Basics of Brioche: How to Knit an Infinity Scarf | KnittingHouseSquare | Skillshare

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Basics of Brioche: How to Knit an Infinity Scarf

teacher avatar KnittingHouseSquare, Knit / Craft / Sew

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Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

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Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Lessons in This Class

11 Lessons (55m)
    • 1. Introduction

      1:55
    • 2. Materials and Class Project

      2:15
    • 3. Italian Cast-On

      8:45
    • 4. Set-Up Row

      2:00
    • 5. Repeat Row (Flat)

      3:42
    • 6. Cast-Off

      3:01
    • 7. Modifications for In the Round

      7:54
    • 8. Project Options

      1:40
    • 9. Project 1: Knit Flat

      10:44
    • 10. Project 2: Knit in the Round

      12:44
    • 11. Conclusion

      0:48
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About This Class

Are you new to knitting and want to learn a new technique, or are you a knitter who has struggled with the brioche stitch in the past?

Learn the basics of knitting brioche with Knitting House Square founder, Madeline, in this detailed introductory course! In this Skillshare exclusive, she will demystify one-color brioche by taking you through each skill you need to successfully create a beautiful infinity scarf. 

The skills taught include how to: 

  • Work the Italian cast-on
  • Set up the brioche row
  • Knit brioche flat and in the round
  • Cast-off brioche

By the end of this class, you will have all the skills you need to continue building your brioche skillset!

This course is perfect for any knitter from beginner to advanced! The only prerequisite skill is familiarity with the knit and purl stitch

