Back To Basics Piano Lesson 3 | Primo Piano4u | Skillshare
Play Speed
  • 0.5x
  • 1x (Normal)
  • 1.25x
  • 1.5x
  • 2x
9 Lessons (35m)
    • 1. Introduction

      1:15
    • 2. Repeat Dots - The Giant

      2:03
    • 3. Emphasizing The Melody - Silver Skates

      9:48
    • 4. Tie Notes - O Where Has My Little Dog Gone?

      5:33
    • 5. Flats - Twinkle Twinkle

      5:50
    • 6. F Major Key Signature And Scale

      3:38
    • 7. Accent Notes, F Major Song - The Old Woman In A Shoe

      5:13
    • 8. Class Project: Flashcard Song In F Major

      0:57
    • 9. Conclusion

      0:48
  • --
  • Beginner level
  • Intermediate level
  • Advanced level
  • All levels
  • Beg/Int level
  • Int/Adv level

Community Generated

The level is determined by a majority opinion of students who have reviewed this class. The teacher's recommendation is shown until at least 5 student responses are collected.

3

Students

--

Projects

About This Class

Back to Basics Piano Lessons by primopiano4u, is the third lesson in this series for beginners who want to play like a professional pianist, by learning the fundamental basics of how to play piano and basic music theory. You’ll learn and apply the concepts taught in this lesson through 5 specially selected piano songs.

Course Outline

  • Introduction
  • Repeat Dots – The Giant
  • Emphasizing The Melody – Silver Skates
  • Tie Notes – O Where Has My Little Dog Gone?
  • Flats – Twinkle, Twinkle
  • F Major Key Signature and Scale
  • Accent Notes, F Major Song – The Old Woman In A Shoe
  • Class Project: Flashcard Song In F Major
  • Conclusion

Primopiano4u, a piano teacher for over 10 years, has consistently coached students to achieve over 80% on Royal Conservatory of Music (RCM) piano and theory exams, and is now eager to share their knowledge with you. So let’s get started!

Meet Your Teacher

Teacher Profile Image

Primo Piano4u

primopiano4u Back to Basics piano lesson

Teacher

Welcome to Back to Basics piano lessons brought to you by PrimoPiano4u. My proven teaching methods have consistently resulted in RCM (Royal Conservatory of Music) piano and theory exam scores of 80% and higher for the past 10 years and now I'm sharing these lessons with you.

See full profile

Class Ratings

Expectations Met?
  • Exceeded!
    0%
  • Yes
    0%
  • Somewhat
    0%
  • Not really
    0%
Reviews Archive

In October 2018, we updated our review system to improve the way we collect feedback. Below are the reviews written before that update.

Your creative journey starts here.

  • Unlimited access to every class
  • Supportive online creative community
  • Learn offline with Skillshare’s app

Why Join Skillshare?

Take award-winning Skillshare Original Classes

Each class has short lessons, hands-on projects

Your membership supports Skillshare teachers

Learn From Anywhere

Take classes on the go with the Skillshare app. Stream or download to watch on the plane, the subway, or wherever you learn best.

