 years. I've told more than 30,000 private guitar lessons, so I'm very experienced with what students need to get started on guitar. For more details about the course, check out the course description. I look forward to seeing you inside the course. 2. Notes on the fifth string: I think in this lesson I'm going to be going over the notes on the fifth string or the A straight. All right, the notes on your a string This is your fifth string right here. That is your a string goes me a That is your fifth string and the notes really go a is open B is on the second fret beings here always together. So it means see has to be on right here on the third friend. Then we have d on the fifth, Fred, that's all. Step to eat, then 1/2 step toe f then a whole step G. Then after G in the musical alphabet, we come back to a So we're gonna go up a whole steptoe and we're gonna get back down It goes a Jean F E. Dean seen being open A Let's go ahead and take a look where the sharps are. The shops were gonna go. We're going to start here with a sharp cause. A is open and the sharp that open a we go up one fret a sharp being sear right here that we're gonna get a C sharp right here. We have a sharp C sharp d is right here is we're gonna go up 1/2 step sharp that d we have Iain f So the next sharp is gonna be in front number nine here. This is f sharp. Then we're gonna go the 11th fret because G is right here. So we're gonna go up here to G Sharp on the 11th 1 more time. That's a sharp C sharp d Sharp, f Sharp and G shar. Now let's take a look at the flats going down the neck. So if we start up here on a I want a flat that a I just go down one fret lower the pitch down 1/2 step. So this is a flat. The G is on 10 said G flat would be on the ninth, fret and then e is on the seventh for it to e flat would be right here on the six Fred. Then here's D sort of flat that d is gonna be on the fourth fret d flat and then be is right here. So if I want a flat that be, have to play the first threatened. So this note here, this could be caught in a sharp or a B flat that's called an end. Harmonic spelling. That just means spending what Keir and you might be using sharps or flats. So one more time, the flats going down It goes a flat, G flat, E, flat, D flat and B flat. Those are the notes on the A string. 3. Sight reading on the 5th string: in this lesson, you're going to be learning to read the main natural notes on the fifth string. There are two strings that you really have to learn. Well, those two strings are the fifth string and the six string. Of course, you need to learn the notes on all of the strings, but the fifth and the sixth string are must learn strings. The reason that you have to learn those strings is because most of the chord you play will be based off of those strings. All right, for exercise number one, we're dealing with three different notes. We're dealing with the fifth String Open, which is a then B is right here on the second fret and then see is on the third friend. So in the first measure, we have an open A on 1/4. It's a whole notes. We're gonna let it ring for four beats. 1234 And if you know, noticed the note is down below the staff. Those air ledger lines. The first ledger line is a C, and then the second ledger line down is an A. So when you see a note that is to ledger lines down and it's right on the second ledger line. That is an open A. So we owe 1234 For measure number two, we have, ah, be that sits just below the first ledger line. And then you played on the second fret, so it's gonna go be 234 Then the third measure, we're back toe open a 234 And then in the fourth measure, we have a C A. C is sits right on the first ledger line down below the staff. So you're gonna go see 234 So if I play that line again, it's gonna go a 234 be 234 a 34 Been seen 234 That's that is how you play exercise number one for exercising them or two. It's going to sound like this 34 with a C two beats than be a B a c for two beats. Been seeing a two beats that be one more time. It's gonna go 3412341234 1234 That is how you play exercise and number two and exercise number three as you can tell Here we have all eighth notes still denotes a b and C what we're gonna do with the eight that says we're gonna alternate. Pick them. We're gonna go down, down, down, down For each measure. So, uh, in the first measure, it's gonna dio a B B B B. In the second measure, it's going to go see. See, see? See A a a. Then in the last measure, it's gonna change on every beat. It's gonna go be B A, C c, B b, and I'm gonna go ahead and play the whole thing now. 34 A B B B B c zzz a B b a c c b b. Now I'm gonna go ahead and play without me saying anything. 