Basic Life Support (BLS) | Mackenzie Thompson | Skillshare
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26 Lessons (45m) View My Notes
    • 1. Initiating Chain of Survival

      1:57
    • 2. 2015 BLS Guideline Changes

      3:28
    • 3. One Rescuer BLS for Adults

      2:39
    • 4. Two Rescuer BLS for Adults

      1:33
    • 5. Adult Mouth to Mask Ventilation

      1:13
    • 6. Adult Bag Mask Ventilation

      0:59
    • 7. AED Steps For Adults

      1:52
    • 8. One Rescuer BLS for Children

      2:02
    • 9. Two Rescuer BLS for Children

      1:51
    • 10. Child Ventilation

      0:57
    • 11. One Rescuer BLS for Infants

      2:01
    • 12. Two Rescuer BLS for Infants

      1:57
    • 13. AED Steps for Children and Infants

      2:13
    • 14. Mouth to Mouth Rescue Breathing

      2:33
    • 15. Rescue Breathing

      1:01
    • 16. Choking in Adults or Children

      1:52
    • 17. Choking in Infants

      1:58
    • 18. Adult 1 Person CPR AED

      1:35
    • 19. Adult 1 Person BLS

      1:39
    • 20. Adult 2 Person BLS

      1:41
    • 21. Adult Airway

      0:29
    • 22. Infant 1 Person BLS

      1:33
    • 23. Infant 2 Person BLS

      1:41
    • 24. Infant Airway

      0:21
    • 25. Airway Management

      2:52
    • 26. Who is NHCPS?

      1:08

About This Class

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Knowing the process of Basic Life Support (BLS) is critical in responding to life-threatening emergencies. The newest BLS course guidelines focus on doing several tasks simultaneously with a group process that promotes efficiency and minimization of errors.

This course will teach participants how to perform life support techniques including chest compressions, basic airway management, rescue breathing, AED use for defibrillation, and more.

The course package includes:

  • Basic Life Support (BLS) Provider Handbook
  • A BLS instructional presentation
  • Optional FREE Certification: This course is for training in Basic Life Support Training (BLS). If you would like to be certified please visit https://nhcps.com/mooc-life-saving-course/ and complete your BLS certification test. Skillshare students receive a FREE certification.

If you want to stay up to date on my newest classes, be sure to click “Follow” below. I also share resources, and my followers are the first to hear about these opportunities!

