Beginner Guitar Lessons: Guitar Lesson 2 | Guitar Lessons By GuitArmy | Skillshare

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Beginner Guitar Lessons: Guitar Lesson 2

teacher avatar Guitar Lessons By GuitArmy, Your personal guitar teacher

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Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Lessons in This Class

11 Lessons (1h 11m)
    • 1. Lesson 2 introduction

      2:54
    • 2. Notes on your first string

      5:49
    • 3. Notes On The First String Quiz small

      5:34
    • 4. Sight Reading on the First String

      6:10
    • 5. Understanding Basic Rhythms Part 1

      5:19
    • 6. Understanding Basic Rhythms Part 2

      7:13
    • 7. How to read guitar tablature

      14:54
    • 8. Learning to play the open G chord

      5:07
    • 9. Learning to play the open C chord

      2:38
    • 10. Hells Bells Riff

      8:53
    • 11. Fade to Black Riff

      6:55
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About This Class

Are you interested in learning how to play the guitar? Then you've come to the right place. This lesson is the second lesson in a series of 10 guitar lessons that the Guitar Training Camp will be publishing. This lesson is designed to be your second ever guitar lesson. If you've never played guitar before and would like to learn this lesson is perfect for you. 

What will you learn in this lesson?

  • Notes on the first string
  • Sight reading on the first string

  • Understanding basic rhythms - whole notes, half notes, quarter notes, eight notes, rests

  • How to read guitar tablature

  • Learn to play the open G chord

  • Learn to play the open C chord

  • How to play the guitar riff for Crazy Train
  • How to play the guitar riff for Back in Black
  • How to play the guitar riff for Layla

Why should you sign up for my lesson?

  • My name is Chris Rupp and I'm the founder of the GuitArmy.

  • I've been teaching guitar full time for over 18 years.

  • I have taught more then 30,000 individual private guitar lessons.

  • I teach guitar students online all over the world.

  • I have a bachelors of music degree from the world renowned Berklee College of Music where I studied with some of the best guitar players on earth. 

  • I created a successful line of guitar instruction DVDs that sold very well and garnered the attention of the "As Seen on TV" folks.

  • I love teaching guitar and helping students become better musicians through the guitar.

  • I will answer your personal questions and help you with learning the material in this lesson.

With GuitArmy guitar lessons on Skillshare you will learn: basic open chords, power chords, barre chords, scales, major scales, minor scales, learn to solo, improvisation, beginner guitar lessons, intermediate guitar lessons, advanced guitar lessons, guitar riffs, rock licks, guitar licks, rhythm guitar, songwriting, modes on guitar, how to read guitar tablature, play a guitar solo, triads for guitar, and much more. 

Why should I take your class and not just learn from YouTube?

You can try to learn guitar from YouTube but eventually you'll figure out there's so many videos out there is very hard to put the information together in a coherent way. I have students come to me all the time that are tired of watching random guitar videos on YouTube and don't know how to put the information together. With this lesson you can get started playing the guitar and follow the next 8 lessons to end up with a full 10 lessons for beginners on guitar. If you missed the first lesson make sure you sign up for that course also. 

Student Testimonial

Hi Chris, thanks so much for reaching out! I'm about half way through lesson 10 of your Beginner lessons via Skillshare, so I was researching more of your teaching, and what's next... and found your GTC Online! I've gotta tell ya, something about your explanations, your method of teaching, and the detailed resources provided, you've connected so many dots for me -- it's appreciated beyond words! I'm mostly self-taught, regret that I started so late in life, and have tried other online resources, but yours has been the most comprehensive! As a corporate facilitator to adult learners myself, I just wanted to express my gratitude!

Mel

Meet Your Teacher

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Guitar Lessons By GuitArmy

Your personal guitar teacher

Teacher

My name is Chris Rupp and I'm a guitar instructor and founder of GuitArmy. I am currently teaching live Zoom lessons to students all over the world. I'm a Berklee College of Music graduate and have been teaching guitar full time for over 20 years. I have taught more than 35,000 individual guitar lessons. I love teaching guitar and want to help students on Skillshare become better guitar players. 

