Back to Basics Piano Lessons By: Primopiano4u | Primo Piano4u | Skillshare

Back to Basics Piano Lessons By: Primopiano4u

Primo Piano4u, primopiano4u Back to Basics piano lesson

Back to Basics Piano Lessons By: Primopiano4u

Primo Piano4u, primopiano4u Back to Basics piano lesson

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11 Lessons (28m)
    • 1. Introduction

      1:32
    • 2. Note Names and Fingering in Music

      1:16
    • 3. Sitting at the Piano, Hand Positioning

      4:29
    • 4. Keyboard Pattern, Home Base Middle C

      1:38
    • 5. C Major Scale, Ledger Lines

      5:04
    • 6. Treble Clef (G Clef) Line and Space Notes

      2:24
    • 7. Bass Clef (F Clef) Line and Space Notes

      2:15
    • 8. Music Notation, Note Values, Time Signatures

      2:55
    • 9. How to Play Piano Songs: Rain, Chimes, Yankee Doodle

      5:23
    • 10. Class Project: Music Note Flashcards and Flashcard Song

      0:31
    • 11. Conclusion

      0:33
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About This Class

Back to Basics Piano Lessons by primopiano4u, is a beginner course for people who want to play like a professional pianist, by learning the fundamental basics of how to play piano and basic music theory. There is no prior musical experience necessary.

Course Outline:

  1. Introduction
  2. Note Names and Fingering in Music
  3. Sitting at the Piano, Hand Positioning, Arch Exercise
  4. Keyboard Pattern, Home Base: Middle C
  5. C Major Scale and Ledger Lines
  6. Treble Clef (G Clef) Notes On a Line EGBDF, and In a Space FACE
  7. Bass Clef (F Clef) Notes On a Line GBDFA and In a Space ACEG
  8. Music Notation, Note Values and Time Signatures
  9. How to Play Piano Songs: Rain, Chimes, Yankee Doodle
  10. Class Project: Music Note Flashcards and Flashcard Song
  11. Conclusion

Primopiano4u, a piano teacher for over 10 years, has consistently coached students to achieve over 80% on Royal Conservatory of Music (RCM) piano and theory exams, and is now eager to share their knowledge with you. So let’s get started!

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Primo Piano4u

primopiano4u Back to Basics piano lesson

Teacher

Welcome to Back to Basics piano lessons brought to you by PrimoPiano4u. My proven teaching methods have consistently resulted in RCM (Royal Conservatory of Music) piano and theory exam scores of 80% and higher for the past 10 years and now I'm sharing these lessons with you.