Transcripts

1. Initiating Chain of Survival: welcome to the general concepts of basic life support for or BLS. In this video, we will learn about the BLS adult and pediatric chains of survival. Taking the right action quickly and confidently could make the difference between life and death for an individual dealing with cardiac arrests. When you find someone who is in need of your help, quickly start and follow the steps from the appropriate chain of survival. The first step in the adult chain of survival is to recognize symptoms and activate PMS by calling 911 next performed CPR but providing high quality chest compressions to circulate oxygen, then locate and activate the I E. D. Once you've activated the 80 the E. M s team will perform advanced life support. When the individual becomes stable and is taken to the hospital, they will receive post cardiac arrest care. Now let's review the pediatric chain of survival emergencies, and Children and infants are not usually caused by the heart. Children and infants most often have breathing problems that trigger cardiac arrest. The first and most important step of the pediatric chain of survival is prevention. This means if you come across the child another infant who is experiencing breathing problems. Take immediate action in the case that the heart does. Stop. Perform high quality CPR if they're still unresponsive after performing CPR, then activate AMs by calling 911 in the M s team will perform advanced life support after their stable and taken to the hospital, they will receive post cardiac arrest care. This concludes lesson on adult pediatric chains of survival. Next, we will review 2015 BLS guideline changes. 2. 2015 BLS Guideline Changes: welcome to the 2015 BLS guideline changes In this video, we will discuss the recent BLS guideline changes that were made in 2015 by the American Heart Association, which updates its guy line every five years on the cardiopulmonary resuscitation, or CPR, and emergency cardiovascular Care or E. C. C. The A H. A 2015 guidelines expand on many of the recommendations made in 2010 as it continues to focus on high quality chest compressions due to the improvement in resuscitation outcomes. The first changes the rate of chest compressions. In 2010 it was at least 100 impressions per minute in the 2015 update is 100 to 120 compressions per minute. The range of 100 to 120 compressions per minute leads to a decrease in cardiac output doing to incomplete cardiac filling during chest recoil. The second changes in the depth of chest compressions. The 2015 updates states the target depth for adult compressions to be between 2 to 2.4 inches, which is 5 to 6 centimeters. Research revealed that compressions delivered beyond this depth could result in resuscitation related injuries. The H A continues to emphasize training and practice to be important in developing good technique in real life resuscitation, rescuers are likely to provide compressions that are too slow to shallow and interrupted too often with frequent refresher training for skills and knowledge. In a detailed feedback on rate and depth of compressions will help develop in upkeep. Good technique in 2010 Sequence change from airway breathing compressions or ABC two Compressions Airway breathing or C A B remains in the 2015 update. The early initiation of chest compressions resulted in improved outcomes. The ratio of traditional CPR cycles of chest compressions to rescue breaths remain the same in the 2015 update 30 chest compressions to two rescue breaths for one rescuer CPR in all age groups and for two rescuers, CPR in adults and 15 chest compressions to two rescue breaths for two rescuers CPR in Children and infants. The A J also points out that high quality chest compressions are most valuable in saving a life. The members of the community should know that even if you don't know how to do anything else doing chest compressions is better than doing nothing at all. Most people should have access to a speakerphone equipped cell phone that they can use to dial 911 or have a bystander call for the rescuer and the E. M s dispatchers construct the rescuer to do hands only CPR. For further details on the 2015 guideline changes for BLS, please refer to your full text manual provided with your BLS package. This concludes our lesson on the 2015 BLS guideline changes. Next, we will review one rescuer, BLS, in CPR for adults. Yeah. 3. One Rescuer BLS for Adults: Chapter two Bill s for adults. Welcome to the one Rescuer Bill s CPR for adults. In this video, we will discuss the one rescuer BLS process in CPR steps. The general adult BLS process is to ensure safety of the scene, assess the injured or ill individual, activate PMS by calling 911 Performed CPR and defibrillator. Now let's review the CPR steps. Start CPR by checking for corroded polls on the side of the neck. Fuel for the pools for no more than 10 seconds. If you are not sure that you feel a pools to begin CPR with a cycle of 30 chest compressions and two breaths. Next, place the heel of one hand on the lower half the sternum in the middle