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Transcripts

1. Lesson 2 introduction: Welcome to beginner guitar lessons. Lesson to my name is Chris Rope, and I am the founder of the guitar training camp. If you've never played guitar before, or you're a beginner looking to improve your skills than my beginner guitar lessons are for you, this course is going to be 10 lessons in total. I will be releasing each lesson one at a time, so you have the time needed to work on and learn the material in each lesson. If you like the 1st 2 lessons and you want the next eight lessons, make sure you sign up is one of my students. Here's some clips of what you'll be learning in lesson to. So here's A B is gonna be a whole step cause A and B or not beside each other. So we get a B. Now B and C are always beside each other. Musically, there one and two and three and four and one and two, and this lecture is part two of understanding basic rhythms. We will start this lesson rest on one than up on the end of one, two and three that I'm gonna mute the end of three so it is the fourth string zero fret metal beat number two. It's going to be on the fourth string. Second fret right here on E. I'm gonna show you three different ways to play an open G chord. This is the first and what I consider Theo. First thing we're going to do is we're gonna take our third finger and put it on the fifth string. Third fret right here on the notes. See, then we're gonna take our second some information about me. I have a bachelors of music degree from Berklee College of Music and have been teaching guitar full time for more than 18 years. I've told more than 30,000 private guitar lessons, so I'm very experienced with what students need to get started on guitar. For more details about the course, check out the course description. I look forward to seeing you inside the course 2. Notes on your first string: in this lesson, you're going to learn the notes on the first string. The first thing when learning the notes on the strings is you need to have an understanding of what the musical alphabet is. It goes a B C D E f g There's no h is in music. All right, so your first string is right here. So when you pluck that, that is an E eso is open Half is gonna be right here on your first fret Thanou CNF are always beside each other on your guitar because musically e n f or 1/2 step apart Ah, half step in music is only guitar is up One friend or down one fret So think of this this open e here a Ziff It was Fred it down here. But it's not enough to play it down there. And then f is gonna be right here. You never together. F and G are not beside each other. They are a whole step apart. So to go from fto gene, you just go up to friends. I just remember that G is on my first dot on the first string. All right, so now on G after G. The next letter in the musical alphabet is a so this is a G. And then it goes back to the beginning of the alphabet G and a or not beside each other, there are a whole step apart. So we're just gonna go up two frets. So a is right here on your fifth string. Then the what comes after is be it just follows the alphabet. So here's a B is gonna be a whole step cause A and B or not beside each other. So we get a B. Now B and C are always beside each other musically, there they are, 1/2 step apart. So this is be this'll is gonna be See those beings here always beside each other. We're on. See here. The next letter in the alphabet is D C. And they are not beside each other, so there are a whole step apart. So we're gonna go up here to the 10th fret, which is D and then we have d here and then if we go a whole step above a d. A. Is obviously the next letter. So we go up into the 12th fret and you could see of to do You got your doubled out. So you get two dots. So what that is, that's the octave marking. So if I start on E and I go up 12 fresh when I get to the 12th fret of the double dots, you're gonna come back to the same letter we started on E. And you went back up eventually going to come to an E again. And that happens on the 12th. Fret. All right, so I'm gonna go over those notes one more time because e half g A B c d More time he half g A B c d e. One thing I usually usually suggest the people is memorized Some of these thoughts like these 1st 3 dots get g a B uh, this that happens to be C sharp d flat. I probably memorized that one, but it is nice to know where G A and B are. So if I say where's a sharper you need to find in a sharp, we could go right to a on sharp The note. Where's ah G flat white know where g is? So I can just flat All right now, let's take a look at the Sharps and flats on the first string. So before I show you where the sharps and flats are on the first string, let's talk about what is a sharp right. Here is a G. If I need Teoh, make that note sharp. I'm raising the pitch by going up half a step. So if this is a G, if I move up, one fret one front higher in pitch than it then I just created a G sharp G. Shar no flat is the opposite of flat is when I'm taking a note and going down 1/2 step or lowering the pitch down 1/2 step. So here's a G here's G sharp and here's G flat s I generally, I think, really, when you take the time to learn the notes on your strings, learn the natural news. These air the natural. It's e f g a, B, C, D e. The notes that aren't sharp or flat ID or called natural notes. I would learn those really well. So if you need to find in a sharp if you know where a is, and then I can just sharpen our flat, it whichever I need to dio. All right, so let's take a look at the Sharps going up eso the first sharp is gonna be f sharp, so I think it where f is and sharp it So we have sharp with G sharp right? Here it is. G's here. Next, we have a sharp no, we have c sharp and then d sharper here one more time. That's f sharp. G shar a sharp C sharp and then d sharp. All right, so let's take a look at the flats going down. Um, right here. E So if I need to play any flat, I would just play right here. Here is the flat. Here's d flat because D is on the 10th fret to d flat would be on the ninth. Then we have B flat right here on the sixth. Fret, then we have a flat way of G flat the flats one more time. We have e flat d flat, B flat, a flat way. Have g flat. And those are the notes on your first string 3. Notes On The First String Quiz small: In this video, I'm going to be quizzing you on the notes on the first string. Let's go ahead and get started. So how this is going to work is I'm going to ask you to play some node on the first string. Let's say if I said I want you to play a G, then you're going to see something that says Paul's and find the note that gives you a chance to pause the video, find where the G is and then unpause and then I'll play the correct answer. That way you can verify that you did it correctly. So that's basically how this quiz is going to work. The first group of notes that I'm going to ask you to find are the natural notes. Those are notes that are not sharp or flat. In. The first note I would like you to find is an a. A can be found right here on the fifth fret. The next note I would like you to find is a D. D can be found right up here on the