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Transcripts

1. Introduction: Hi, and welcome to PrimoPiano4u, the faceless wonder, whose hands will teach you back to basics piano lessons. This is a beginner course for people who want to play like a professional pianist by learning the fundamental basics of how to play the piano and basic music theory. Don't worry, there's no prior musical experience necessary. And studies show that people who play the piano actually increase their IQ. So why not become smarter while getting to know the ins and outs of how to become fluent in the universal language of music? The goal of this course is for you to be able to know how to read piano sheet music and be able to correctly identify and play the musical alphabet of A B C D E F G on the keyboard. You'll be amazed at how quickly you can pick up a piece of music and play it when you know the basics. With my help, you'll also learn how to create your own musical note flashcards as a class project and even be able to compose your first song with them. I've been a piano teacher for over ten years and have consistently coached my students to achieve over 80% on Royal Conservatory of Music Piano and theory exams. And now I'm sharing my knowledge with you. So let's get started. 2. Note Names and Fingering in Music: The names of the notes in music. The names of the notes in music, are A, B, C, D, E, F, G, which repeat and cycle through on the keyboard, no matter if they are high. A, B, C, D, E, F, G, or if they are low A B C D E F G. If you notice the note after G is again A. And then the whole cycle starts again A B C D E F G and again A B C D E F G. And that's the fundamentals of the names of the notes in music. Fingering and the right and the left hand. You use your right and your left hand to play on the piano keyboard. For fingering, your thumbs are 1. The index finger is 2, your middle finger is 3, your fourth finger is 4, and your pinky is 5. Let's show that on the piano. 1 2 3 4 5, 5 4 3 2 1. 3. Sitting at the Piano, Hand Positioning: How to sit at the piano. Sit up nice and straight, roughly around the middle of the piano bench with feet firmly planted on the ground. So you have a good stable base in which to produce sound from. If you're unable to plant your feet on the ground, no problem, just grab a stool and place it under your feet. Make sure when you reach for the keys, your shoulders are not up around your ears like this, but nice and relaxed and your arms are free to move about with your wrists parallel to the keyboard and fingers curved. Proper alignment is essential to producing clear sound and to avoid injuries. Hand positioning. When you place your hands on the keyboard, your fingers should be curved. Now what do I mean by curved fingers? I mean, just like this. There should be a nice arch. This is your firm base. Imagine that there is a ball placed underneath your hand like this. Now you want to play using the finger pads of your second, third, fourth, fifth finger, right here, just like this. And to use your thumb, you don't want to play using the whole finger pad here. You want to play using the side of your thumb like this. Make sure that your fingers lift and drop from your knuckle right here. Like this. Well, let's play a couple notes on the keyboard with lifting and dropping from the knuckle. And you also want to play in the center of the key. You don't want to play on the side like this. Because that muffles, your sound, you want to be accurate in hit in the center of the key. Just like that. You also don't want to be playing with your wrist like this. That's really awkward. Or you don't want to play like this. That's also awkward. You also don't want to play with flat fingers like this. And you don't want to play with your fingers like this, either. People tend to play like this if their fingernails are too long because they can't access the finger pad. That's this part right here of their fingers. I usually get asked, you know, why should we play with curved fingers? The reason why you should play with curved fingers is because you have better motor control and you're able to produce clear sound so that you can play quickly and efficiently. I'm going to demonstrate the C Major scale. Just think that if you're able to learn to groove this technique of playing with curved fingers, you can translate this knowledge to typing on a computer keyboard even faster. Just think of how many more emails you can respond to people in a minute now that you can type faster. Try this exercise at home. This is called the Arch exercise. This is how you maintain the arch in your hand, just like this. So the exercise goes like this with your right hand and your left hand. Make sure you're putting your second finger to your thumb, your third finger to your thumb, your fourth finger to your thumb, and your fifth finger to your thumb. You can also practice saying the names of the fingering. So this one will be 2345. Now translate this onto the piano. 12345 Go backwards 54321. Make sure to maintain your arch. Now, practicing this daily is going to help improve the dexterity and the fine motor control skills in your hands. People have a tendency to have difficulty doing this with their fourth and fifth finger because they're typically a little bit weaker than our second and third fingers, because they're actually attached here. So, you need to practice the individual movements between your fourth finger and your fifth finger. Practice wiggling it just like this 4 5 4 5. And you'll find that that's going to improve the quality of your sound and the strength in your fingers. 4. Keyboard Pattern, Home Base Middle C: The piano keyboard, and how to identify your home base. Middle C. The piano keyboard is made up of 88 white and black keys. It's made up of a pattern of repeating, 2 black keys, 3 black keys, and 2 black keys and 3 black keys. Your home base is a point of reference, and we're going to start with that being the middle C. The Middle C is located to the left of the 2 black keys. You see the pattern of 2 black keys, C. To the left of this is your C. Knowing that the names of the notes, are A B C D E F G, you can count up or down to find the rest of the notes. For example, the note after C is D, and the note before C is B. And if you notice, it just repeats throughout the keyboard. So this is a low C here, pattern of 2 black keys to the left. Let's find another C, pattern of two black keys and to the left is this is your middle C. Let's find an even higher C, pattern of 2 black keys and to the left is C. And last one here, pattern of 2 black keys and to the left is a C. Pretty simple right? 