of the chest. Then put your other hand on top of the first hand, then straighten your arms. Impressed straight down. Remember that compression should be at least two inches into the chest, but no more than 2.4 inches at a rate of 100 to 120 compressions a minute. Make sure that between each compression, you completely stop pressing on the chest and allow the chest wall to retain to its natural position. Do not lean or rest on the chest between compressions that can keep the heart from refilling blood between each compression. Stop after 30 compressions. Open the airway by using the head tilt chin lift maneuver. Put your hand on their forehead until the head back, then use your index and middle fingers on the lower jaw toe. Lift up the job. Do not do the head tilt chin lift maneuver. If you think the individual may have a neck injury in this case, use the jaw thrust maneuver. Use your index and middle fingers to lift up on both sides of the lower jaw. Next, give a breath while watching their chest rise up. Repeat while giving the second breath. The's breaths should be delivered for one second each. Resumed chest compressions. This concludes our lesson on one rescuer, BLS and CPR for adults. Next, we will review to rescue a BLS and CPR for adults 4. Two Rescuer BLS for Adults: welcome to the two rescuer, BLS and CPR for adults. In this video, we will discuss the two rescuer BLS process and CPR steps. The general adult BLS process is to ensure safety of the scene, assess the injured or the ill individual. Activate M s by calling 911 perform CPR and defibrillator. The steps for CPR are similar between one rescuer and to rescuer BLS. However, there are some slight differences. Let's review the two rescuer CPR steps for the first step. Have the second rescuer get the A D ready next delivered chest compressions counting out loud that have the second rescuer apply the E D pads on the individuals bare skin. In addition, have the second rescuer open the individuals airway and give to rescue breaths. Continue the CPR cycles of 30 compressions, followed by two breaths. Switch positions every five cycles. Try to minimize interruptions and CPR by switching positions while the E. D analyzes the heart rhythm. This concludes our lesson on to rescuer BLS and CPR for adults. Next, we will review adult mouth to mask ventilation 5. Adult Mouth to Mask Ventilation: welcome to the adult mouth to mask ventilation. In this this video, we will discuss the use of a mask to deliver breaths in one rescuer. CPR breath should be supplied using a pocket mask. If it's available. First, give 30 high quality chest compressions. Next, Seal the mask against the individual's face by placing four fingers of one hand across the top of the mask and place the thumb of the other hand along the bottom edge of the mask. Using the fingers of your hand on the bottom of the mask, open the airway using the head tilt chin lift maneuver unless you suspect the individual may have a spine injury. Finally, begin ventilating by squeezing the air bulb for over one second. As you watch the chest, rise with each ventilation. Make sure you are pressing firmly around the edges of the mask. This concludes our lesson on adult mouth to mask ventilation. Next, we will review adult bag mask ventilation. Who 6. Adult Bag Mask Ventilation: welcome to the adult bag mask ventilation. In this video, we will discuss the use of a bag mask to deliver breaths in two rescuer CPR. Begin by delivering 30 high quality chest compressions, counting them out loud. The second rescuer holds the mask with one hand, using the thumb and index finger in the shape of a sea on one side of the mask. This forms a seal between the mask and the individual's face. Using the other hand, the second rescuer opens the airwaves, lifting the job. Finally, the second rescuer gives two breaths for one second each. This concludes our lesson on adult bag mask ventilation. Next, we will review 80 steps. 7. AED Steps For Adults: Chapter three use of a D. Welcome to the 80 Steps. In this video, we will discuss the use of an A D and how it works. An A D or automated external defibrillator is a device that recognizes ventricular free relation and other dysrhythmia as and delivers an electronic shock at the right time. The 80 is nearly foolproof and will not allow you to make a mistake. It is safe for anyone to use it. Now. Let's review the easy steps. First, retrieve in a D, open it in, turn on. They're often stationed in public buildings. Next, exposed the individuals chest, dry it and remove any medication patches. Then open the E D pads. Peel off the backing and check for a pacemaker. Make sure not to place the pads on top of the place maker. Apply the upper chest pad above the breast in lower left chest pad below the armpit. Ensure that the wires are attached to the A D box, then move away from the individual. Stop CPR and instruct others not to touch the injured or ill individual. The E D will analyze the rhythm. If the E. D reads. Check electrodes that ensure that the chest pads are making good contact. If the message reads shock, then clear the individual impress and hold the shock button until the 80 delivers the shock immediately. Resume CPR for two minutes after the shock. Repeat the steps if necessary. This concludes our lesson on a D steps. Next, we will review one rescuer, Beale Les, for Children. 