tenth fret. The next note I would like you to find is an F. F is right down here on the first fret. The next node is find the node B. The node b is right here, up here on the seventh fret. The next thing you need to find is a G. G is right down here on the third fret. The next note I'd like you to locate is an e. There are two correct answers for this. You could pluck the first string open. You can play it here on the 12th fret. Both are correct. They are both 0s there, just one octave apart. And the last natural note that I'd like you to find is a C. C is going to be found right up here on the eighth fret. So those were all of the natural notes. Now I'm going to ask you to locate some sharps. The first sharp I'm going to ask you to play is an F sharp. F sharp can be found right down here on the second fret. Here's where f is just some sharp denote ego up a half-step. That's where F sharp is. Now I would like you to find a c-sharp. C-sharp is going to be found right up here on the ninth fret. Now let's see if we can find an, a sharp. A sharp is going to be right here on the sixth fret. Next, I would like you to find a D sharp. D sharp is going to be right up here on the 11th fret. And the last sharp I would like you to find is a G sharp. G-sharp can be found right here on the fourth fret. And that's all the sharps on the first string. Now I'm going to ask you to find some flats. The first flat I would like you to find is going to be a B flat. B flat is going to be right up here on the sixth fret, right here between a and B. That's B flat. Next, I would like you to find a D flat. D-flat is going to be right up here on the ninth fret. Now I would like you to find a G flat. G flat can be found right down here on the second fret is the same as F sharp. We have G. That's what an enharmonic spelling. So right here is G flat. Next, I would like you to find an E flat. E flat is going to be right up here on the 11th fret. The E is on the 12th fret, so we do give them half a step. Right here is where we have E flat. And the last flat is going to be in a flat. And a flat to be found right down here on the fourth fret. Thanks for taking the time to take this quiz on the notes on the first string. If you find that you really didn't do that grade within, just go back, review the notes and I'm sure you'll do much better than next time. Now let's move on to the next lesson. 4. Sight Reading on the First String: in this lesson, You're going to read some notes on the first string. Let's take a look at the first exercise. In this first exercise, we have four measures and we also have four whole notes. If you remember a whole notice. Four beats. So if I play a note, I'm just gonna let it ring for four beats like 1234 All right, so in the first measure, we have an open E. Just so you know, I'm not showing you how I'm picking this, but I'm picking all I'm picking all of the notes down because all of the news come in on a downbeat. So for this first exercise, I'm going to pick every single note down. And for the first measure, we have an open E for the second measure. We haven't f the third measure. We have a G right here on. Then in the fourth measure, we have an ass. All right, so I'm going. Let's go ahead and play that Valkanis in 12341234123412341234 And that's how you play the first sight reading exercise and exercise. Number two, We are reading half notes, half notes or two beats. So if you're playing a couple half, that should be going 123 4/2 notes or simply to beats, they don't have to commit on beats one and three. They could come in on any be, but they're basically there to beats. I generally think of them as two foot taps, so I will go ahead and play exercise Number two. Let's go sound like this right now. I will go through and I will say the letters out loud as I'm doing it. I'm going e for two beats than G F than an e E. Then asked. The one thing I didn't mention in the first exercise is when you're doing the sight reading , Really, make sure that you're not looking at the guitar tablature that you're actually looking above at the staff and you're reading the notes. The guitar tablature is down there below. It tells you what friend, what string and what fret to play you know each finger on, but really spend more time looking at the notes and learning the notes, like in the first measure, you haven't e s o the notes in the spaces Go f a ce from the bottom up, That's all. You know that that's an e, um, And then we have a G, which sits on top. So I would go through and figure the notes out for yourself and, you know, used the guitar tablature sparingly. It's there to help you to make sure that you're playing the notes in the correct places. But really make sure you are focusing on reading the notes. And that was exercise number two in the third exercise. It is four measures of quarter notes. 1/4 note is one beat. If we're in for four, it's one beat. So every time you tap your foot, that is 1/4 note already. So I'm gonna go ahead and play it. I will play it without saying the notes, and then I'll go through in play with satar notes. 12 34 Okay, now I will say the notes as I play it. 1234 e g f g e s e s e g s a g e s. And that is how you play exercise number three. All right. For exercise number four. I mixed up the rhythms I have. Ah, some whole note. I have a couple half notes and quarter notes, so I will go ahead and play it. 1234 Now we'll go through it again and I will say the letters out loud. 1234 Jean F G S f g g and if the counting Ah, I will go through again in do the counting out loud. 341234123412341 to 34 And that's how you play the three basic notes on the first string. 5. Understanding Basic Rhythms Part 1: in this lesson, you're going to learn the basic rhythmic values for ah, whole note, 1/2 note, 1/4 note and an eighth note. You're also going to learn how to read the rest for the notes that I just mentioned. Because this lecture was kind of long, I decided to break it up into part one and part two. Let's take a look at the first example for this first exercise. I'm using a D chord the whole way through it. And if you don't remember how to play, Deke, or you're gonna put your first finger on Ah, third string second fret You're gonna put your second finger on the first string, second friend, you take your third finger and put it on the second string. Third fret right here. It sounds like this. What I do is I really strum all six strings. I let my my thumb here touch the six string on that. I just strum strum all six strings. Even though the guitar tab for exercise number one just only shows the 1st 4 strings, it's fine. If you strum the 1st 4 you could actually only hit the fifth string. That's fine And if you're doing proper muting, you can get away with strumming all six. All right, so in exercise number one, we have all whole notes, whole notes or four. They are four beats on DSO. Basically, you're going 1234 each one. You're gonna let it a strawman. Then you're gonna let it ring for four beats or four foot taps were in the time signature for four. So every time, every time you tap your foot, it is one beat. So you're basically letting it ring for four foot taps, So I