BEGINNER GUITAR CHORDS - Easily Learn Guitar Chords - Guitar Chords from Scratch - Guitar Chords! | Lesson Pros | Skillshare

BEGINNER GUITAR CHORDS - Easily Learn Guitar Chords - Guitar Chords from Scratch - Guitar Chords!

Lesson Pros, Learn from the Pros

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38 Lessons (3h 9m)
    • 1. Promotional

      0:37
    • 2. 2 - How to Get a Good Sounding Chord on your Guitar

      2:14
    • 3. 3 - How to get rid of Pick Recoil for Chording

      7:55
    • 4. 4 - How to find the proper Pick Depth for Playing Chords

      6:20
    • 5. 5 - Playing Chords with Ease - Using your pick at just the right angle

      6:22
    • 6. 6 - G Chord

      2:41
    • 7. 7 - C Chord

      1:43
    • 8. 8 - D Chord

      4:09
    • 9. 9 - Country G Chord

      1:22
    • 10. 10 - Country C Chord

      3:12
    • 11. 11 - Em Chord

      2:19
    • 12. 12 - A Chord

      3:13
    • 13. 13 - E Chord

      0:52
    • 14. 14 - Am Chord

      1:23
    • 15. 15 - Bm Chord

      4:16
    • 16. 16 - F Chord

      5:11
    • 17. 17 - D7 Chord

      0:51
    • 18. 18 - B7 Chord

      1:52
    • 19. 19 - Example - Boom Chuck Strum

      4:47
    • 20. 20 - Practice Session - Boom Chuck

      5:30
    • 21. 21 - Class Tools #1 - 80 BPM

      9:55
    • 22. 22 Example Boom Chuck 4321 Strum

      2:17
    • 23. 23 Practice Session Boom Chuck 4321 1 ss 1 small

      2:55
    • 24. 24 Class Tools #2 - 80 BPM

      9:55
    • 25. 25 - Exercise - Sweep Strumming Pattern

      6:57
    • 26. 26 - Practice Session - Sweep Strumming Pattern

      3:31
    • 27. 27 - Class Tools #3 - 70 BPM

      10:26
    • 28. 28 - Exercise - Variations of Open Power Chords

      6:49
    • 29. 29 - Additional Material - Hammer-ons

      2:32
    • 30. 30 - Additional Material - Pull-offs

      1:49
    • 31. 31 - Additional Material - Vibrato

      1:31
    • 32. 32 - Additional Material Intro to Bends small

      1:57
    • 33. Class Tools #1 - 70 BPM

      9:58
    • 34. Class Tools #1 - 90 BPM

      10:25
    • 35. Class Tools #2 70 BPM

      9:58
    • 36. Class Tools #2 90 BPM

      10:25
    • 37. Class Tools #3 60 BPM

      10:33
    • 38. Class Tools #3 80 BPM

      10:19

About This Class

Beginner Guitar Chords Class- How to Play Guitar Chords

Learn how to play Beginner Guitar Chords- Guitar Chords Class- Get a jump start on playing by learning your Guitar Chords

Learn the basic concepts and building blocks that you will need to get started playing the guitar.

Why take a guitar chord class from this guy?

I know how to teach! I have taught well over 50,000 students all across the US. 

After, performing and teaching all over the US. at workshops, out of my home and through multiple schools, I was asked by many of my students to make videos of my lessons.  So, here is the result.

I hope you will join me on the inside of this class where you will learn the basics of guitar.

Building a strong foundation easier with short cut guitar chords:

·         Learn everything from making chords sound good when you play them to strumming patterns to use your new chords with to help you get to playing right away. 

·         Learn your basic chords - I will teach you a shortcut way to play
this class to make it easier to learn guitar faster.