Meet Your Teacher

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KnittingHouseSquare

Knit / Craft / Sew

Teacher

Philadelphia based knitwear designer and knitting instructor

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Transcripts

1. Introduction: Are you new in knitting and want to learn a new technique? Or are you a more experienced knitter and have previously struggled with brioche stitch? Well, in either case, you're in the right place. Today I'm going to be taking you through the brioche stitch from cast on to cast off. Hi, my name is Madeline from Knitting House Square, and I've been knitting for over 10 years now. For the past five years or so, I've been designing my own patterns and creating tutorials just like this one to teach others how to knit. In this class, I'm going to be teaching you the brioche stitch. I selected this stitch because it's the perfect stitch for a beginner knitter who's looking to build their knitting skill set. Brioche is a beautiful stitch that's known for its voluminous doughy texture. Brioche can be found in just about any genre of knitting, from home goods to accessories to clothing. Because of the warmth and thickness of this stitch, two of the most popular uses for brioche are hats and scarves. This is also a stitch that can follow you through your whole knitting journey, from a beginner knitter learning one color brioche to an advanced knitter working increases and decreases in two-color brioche. Today we're going to begin with the basics of that one-color brioche, and we're going to learn it both flat and in the round. We're going to start by learning a cast on method that lands itself beautifully the brioche stitch. What it does is it creates a beautiful cast on edge that measures perfectly into the brioche stitch. Then once we've completed that, we're going to learn the setup and repeat rows that are required for knitting brioche flat. Once we've mastered brioche flat, we're going to then move on to brioche in the round. Lastly, we're going to combine all the skills we've learned to work on our class project. Our class project is going to be a beautiful infinity scarf. I'm excited to share my passion for knitting with you and I hope you love the craft as much as I do. 2. Materials and Class Project: The project we'll be creating in this class is a brioche infinity scarf. As I mentioned in the introduction, there are two options for how you can knit this, and within each of these options, I give you the full instructions for how to create the correct size and width for you. The first option is to create one where we knit flat, or we're working over a flat, and that's this one right here. This one I knit to a length where it's just a single loop brioche scarf, so more of like the cow design right here. I think this one looks really adorable this way. You can also lengthen this one to do the double loop infinity scarf. The second option is where we knit our infinity scarf in the round. Here I've done the double loop infinity scarf. You can see that when I put this on, I have plenty of room to wind it around twice. I just love the way this one turns out as well, so those are the two options for your projects for this class. Today I'll be knitting all of my samples and projects out of Lion Brand's Hue + Me Yarn. This is a bulky weight yarn that recommends a size US 10.5 knitting needle. Now, the tendency of brioche is to grow when you knit it. What we're actually going to do is we're going to go down in knitting needle size. This will help prevent our fabric from becoming too loose after we wash it and begin wearing these items. We're going to be using a size US 10 knitting needle instead. In total, to knit all the swatches, we're going to be working through, end a double-loop infinity scarf. You're going to want about three balls of this yarn, so right Right 400 yards of bulky wave number 5 yarn, is going to be the total amount you need for the project and all the swatches. In addition to the yarn, we will need one stitch marker to mark the beginning of the round, or to give us 10, 40 inch circular knitting needle, a pair of scissors, and a tapestry needle. Once you've gathered all your supplies, we'll be ready to work the cast on. The cast on method I'm going to be showing you next is called the Italian Cast-On. It's a beautiful cast-on you use for all your brioche knitting. 3. Italian Cast-On: Brioche is an incredibly stretchy variation of ribbing, and for this reason we need to use a really stretchy cast on method as well. The method I'm going to be showing you today is called the Italian cast on. This is the cast on method you're going to see most frequently used with brioche. One of the benefits of this method is that its worked the exact same way, whether or not you're knitting flat or in the round. You can also use this cast on method, no matter whether you're casting on an even or odd number of stitches for brioche. The way the cast on method works is it consists of one set of movement, then a two stitch repeat, then lastly one closing movement. I'm going to take you through each one of those steps now. Today we're going to be working the Italian cast on with one color of yarn. When this cast on method is used with only one color, it is a variation of a long tail cast on. What that means is that we're going to have to have