8. One Rescuer BLS for Children: Welcome to the one rescuer, BLS for Children. In this video, we'll discuss one rescuer, BLS. For Children that is age one to puberty. There's some slight differences between BLS for adults and Children. Now let's review the one rescuer BLS process. For Children, the first step is to tap their shoulders and shout at the child to determine if they're responsive, then assess if they're breathing by putting your ear up to their mouth or by watching their chest. If they're not responding, then yell for help. If someone responds to you, then send them to get an A D next feel for the child's Paul's. For no more than 10 seconds, you can either check for corroded pulse on the side of the neck or the ephemeral pulse on the inner thigh in the crease between the leg and the growing. Make sure that this entire assessment shouldn't last longer than 10 seconds. If there's no pulse or you can't tell, then begin CPR with the 32 to compression to breath ratio. If the pulse is less than 60 beats per minute, then still initiate CPR. The compression death should be about 1/3 of the chest that is two inches for most Children after two minutes or five cycles of CPR. If no help has arrived, leave the child to call E. M s and get an a D in case she witnessed the child become unconscious and have no one to help you. Call 900 get a nadie before starting CPR. Use and follow the prompts while continuing CPR until E. M s arise or until a child's condition normalizes. This concludes our lesson in one rescuer. BLS for Children. Next, we'll review to rescuer BLS for Children. 9. Two Rescuer BLS for Children: Welcome to the two rescuer, BLS for Children. In this video, we'll discuss to rescuer BLS for Children that is aged one to puberty. You'll see that the process of one rescuer and to rescuer BLS in Children is very similar. Now let's review the two rescuer BLS process. For Children, the first step is to tap their shoulders and shout at the child to determine if they're responsive. Then assess if they're breathing by putting your ear up to their mouth or by watching their chest. If the child is not responding or breathing, then send the second rescuer to activate TMS by calling 911 and to retrieve in a D next feel for the child's pulse. For no more than 10 seconds, you can either check for corroded pulse on the side of the neck or the ephemeral pulse on the inner thigh in the crease between the leg and the groin. If there's no pulse or you can't tell and if the second rescuer has not returned, then begin CPR with a 32 to compression to breath vacio. If the pulse is less than 60 beats per minute, then still initiate CPR when the second rescuer returns, begin CPR by performing 15 compressions and then having the second rescuer deliver two breaths. Next, use and follow the e D prompt while continuing CPR at a ratio of 15 compressions to two breaths until E. M s arrives or until the child's condition normalizes. This concludes our lesson on to rescue a bill. As for Children next, we'll review child ventilation. 10. Child Ventilation: Welcome to the child ventilation. In this video, we will discuss got strategies and techniques for child ventilation. Firstly, make sure that the bag mask is the correct size. The bag mask should cover the whole mouth and nose, but not the eyes and chin. In the absence of a spine injury, open the airway using the head tilt chin left maneuver to ensure tight steel used the E C clamp that is the letters E and C formed by the fingers in the thumb over the mask. Then squeeze the bag to deliver breaths. Each breath should last one second and cause the chest arise. This concludes our lesson on child ventilation. Next, we will review one rescuer, BLS, for infants. 11. One Rescuer BLS for Infants: welcome to the one rescuer, BLS for infants. In this video, we'll discuss one rescuer, BLS, for infants, which is 80 to 12 months. The first step is to tap their shoulders and shout at the infant to determine if they're responsive. Then assess if they're breathing by putting your ear up to their mouth or by watching their chest. If the infant is not responding or breathing, then yell for help. If someone responds, then send them to call 911 and to retrieve in. 80 D. H. A. Emphasizes that cellphones with built in speaker are available everywhere so rescuers do not have to leave the scene to call 911 Next feel for the infants, Break your pulse for no more than 10 seconds. If there's no pulse or you can't tell, then begin CPR by performing 30 chest compressions, followed by two breaths. If you can feel a pulse, but the rate is less than 60 beats per minute. Begin CPR to perform CPR on an infant. Have the infant face up on a hard surface. Then, using two fingers, perform compressions in the center of the infants chest. Make sure not to press on the end of the sternum, as this can cause injury. Also, keep in mind that compression depth for an infant should be about 1.5 inches and at least 100 to 120 compressions per minute. Perform CPR for about two minutes, which is usually five cycles of 30 compressions and two breaths. If help has not arrived yet, call 911 and retrieve in 80. Next use and follow the e D prompt while continuing CPR until TMS arrives, or until the infants condition normalizes. This concludes our lesson on one rescuer. BLS for infants. Next, we'll review to rescuer BLS for infants. 