phone

Transcripts

1. Introduction: Welcome back. It's primopiano4u, the faceless wonder whose hands will teach beginners back to basics piano lessons using my over ten years of experience coaching students to top marks on RCM piano exams. Now that you've completed Lesson 1 covering C major and Lesson 2, covering G Major, we will further master these key signatures and add F Major to your repertoire in Lesson 3. The goal of this lesson is to learn a new key signature and to play pieces hands together, bringing out the melody of the song. You will add flats to your musical note flashcards so that you can compose and create a song in the key of F Major. So let's get started! 2. Repeat Dots - The Giant: Repeat dots. Repeat dots at the end of the song, tell you to go back to the beginning of the piece and play it again. I've selected the song, The Giant from the Leila Fletcher book to demonstrate this concept. You'll notice that the first time we play it through, is for Verse 1. And when we go back to the beginning, we're playing Verse 2. Just listen while I play this for you. Repeat. Let's practice playing the song, The Giant saying the names of the notes out loud, so that you can focus on the new concept, which are the repeat dots. CBCG ABCG FAGB ABC (repeat) CBCG ABCG FAGB ABC. Now let's play the giant counting out loud. 1234 1234 1234 1234 (repeat) 1234 1234 1234 1234. 3. Emphasizing The Melody - Silver Skates: How to make the melody in a song sing. To make the melody in a song sing, you need to play the melody a little bit louder than the accompaniment. I've chosen the song, The Silver Skates from the Leila Fletcher book to demonstrate this concept. Just listen while I play this song for you. I want you to try playing the song, the silver skates on your own. Now the best tip is actually to start playing this song hands separately. I recommend starting to play with your left hand because your left hand is the one with the melody. So the first thing you do is you see that the first note in the left hand is a C. And you scan the music for anything that's a little bit unusual. Now in our last lesson, we learned sharps. And there's actually only one sharp in this entire piece. And it's found in measure 12. And that's the A Sharp. So A is here, the A Sharp is here. And it's played with the second finger. And the last thing I do is I check to see is there anything a little bit unusual about this piece? And there is. You have to cross your left hand over and play the high C in the very last measure of this piece. And that high C is found right here. And it's also played using a staccato note, which is a short note like this. So just listen while I play the left hand for you. Now, let's practicing the names of the notes in the left hand aloud. C, B, A, G, ABC, ABC, B, G, C, BCB, A, A#, B, GAB, C, C. Now let's practice doing the silver skates. Counting aloud and only playing our left hand. 123 123 123 123 123 123 123 123 123 123 123 123 123 123 123 123. Let's now learn how to play the right hand. The first thing we do is we look for the notes in the right hand. And in the Treble Clef the bottom note is an E played with your thumb. And the other note on top of it is a G played with your third finger. Now because the notes are stacked together on top of each other, this means you need to play them at the exact same time, like this. So I scan this piece and I notice that there are rests, which means that in the right hand, I have to make sure that I'm not playing anything when there are rests. Just listen while I play the right hand for you. Now let's try The Silver Skates. playing the right hand and saying the names of the notes aloud, EG EG, EG EG, EG EG, EG EG, FG FG, FG FG, EG EG, EG EG, EG EG, FG FG, EG EG. Let's practice the right hand of the silver skates by counting aloud to make sure that we are playing the correct rhythm and observing all the rests. 123 123 123 123 123 123 123 123, 123 123 123 123 123 123 123 123. Now, let's try to play the silver skates hands together. Let's go very slowly. So in the right hand and the left hand. I've prepared my hands C with my thumb in the left hand, and the E and G with my thumb and third finger in the right hand. Now notice that the very first note in the left hand is a C, and it is held. For three counts because the time signature is in 3/4 and because it's a dotted half note. So that means that I play it like this. 123. I want you to notice that I held the left hand while I then played the right hand. I also played the left hand a little bit louder than the right hand, because the left hand is the melody and you need to play it louder. And the right hand is the accompaniment, which means you need to play it softer. Just listen while I demonstrate this, See if you can hear the melody in the left hand. Now the other thing, that's a little bit tricky, about this piece is the very last bar. You have to cross your left hand over. That's this one here from the middle C, in the second last bar, all the way over to the high C, up here and use your second finger. And it is a staccato note, so you need to play it like this. You have to be quick. So in order to make sure that I'm playing this correctly, what I do is I go to the last two bars and I practice it a couple of times. I see how far my left