two sections of yarn. We're going to have what's called a tail and then working yarn as well. The first thing I'm going to do is I'm going to unwind some of my yarn to create my yarn tail. For this smaller sample we're going to be creating first. We don't need that long of a tail because we're only going to be casting on about 16 stitches. I'll start with about 24 inches here. I always like to have a little extra just to make sure I don't run out, and then once I find that location, I'm going to pinch the yarn with my right hand. I'm going to rearrange my yarn, set my working yarn is over towards the left and it's closest to me, and then that tail is also on the left, but it's furthest away from me. Now what I want to do is I wanted to grab onto both of these strands with my left hand. I'm just going to put my left-hand, go right behind them. Then towards myself, grab onto both this strands with my bottom three fingers and now I'm going to push away from myself on my tail with my pointer finger. I'm going to push towards myself on my working yarn with my thumb. Now you can see when you look at this from the top, you're creating a diamond shape. This is exactly what we want. This is similar to what you'll see with the long tail cast on or the German twisted cast on. Now next up, what we're going o do is I'm going to let go of that spot my right-hand real quick and I'm going to take one of my knitting needle points, and I'm going to put it right on top of my yarn where I used to be pinching it. Now when I put it here, what I want to do is I want to hold the yarn in place with my pointer finger there. I'm like sandwiching the yarn in between my finger and the knitting needle. Now with this cast on again there's one setup movement, then two repeat movements and one closing movement. First we have a really quick setup movement. To make the setup movement, we're going to go take our knitting needle we're always going to be moving the knitting needle and not so much our fingers, so we're going to take our knitting needle and we're going to go down the center of that diamond, back behind the stream that's furthest away from us up the back and then arrive back at the top center again. Whenever I finish any of these movements, I'm always finishing with a knitting needle on top of the yarn and pointing in towards the center of that diamond shape. Next up, let me zoom you in and we'll go through the two repeat movements. The reason there are two repeat movements with brioche knitting is because you want to alternate between casting on a knit stitch and a pearl stitch. The first repeat movement I'm going to show you now is going to cast on a knit stitch. When I cast this on, again, I'm just going to be moving the knitting needle. Then when we finish, we're going to arrive back up here at the top center. To start this movement, we're going to go towards ourselves and over the string closest to us, down the front go below that front strand, come back up the center. Now we're going to go up over and down the back of the strand furthest away from us, and they come underneath both of those strands towards ourselves up the front then arrive back at that top center position. That was our first repeat movement and we just cast on a knit stitch. Now for the second repeat movement, and if you ever need more yarn just loosen up a little bit with your bottom three fingers here and it'll release a little bit more yarn. For the second repeat movement we're going to be casting on a purl stitch. To do this, we're going to take our knitting needle, go up over the strand furthest away from us, down the back, underneath both of the strands all the way towards ourselves, up the front, then we're going to come down the center, back behind the bottom of that back strand. Up behind it and arrive back at front center or top center again. Now we had our setup movement or repeat movement 1 which was casting on a knit stitch and then our repeat movement 2 which is casting on a purl stitch. Let me show those to you one more time. Also if you ever drop your yarn or you want to replace your fingers, just let go of your yarn and then make sure you're going to be pushing away on the tail with your pointer finger and pushing towards yourself on you're working on with your thumb. For repeat movement 1, we're going to go towards ourselves, down in front of that string closest to us. Then we already come up the center, we're going to go back behind the strand furthest away from us. Then below both of the strands towards ourselves, up the front and arrive back at that top center position. For the purl stitch, we're going to go up over the top, back behind the strands, underneath both of the strands all the way towards ourselves, up the front, then come down the center, down below that strand furthest away, back up behind it, and arrive back at that top center position. Now when I look at the front of the work, I can check it to make sure I'm casting on the correct thing. First we used to have our setup stitch there. Then we have a knit stitch and you can see that even just by looking at this stitch, it looks like a knit stitch there, so there's no bump down there at the bottom. Then we have a purl stitch and that one looks exactly like a purl stitch there because we have that bump in front. No bump on the next stitch so that one's a knit