will play exercise number 134123412 341234 34 That is how you play exercise number one and exercise number two. We are taking a look at half notes. Ah, half notice, two beats. So if I was going to strum accord, it's basically two foot taps like one too. That would be 1/2 note. So every two foot taps is going in for four is going to be 1/2 newme. Alrighty. So I'm once again will use a d chord. So I'm going to play exercise number two 1234123412341234123 four. And that is how you play Exercise number two where we are playing half notes for exercise number three were strumming quarter notes 1/4 note is one beat So we're basically just to be strong a whole bunch of D's here. All right, I'm gonna counts in 1234 1234123412341234 That was exercised Number three when we were playing quarter notes in this exercise number four we're taking a look at eighth knows When you have 1/4 note in your shop and 1/2 you end up with 2/8 notes. So basically, how you strumming Count them, you're going to go one and you do the you count the number on the downbeat one and when your foot comes up, then you when your foot comes up in directly in the middle of the beat, that's you say the word and a n d. So you're going one and two and three and four, basically evenly strumming 8/8 notes in one measure. So I will count us in and we'll go ahead and play this, uh, this exercise number 41234 one and two and three and four and one and two and three and 41 and two and three and 41 and two and three and four on. That is how you strum eighth notes and 6. Understanding Basic Rhythms Part 2: this lecture is part two of understanding basic rhythms. We will start this lesson by taking a look at rests and how to read them. Okay, for exercise number five, there's nothing to play here in this. This exercise number five that you're just learning. What do the different rests look like in measure number one? We have a whole note. Rest. That's what that looks like in measure number two. We have to half note rests in measure number three. We have 4/4 note. Rests those squiggly little lines. And then in measure number four, we have 8/8 note rests. What arrest is is when you see arrest your you're not. You're supposed to be silent for that length of time. Whether it's 1/2 note, 1/4 notes and eighth note, you're supposed to be completely silent during the rest. That was exercise and number five for exercise number six. We have two whole note rests, and we also have to hole notes We need to play, so I'm gonna go ahead and play. It's gonna sound like this. 1234123412341234123 four. So what I'm doing on beats number two and four, I'm just meeting my strength because they were ringing because I was playing a whole note. So they were ringing out. And then when I get to beats two or four, I just stopped the strings from ringing with my palm do kind of palm You You could use these fingers, but then you have to take the time to set up the court again. So I would probably instead of heaven Teoh set up the court again. I would probably just use your right hand here to, ah, mute out the strings. That was exercise and number six, this exercise Number seven We're taking a look at half notes and half note rests, so I will play after size. 7123412341234 12 3412341 thing I thought of is as I muting the strings on, like in the first measure, I'm going 12 that I muting the strings. Another thing you can do a za little extra added security. You don't hear anything is with your left hand lift your fingers up just a little bit. So deadens at least a dense the strings of the notes that you're playing. Eso I would lift up my fingers just a little bit and then I would also do the muting. So it sounds like 1234 As soon as I do the muting and let my fingers up a little bit, not lift him up off the strings. Just make sure you lift him up a little just to just to dead in the string. And that was exercise number seven. All right. For exercise number eight. We are dealing with quarter notes and quarter note rests. So here I will play. 12 341 Rest 34 Rest 23 Rest Rest 23 Rest one to rest for. All right, let's go ahead and play it one more time. 341 Rest 34 Rest 23 Rest rest. 23 One To rest for you don't have to say the word rest. I'm just saying it. So you can hear when you're supposed Teoh to rest eso if I go and play one more time, but I won't count it or anything. I'll just play 34 and that's how you play. Exercise number eight. All right. In exercise number nine, We're taking a look at eighth notes and eighth note rests. This is by far the hardest rhythm to play, so I'm going to go through it a lot slower, and I will go ahead and play it and kind of counted out loud. 1234 one and two and rest and four and rest. And two and three rest four and one rest two and three and rest and one and two rest three and rest. Now let's get through that nice and slow. The first measure, it's going to go one and two and then it's arrest on beat three on the downbeat of three. Then you're gonna strung up on the end of three and then you're gonna get four. And in the second measure, you're gonna rest on one. So in terms of me strumming, what I'm gonna dio is I'm going to kind of fake strum down. So on when I say one, I'm going to miss the strings kind of do a false Strummer fakes Trump, I'm going to go rest on one that up on the end of one and two and three that I'm gonna mute the end of three than four. And for the third measure I want to commit on one is gonna go one that I'm going to rest on and and then two and three and rest on four, then strum up on the and before for measure number four, I'm gonna go one and two rest on the rest on the end of two and then down, up for 33 and a mute on four and then strung up on the end of four. That's how you play Exercise number nine, where we're taking a look at eighth notes and eighth note rests. The purpose of this lecture was the introduced basic note values learned to read and strum them. Learning to read some basic rhythms on guitar will be very helpful when trying to play songs. Ah, lot of times there are suggested rhythms with a set of lyrics. By being able to read and play suggested rhythms, you will be able to make your guitar sound like the song that you want to play 7. How to read guitar tablature: in this lesson, I'm going to show you how to re guitar, tablature, guitar, tablature or guitar tabs is the most popular way that people learn guitar parts. It's a system of reading music without having to read music notes. This appeals to most people. I've been reading guitar tablature longer than I've been reading music. I must admit that I've always preferred reading guitar tab to reading music because I just wanted to know Where do I put my fingers? I've always had a pretty good ear for music and being able to make it sound like the recording. I just needed to know where to put my fingers. I will say that reading guitar tablature is not a replacement for reading music notation. I think you should be able to do both Well, so taking a look at this first exercise we can see we have some note to going across the top you have on the left side. You have, ah, the G clap for the trouble class. You have the time signature for