·         You will learn variations of different chords

·         You will be able to get started on a boom chuck strum

·         Plus you will learn slides, bends, hammer-ons and pull-offs

Who is the target audience for this class 

·         Anyone interested in learning the guitar and learning guitar chords

·         Anyone who wants to play guitar for enjoyment

·         Anyone who wants to be a performer or a musician

·         Great for any age

Explained In Depth

·         All of these videos break down each element in a comprehensive manner. In all of my years as an instructor, I've found the most common failure points for most students, and I make sure to get you all the information you need to succeed at playing the guitar. 

Questions
Feel free to send me any questions you might have on this class. I want to make your learning experience the best that it can be.

Thanks
Thanks for taking the time to look at this class. I look forward to seeing you on the inside and teaching you the beginner steps on how to become a better guitar player.
Chuck M.

Beginner Guitar Chord Class Learn How to Play Guitar Chords

Learn how to play Beginner Guitar - Guitar Chord Class - Get a jump start on playing by learning your Guitar Chords

Transcripts

1. Promotional: My name's Chuck Millar and I've created this course specifically for the person who is just beginning to play the guitar have created a simple method toe. Learn a host, of course, easily that sound good with almost every song I'll walk you through how to make your chords and strumming sound great. We'll start at the beginning, learning simple chords, and by the end you'll be able to play along with musicians in real time with strumming patterns we learn. If you're ready to learn some chords and strumming patterns, then let's get started. 2. 2 - How to Get a Good Sounding Chord on your Guitar: the first step to having a good sound. Ekstrom is to hold our pick correctly, and we're going to hold our hand in a loose fist. So this is a closed fist, knows there's no light on the other side of the fist, but I'm gonna open it up so that you can see some light going through that fist. So it's relaxed, said. It's open just a little bit like your curling your fingers around, and then your thumb just comes by and touches the index finger. The next step is you're going to get this thumb down just a little bit, so it was kind of touching the side of your finger like you're pinching something, and now it's coming down just a little bit at an angle, and now your index finger is also going to come down just a little bit to match it. And now when we have that instead of coming up, it's the index finger jettison down a little bit more than the rest of the fingers and then the thumb simply just comes down to magic. Once I have my hand in the proper position and from this side it looks like this from this side. It looks like this. Once you have your hand in the proper position and you have that loose fist with the fingers coming down and the index finger coming down, the pick is going to be placed in the fingers pointing towards the ground. And when it's pointed towards the ground, it's in the right position. So when we curl our fingers around, it's going to be pointed directly towards our guitar. So take some time, practice holding your pick the right way. Make sure that when your pick finally gets to your guitar in your palm faces towards your strings, it's not pointed up in the air. It's not pointed down to the ground. It's not twisted or tilted it anyway, but it's simply getting that pick very straight onto the strings but holding it with your fingers. So that's our first step. Once we get through that first deputy, feel comfortable with it. We'll see you in the next lesson. 3. 3 - How to get rid of Pick Recoil for Chording: Now that we know how to holder pick correctly, we're gonna do some basic things to be able to make some changes to that pick. So first things first, though, we're making sure that our pick is faced directly towards strings directly towards the strings. And after we get that done, we're going to make sure that our pick is not tilted down. So it's not down. And it's also not up these air some very common mistakes that people use when they start to strum. And they get into these habits because they have some immediate success with some of bad habits. Again, one of those bad habits is taking that pick and let it letting it tilt downwards so the pick slides easily through the strings. However, this gets to be a problem when we started doing up and the pitch gets caught underneath the strings, so there's ways to remedy that. Also, we're going to caution ourselves so that we don't have our pick do the lean down thing and lean up thing, and this is very common with beginners to we're also we're going to want to make sure that our wrist does not have any turning motion. Except we're going tohave our hand flat so that the palm is faced as the same angle of the strings and you grab your pick and the palms still face towards the strings. So there's really, really no