12. Two Rescuer BLS for Infants: welcome to the two rescuer, BLS for infants. In this video, we'll discuss to rescuer BLS for infants, which is 80 to 12 months. The first step is to tap their shoulders and shout at the infant to determine if they're responsive. Then assess if they're breathing by putting your ear up to their mouth or by watching their chest. If the infant is not responding or breathing, then send the second rescuer toe. Activate TMS by calling 911 and to retrieve in e D. The H A emphasizes that cellphones with built in speakers are available everywhere so rescuers do not have to leave the scene to call 911. Next feel for the infants. Break your pulse for no more than 10 seconds. If there's no pulse or you can't tell, begin CPR with 30 chest compressions, followed by two breaths. If you feel a pulse, but the rate is less than 60 beats per minute, then begin CPR. On the second rescuer returns, begin CPR by performing 15 compressions and having the second rescuer deliver two breaths. If the second rescuer can fit their hands around the infants chest and have them perform CPR using the two thumb encircling hands method. Make sure not to press on the bottom end of the sternum as it can cause injury. Also keep in mind that compression death should be about 1.5 inches in at a rate of a least 100 to 120 compressions per minute. Next, use and follow the e D prompt while continuing CPR until E. M s arrives or until the infants condition normalizes. This concludes our lesson on to rescuer. BLS for infants. Next will review 80 steps for Children and infants. 13. AED Steps for Children and Infants: Chapter six E. D for Children and infants. Welcome to the E. D. Steps for Children and infants. In this video, we will discuss how to use in a D for Children and infants, and a D or automated external defibrillator is a device that recognizes ventricular free relation and other dysrhythmia is and delivers an electric shock at the right time. The E. E. D is nearly foolproof and will not allow you to make a mistake. It is safe for anyone to use. Now. Let's review the E D steps first, retrieve any D, open it and turn it on. Next. Exposed the individuals chest, dry it and remove any medication patches, then opened the pediatric A D pads. Peel off the backing and check for a pacemaker or defibrillator. Make sure the E. D pads do not touch each other to ensure that they don't. It may be necessary to place one pad on the front of the chest and the other pad on the back of the infant. Adult pads may be used if pediatric pads are unavailable. Apply the upper chest pad above the breast and lower left chest pad below the armpit. Ensure that the wires are attached to the box, then clear the individual, stop CPR and instruct others not to touch the injured or the ill individual. D E D will analyze the rhythm if the D reads to check electrodes that ensure that the chest pads are making good contact. If the message reads shock, then clear the individual and press and hold the shock button until the A E de delivers the shock. Resume CPR for two minutes after the shock. Repeat the steps if necessary. This concludes our lesson on 80 for Children and infants. Next way will review mouth to mask rescue breathing. 14. Mouth to Mouth Rescue Breathing: Chapter seven Airway management. Welcome to them to the mouth to mouth rescue breathing. In this video, we will discuss mouth to mouth rescue breathing for adults and Children in mouth to mouth nose rescue breathing for infants until it advanced. Airway is available. You should use mouth to mouth, mouth to mask or bag. Mask ventilation, often times Ah, pocket mask or bag mass is not available at the scene of an accident. Mouth to mouth rescue Breathing is effective in delivering oxygen into the individuals. Lungs. Now let's review mouth to mouth rescue breathing for adults and Children. First, open the airway using the head lift chin lift maneuver. Pinch the nose shut to prevent air from escaping. When delivering breaths, create a seal with your lips around the individuals. Mouth. Blow into the individuals mouth and watch the chest. If the chest doesn't rise, you may need to retell the head or unblock the airway. Given additional breath, make sure the breaths are duration of a full second. If the chest doesn't rise in two breaths, continue giving chest compressions. Now let's review mouth to mouth nose ventilation for infants. First, open the Infants Airways using the head tilt chin lift maneuver. Be sure not to hyper extend the neck. Then