four. That's actual music notation down below, where it says Tab, those six lines are actually representing the six strings on your guitar the top line is your first string on and then the the lowest line is gonna be your six string right here. So you're kind of looking at it upside down. Um, the strings going to go. 123456 So when the first measure the first quarter note, it is an F. And if you're reading them the music notes, you know, to play f right here. But if you didn't know how to read music, you would take a look. And on the top line, which is your first string, you see, it says one. So that means you put your finger on the first string first fret. I tell my students, This is kind of like paint by numbers. It's literally telling you what string and what fret the play. So in the first measure, we're gonna play first string first fret, then next on beat number two, we're gonna play the first string zero fret or open beat Number three. It says Second string, which is your B string here, says second string third fret. So we'll play right here. And then on the fourth beat it is the third string second fret s If I were to play that measure, it would sound like the's examples aren't necessarily. Then that's what the sound good. It's basically just to get you to read Tablet. You're on a couple different strings. So one more time the first measure is going to go first string first fret first string open , second string. Third fret on. Then the third string. Second fret for the second measure. Once again, we have 4/4 notes, and the first note is going to start on the so it starts on the fourth string. Zero fret. So a lot of times, Um, instead of going 1234 I might go the opposite direction to go 654 to find that fourth string open. So it is the fourth string zero. Fret. Metal beat number two. It's going to be on the fourth string. Second fret right here on E. Then for beat number three, it's gonna be on the fourth string. Third fret, and then the fourth beat is gonna be the fifth string open. Once again, that measure sounds like, uh, go open 23 Open to read the third measure. The first note starts on the fifth string. Second fret right here on the second beat goes to the six string, which is the lowest line that lets you know that that is the six string, the lowest string. And it says the plate on the zero frets. You're gonna play it open and 1/3 beat it, says six string. First fret. And then the fourth beat is the fifth String zero Fred or open. So if I played that measure again, it would sound like this 20 fret. First, Fred on the fifth string, um, tell you play the first exercise. Now let's take a look at exercise number two. So in this first measure of exercise number two, you'll see a bunch of numbers stacked on top of each other. When you have that all those notes stacked on top of each other, that means you have to play them at the exact same time. So if I look here, I see on the six string, I'm supposed to play it on the zero, fret the then on the fifth string, second fret and then on the fourth string second fret. And then, on the third string, fresh fret on the first strings on strings to on one open s So if I put those together, it's an e chord. Now there's nothing there. We're looking at that tablet, sir, That tells you what fingers you're supposed to use. That's where your experience comes into play. I can use weird fingers. I can choose any fingers I want. This will be strange to do like this doesn't sound very good. You know, I know which fingers to use to play any major court. But it does tell you exactly what notes to play, what numbers, what frets to play to play that chord. And that was the first measure of exercise number two in the second measure, what we have is we have a G chord. One thing I will say is once you re guitar tablature long enough, when you see a group of notes stacked on top of each other, you will probably just recognize exactly what that court is. You know, once you see enough, G's eased these ays. You just get used to what the what the set of numbers looks like so soon as I see that I know that that is a G chord and I'm going. So we're gonna go ahead and play it here. We're gonna start on the six string third fret and the fifth string Second fret and then the fourth string open, third string open. And then on the second string, third fret. Then on the first string third front. So I'm playing 320033 That happens to be a G chord. It's a whole note. So if I was going to play that measure, I would be going just going. 1234 How do I know that's a whole note? Cause I'm looking at the music up above that. The guitar tablature is not telling you exactly what kind of noted is it? Just telling you what strings and whereto what? You know what strings of what fret. Now let's take a look at the third measure. In the third measure of exercise number two, I realize I'm saying the third measure, but if you look at the beginning of the measure at the top above the notes right where it says e minor, it does have a six. There s O that I did all these exercise on one in one file so it measured him. If you're gonna see measures upto one through nine, I'm just referring to it as the third measure of what you're seeing right now. Exercise number two. All right, So if we look down here at the six string, uh, very for on the beat number one, I could see we have a bunch of eighth notes. There is gonna be the six string open aan den stacked right on top of that at the same time , we have to play the six string open. We have to play the fifth string. Second fret and B and e power cord. So what you're supposed to do there? You can see you have eight of those in a row. So you're going to go one and two and three and four and just play eight of them. 12345678 No, If you look above the tablature, it says PM, that means palm mute. What palm muting is is when you're literally putting your palm your hand on the strings, I usually tell people Put it right here where the string meets these saddles here at the bridge. So you just let my lecture. If I let my palm just kind of lay right there, kind of mutes out the strings. I can still hear the note what note it is, but it's still muted. It's not. I'm just muting it a little. And if you move your palm back even further than it won't be muted. If you move your palm closer up higher up on the strings, you can hear very quickly and really deadens the No, you can't hear the note, so you kind of have to figure out Where is that sweet spot where your palm needs to go so you can still hear what noted it is, And yet it's still palm muted. That takes a little practice, but it's kind of fun. It's extremely common on guitar Teoh do palm muting. So this is a skill that you're you're gonna need to get them eso to play that measure. It's gonna go. That was the third measure of exercise at number two for the first measure of exercise number three. We have 4/4 notes and on beat number one, it says to play five thin, there's a line that's going upwards to seven, but that means that's a slide. That means you're supposed to play five. And then as you come to beat number two, you're supposed to slide up from 5 to 7. There's a There's a lot of different