34 That's how you play exercise and number three. That's how you read the main notes on the fifth string. Now you just have one more string to go 4. Rhythm 4: welcome to rhythm, for there's only two things in music, the notes and the rhythm you play. That's why rhythm is so important. This course isn't going to help you master rhythm, but it is going to introduce you to some basic rhythms to help you get started with guitar . Let's take a look at rhythm for and exercise Number one I have. Ah, it's kind of a reggae beat. What I I'm using triads. I'm using a little a major try instead of playing the Fool Bar chord, which you probably don't know yet. I'm just using this little triad here, most starting on the third string. Six threatened them playing, barring my first finger across the fifth fret of strings one and two here makes a little a major triad. This is the third C sharp e thin A. It's a little a major triad, and what we're doing here is we're only playing on. The ants were not playing on any of the downbeat. So we're going one and two and three and four, and you might see me putting the hands down. You're actually supposed to be quiet since we have arrest on all of the downbeat. What you're supposed to do is, you know, play your rest, play the end of one, then be quiet on the downbeat of to to do that, I put these fingers down on with my left hand here and then I also have a tend to tendency to just go ahead and lay my palm down that way. I'm kind of guarantee that no strings gonna be ringing. All right, So why don't we go ahead and take a look at the second measure For the second measure, it's gonna be the same rhythm, except I'm using a D chord. I've chose the plant more of a triad and just use strings 12 and three instead of trying to play the open the open d of the open A. So I'm just going one and two and three and four. And what's getting the same thing? You're playing on all the ends and you're not playing anything on the downbeat because they are rests. Now let's take a look at the third measure for Measure number three. What I'm using here, I'm using an e major chord. It's a little e major. Try it here just like this is a d triad by slide it up. Two frets up. The whole step becomes an e triumph. So it's going to the exact same rhythm in just one and two and three and four. Now I'll go ahead and play that rhythm a couple times so that you can play along with me. Third. Here we go. 12 341 and two and three and four and one and two and three and four and one and two and three and four Now I played that rhythm one more time without any county. 1234 Uh huh. That is how do you play exercise number one for exercise number two. What we're using. We're using an open G cordoned first measure. You may see a dot beside the first beat, which is 1/4 note. What that does to a note. It adds on half the value of what the note already waas. So it was 1/4 note. Half of 1/4 a quarter knows one beat half of one beat is 1/2. So we had that half to the original one beat and we end up with 1.5 beats So what's gonna happen here is gonna play down on one. Then you strung up on the end of two. You get one Skip two and three skip for. And so, once again, the first measure is one Skip two and three Skip for and the second measure is going to sound like this. 123 Skip for and one more time It gives 1234 And the third measure, it's gonna sound like this one to skip three and 41 to skip three and four. Now, go ahead and play the whole thing through. 123412 and 34 And 1234 And 123 and four. That is how you play exercise number two for exercise number three. I chose to use an e minor chord, alright? And each measure is the same. So once you can play the first measure, you can play all three of you just have to be able to link them together in time. So the first measure, you're gonna count it, you're gonna go one, and then you're gonna rest on too, so you need to mute those strength, get one and mute the strings on the downbeat of two. When you meet those strings, you need to get your pick into position. And what I mean by that is you don't want to get one and rest, and then your picks up here and then you need to strum up. So you need Teoh. Need to mute the strings and then have your pick ready for the next Strom. So you gonna get one and mute on two and three and rest there. Mute on four, then strung up on the and before that sounds like one and two and three and four. And now go ahead and play the whole thing through and you can play along with me. 12 341 and two and three and four and one and two and three and four and one and two and three and four now some through without counting 34 And that's how you strum exercise number three. That's how you play rhythm number four 5. Strum this open chord progression 2: in this lesson, you're going to be strumming another chord progression, using all of the open chords that you've learned so far in this course for exercise number one. We have straight eights the whole way through and we're going to start with an a minor chord and get a G major thin. The d major e major way have straight eights the whole way through. So you're gonna be going down, up, down. So here we go. I'm gonna go ahead and count all way through. 