hand has to go from the C, the middle C on a thumb, all the way over to crossover to my C. Up here with my second finger. What I do is I see that my E and G are being played by my first and my third finger. And then I have a finger for each key. And my last finger is actually a pinky, and it's on B. So I actually use this pinky as a marker so that I know where my C is. That's here. So it's just one key over. So if I can visualize this, I know and I can anticipate that this note is coming up. So I would practice it and I would play it just like this. The last two bars of the song. Just like that, so that I'm ready, Practice this several times yourself so that you're able to do the crossover effectively. Now I'm going to play the song for you one more time, making sure that we're emphasizing the left hand, which is the melody. And we're making sure that our right hand is softer, which is the accompaniment. And that everything is played nice and smoothly with good rhythm. 4. Tie Notes - O Where Has My Little Dog Gone?: The tie. The tie is a curved line between two consecutive notes of the same letter name in the same position on the staff. Play the first note only and hold it for the time value of both notes. I've chosen a piece called O, Where Has My Little Dog Gone? to demonstrate how to play the tie. Just listen while I play it once for you. Let's practice play O Where Has My Little Dog Gone? I'm going to help you out. So the first thing I do is I take my right hand and I look for the note. And the very first one is an E that's played with my second finger, right here. The next thing I do is I look for my left hand, and I see that it's played with my thumb on middle C, right here. Then I scan the music and I look for what's new, which is the tie. And the tie is found in bar 8 and 9. So the tie, I look for the note and that's a G played with 4. I can see that my time signature is 3/4. So that means that I have to hold this note, this dotted half note, for three counts. And you can see that it's attached to a quarter note for one count. So I'll demonstrate bar 8 and 9 for you. It sounds like this, 1231. The next thing I do is I look for the other tied note, which is at the very end of the piece, the last two bars. And that note is a C, the middle C, played with my left hand. So I see that it's right here. Middle C. And again, I'm going to play the entire measure. And I'm going to hold it because it's a dotted half note. And the next one, the very last bar, is just a half note. So that's held for an additional two counts. So in total, I'd be holding this C for 5 counts like this. 12312. Let's practice playing O Where has my little dog gone? counting aloud to ensure that you're playing with the correct rhythm and that the ties are correctly observed. 123 123 123 123 123 123 123 123 123 123 123 123 123 123 123 123 123. Now, you can see that the very first measure started on beat 3 with the E. And so I counted 12 and then played 3. So I just want you to notice that this piece begins with what is called an incomplete measure. And the incomplete measure is at the beginning of the piece, and it's balanced by the incomplete measure at the end of the piece. Now the incomplete measure at the end of the piece is actually the held C, The middle C. Now this note was only held for two counts, 12. And you can see that the third beat is actually at the beginning of the piece, which is this E. Now, let's practice saying the names of the notes of O Where Has My Little Dog Gone? aloud. So that you can focus on the new concept, which is the tie. E GE CBC DB GG AG FED G EF GE CBC DB GG AG FED C. 5. Flats - Twinkle Twinkle: The flat. The flat is another accidental. It lowers a note by one semitone. So for example, this note is B. And the black key, which is lower on the piano, to the left of this white key, is the flat, B flat. The flat sign is used once in the measure and it makes all the notes of the same letter name flat. So let's learn some of the black keys on the piano and see what they would be called if they were to be flats. So this one here is a B flat because this is B, B flat. And again, this next one will be A flat because this note is A, A flat, one semitone lower. The next one is G flat. This one is E flat, and this one is D flat. Now that we've learned the accidental of the flat, let's apply this to a song. I've chosen the song Twinkle Twinkle, from the Leila Fletcher book. Just listen while I play this once for you. Now I'd like you to try playing Twinkle, Twinkle on your own. But first, I'm going to help you out. The first thing I do is I take a look at the first note of the music, and that's an F. And it's played with my fifth finger in my left hand. Because it's in the Bass Clef. The next thing I do is I look for where my right hand is supposed to go. So in the Treble Clef, I see that it's a middle C played with my thumb. Now that I prepared both my hands, I scan the music and I look for what's new. What's new is the flat, the B flat. And I scan the music and I see that the very first time that we play a B flat is in the third bar. And it's right here. And it's played with my second finger. I want you to notice that when I play flats, I'm actually playing as close as I can to the edge of the flat right here. I'm not playing all