stitch, bump on the next stitch so that one's a purl stitch. It's a great way to check as you're working all the way across this cast on edge. Also, in the class attachments, you're going to find the full written version of this cast on. That way if you want to follow along with the movements that way some people do find it more helpful to read the written version so I've included those as well. Now I'm going to continue alternating between the knit stitch and the purl stitch until I'm one stitch less than the number I want to cast on. I want to cast on a total of 16 stitches. I'm going to stop once I've reached 15 stitches. Now I've finished casting on those 15 stitches, and as I'm casting onto, I'm trying my best not to twist any of the stitches because it can be really difficult to untwist them if they do begin twisting up. Just try and keep all your cast on edges down towards the table. Now I need to cast on the final stitch. The way I'm going to do that is I'm just going to tilt my left hand so my palm is up towards the ceiling. Now I'm going to take my knitting needle and I'm going to go underneath both those strands wrapped around my thumb, and I'm going to come up the center. I'm going to slide that loop off my thumb and onto the knitting needle. Now I just gently tighten that into place. Now I've cast on a total of 16 stitches. 4. Set-Up Row: Now that we've completed our cast on edge, the next thing we need to do is we need to prepare those cast on stitches to work for brioche repeat. The way we do this is by working a set-up row. The set-up row I'm going to be showing you now is where we introduce yarn overs into our work, so then later on, we can work that brioche repeat. Now that I've completed that cast on, what I'm going to do is I'm going to turn my work, so my knitting needlepoint is over towards the right and you can see that my work yarn and my tail coming out right down here on the right-hand side of my work. I'm going to find my working yarn, just to make sure I'm not working with my tail. Always want to make sure you're not working with your tail. Now across this set-up row, we just have a really simple repeat. The first thing we're going to do is we're going to slip the first stitch purlwise and we want to slip it purlwise with the yarn in front. I'm laying the yarn right on top of my right hand just to make sure it stays in front, slip it purlwise with the yarn in front, then I'm going to knit one stitch. What bringing the yarn to the front there did is it created a yarn over. Now again, I'm going to do that exact same thing. I'm going to bring my yarn to the front, slip one purlwise, then knit one stitch. Yarn front, slip one purlwise, knit one, all the way across. That is all there is to the set-up row. Now we're ready to turn our work and begin the repeat row. 5. Repeat Row (Flat): Now that we've finished that setup row, what we can do is we can turn our work. Again, our knitting needlepoint is over towards the right. Now we're going to begin our repeat row. Whenever you're working brioche for a flat knitting with an even number of stitches, exactly what we have, there's really only one repeat row that you need a repeat over and over again to create the brioche pattern. Let me show it to you here. First, we want to make sure yarn is in front, which it already is. With the yarn it front, we're going to slip the first stitch purlwise. Then we're going to work what's called a brioche knit. This is where we knit that slip stitch from the previous row and the yarn over together. I'm just going to take my right knitting needlepoint, go into both of those, the stitch and the yarn over as if to knit, wrap the yarn around and pull it through. That's what's called a brioche knit or a lot of times in patterns, you'll see it written as a BRK a B-R-K. That is something you'll see quite frequently in brioche knitting. Now again, we're going to repeat that again. We're going to bring our yarn to the front. Slip one purlwise, then work a brioche snip of the yarn over and that slip stitch together. Yarn front, slip one, brioche knit. Now on this round, you can see that because again, I'm bringing the yarn to the front before I slipped that one stitch, again, I'm creating the slip stitch and the yarn over that are right on top of each other. Again, when we get to the next round, we're going to work the brioche knit on those stitches. Now again, we can turn our work. Now on this side we're going to work that same repeat again. We're going to have the yarn in front, which had already is, we're going to slip the first stitch purlwise. Then I'm going to work a brioche snip of the yarn over and that slip stitch from the previous round together. Yarn front, slip one, brioche knit. Now we can turn our work and again just work that same repeat row over again. Now what we're going to do is we want to continue to work that row over and over again so we can create a small sample of our work. You want to go for just about four inches. So you want to measure from the cast-on edge up to the bottom of the knitting needle and when that measure is four inches, I'll come back and show you a simple cast-off method you can use for brioche. 