create a steel with your lips around the infants, mouth and nose. Deliver the breath and watched the chest rise. Keep in mind that it infants. Lungs are smaller than adults and need a smaller volume of air. If the chest does not rise, re just the tilt of the head, then whoever the second breath and watch the chest to rise. If you are unable to cover both the infants mouth in the nose entirely with your mouth, then pinch the nose close and then deliver the breaths into the infants mouth. If the chest does not rise, re just the tilt of the head, given additional breath and watched for the chest to rise. This concludes our lesson on mouth to mouth rescue breathing. Next, we will review rescue breathing. Yeah. 15. Rescue Breathing: welcome to rescue breathing. In this video, we will discuss important tips on rescue breathing. Cardiac arrest is often preceded by respiratory distress and arrest. It is vital to know this so that you can save the individual by preventing potential cardiac arrest. If any individual has a poles but is not breathing immediately open the airway using the head, tilt chin, lift, maneuver and begin rescue breathing. Adults should receive a breath for every 5 to 6 seconds, while Children should receive a breath every 3 to 5 seconds. Begin CPR of the pole, slowed down or stopped. Review the rescue breathing table in your manual for more detailed information. This concludes our lesson on rescue breathing. Next, we will review choking in adults and Children. 16. Choking in Adults or Children: Chapter eight. Relief of Choking. Welcome to choking in adults and Children. In this video, we will discuss relief of choking in adults and Children. Choking is a common but highly preventable cause of cardiac arrest. If it's a mild obstruction and the individual is breathing, wheezing and coughing, stay with the individual and encourage them to stay calm and cough. If it's more severe and the individual has little to no breathing and is making little to no noise, use the Heimlich maneuver and call E. M s. If the individual becomes unresponsive. Then began B. L s steps to do the Heimlich maneuver or abdominal breasts. Stand behind the responsive individual and wrap your arms around their waist under their rib cage. Put the side of your fist above the individuals naval in the middle of the belly. Do not press on the lower part of the sternum. Using your other hand, hold the first fist and press forcefully into the individuals, abdomen and up toward the chest. Continue performing these thrusts until the obstruction is relieved or until the individual becomes unresponsive. If you can see a foreign object in the individuals mouth and can easily remove it, then do so watch and feel for the breathing to begin. If the individual does not begin breathing, continue to provide CPR and rescue breaths until help arrives. This concludes our lesson on choking in adults and Children. Next, we will review choking in infants. 17. Choking in Infants: welcome to choking in infants. In this video, we will discuss rooms relief of choking in infants that is the age of 0 to 12 months. If it's a mild obstruction state with the infant and try to keep them calm, did not do a blind finger sweep. As you force the object further into the airway, call the M s if they do not quickly rid the obstruction. If it's more severe, use back blows and chest trust and call E. M s. Begin BLS steps. If the infant becomes unresponsive to do black blows and chest thrust in an infant, hold the infant in your lab. Put the infant with their face down in their head lower than their chest. They should be resting on your forearm. Put your forearm on your side. Support the infant's head and neck with your hand. And be sure to avoid putting pressure on their throat. Using the heel of your idol, hand delivered five back blows between the shoulder blades. Using both hands and arms, turn the infant face up so they're now resting on your other arm. This arm should be now resting on your thigh. Make sure that the infant's head is lower than their chest. Use fingers of your idle hands. Provide up to five quick downward chest through us over the lower half of the breast bone. Perform one thrust every second. If the obstruction is not relieved, turn the infant face down on your other form and repeat the process. Continue doing the steps until the infant begins to breathe or becomes unresponsive. This includes our lesson on choking in infants. Thank you for choosing an HCPs at your provider. 