movement of the pick. There's no movement of the risk. There's no movement of the arm from the elbow, is just simply holding onto the string. Any motion from the wrist is going to come on Lee, by the chance that our rece is loose and our whole motion from the elbow as I strum is going to move up and down on Lee because it has forced from the elbow to do so and then down from the elbow to do so. It's is loose, as if you're shaking out a rag, just loosen, just allowed to move. One of the things that we're also going to think about one we're playing our strumming is that we're not going to make what we call an a frame with our wrist, so that looks like this are wrist is gonna be nice and straight instead of that a frame and it's very common for beginners to make this mistake so flatten out that risk, trying to get your arm from the elbow all the way through your wrist and your fingers to be a nice straight line. Some other things to think about is when we're holding our pick. We can either have a lot of pick showing or a little bit of pic showing. Now there's some advantages to both. There's also holding your pick in the middle so that your index finger relates toe where the tip of the pick is, and other effects where you're holding the side of the pick were. Now you have two points that index point and then the pick up point. So now they're one point ones right over the other, and then the other one is moved over to the side so you can tell that the pick is a little bit lower than what my index finger is. And I'll describe what these different sounds sound like. I'm gonna just use this d chord, and the pick that I'm going to use first is ah, pick where I have a whole lot of pic showing some things that we're going to hear and I want you to listen for is the noise of the pick through strings. If I want to have my guitar sound like it has a lot of presence and I want to hear those ticks, I will hold my pick in that manner if I want to remove that tiki sound from my guitar. And I don't wanna have that present sounding guitar and I want to remove any pick noise. What's gonna happen is we're gonna take that pick and we're going to barely have any PIC showing. And there it is. So you can kind of see there's Onley, just a smidgen of pic showing now what happens when you play that it's going to sound very fluid. But in order for your pick not to pop off the string with a term we call pick request recoil from the strings that that bouncing motion that spring motion is called pick recoil . So in order for us not to have that pic recoil sound, we have to be able to make our fingers very flexible. Were barely holding on to the pick at this point, and you're going to feel like you're almost going to drop it at any time now. Uh, it takes a lot of practice to be able to hold your pick and not let it move or rotate in your fingers when that happens. But what you're going to do is you're gonna take your middle finger and touch just this side of the pick. So I had my fingers. I'm barely showing any pick. And then that edge of the pick right there touches this finger and that will help it to not rotate in your fingers. And this is what it sounds like versus having out thicken. The other version of holding your pick is having your pick out to the side where I have the point of my finger coming down. And then I have the pick the point of the pit coming down. And this allows this pick to flex. I'm going to get a fair amount of pick noise again, but it's a great way for some of us. Tobe able toe, get the pick through the strings when were first starting out in the cells like this? Ah, any one of these pick holds is gonna be okay. The main thing that we have to take away with each one of these picks is that when we move through the string, our fingers have to be soft enough. So they're not squeezing down on the pick so that the pick is allowed to move in the fingers, right? It's not so tight that it doesn't move back and forth, so my finger here is pretending that it's hitting a string, and now the pick is allowed to flex, and when it comes up and hits the string again, it's allowed to flex again. That only happens if you're your fingers are not squeezing that string. So practice holding your pick in these different picked formations and simply tried to strum a couple times using open strings on and when you're ready and you feel comfortable holding that pick, see you in the next lesson. 4. 