Beginner Guitar Lessons: Guitar Lesson 3 | Guitar Lessons By GuitArmy | Skillshare

Beginner Guitar Lessons: Guitar Lesson 3

Guitar Lessons By GuitArmy, Your personal guitar teacher

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6 Lessons (18m)
    • 1. Lesson 3 introduction

      2:31
    • 2. Notes on the second string

      3:23
    • 3. Sight Reading on the Second String

      3:45
    • 4. Rhythm 1

      4:52
    • 5. Learning the open E chord

      1:39
    • 6. Learning the open E minor chord

      1:29
11 students are watching this class

About This Class

Are you interested in learning how to play the guitar? Then you've come to the right place. This lesson is the third lesson in a series of 10 guitar lessons that the Guitar Training Camp will be publishing. This lesson is designed to be your third ever guitar lesson. If you've never played guitar before and would like to learn this lesson is perfect for you. 

What will you learn in this lesson?

  • Notes on the second string
  • Sight reading on the second string

  • Rhythm 1 - you will learn to strum a rhythm with guitar tablature in the video

  • Learn to play the open E chord

  • Learn to play the open E minor chord

Why should you sign up for my lesson?

  • My name is Chris Rupp and I'm the founder of the GuitArmy.

  • I've been teaching guitar full time for over 18 years.

  • I have taught more then 30,000 individual private guitar lessons.

  • I teach guitar students online all over the world.

  • I have a bachelors of music degree from the world renowned Berklee College of Music where I studied with some of the best guitar players on earth. 

  • I created a successful line of guitar instruction DVDs that sold very well and garnered the attention of the "As Seen on TV" folks.

  • I love teaching guitar and helping students become better musicians through the guitar.

  • I will answer your personal questions and help you with learning the material in this lesson.

Why should I take your class and not just learn from YouTube?

You can try to learn guitar from YouTube but eventually you'll figure out there's so many videos out there is very hard to put the information together in a coherent way. I have students come to me all the time that are tired of watching random guitar videos on YouTube and don't know how to put the information together. With this lesson you can get started playing the guitar and follow the next 7 lessons to end up with a full 10 lessons for beginners on guitar. If you missed the first 2 lessons make sure you sign up for those courses also. 

Student Testimonial

Hi Chris, thanks so much for reaching out! I'm about half way through lesson 10 of your Beginner lessons via Skillshare, so I was researching more of your teaching, and what's next... and found your GTC Online! I've gotta tell ya, something about your explanations, your method of teaching, and the detailed resources provided, you've connected so many dots for me -- it's appreciated beyond words! I'm mostly self-taught, regret that I started so late in life, and have tried other online resources, but yours has been the most comprehensive! As a corporate facilitator to adult learners myself, I just wanted to express my gratitude!