1234 one and two and three and four and one and two and three and four and one and two and three and four and one and 23 and four. And now go ahead and play one more time. Make sure you're playing along if you want to get 341 and two and three and four and 123 and four. One and two and three and four and one and two and three and four. That was exercise number one for exercise number two. We have an e minor chord. Then we're going to go to a C major chord than a G major chord and then to a D major court , and it's straight eights the whole way through. So that's here. We g 012 341 and two and three and four and one and two and three and four and one and two and three and four. One more time. 34123 and four and 123 and 412 and three and 4123 That is how you strum exercise and number two. That is how you play this open chord progression to keep working those court transitions. 6. Power chord exercise 1: you've already learned how to play a power cord. Now let's put it to use in this lesson, you will be practicing power chords based off of the six string for exercise number one of this power court exercise. If you take notice, it's all quarter notes and it starts with an F first. Fret here because this is where the note F is they were gonna go up to the A threat and play. See, I'm gonna play a Fred and they were to go up the six friend played B flat. All right, so play through it goes 34 Now, when you go between the cords. When I went from first Fred f up here to the eighth fret for C. What I did is I muted between there, so I didn't see in here like the whole drag up the whole me sliding up. But me personally, I don't really care. I don't mind going t 03 e. I don't mind that hearing that slide up, uh, I'm just so used to hearing it, especially if you're going, you just kind of get a lot of string noise and sliding all over the place. So If you don't want to hear that, you can. You can you? Between there. But I say just let it fly because it's it's more about you kind of getting used to keeping your fingers down and keeping the finger spacing. Correct. So I would I wouldn't sweat the string noise so much and just go ahead and enjoy it. Here's that exercise number 11 more time. 34 34 123412341 That was exercised. Number one for exercise them or to What we're doing here is we're playing straight eights, the whole the whole way through and there's gonna be palm muted. So we're gonna start here with the B five and to palm you basically, you have your saddles here. You're gonna put your poem just above where kind of the strings starts right here, and you're gonna let it rest there. So when you pluck the string, sounds muted. If I didn't, it was selling this. So what you want to do is just let your poem right on there If you can, you can try. You can move your poem up and down to see where What sounds good to you by moving up a little too far. It sounds dead and my moving back I get that hollow sound. That's where I want it to get back too far. Just bringing is not muted at all. So I'm gonna go ahead and play through this exercise to it goes 34 one end to end. Three in 4123412 and three and four and 1234 So you may have noticed that I was streaming everything down. The reason I'm doing that, it's a very rock n roll thing I could be. Oh, that would be more efficient, But it's very rock n roll to be to do a lot of down strokes, way of breaking the rules a little in this one. But that's OK. It's It's a very common thing in rock, so I'm gonna go ahead and play that exercise one more time. 34 one and two and three and four and one and two and three and 123123 That is how you play exercise number two. That's how you play power cord exercise. One 7. Learning to play an open D minor chord: in this lesson, I'm going to show you how to play an open D minor chord, all right, To play a D minor chord. The first thing I typically do is, um I usually put my third finger down. I don't think it really matters which one you put down. But for whatever reason, because when I play d major chord, I always put this finger down first and then dropped the other two fingers and around. So I think when I play D minor, I tended it at. But if you want to build it from the first string in the second string and third shrink, that's fine as well. I'm just saying how I do it. Um So let's go ahead and build it. We're gonna take our first finger, and we're gonna put it on the first string. First fret right here. That is the note F Next, we're gonna take our second finger and put it on the second string. Third fret on third. Fret here on D, then we'll take our middle finger. Here are second figure. We're gonna put it on the third string second friend right here on that A were playing the notes A, D and F because to play a D minor chord, we need the notes d f a and then what we want We want to strum strings 123 and 4/4 string is gonna be open If you wanted to, you could strum the fifth string as well because that's an open A If you strung all that a one through five, it would sound fine normally what ideo When I do it, I let my thumb come up over top and I'm you doubt the six string What that does that allows me to strum all six strings on No worry about whether I'm hitting the fifth string of the six string eso that's up to you. You can just keep it tight and just play one through four or you can dio off all six. That is how you play the open d minor court