4 - How to find the proper Pick Depth for Playing Chords: in this lesson, we're gonna discover how pick depth relates toe having a good sounding strum. Now, pick depth means how far your pick gets inside the strings. If we have zero picked up and we choose a miscellaneous cord, what's gonna happen is that I'm going to strum up and down and you won't hear any thing ring out because the pick isn't touching the strings. I have zero pick depth, what we want to be able to do, and you can choose any corn that you want. Teoh, um, we're going to be discussing some chords later in this course. But for right now, we're gonna be using a G chord and let me teach it. Teach Chris quick, just in case you don't know it. Our pinky is going to be on the third fret of the first string, and it comes up and touches the front, not on top of the front, not in front of the front, but behind the front and touches it. So the third fret of the first train, it's a pinky. And then my ring finger goes on the third front of the second string and now I can't touch that fret because my pinkies, in a way, but it comes up and touches the pinky. My middle finger comes up all the way and touches the sixths string just for a proper form . We're making sure that our our finger right here touches the guitar. And when we curl our fingers around, we're going to make sure that a wrist doesn't come down. Our wrist is gonna be nice and straight here. That's gonna be nice and straight. So no moving of the wrist whatsoever and were playing that G chord and is the pinky the ring. And now this middle finger comes up to the third fret of the sixth string's. Everything really isn't 1/3 fret. What were really thinking about is trying to mute the fifth string, but we're pressing down with all the rest of our fingers on. We're getting a good sound out of each of the tones. If you have to take some time and figure out how to play this chord. Um, getting used to pressing with all over the fingers cause sometimes and we're beginning, we think about pressing down maybe that middle finger and then these guys come up or and then you get some dead tones down here. Sometimes you take you these guys like while I'm getting a dead tone, some pressing down over here. And then that middle finger comes up. And now that's dead. So making sure that you pressing down with all of the fingers all at once and then we'll get a good sounding chord. So when we're discussing this idea of no pit depth, we're not really having any strumming pattern per se. We're just doing strums strong straight up, all the way through the strings down. Eventually, if you finally get your hand close enough to the strings and a little closer and a little closer and a little closer, you're eventually going toe hit thes strings. But just a little bit as soon as you hit those strings just a little bit stopped coming into your guitar. E a t. This point, your pick is just riding across the top of the strings. If we would have continued to get our pick a little farther closer to the strings and little farther close for the strings are pick would have developed pick depth problems where we had that term that we use before called pick recoil. So it's moving in, moving in, and I'm finally touching the strings. I'm gonna press a little harder a little further, and you can tell what happens is the pick kind of pops off the strings way, and we want to avoid that. If that ever happens and you find yourself really hearing those harsh tones out of your guitar, simply get the pick away from the strings and slowly get it in till you're just barely riding right across the tops of Mystery on. That's where we want to be. So again, this lesson we covered proper pick depth practice that G chord is in new court for us, and we're just strumming straight up and down. No big deal. We're just trying to get the proper pit depth for our new strums that were about to learn a little bit later. If you're going to apply Accord to, it is just gonna be that geek or that we learned and it's straight strums all the way down some things to think about when we're doing the down, up, down, up strum. We're making sure that our pick goes pretty far away from the strings a couple inches or so on either side. Notice how it clears the string a couple inches and I'm going to try to use an arc. So I'm not just going straight through the strings on the edges. My on the edges of my pick. It's gonna come out like this, so it's gonna come up, and as I do a downstream, it's gonna go out in a way out in a way out in a way. And this is what it looks like out in a way, I'm over exaggerating. Out in a way out in the lane we're trying to avoid is the natural reaction to let our pick drop and hit the car. That's pretty pretty natural for us to want be able to do so to correct it right away. We start having a arc pattern, but for us we're just going toe about two inches away from the strings. We're gonna try to hit every single string on the way. All right, spend some time working with your proper pick depth, and we'll see you in the next lesson. 5. 