18. Adult 1 Person CPR AED: If the scene is safe, approached the victim and assess their responsiveness. Send another person to call 911 and gain 80 of possible. If the victim is not breathing or only gasping. Begin CPR, starting with compressions. Perform 30 compressions at a rate of 100 to 120 compressions per minute at a depth of at least 1/3 the chest. For adults, this is at least two inches. Open the airway and deliver to breath, each lasting one second and watch for chest rise. Resume compressions is important to minimize interruptions and chest compressions to 10 seconds when the A. D is brought to seen. Begin by turning the device on. Remove any clothing from the victim and apply the 80 pads, one below the right collarbone and the other to the side of the left nipple below the armpit. Plug in the connector and clear the victim, while the A D analyzes the rhythm. If no shock is advice, resume CPR, beginning with chest compressions. If a shock is advice, clear the victim again before delivering the shock. Once a D has charged Hit the shock bud. After delivering the shock resume, CPR beginning with 30 chest compressions. Open the airway and deliver two breaths. Continue. At this rate, you have 30 compressions to two brust until the 80 prompts you to stop or further help arrives. 19. Adult 1 Person BLS: If the scene is safe, approach the victim and assess their responsiveness. Send another person toe. Activate the emergency response system and getting a D. If possible, Assess breathing and chuck corroded pulls. If the victim is not breathing or only gasping and has no pulse, begin CPR, starting with compressions. Perform 30 compressions at a rate of 100 to 120 compressions per minute at a depth of at least 1/3 the chest. For adults, this is at least two inches. Open the airway and deliver to breath, each lasting one second and watch for chest arise. Resume compressions. It is important to minimize interruptions and chest compressions to 10 seconds when the A D is brought to seen. Begin returning the device on. Remove any clothing from the victim and apply that a D pads plug in the connector and clear the victim while the A D analyzes the rhythm. If no shock is advice, resume CPR, beginning with chest compressions. If a shock is advice, clear the victim again before delivering the shock. Once the 80 has charged, hit the shock button after delivering the shock resume CPR, beginning with 30 chest compressions open the airway and deliver two breaths. Continue. At this race, you have 30 compressions to tuber us until the 80 prompt you to stop or further help arrives. 20. Adult 2 Person BLS: If the scene is safe, approach the victim and assess their responsiveness. Some the other person to activate the emergency response system and get an 80. Assess breathing and check the corroded pools. If the victim is not breathing or only gasping and has no polls. Begin CPR, starting with compressions. Perform 30 compressions at array of 100 to 120 compressions per minute at a depth of at least 1/3 the chest. For adults, this is at least two inches. Open the airway and deliver tuber us, each lasting one second and watch for chest arise. Resume compressions when the A. D is brought to seen. The second rescuer should begin by turning the device on. Remove any clothing from the victim and apply the A D pads, one below the right collarbone and the other to the side of the left nipple below the armpit. While the other rescuer continues performing CPR, plug in the connector and clear the victim, while the A D analyzes the rhythm. If a shock is advice, clear the victim again before delivering the shock once the A. G s chart hit the shock. But after delivering the shock resume CPR, beginning with 30 chest compressions. After the compressions, the second rescuer open, say airway and delivers two breaths. Continue CPR at this ratio of 30 compressions to two Brunt's until the 80 prompt you to stop or further help arrives. The rescuers should switch roles every two minutes or after five cycles of CPR. 21. Adult Airway: After performing compressions, you can perform the head tilt chin lift maneuver. Place one hand on the victim's forehead and the other on the chin. Tilt the head back and deliver to breath. Make sure to wash for chest arise. 22. Infant 1 Person BLS: if the scene ISI approached the victim and assess their responsiveness. Send another person to activate the emergency response system and getting a D. If possible, assess breathing and check the infants pulse. If the end is not breathing or only gasping and you can't find a pulse, begin CPR, starting with compressions. Perform 30 compressions at a rate of 100 to 120 compressions per minute at a depth of at least one through the chest. For infants, this is about 1.5 inches. When the A G is brought a scene, begin by turning the device on. Remove any clothing from the victim and apply the au de pads one on the front of them, thin chest in one on their back. Plug in the connector and clear the victim while the A D analyzes the rhythm. If no shock is advice, resume CPR, beginning with chest compressions. If a shock is advice, clear the victim again before delivering the shock. Once the A G has charged hit the shock. But after delivering the shop, resume CPR, beginning with 30 chest compressions, open the airway and deliver two breaths, each lasting one second watch for chest rice, begin again with 30 trust compression and continue at this ratio of 30 compressions to two breaths until the 80 prompt you to stop or further help arrives. 