6. Cast-Off: The last step to knitting are brioche sample is the cast-off edge. Similarly to the cast-on edge, we want to ensure that the cast-off edge is incredibly stretchy. The method I'm going to be showing you here is very similar to the standard cast-off method, we just added in one extra little step to make it a little bit more stretchy. The first step is going to be to knit the first stitch. Then I need to work the next stitch and they are never together, so I'm going to work a brioche knit. Now what I'm going to do is I'm going to pass both of these stitches that are over here on my right-hand knitting needle, back over to my left-hand knitting needle. I'm going to take the left knitting needle point, and go right into the base of those from left to right. I'm going to take my right knitting needle point, and I'm going to knit both of those loops together through the back. Now, we have one stitch over here on the right knitting needle. We've decreased our first stitch. I'm going to knit the next stitch from my left knitting needle, pass both of these stitches back over to my left knitting needle, knit them both together through the back. That is our repeat right there. We're going to knit or in this case, brioche knit, pass both the stitches back over to the left-hand knitting needle, knit them together through the back loop. Again, knit one, slide them both back over, knit them together through the back. I'm going to continue this all the way across, until I end up with that one remaining stitch on my right-hand knitting needle. Then, I'll show you that last step. When I end up with that one stitch on my right-hand knitting needle, I'm going to pull on that knitting needle to make the loop become larger. Then I'm going to cut my yarn, and I usually leave it on an 8-inch tail to weave in later. I'm going to thread my tail through that loop, and gently tighten to secure. There's my top cast-off edge, and usually to get it to even out a little bit, I just stretch it out a few times. That is a nice quick and easy cast-off method, that you can use for brioche knitting. If you're looking for a more advanced cast-off method, I would recommend checking out something like the Italian cast-off, also known as a tubular cast off. 7. Modifications for In the Round: In a brioche in the round uses all the same techniques as native brioche flat. In fact, we're actually going to work two full rows flat before we join them around. The reason for this is that the Italian cast-on method that we are utilizing has a tendency to twist. To help mitigate that and keep our work from twisting as we're working up through it, what we're going to do is we actually want to work a few setup rows, just flat, and then we're going to joining the round. Next step, I'm going to demonstrate a small swatch of what knitting brioche in a round looks like. Then in a future lesson, we're going to be working our class project, which is an infinity scarf in the round where we're going to utilize all these skills. For this demonstration, I'm going to be using my 16-inch knitting needle. I have a 16-inch cord on here, and I'm going to cast on 36 stitches to prepare to join in the round. Again, I'm going to be using that Italian cast on. Here I'm going to do a little bit longer than what I had before because before we'll need about 16 stitches so here it's probably almost about a yard that I have. I'm going to work my Italian Cast On. I set up movement, knit, purl. Lastly, my closing movements. There are my 36 stitches. Now as I mentioned, I don't want to join in the round immediately because this cast-on method has a tendency to twist. To prevent this, I'm going to work this setup row and one additional brioche row flat. This set up round or row, is identical to what we showed in video 4. Here we're going to bring the working yarn in the front. The first stitch purlwise, then knit one stitch. Bring the yarn in the front, slip one purlwise, knit one stitch. I'm going to repeat this all the way across. We're going to turn our work, now we're going to work one of those brioche repeat rows. Here I'm going to split my first stitch purlwise with the yarn in front, then work a brioche knit. Work the repeat again, bring the yarn to the front, slip one, purlwise, brioche knit. Now that I've completed the setup round and that first row, I'm ready to join in the round. Here I'm going to place one stitch marker just so I remember where my beginning of around is. I'm going to stretch out my work just a bit so it goes to both knitting needles, and I'm going to twist all my work so I make sure all my cast on bumps and the work I've done so far is going down towards the table. I can now join in the round. Over here my right hand, I have my stitch marker and this is where my working yarn is coming out of, as well as my tail over here, and I'm about to start knitting into the stitches over here on my left-hand knitting needle, all my cast on bumps are going down towards the table. Now for this first round, in the round, I do have a new stitch to introduce here. The first thing I'm going to do is I'm going to purl this stitch and the yarn over it together. This time we're purling them together, not knitting them together. This is called a brioche purl or a BRP as sometimes it's written. I'm going to put my knitting needle under the base of both of these stitches as if to purl, wrap my yarn around, make sure it's my working yarn here. Pull through. Now I'm going to slip one stitch purlwise and do a full yarn