5 - Playing Chords with Ease - Using your pick at just the right angle: in this lesson, we're gonna learn how to greatly reduce pick recoil by using a new trick. This little trick is a way for us to be able to kind of get past some of those beginner, clunky stuff right away by taking the pic like we're gonna take this pick and it was flat. Remember that our palm is flat. Our pick is in her fingers were trying to hold it with one of those three different ways and then this pick now and I'm gonna move it up here so you can see. But yours is gonna be down here. You're either going to move it 100% straight up and down by moving your hand and your thumb counterclockwise. So it's flat right now. It's not tilted, it's not Tilted was flat. The point is pointed towards your guitars. That's not tilted. So now we're going to move it like you're using a screw in a screwdriver and it's just twisting. So we're twisting that straight up or if it's more comfortable for you to do so, which most people are pointing it straight down. So either straight up or straight down, there are some of us in the world that have a really flexible thumb. And for those people, it might be easier to get your pick straight up. For most people in the world getting your picks straight down, and it will be uncomfortable for your rest. Just know that it's not going to stay that way for a lot. And if you're a down person, that's no, no big deal. But just know that, um, I'm a person because of that thumb, and that's how you're going to see it. So when we're thinking about getting our picks straight up and down, whether it's down or up, we're going to just take that G chord that we learned. And we're going to strum straight down with that up pick way here, a couple things with that. First of all, we don't hear any real big strum like me normally, what with the way and since we're not really getting a good sound, we are getting something that is good, and that's something that is good. Is that pickets sliding through the strings without any pick recoil? It just simply just loathe. It is almost impossible at that point to have any clunky notes because it just floats so easy to the strings. Now, how does this help us? Right, So what we're going to do is whether you're going from a down and slowly bring it back up. So to see the angle of the picks, if it's down and slowly bring it back up to flat or if it's from the top and slowly bring it down for me, I guess I'm gonna be up. So whichever way you do, it's gonna be fine. So I'm gonna go straight up and down, and then I'm gonna this just move it to the strings and eventually I'm slowly, slowly, slowly the slowest I possibly can turn that. And this is what it's gonna sound like if we do this exercise. So listen first, slowly getting the pick to turn and noticed you can actually start to hear a little bit of a strong When you go back to flat. Let's see how it went away that strum so and I want to go a little bit further. And now we're hearing that strum really well. And at this point, my pick is about a 45 degree angle from this way to the through the strings. I'm gonna go from the top and go even further to see what that sounds like. Here's that 45 degree angle. I'm gonna go a little further closer to flatten. Does he have a big, fat tones with flat pick for some of us? We're gonna have a little bit of trouble having our pick flat and it not having that pick recoil. If you're one of those people and you're having your kind of pop off those strings, you can always take your pick and moving at about a 45 degree angle, either down or up, depending on what's comfortable to you. And you're gonna be ableto have that smooth sounding pick. So at that 45 degree angle, you can use that G chord and strum Get that nice, clean, silky smooth tone and it flows through the strings and you still get a good tone. If I was to put mawr pressure on the string, you'll hear the difference in what happens. So I'm just gonna put a little bit more pressure on my pick and have a little bit more pick depth. So I'm gonna have my pick nice and straight up and down and you still kind of hear a little bit of a strong, but you kind of hear slide to the strings, and I'm slowly going to get it through the strings on here is that 45 degree angle on, and I'm gonna move it flat on. That's when we run into that pick Rico or problem. So to solve that, for most folks, especially the beginners out there, we're gonna take that pick if you need it, and we're gonna move at that 45 degree angle or down at that 45 degree angle, practice with that technique. Start all the way up, go to flat or start from a down and then go all the way to flat Next. Start all the way up and go to a 45 and see what that sounds like or go from flattened and go to a 45. Try that along with your G chord or whatever cord that you know how to do. We'll see you in the next lesson. 6. 6 - G Chord: in this lesson, we're gonna be learning some basic chord shapes in orderto move along into strumming patterns. We will have to be able to know some certain chords, and there's going to be some of us who don't know our cords quite yet, and that's the reason why they're here. Also, for those of us who know different versions of these cords, these versions of the cords that I'm gonna teach you may be new, seem. Might wanna learn some new chords. Course Review some course. If you're really adept at seeing somebody's fingers for the first time in mimicking where their fingers are and being able to play chords right along with somebody for the first time or very quickly, you may want to skip this section, but it's always a good review. There's always on the bottom left hand part of your screen. You can always speed up these sections for quick review or to learn something very quickly if you already