5. C Major Scale, Ledger Lines: The letter names of notes. Let's learn to read the letter names of the notes of the C Major scale. As you can see here, this is the middle C. This is our home base and our point of reference. It's located to the left of the 2 black keys. Now, you can also see that there's a line drawn through it. And it's actually written on a line. This is because this line is called a ledger line. I like to call the ledger line, ladder notes because it helps you to reach notes that are written lower in the staff, like the Middle C, or higher in the staff like this high C. So let's play the notes of the C Major scale, which consists of four octaves. This is a, C, D, E, F, G, A, B, C, D, E, F, G, A, B, C. C D E F G A B C D E F G A B C. Now that you know the letter names of notes, let's begin by learning the C Major scale. Let's start with our right hand. First, we're going to find our point of reference, our home base, which is the two black keys. to the left of that is the Middle C. We're going to play the C right here with our first finger. Then we're going to play D with the second finger. E with our third finger, then we're going to tuck our thumb underneath to play F, Use our second finger to play G, our third finger to play A, our fourth finger to play B, and our fifth finger to play C. Now we're gonna go backwards. B with 4, A with 3, G with 2, F with 1, crossover our third finger to play E. D with our second finger, and C. Now I'm gonna play this for you. So you can hear how it sounds like. I'd like for you to practice this, saying the notes out loud as you play, just like this CDEFGABCBAGFEDC. Now, I want you to say it using the fingering names 123123454321321. It's as simple as that! Now let's learn the left hand. We're going to start here with our fifth finger on C. So again, to find a lower C, we move our hand from the middle C with the two black keys down here, 2 black keys to the left of that is C, We're going to start with our pinky finger. This finger. So C with 5, D with 4, 3 on E, F with 2, G is 1. Cross our third finger over to play A, B with 2, and C with 1. Now we're going to go down. 2 on B, 3 on A, tuck the thumb under to play G, F on 2, 3 on E, 4 on D, and 5 on C. I'll play this for you so you can hear how it sounds like. I want you to notice that when I played it, I played all the notes evenly. And what I mean by evenly is I didn't bunch them together like this. Have a big pause when I cross my third finger over. I wanted to play it nice and steady. And I wanted to make sure that I was playing from the knuckle and using the natural weight of my finger to get good sound. And I was playing in the center of the keyboard. I also, when I was crossing over, wasn't crossing over like with my elbow out like this, I was making sure that I was floating over the keys like this. And when you go home, I would like for you to practice on your own how to play them hand separately, right hand first, and now the left hand. And for an extra challenge, I want you to try to play them hands together. 6. Treble Clef (G Clef) Line and Space Notes: I often get asked, how can I learn the names of the notes even faster? Well I do this by dividing it into the treble clef notes on a line, which are EGBDF. The Treble Clef is also known as the G Clef. Now why is it also known as the G Clef? It's because where the circle of the treble clef is, is exactly where the note G, This note G is. That's why it's also called the G Clef. So let's learn how to memorize EGBDF, the notes of the treble clef on a line even faster. So what tip and trick do I use? I use the tip and trick to think of a mnemonic. I think of E for Every, G for Good, B for Boy, D for Deserves, and F for Fudge. You can make up your own. But again, I find Every Good Boy Deserves Fudge. E, G, B, D, F, makes it really easy to remember. You could even make up Every Good Bird Does Fly. Also E, G, B, D, F. I look forward to hearing whatever fun mnemonics you guys decide to create an order to memorize your notes even faster. The treble clef and notes in a space. Let's learn the treble clef, otherwise known as the G Clef, and the notes in a space. So the notes in the treble clef, on a space are, F, A, C, E. Now this is an easy one because it actually spells the word FACE. Now, I don't know if you noticed this, but as I was playing this, I actually skipped a note. And what do I mean by note? I mean that there are notes in the middle. See this is F I skipped this note here. This is A, I skip this note here, C I skip this note here, E. And this is because when scales are written, it's always alternating. It's usually on a line, a space, a line, a space. But because the notes in FACE are written on spaces, that's why you see this gap here. That's FA, AC and CE. 7. Bass Clef (F Clef) Line and Space Notes: Let's learn a trick for learning the Bass Cleft notes, otherwise known as the F Clef, and the notes on a line GBDFA. So why is the Bass clef called the F Clef? It's because the circle at the top on the second highest line of the staff actually circles around the letter F found right here on the keyboard. So how do I remember all the lines in the Bass Clef notes are GBDFA? I remember that because I think of the mnemonic, G for Great, B for Big, D for Dogs, F for Fight, and A for Animals. Again, Great Big Dogs Fight Animals, GBDFA. That's easy. The Bass Clef, otherwise known as the F Clef, and all the notes in the Bass Clef on the staff that are in a space. They are ACEG. Now let's think of an easy mnemonic that helps us remember the notes are ACEG. A for All, C for Cows, E for Eat, and G for Grass. That's pretty easy. All Cows