over. I'm going to take my yarn from the front of my work, go up over that knitting needle, down back to the bottom again. Now again, I'm going to work a brioche purl, so I'm going to work that stitch and the yarn over together, slip one stitch, do a full yarn over. To show it a little bit more zoomed in here, I'm purling that stitch in the yarn over together, slipping one stitch purlwise, then doing a full yarn over. Start again. Purling those two together, slip one, full yarn over, pull those two together, slip one, full yarn over. Now I'm going to continue this all the way across this round. All the way back until I get to that stitch marker. Now I'm going to slip the final stitch and work that last yarn over. Now I'm going to pass my stitch marker. That was the first repeat round for brioche around. Now for this next one, the next repeat round, what we're going to do, is we're going to slip the first stitch purlwise then we're going to work a brioche knit. Our yarn is already in the front here so we're creating a new yarn over, bring our yarn to the front, slip one purlwise, brioche knit, yarn to the front, slip one purlwise, brioche knit all the way across this round. Now I'm back at the beginning of the round again so I'm just going to pass my stitch marker and now again, I bring my yarn to the front and I've worked that brioche purl on the first stitch and begin the next round. The thing you want to keep in mind when you're working this, is first you want to pay attention to whether you're on those brioche purl or the brioche knit rounds. You can tell which round you're on by where the yarn over happens. We can see that this yarn over happens right on top of purl stitches, so that means we're on a brioche purl round. Alternatively, on the opposite rounds, you'll see the yarn over happens on these knit stitches. In that case, you're on the brioche knit round. Now I'm going to continue repeating these two rounds over and over again until I've reached a small sample, probably about four inches again, and then I'm going to cast off the exact same way I did for this smaller sample. 8. Project Options: Now that we've covered all the basics of brioche, we're ready to begin our class project. Here I've provided you with two different options for how you can complete the class project. The first method I'm going to show you is where we knit an infinity scarf and we're going to be knitting it flat. We're going to cast on a small number of stitches, then continue to work for a long length, and then lastly cast off and seam the two sides together. This creates a really nice infinity scarf with the seam. The second option is more advanced. This is where we're going to knit an infinity scarf in the round. Here we're going to cast on a large number of stitches under our circular knitting needles. We're going to work a few set of rows flat that we're going to join in the round and made up for a short distance, then cast off all those stitches. This creates a really seamless and beautiful look. So the second option is a little bit more advanced because you do have to be more focused on the twisting of the stitches in that method. But either option is a great one and I hope you enjoy whichever one you choose. Both of the infinity scarves have a total circumference of 60 inches and a width of nine inches. I provided additional instructions in the pattern link to this class. They give you instructions for how to increase or decrease the different lengths or widths of your infinity scarves. That way you can customize this project to be perfect for you. Again, both of the projects are made out of bulky weight yarn, so it creates a fine quick knit. Let's get started. 9. Project 1: Knit Flat: First for a simpler version, I'm going to show you how to work in infinity scarf when we knit flat. Here we cast on, using the same Italian cast on method, just going right across a row, then we work our setup row and repeat row all throughout and just create the length that you'd like for your infinity scarf. Here, I actually created more of a cow length just to do the single loop, but all you have to do to make it longer is just knit for a longer distance and I include all the dimensions that you need in the pattern. Then lastly, I'll leave you as cast off and seam the two sides together. Then we just block and enjoy. Let's get started showing you all the steps you need to create this project. To figure out how many stitches I want to cast on for my infinity scarf nip flat, what I'm going to do is I'm going to take this swatch that I knit in the previous lesson. Here, we cast on those 16 stitches and then we just worked this panel flat. If I take a ruler and I measure how wide those 16 stitches are, mine comes out to 7.5 inches here, so 16 stitches in brioche equals 7.5 inches. Now, I typically like my infinity scarves would be about 9-10 inches wide. Let's say I go with this nine inch number, so I know that 16 stitches equals 7.5 inches, then I can scale the number of stitches to figure out how many I need for nine inches. For my number, I'm going to need to cast on about 20 stitches. Again, you're going to want to choose an even number. Now, for this scarf, I'm going to be using a different color right here and I'm going to find, so instead of the tail we start with before, was only 16 stages we're going to get a