things that you can know Tate on guitar tablature. So I wanted to put a couple of really, extremely common ones. There's probably a 30 to 50 different things that could be notated on a guitar tablature. I'm gonna show you like four or five of them most common ones. All right, so we're going from 5 to 7 on then will be number three. We're playing on the second string. Seventh fret. Then we're gonna slide down to the fifth friend. So it goes. And when I do, when I do that slide, I'm not picking. I'm not I'm not playing. Five. Been playing five again. T get get it so you can slide up to seven. I'm just picking it once on sliding. And when you do a slide, you have to keep your, uh, you have to keep ah, decent of pressure on the note if you don't, um, a lot of times people try to go, you don't want to hear that? No disappear as you're going up the slide. Yeah, And you don't also want to hear this. You want to really slow slide, You don't hear E If I was gonna slide from, say, 5 to 10 when the time was a little better the 1st 1 I did hear a little bit in there. That's what a slide is. That was the first measure of exercise and number three in the second measure. What we have is, ah, I'm gonna play on the second string fifth fret on. Then there's a weird little almost looks like a boomerang or something that arch that is letting me know that I'm supposed to hammer on to fret number seven on the second string. What a hammer on is when you play a note, then you take a finger and you basically hammer it down. I'm not plucking that seven. I'm just going this and then taking this finger and hammering and hammering it down hard enough that you I'm playing the note with my finger. I thought this would be a hammer on you do it anywhere. It's really common on guitar to do something that kind of thing So in the in the measure there, I'm going five hammering on 27 on beat number two. Then on the second string seventh fret I'm a plane. That note what this is This is a pool off this I'm playing seven on and I'm still holding this note here cause I'm gonna pull off to that note. So I'm playing that seven on I'm pulling off so that I can Here, Fred number five. What pull off is it's basically I'm basically plucking the second string with this finger because you play the note, it's still ringing. And then I'm gonna pull down on B, plucks the string with with my jam with my third finger here so that I can hear this note here on the fifth fret. So this is ah, that measure. It's like five hammer on seven and seven. Cool off to five. So when you do something like this, what you're really doing is you're doing a amron and then a pull off Kameron, pull off hammer ons pull up these extremely common techniques that you'll see on guitar tablature a lot. That was measure number two for Measure number three. What we have is we have two different bends on the first beat. It's all going on the second string, fifth fret way Have a full step bend. What that means is we're gonna take the this This note right here happens to be in the note E and we're gonna push this string up so it sounds like friend number seven or a whole step above on. That's how you bend the note I like to use. I usually use this finger to help push. You can use this finger as well because it's tough on your fingers. If you just try it with one finger. Mase, do that Might fly out from underneath your fingers. Roy tears your fingers up. So don't be afraid to let your fingers help to basically take the weight of the string. Right. So the first thing we're gonna do is this gonna play five, bend it up a whole step, then for beat number three, we're gonna take that same note and then if you see it's 1/2 that means you're supposed to bend it up 1/2 step. I have step above that note would be on the sixth fret right here. So we're just gonna push it up a little bit. The sound like this note right here. So that measure would sound like 34 time now. In reality, you probably wouldn't see that in a piece of music to do. Ah, the bend up to this note in this? No, it sounds a little weird, but I just wanted to at least demonstrate what a band is. And what does it look like in guitar tablature? And that was exercised. Number three Reading guitar tablature can be a lot of fun and a quick way to learn a lot of music. I primarily use the website ultimate guitar dot com to find access to millions of tabs. I suggest picking out a few of your favorite songs, look up the guitar tab and try playing them. 8. Learning to play the open G chord: thing in this lesson, I'm going to show you how to play an open G chord. I'm gonna show you three different ways to play an open G chord. This is the first and what I consider to be the most common way to play an open G chord. What you're gonna do here is you're going to start with your second finger. When you gonna put this second finger on the six string? Third fret the G here, we're gonna take our first finger, and we're gonna put it on the fifth string. Second fret we're here and we're gonna take our third finger. We're gonna put it on the second string. Third fret. Then we take our pinky and we're gonna put it on the first string. Third fret. So it looks like this on when I played this open G court, I'm strumming all six strings. That's why it is. Ah, fun. Easy court to play. You don't have to worry about not strumming any particular strings. Eso One of the issues you're gonna have is your first finger is gonna accidentally touch the fourth string. So you have to kind of get used to arching your fingers up nice, and I if I just take this finger and I lean it over just a little bit, it touches the fourth string really easy. So I have to learn how to angle my finger up to kind of get it out of the way of the fourth string. So what you can do is you can go through and pick each individual string and listen. Are there any problems? Are there any strings where something doesn't sound right? Eso generally, if something doesn't sound right, it's because you're not pressing down hard enough. Or there's another thing of its touching the string that shouldn't be touching the string. So this is the first way. This is the forefinger way to play G chord to me. This is the way I play it almost all the time. But I am going to show you two other ways to play G chord. So let's go ahead and take a look at another way. All right, the second way to play an open G chord. You will see this cord used a lot in books. A lot of times they'll show you to use the three finger G chord. I think just because it's a little easier than using all four fingers. Eso This court is a legit G chord. The reason both cords can be correct is whether I'm playing a chord like this using this. No de here. If I'm using the three finger way where I'm using the second string open, that's an open be. And in a G major chord, you have G's, B's and D's. So, technically, whether I play it like this or like this, they're both, uh, 100% correct. So to build the second Virgin here, the three finger one, we're gonna start here with our second finger on the six string Third fret. They're gonna put our first finger on the fifth string, second friend, then the only other finger we're