Eat Grass ACEG. So I want you to practice being able to find these notes on the keyboard. So how do we find it on the keyboard? Again, we go to our home base, which is our point of reference. The two black keys to the left of that is the C. Now let's count down to the highest note that we can see here, which is the G. So CBAG, That's how we know that the G is here. Now how do we read the other note? Because it's a skip down. This is the E here, skip again for the C, Skip again and A. So again, All Cows Eat Grass. ACEG. 8. Music Notation, Note Values, Time Signatures: How music is written. Music is written on a staff which consists of five lines. The notes are written on the lines and the spaces. There is also a Treble Clef, which usually we use to play right-hand notes, like CDEFG. And a Bass Clef, which usually we use to play left hand notes like CBAGF. Note values and time signatures. Note values and time signatures tell you the rhythm of the song. For example, the note value of a whole note is held for four beats or four counts like this 1234. A dotted half note is held for three beats like this 123. A half note is held for two beats 12. A quarter note is held for one beat 1. And an eighth note is held for half a count. Here's an example. If I were to play a whole note against a half note. So I'll hold the whole note in the left hand for four counts and the half note for two counts in the right hand. Now if I were to do this with quarter notes in the right hand, I would have four quarter notes and one whole note. So again, 1234. And if I were to do this with eighth notes, with half counts, I would be playing it like this 1 and 2 and 3 and 4 and. Time signatures. The time signature is placed at the beginning of a piece. It's usually made up of two figures, the upper number and the lower number. The upper number tells you how many beats, that's counts that you will use per measure. If, for example, I had a time signature of 4/4, I would know that because the top number is 4, I have four counts, 1234. Now, what does the lower number figure tells you? This tells you that if I have four counts, it means that I have four quarter notes. So a 4/4 time would be something like this. 1234 and 1234 9. How to Play Piano Songs: Rain, Chimes, Yankee Doodle: How to play a song at the piano. Yeah! We finally made it! We've learned all of our note names and now we're ready to take that knowledge and to transfer it to reading this sheet music and to playing a song. This song is called Rain, and it's from the Leila Fletcher music book. Just listen while I play it once for you. Great. So now I'm going to explain how I was able to find the first note on the keyboard. The first thing I did, was I took a look at the Treble Clef and I noticed that the first note there is actually a C, The Middle C. So what I did is I took a look at our home base again, which is the two black keys and to the left of that is the C. Now I noticed that in the sheet music there's a 1 there that's the fingering. So that tells me I need to play this middle C with not my second finger, but with my thumb. Next I scanned the music and I saw that the next note in the Bass Clef, is actually also a middle C, And it's also played using finger 1, right here. So what I did is I prepared my left hand and made sure it was in the right position so that I was able to play the piece smoothly. The next thing I did was, I took a look at the notes. And again, remember our home starting note was the Middle C. And I saw that the notes we're going in a pattern sequentially up. That's how I knew that the next note was DEFG. And as you can see, when the notes are going down FEDC, the notes are going up DE, they're going down DC. And then in the left hand. CBAGF because the notes were going down. Now the notes are going up GABC. Here's a gap. I know this note is G because I played it before GABC. Now I'm going to play this song, just saying the notes of the names aloud so that you're able to recognize what they look like on the sheet music and transfer it to the keyboard like this. CDEFGFEDCDEDC. CBAGFGABCGABC. Now, we learned time signatures, and the time signature is 4/4. It's written right after the Treble Clef and after the Bass Clef. So that means that in order to play this piece correctly, I need to be counting 1234 throughout the piece. Now the quarter notes are held for one count and the whole note is counted for four. I'm going to demonstrate this counting aloud so you can see how long you need to hold each note. 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1234 (held). 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1234 (held). Practice doing this, saying the notes out loud first, and then counting out loud to make sure that you are playing with the proper rhythm. I don't want to be hearing songs where it's a little bit uneven because we're looking for the notes and I don't want it to sound like this because that's not how the notes are written. These notes are quarter notes, so they need to be played nice and evenly like this. So practice making sure again that you're playing with curved fingers and that your wrists are relaxed like this, not like this, not like this. And making sure that you're not playing with flat fingers like this, or flat fingers like this. To further master the Middle C position. Here are two songs for you to practice. The first one is The Chimes, and the second one is Yankee Doodle, both from the Leila Fletcher book. Yankee Doodle. 10. Class Project: Music Note Flashcards and Flashcard Song: Learn your notes even faster by making homemade flashcards. Mix them up and play a flashcard song. Here's mine. For this class project, the only materials you need, are scissors, staff paper or blank paper and a marker. When you're finished, share your pictures of your completed flashcards with me and post your flashcard song video. 11. Conclusion: Now that you've mastered the basics of playing the piano, you can now take your piano playing to the next level. Join me, PrimoPiano4u, the faceless wonder, in the next lesson of Back to Basics Piano Lessons. Check out my website and YouTube channel for more music resources.