little bit longer of a tail, so I'll probably do about two feet here or so. Now, I'm going to use the Italian cast on, to cast on those 20 stitches. Here, I don't need a very long knitting needle, so I'm just going to be using a shorter cord. Now, I'm just going to double count those stitches real quick to make sure I have the correct number. Now that I've finished casting on, I'm going to turn my work and I'm going to work that setup row exactly the way we did in lesson 4. I'm going to make sure my working yarn is in the front and I'm making sure it's my working yarn and not my tail. I'm going to slip the first stitch purlwise with the yarn in front, then I'm going to knit one. Repeat again, you're in front, slip 1 purlwise, knit 1 all the way across. Now that I have completed the setup row, I'm going to turn my work and now I'm going to work this single repeat row that we learned in lesson 5 and I'm going to continue repeating this row over and over again until the length of my infinity scarf is the size I like it. Now, the nice thing about knitting flat is you can try it on as you're going along, so if you figure you want yours a little bit longer or shorter, you have the ability to modify it by just repeating or taking out some of those repeats. The repeat row again, is making sure my yarns in front, I'm slipping the first stitch purlwise, then I'm knitting or doing a brioche knit here, where I knit the yarn over and the stitch together. Yarn in front, slip 1 purlwise, brioche knit all the way across, and then just keep on repeating this row over and over again. This makes a really nice relaxing knit. Now, I finish knitting the brioche stitch over and over again until I've reached the desired length that I like. What I'm going to do is I'm going to cast off all the way along this top edge. I'm going to use that same cast-off method we saw in a previous lesson. First, I'm going to knit the first stitch, then I'm going to work a brioche knit, so I'm knitting the stitch and the yarn over together. Now that I have two stitches over here on my right hand knitting needle, I'm just going to pass them both back over to my left hand knitting needle and I'm going to knit them together through the back. Now, again, I'm going to work the next stitch to my left hand knitting needle, and now that I have two stitches over here on the right, I'm going to pass them both back over to my left hand knitting needle, knit them together through the back. I'm going to continue this all the way across the top edge. Now that I only have the one stitch left on my right knitting needle, I'm just going to tug under the needle, set loop becomes really large and now, I want to cut my yarn leaving a fairly long tail because we do want to use this tail to seam the two sides together. I always like to have extra, so I probably have almost about a yard here. Now, I'm going to thread that tail through this last remaining loop. I like to go underneath the loop, the tail is below where this loop is and then pull it up through, perfect. I've just zoomed out here a bit just show you real quick how to fold this so that we can begin seaming. The way I like to fold it, is I just lay it straight and then I'm going to fold in both of the edges, so I have my cast off and my cast on edge right here. Then when I decide how to position the piece here, what I want to do is I want to make my longer tail, which for me is my cast off tail. I want that one to be over here towards the right. It doesn't really matter which side your cast on tails on as long as your cast off tail or whichever tail is longer for you is got over here on the right because then I like to see him from the right over towards the left. Now, I'm going to take my tapestry needle and thread it with this tail and now, as I work across this edge, what I want to do is on either side, I want to match up the stitches. First, we can see I have a column of knit stitches on either side. First, I'm going to take this tail with my tapestry needle, and I'm going to pick up the bottom most knit stitch along this first column. I want to get both sides of the knit stitch and you can see it creates a little v there, so I want to make sure I've both sides of that v, thread my yarn through there. Now, I'm going to go back up here to the top and I'm going to pick up both sides of the v on this side, thread my yarn through that one. Now, next up, we have a pearl stitch. Here, I'm going to pick up both sides of the pearl stitch, you can see there's these bars that go down on either side and then there's one bar horizontal. I'm going to pick up these two diagonal bars closest to the edge and then on the opposite side, I'm going to find the two diagonal bars that are closest to the bottom, so we can see we have two diagonal bars and then one horizontal bar in there. I'm going to pick up the two diagonal bars closest towards the edge. Now again, I'm going back to a knit stitch here, I'm going to pick up both sides of the knit stitch then I'm going to go the opposite side of my work and here, I'm going to pick up both sides of the knit stitch. I'm just going to keep on alternating between picking up pearl bars and knit stitches all the way across this edge. Now, I do take my yarn as I go across, I just try to make sure that it's not too tight because I do still want to have some of that stretch