gonna put down as we're gonna put our third finger on the first string third friend. And then you can strum all six strings, just like with the first version. It's probably the easiest way to play a G chord, but I find that the forefinger cord is used more often in songs, but that's that's up to you what you want to use. But both are correct now, I'm gonna show you. Ah, third way to play an open G chord in this third version of G, it's still going to be the same three notes of same three. It's still the same. Same fingering Aziz the second version. But we're gonna use different fingers That makes any sense. Eso What's gonna happen here is gonna take your third finger and put it on the six string third fret, and then you take your second finger and put it on the fifth string. Second fret, and then you take your pinkie and put it on the first string. Third friend first. It seems really weird. Like Why would you ever want to use this chord when you can play that one? But depending on what song you're playing, if you're going between chords G and C a lot, it's actually easier. Teoh. It's the quickest way to go from a geo seek or without having again believe it or not, going from G to see. That's a pretty tough transition when you're beginning, so this is an easier way to go from G to see another reason is in some songs, so add the notes see here to make it a Jesus for so if you ever hear that in a song, they're going from G to G sets for a lot of times. This is how they're doing it, and that is the third way to play an open G chord. The open G chord is probably the most commonly used chord on the guitar. It's used in millions of songs. It is a must know cord practice playing it because you will need it. 9. Learning to play the open C chord: thin this lecture. You're going to learn how to play an open C chord. All right. To play in open sea cord, you're gonna need three fingers. That's what it sounds like. So to build the cord, the first thing we're going to do is we're gonna take our third finger and put it on the fifth string. Third fret right here on the notes. See? Then we're gonna take our second finger. Put it on the fourth string. Second fret on the note e They were gonna play the third String open, which is open G for the second string. We're gonna put our first finger on the first fret on this. See right here. The first thing we're gonna play open, which is open E. So if I put all this fingers down, Sounds like that now for the six string, you're not supposed to play the six string. So what I do is I just let the tip of my third finger there touch The six string is called a flesh mute. It also helps get my finger out of the way of the fourth string. I also use my thumb here to touch the six string that way I can strum all six strings. It sounds nice, and I don't have to worry about dealing with the six string, I think one of the tougher open courts to play. So what you want to do is you want to go through and pick each individual string, see where the problem areas are. Like I mentioned in other videos, Um, it's basically you're not pressing out hard enough or you have the finger touching or the another wrong string. So you just want to keep your fingers arched up and not have them touch. Other strings were not supposed to, but this court will get better over time. You just kind of have to keep grabbing its Drummond on just kind of keep doing that over and over. It might take a couple 100 times, eso, you know, trying to get. Try not to get too frustrated if some of the notes are muted, just realized that over time your hands and your muscle memory will get used to playing this cord and it will improve. This was how to play an open C chord, and that is how you play an open C chord. Now that you've learned how to play a D, G and C chord. You can play songs like Knocking on Heaven's Door by Bob Dylan or Sweet Home Alabama, by Leonard Skinner. Just remember to take your time with the cord transitions and know that they will speed up over time. The more you that you practice, oh! 10. Hells Bells Riff: Hey, this is Chris from guitar me. And in this lesson I'm going to show you how to play the guitar riff for hell's bells by ECBC. Alright, so let's start going over how to play. As you can see, I put the guitar tablature up above. So we're gonna take a look at the first measure. We start off with an open a as well. You just playing the fifth string open. Then you go out and play this E on the search string night fret. Then you got to play does a lot of the fourth string, seventh fret. So you basically plant a, this is an, a power chord here, this aid. So that's where we're starting off with regard to open 97. Then what I do is I bar this next one here to get this d here on the third string, seventh threat. So I can just lay my finger down and take your finger off. So you get this. Then the next note is going to be this, a gown on the fourth string, seventh fret that you're going to get to the fifth string open. And then you're going to come back. And you're going to actually switch down here to this C, O, the third string, fifth fret. So it gives the timing of that is going to go one. Skip 3. And so that's how you play the first measure. Now let's take a look at how you play the second one. So for the second measure, on the downbeat of one, we don't play anything, just that five is still being held over from the end of four from measure 1 because it's going for, and you don't play being a one. Then we're going to play this G on the fourth string, fifth fret. And then on the end of one. So it's like going for. Then we're gonna play the fifth string open on the downbeat of two. And then on the end upto little play this. Hopefully those a and D right here. Now play both of those at the same time on the end. And they look for the downbeat S3, we don't play anything because there's a tie there. So from the end to it's going to, it's going to skip three. Were a play that a again on the end of three. And then for it's gonna go for me for the last news or just the open end. So let's go ahead and play through that again. So what I did to play through on, let us start on the beat number for the previous measure. So it's going to go for, so let's go ahead and do that one more time or one. So now I'm going to go ahead and play through measures wanted to and you go ahead and play along with me if you like. Here's how it goes. Alright, I'll go ahead and play through that one more time. Let's put ago. Alright, so that's how you play measures 12. Now let's go ahead and take a look at the third measure. So for the third measure, it's basically the same as the first measure, except at the end of the second measure, we're going to play that opened a on the end of four. So it's going to go for, and they go into the third measure. You don't play anything on the downbeat of one. Now you're going to go 1234. So like I said, it's exactly the same as the first measure, except we're tying in the a beef node from the end of four for measure number two. So I'll play the measure again, just coming in on the fourth beat of the second measure, where it goes four and skip one. So that's how you play the third