23. Infant 2 Person BLS: If the scene is safe, approach the victim and assess their responsiveness. Send the other person to activate the emergency response system and gain a D. Assess breathing and check the brake you Opal's. If the victim is not breathing or only gasping and has no polls, begin CPR, starting with compressions. Perform 30 compressions battery of 100 to 120 compressions per minute at a depth of at least 1/3 the chest. For infants, this is about 1.5 inches. Open the airway and deliver to breath, each lasting one second and watch for chest rise. Resume compressions when the A D is brought to seen. The second rescuer should begin by turning the device on. Remove any clothing from the victim and apply the I E. D pads. One on the front have been chest and one on their back, while the other rescuer continues performing CPR. Plug in the connector and clear the victim, while the A D analyzes the rhythm. If a shock is advised, clear the victim again before delivering the shock. Once the 80 has charged, hit the shock button after delivering the shock resume CPR, beginning with 15 chest compressions using then circling hand technique. After the compressions, the second rescuer opens the airway and delivers two breaths. Continue CPR at this ratio of 15 compressions to two breath until the 80 prompts you to stop or further help arrives the rescue issues, which rules every two minutes or after about five cycles of CPR. 24. Infant Airway: place one hand on the infant's forehead and the other on the chin. Tilt the head back to a neutral position and deliver two breaths. 25. Airway Management: airway management is a fundamental lifesaving skill. Your management of the airway depends upon your abilities, training and scope of practice. The best message of airway management will vary depending on patient condition, equipment available and skill level of the provider. The 1st 2 steps in any airway management response involved opening and clearing the airway . First, open the airway using a head tilt chin lift by placing one hand on the forehead and the other on the chin. Push with the palm to move the head back while lifting the jaw to bring the chin forward. Second, clear the airway suctioning baby necessary to remove foreign material or secretions. Now that the airway is open and clear, consider a couple airway adjuncts to maintain pansy. There are two main types, including the Aural Fair and Julia Lowell Airway, for unconscious patients in the nasal flaring Jaleel Airway. For conscious patients, selection of the proper size Orel Fair and Julia Will Airway is owned by assessing the playing at the lips of the patient, and the tip of the airway should be at the angle of the job. Insertion is achieved by pointing the tip toward the hard palate and then rotating 100 and 80 degrees until the tip touches the posterior all fair and Julia Wall selection of the proper size Nasal flaring tool airway is done by assessing the flange at the nostril, and the tip should just to reach the trace of the year to insert, place the tip perpendicular with the maxillary bone, using gentle pressure in a spiral motion until the device is in place. Beyond the nasal firings, providing a patent airway after placement. Listen to the chest. Ensure that the patient is receiving adequate breath sounds. Now that we have our airway at junk in place, we now move to bag mask ventilation. To properly use the bag mask. Use the EEC formation with your hands to do so for must see with the index finger in a thumb on one hand on the top side of the mask on the bridge of the nose. This securely applied the master the face now the three remaining fingers for money and use these fingers to lift the job, forming the airway. Now, maintaining this position, the provider squeezes the back, taking one second to purified one ventilation. If a second providers available to assist with bag mask ventilation. One provider will deliver ventilation with the bag mask, while the other provider provides the same E C formation with both hands to the mask. So you have completed the airway management skills training. Please feel free to review as often as you would like, and we encourage you to practice your skills with a skilled health care provider, so please go out there and save lives. 26. Who is NHCPS?: Welcome to National Health care provider Solutions, the most trusted name in online medical certification. Today, our certification courses can be accessed 100% online and completed from any device designed by board certified physicians. Adhering to the latest H A standards, you can now join thousands of health care providers around the world who have received certifications completely online in less than an hour. Our A, C. L s, BLS and Pals courses are eligible for A M, a Category one credits and our CPR courses eligible for a. M. A Category two CMI partnered with the Save A Life Initiative. We seek to empower others to save lives by providing advanced healthcare education. Here's how enroll in the course you need. Review the online handbooks, watch the skills videos and passed the exam. Your digital provider card is instantly available, and your physical card will be mailed to you. 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