Mel

Transcripts

1. Lesson 3 introduction: Welcome to beginner guitar lessons. Lesson three. My name is Chris Rope, and I'm the founder of the guitar training camp. If you've never played guitar before or you're a beginner looking to improve your skills that my beginner guitar lessons are for you, this course is going to be 10 lessons in total. I will be releasing each lesson one at a time, so you have the time needed to work on and learn the material in each lesson. If you like the 1st 3 lessons and you want the next seven lessons, make sure you sign up is one of my students. Here's some of the clips of what you'll be learning in Lesson three. All right, so the first flat I'm gonna do right here is where B is. So be flat would be right here would be flat in the third measure. We start with the half note on beat number one, which is an open be so it's gonna go 12 a half note so it takes up to beats Beat one against one notes on Tuesday, todo All right, So to build this team major core, the first thing going, I'm going to do is take my second finger, Put it on the fifth string. Second fret on that would be here way. And then for strings 12 and three They're just gonna be open some information about me. I have a bachelors of music degree from Berklee College of Music, and I've been teaching guitar full time for more than 18 years. I've taught more than 30,000 private guitar lessons, so I'm very experienced with what students need to get started on guitar. For more details about the courts to check out the course description, I look forward to seeing you inside the course. 2. Notes on the second string: in this lesson. I'm going to show you the notes on your second string. The second string is your B string. Your second string Is this one here? Not there. This one here. This your fifth string A Because it goes he a d g b. All right, so the notes are going to go open. B c is on the first fret d whole stepped e half steptoe whole step g. Then it goes back to a appear on the 10 Fred and then back to be on the 12th theme pattern just continues. If I wanted to go, I could go B c D e f g a But I generally just tell people just practice up to the I mean, I would probably practice to the end of the neck, but in general, you just gonna practice up to the 12 threat because then it just starts repeating the pattern. All right, so if we do that again, it's gonna go B c d. He asked g a and then b, You wanna remember that the notes B and C are always a whole step? I mean, sorry. Half step apart And the notes e and F are always 1/2 step apart. B and C always together e and f always together. Now let's go ahead and take a look at the sharps and flats on the second string. Okay, so the sharps going up the neck Here's where C is to see Sharps will be right here because the sharp enough you have to raise the pitch up 1/2 step. So here we have C I need to play C sharp. I'm just gonna go up One fret reason I'm considering this up the next thes the pitch goes up this way and the pitch flats go this way because the pitch is going down. All right, so here's c sharp. Here's d sharp because he's right here. Here's f sharp way. Have g sharp on 9 May have a sharp on the 10th front. One more time. C sharp d sharp f sharp, g sharp on a sharp No, we'll go ahead and take a look at the flats going down the neck. All right, so the first flat I'm gonna do right here is where B is. So be flat. Would be right here would be flat a flat G flat. Ah, e flat d flat. One more time of the flats. Here's B So we lowered down 1/2 step by going to the left here. That's a B flat, a flat G flat, E flat, D flat. Those are the notes on the second string of your guitar. 3. Sight Reading on the Second String: in this lesson, you're going to learn how to read the notes on your second string. Let's get started. This exercise we're taking a look at what? The main three notes that you're gonna be reading on your second string. They are the notes open B, C and D B C and D open 13 All right, So if we look at the first measure, uh, I'll go ahead and play the whole thing for us, it's gonna sound like 34 a. The way the first measure, we start with the sea. So it's going to go see when we have the open string be those are both quarter notes. The beat wise is going one. Teoh. That'll be number three. We have 1/2 note, which is a d. So it comes right down on three. It's going three and it's ringing throughout. Beat four. So that measure goes be The timing is one Teoh three don't planing on for For measure number two, it gives b d. C. Being on. There are 1/4 notes, so it's just beats 123 and four. So once again it is the d. C B O in the third measure. We start with the half note on beat number one, which is an open be. So it's gonna go 12 a half note So it takes up to beats 12 then on beat number three, we have a C quarter notes or just one beat and then beat them before we have a D, which was 1/4 note also. So that measure gives B C. D and the timing and that measure is going to go. 1234 Measure number four. What we have here is we have ah, 2/4 notes, followed by 1/2 note the own beat number one. We have a D quarter note and it goes to see on this beat number two and then we have 1/2 No , no beat number three, which is an open Be on you. Can you play that on beats number three and four. So that measure is going to go D C B timing wise is going 1234 Okay, now I'm just going to play through that exercise a couple times and you can play along with me accounts in 1234 Hey, More time. 1234 Ah, That's how you read the three basic notes on the second string 4. Rhythm 1: in this lesson, you're going to Stroman easy, but classic strum patterns. Let's get strumming. This is how rhythm number one is going to sound for this rhythm. I'm using an a major chord. If you look at the guitar tablature tablets or it starts on a string number 502 on the second, fret on the fourth string. Second fret on the third string on the second fret on the second string, I'm using the fingers 23 and four just an a major chord, all right. And if you notice ah, it's the exact same rhythm for each measure. I just wanted to put a real common, simple strum pattern that you can use for songs. It's going to go 1/4 note. Beat one. It goes one. Then you have eight notes on Btu's. You're gonna go to and down up for beat Number three. It's 1/4 notes just just coming down, and then for four you have eight notes and you're gonna go for and let's go sound like one , two and three for and streaming wise going down, down, down, down, Typically with strumming rhythm, you're gonna stream down on a downbeat when your foot's coming down on a downbeat, you should be strumming down when your foot's coming up. You're tapping. I mean, I'm kind of exaggerating my foot here. My leg Simple strumming Here is when my foot is down on the beat I strum down and on the hands When I feel comes up I strum up So I would play that first measure again. Down, down, down. All right, now I'm gonna play the whole thing a couple times so you can go ahead and strum along with me. 12 34 Now go ahead and play it and I'll count alone. 3412341234 And 1234 And if you like this rhythm, don't be afraid to try different chords like if you learn how to play the open D court. Uh, if you're feeling pretty good about it and you're able to strum it pretty easily, you know, you could change courts per measure. I could do in a chord de court switchback day. Transitioning between chords is pretty tough, especially if you're just beginning guitar. You have to realize that the court transitions you may take hundreds, if not thousands of times going between cords until you're able to transition immediately without having to kind of mess with your rhythm at all. So that's why, with rhythms, I generally just use one just one chord. That way you're just focusing on your right hand. What is your right hand on practicing, Keeping good time without having the hassle in the trouble of Can I switch you? Can I get my hands on a G chord quick enough so that I don't miss a beat? I'll play it one more time. Being a good rhythm player is probably the most important thing that you can do on the guitar. People don't realize that as a guitar player, you will spend at least 95% of your time playing rhythm guitar, so it kind of seems silly to sit around and spend countless hours mastering suite patterns just to impress a couple of friends and some people on YouTube. If you're not even a good rhythm guitar player yet, the better your rhythm, the better. Your guitar leads air going to sound spend time learning how to strum properly, and it will pay huge dividends in the future 5. Learning the open E chord: this'll, Ehsan, you're going to learn how to play an open e chord. This is what an E major court looks like. When you strum it, you strum all six strings. Of course. Don't strum up a appear at the neck you strum down where your pickups are or your sound hole If you have an acoustic, All right, so to build this e m major core, the first thing going I'm going to do is take my second finger, put it on the fifth string. Second fret on, that would be here. Don't take my third finger and I'm gonna put it on this e here, which is on the fourth string. Second fret so on strings five and four or the both on the second fret and take my first finger here and put it on the third string. First fret which is g sharp and then for strings one and two are there open. So when I play that, put that together the notes in any major court r e g sharp and be so every note in this court has to be e g sharp B. So if I go through, this is an E here on the six string. Then we have a B. Then we have an E on the fourth string that we have a G sharp on the third string that we have an open be for the second string theory. First ring is an open E. That is how you play an open E major chord. 6. Learning the open E minor chord: thing in this lesson, you're going to learn how to play the most epic chord on the guitar. E minor. This is what an e minor chord looks like. The reason I caught in the most epic cord. It's the lowest pitch minor chord that you can play on the guitar a lot of times it sounds cool if you instead of strumming it from strength six. The one you strum it the opposite way from 1 to 6. You hear that in a lot of ah rock songs? Sounds pretty cool. All right, so the first thing we're going to do to build it, we're gonna take our second finger and put it on the note, Be here, which is on the fifth string. Second fret, and we'll take our third finger and put it on the fourth string. Second fret, which is the note E right here and then for strings 12 and three. They're just gonna be open. So it looks just like this place used to hear from all six strings. Well, more time. And that is how you play an E minor chord