measure. Let's take a look at the fourth measure. Alright, for the fourth measure, I think this is probably the coolest measure. What we're doing is we're starting off with this five right here being held over from the end of four. So in the third measure it goes OR, and so we'll play D on the downbeat of one, and then on the end of one will play this five here, this G. And then on the downbeat of two, we're going to play open a bit on the and of two or the play this a and D here, like we did in the second measure. So we go on. But then this next part I think is probably the coolest part, is they go, they play a C power chord, which is at 35 right now, that it's C and G. And then they stretch it down here to get this b. So they're playing this b and g go on. 3, 5, 2, 5, and 0. So you get this. You might be thinking, Well, why are you using your pinky here? Instead of go? It goes down here. My hips aren't really that baked. So this is the kind of an awkward to stretch. So instead I just use my pinky. And then this stretch here from the second to the fifth fret becomes quite comfortable so that such it gives. So if I play through that fourth measure, it's gonna sound like this. I'm coming in on the fourth beat at the third measure here, going 41234. The reason that open, it's so important at the end because you have to get your hands back up here to do it again, start the pattern again. So you gotta go. So I believe that's probably why they put that opening there because they had to get their hands setback that we're very quickly. It allows you what that open allows you to get your hands up your set and allows you to authenticate, continuously, play the riff without any, doesn't sound like you have to stop at all to change your hand position. I'm going to go ahead and play through the rip a couple of times slowly so you can go ahead and play along with me. Here we go. So that's how you play the rift to Hell's Bells. One of the keys that you want to do is learn how to let the notes ranked as long as they can. When everything we're bringing a lot. Sometimes students will go. You don't want that, you don't want it all chopped up. It takes a little practice. You have to get used to how long can you hold each finger down? We want to try to hold each one as long as you can before you, though. And what that'll do is it'll make it sound a lot smoother. There's, the notes will be ringing out as long as they can, and it'll sound much more like the song. So that's how you play the riff for Hell's Bells by AC DC. It's just an awesome, great classic rock ref that's going to impress your friends and just another great lake to add to your repertoire. 11. Fade to Black Riff: Hi, this is Chris from guitar me. And in this lesson, I'm going to show you how to play the intro roof to fade to black by metallic. Alright, I choose fade to black because it is my favorite metallic Assange. So I thought it'd be really fun. Quick brief lesson on just how to play the intro part. If you listen to the recording, it sounds like it's acoustic, but I'm just gonna do it here on my electric. Alright, so the first measure, what you're gonna do is you can look at the tab below to help them below. And we're going to start on the fifth string. Second fret, which is a mean. And in this measure we have all eight nodes, so it's going to be 1234. And terms of the timing we're gonna lend to node spring out. So when you, as you're playing and you don't want to go over, well, not sound right. You want to let him rain, which means you're gonna have to arch your fingers up nice and high. Make sure all the notes keep bringing. Alright, so let's go ahead and play this. We're gonna go the fifth string, second fret. And we're gonna go to the fourth string, fourth fret. Then we do the search string element. So it's gonna be a one man. And then we're going to play this F sharp here again on the fourth street, fourth fret. Because one man, to apologize for my singing along with it. And then it'll be number three. We're basically kinda play this to four again here, this nice sharp. Take us three, and then we're going to put our pinky down on the fifth string, fifth fret for being number four. And then on the NDA for we're gonna play this and F sharp again, Cisco Satellite, One Man, 23 man born. And now you probably should keep your pinkie down like but I'm always afraid if i don't lift it back up that I made mute it out just like I just did that. There didn't you really have to make sure your art, your pinky up nice and high to make sure it doesn't hit the fourth string. But that is how you play the first measure. So I'm gonna go ahead and play that measure a couple of times and you can play along with me. Here we give 34. So that is how you play measure number one. Let's take a look at measure number two. Permission number two, it's the same, the same rhythm and they're all eighth notes except when there were everything's gonna bring together except we're gonna start with the open string that fits during open. Then play this fourth string, fourth fret, third string open. And then the fourth straightforward thread, again, that string open. Fourth string for thread. Then the fifth string, fifth fret, this D, and then back to this, this four here. So it sounds like. So one more time, measure number two, it's gonna sound like this. So now I'm gonna go ahead and play a measured number two a couple times if you want, go ahead and play along with me. Here we get 34. So that's how you play measure number two. Let's go ahead and take a look at how play measure number three. Measured number three is going to be easy because it's the exact same thing as the first measure where it goes. So let's go ahead and practice number three a couple of times. It's gonna go to more and more to the tabs right down below in case you're not sure which strings I'm playing. Go idea will more time. 34. That's how you play mentioned number three. Let's take a look at measure number four. Alright, for measure number four. And once again, we have all eighth notes around. Let everything ring and we're going to start here. I'll go ahead and play the measure first. It sounds like I first we're going to start with on the fourth string, fourth fret, this C-sharp. The next two notes, this mean that stayed on the frets too, on strengths 43. I just like to bar, use my first finger into bar, cross them. That makes the most sense as a guitar player. So you go in one hand and then you're gonna play this, see sharper this for on festering towards them running in. And you get played as e here on the fourth string, second fret again. So yeah, one man to man, three. None on the downbeat of four would play open a. And we're going to play E again, which is on the fourth string, second fret. So it sounds like once again and again. So I'm gonna go ahead and play this slowly and you can go and play along with me. Three, for non the song, you don't play that over and over you any plane at one time. So there's only four measures and then you just kinda keep repeating the pattern. So now I'm gonna go ahead and play the pad and a couple of times slowly and you can play along with me. 1234.