the way up here. And I'm not playing kind of in the center. I'm playing closest to the edge because my other notes around it are all white keys and it's easier for me to play the song smoother if I place my finger like this, and again, my fingers are curved and I'm using the pad of my fingertip right here to press nice and firm like this. So if I look at measure three, I'm actually playing 2 B flats. Now, why am I playing 2 B flats? It's because the flat sign is only used once in this measure. And it makes all the notes. The second B, a B flat after it, so that they don't have to write it twice. So in this song, there are total of eight B flats. Let's play Twinkle, Twinkle, saying the names of the notes aloud to make sure that we're ready to play all the B flats in this song. FFCC DDC BbBbAA GGF CCBbBb AAG CCBbBb AAG FFCC DDC BbBbAA GGF. Twinkle Twinkle counting aloud. 1234 1234 1234 1234 1234 1234 1234 1234 1234 1234 1234 1234. 6. F Major Key Signature And Scale: Now that we've learned flats, it's time for us to learn the key signature with one flat. And that is the B flat. This key signature is the key of F major, and it only has the B flat. Listen while I play the F major scale for you. Okay, Let's learn the F Major scale hands separately, starting with our right hand. F on 1, G on 2, A on 3, B flat on 4, tuck the thumb under for C on 1, D on 2, E with 3, and F with 4. Now we're going to go backwards, E on 3, D on 2, C with your thumb. B flat,with your fourth finger A with 3, G on 2 and F with 1. And let's try the left hand. F on 5. G on 4, A on 3, B flat on 2, C with 1. Crossover Your third finger on D with 3. E with 2, and F with 1. Now we're going to go backwards. E with 2, D with 3, tuck the thumb under for C, B flat with 2, A with 3, G with 4, and F with 5. I want you to practice doing this, hands separately First playing the right hand like this. And the left hand like this. And saying the names of the notes out loud like this. FGABbCDEF EDCBbAGF. In the left-hand, saying the names of the notes aloud like this. FGABbCDEF EDCBbAGF And hands together like this. And now hands together saying the names of the notes aloud like this. FGABbCDEF EDCBbAGF 7. Accent Notes, F Major Song - The Old Woman In A Shoe: The accent. An accent is placed over a note or under a note. And it means that the note is to be played a little louder. So the note is to be accented. So say for example, I was playing a note like this, that's just played regularly. If I was going to accent it, it would sound like this. I would attack the note a little bit faster and a little bit harder. Now I've chosen the song, The Old Woman In A Shoe from the Leila Fletcher book. I've chosen this song because it has a key signature of one flat, the B flat, which means that it's in the key of F Major, which we just learned. And because it has something called accents. And it's found in two bars of this piece Bar 14 and 15. Just listen. while I play bar 14 and 15 for you. Just listen while I play The Old Woman In A Shoe. Now, I'd like for you to try playing The Old Woman In A Shoe. First thing I do is I take a look at the key signature, and there's a flat placed on the B, on the line B, just after the Treble Clef and after the Bass Clef. And that tells you that every note in this piece, which is a B, is to be played B flat. So what I do is because this is one of the new notes, I look to see how many B flats there are in this entire piece. And there are five. So I make sure that I'm prepared to play them. The next thing I do is I take a look and I see where the first note my right hand is, and that's a C, the middle C played with my thumb. Then I take a look at where the first note in my left hand is so I can prepare it. And that's an A played with my third finger. And the next thing I do is I take a look at Bar 14 and 15. Those are the new concepts, the accents. And I see that I need to play them with a little bit more attack like this. Now that I've identified what's new, I'm going to play the piece for you, Counting aloud to make sure that we have the correct rhythm. I'm going to count using ands because there's an eighth note. 1+2+3+ 1+2+3+ 1+2+3+ 1+2+3+ 1+2+3+ 1+2+3+ 1+2+3+ 1+2+3+ 1+2+3+ 1+2+3+ 1+2+3+ 1+2+3+ 1+2+3+ 1+2+3+ 1+2+3+ 1+2+3+ 1+2+3+. Let's practice saying the names of the notes aloud for The Old Woman In A Shoe. So that we make sure that we play all of the B flats. that were written in the key signature. C, FFF, C CC, DDD, AAB, CCC, CDE, GFF, FC, FFF, CC, DDD, AA, Bb-C Bb-C Bb-C, Bb-C DE, A-G FF, A-F. 8. Class Project: Flashcard Song In F Major: Class project. For this class project, I'd like you to add flats to your musical note flashcards. Next, I want you to compose and create a song in the key of F major. Remember, that F Major sounds like this. And it has one flat, B flat in the key signature. Here's my flashcards song. I look forward to hearing your Flashcard Song and to seeing your pictures of your completed flashcards, including flats. 9. Conclusion: Congratulations! You've now mastered playing pieces hands together and bringing out the melody. And you've added F Major to your repertoire. Join me, primopiano4u, the faceless wonder, in my next lesson of back to basics piano lessons. Check out my website and YouTube channel for more music resources.