in the brioche, so I just like to make sure it's nice and secured and you can't tell so much that there is a seam there. Seaming this way, what it does is it attempts to line up all of these different stitches. You can see there is a bit of an off skew, but that's okay basically, but it lines up as best as we can the knit stitches and those pearl bumps all the way across this brioche. I've now finished sawing all the way along that edge, and I just wanted to show you the inside real quick to basically tell you real quick again why I love that Italian cast on so much. You can see the Italian cast on for me is this side that barely has a bump right here, so the Italian cast on is really easy to pick up those edge stitches because they are so clearly defined as made or pearl stitches. Over here on the other hand side, you can see just the regular cast off I used, it does create a little bit of a bump on the inside of the work, but at the same time, you don't really notice it at all and because you don't have a bump from the Italian cast on, it really minimizes that seam dimension that it takes up. Now, all that's left to do is we just have to weave in our two ends and then a great place to weave these in is rate into that cast-off edge that's now on the inside of your work, creates a really nice place to weave them into, that's easy to get to and then what I'm going to do is I'm just going to soak this in some lukewarm water and then roll it up in a towel to dry it out and lay it flat. Then once it's dry, it'll be all ready to wear. 10. Project 2: Knit in the Round: Next up is the second way you can work the class project. Here's my sample right here, and what I've done here is I've knit the same infinity scarf just in the round. We cast on along this bottom edge, work the first few rows flat as we did previously, then we're going to join in the round and work up through our project, then lastly work our cast off edge. Again, I give you the different number of stitches you need to create either a single loop or a double loop infinity scarf. Here I have the double loop, and you can see this creates a really nice, beautiful texture fabric, and the perfect little double loop infinity scarf. Let's get started with this project. Now in front of me for the project, I should have my yarn and my longer circular knitting needle here, and to start, I'm going to cast on a total of a 150 stitches using the Italian cast on. Now, I've finished casting on that 150 stitches. It can be really tricky to count the stitches with this cast on, just because this cast on method has a tendency to twist. When I'm counting the number of stitches I have, I start over here at this edge, and you can see I almost ran out of yarn with my cast on. I'm starting off where I finished casting on, and I'm going to count from left over to right. As I'm counting along, I try to just make sure that it's twisted downwards, so these cast on bumps are towards myself. I just count along and I make sure that I'm alternating between the knit stitches without the bumps in front, and the purl stitches with the bumps in front. Over here you can see it gets a little bit more twisted, so what I'm going to do here is I'm just going to stretch them out, and so it's easier to tell if it's twisted when it's stretched out. I find that usually it needs to be twisted towards myself, and only a little tiny bit. This started out up toward the ceiling and I didn't know how many stitches were in here, but if I just gently push these cast on bumps towards myself, then I can see that full cast on edge all the way along there and keep on counting the difference. Then over here, again, I'd stretch it out, stretch it out, and just keep on making sure the cast on bumps are all facing towards myself. Now that I've finished casting on all the stitches, what I'm going to do is I'm going to turn my work and I'm going to work the setup row exactly the same as we did in the previous lesson, both when we're knitting flat and knitting in the round. Here we're going to make sure our yarn's in the front, we're going to slip one purlwise, then we're going to knit one. Then again, we're going to bring our yarn to the front, slip one purlwise, knit one. I'm going to repeat all the way across these 150 stitches. Now that I've just finished that setup row, I'm going to turn my work to begin the same first row as when we're knitting flat. Here I'm going to work the repeat of slip one purlwise with the yarn in front, then I'm going to knit the yarn over and that previous slip stitch together. Again, bring my yarn to the front, slip one purlwise, knit those two together, yarn in front, slip one purlwise. 11. Conclusion: Thank you so much for joining me today as we worked through the basics of brioche. Through this class, we learned a beautiful brioche cast on that accentuates the stitch, we learned the brioche repeat, and we've learned how to knit brioche in the round. Don't forget to upload a picture of your finished infinity scarf in the Projects tab for this class. I would love to see everyone's finished projects and the beautiful yarns you selected. Also, if you're interested in seeing more of my knitting content, be sure to hit the "Follow" button next to my photo, that way, you can stay up-to-date on all the future classes I add here on Skillshare. I'll see you next time.