have a lot of cord theory chords that you know how to do. All right, let's get started. We're first going to start with that G chord in this course. We're gonna use a lot of this particular chord and the court we're gonna uses a g chord where I have my pinky On the third fret of the first stream My ring finger on the third fret of the second string And it comes up and touches the pinky My pinkies all the way up to the front Not on top of the front and not in front of the front but behind the front and touching my third finger Touches my pinky and my middle finger comes up and tries to If you can touch the sixths string third fret And if you're having a too hard of a time reaching and it comes about here no big deal just maybe a little buzzy over time try to reach up and touch that front We're gonna strum from the sixths. String down basic chord shape G note that the fifth string is muted and should be new Did so that means we shouldn't curl around this finger so much that that a string rings out. We wanted to be more flattened so that the a string the fifth string is muted. All right, practice your G chord and we'll see you next lesson 7. 7 - C Chord: our next chord that we're gonna learn is a c chord. And really that seek or that we're gonna learn is a variation of the geek or that we've just learned The G chord that we've just learned is the pinky on the third front, their finger on the third fret second finger on the third prep of the six 2nd 1st way Learn this in the last lesson, Theo Onley difference between my geek or this is a G tone is I'm gonna take this middle finger and move it. One set of strings down to now reside on my see tone, the fifth string third fret. So it was here for a G chord, and now it's going to be down here for a C chord. Keep in mind this is only one version of a Sikh or there's many but this is the Sikh or that were learned right now, and we're going to strum from the fifth string down. Alright, that makes it easy. When I played the C chord to be able to go back and forth from G. Jean, then to see Gene and to see now keep in mind, just like my G chord where my fifth string was muted. Now my fourth string is now muted, so there's R C court. All right, practice your C court and we'll see you in the next lesson. 8. 8 - D Chord: in this lesson, we're gonna be learning some variations of the D chord. All right, we're going to start learning a simple version of our dick Ord or I play my third finger on the third front of the second string. So if we don't know our fingers quite yet, it's 1234 Just like kid math and thumb doesn't get it number. So when I play my third finger on the third fret of my second string, I'm also gonna play my index finger on my second fret of my third string. Notice that my fingers don't have any spaces in between the fronts I'm gonna. And if they do, I'm going to sink them up and touch the Fres. Never on top of the fronts number in front of the fronts but behind and still touching. What I'm gonna do is I want to take the fourth string and I'm going to strum it all the way down. Uh, I'm gonna concede that some of us may not know our string name, So this is the first string second string, third string, fourth string, fifth room and six stream. I'll be referring them to the first strings. Second string, third string, fourth string, fifth string and six string. Throughout this course, there's going to be times when I name Strings, but it's not gonna be quite as important as knowing the simple version. 123456 where the six has the biggest drink and the first has the little a string. So I have my second string third finger, third string first finger and I'm strumming from the fourth string Down Things is a d sess two chord because I had e tone it, and it's a little simpler than playing Ah, full dick ord and we're gonna learn the full D chord and we still have these two fingers down. Except I'm going to use my middle finger in Play it on the second front of the first string , and I still have my other fingers in motion and I play it from the fourth string down on. That's a full D chord. Sometimes we just want to have the G sound come out but mawr over. We want to be able to play a quick D, and it helps us for those folks who are having trouble playing their cords fast And also this is a typical country or bluegrass sounding discord. And it looks like this. I still have the two notes that I had my index finger in the second front of the third string, my third finger in the third front of the second string, and now my pinky now resides on this third front of the first string. And it sounds very similar to the D that we played before with two fingers except Nam, including my thinking on the reason why this is more important is that when I use my G chord on, then my C chord, the Onley moving one finger to be able to play a D chord Now. Then I could move freely Onley changing chords with one finger at a time. Remember, the G chord starts at the six string fifth string for the C fourth string for the D Chord. So in recap, we have our regular old simple dick ord DSS to record full D. It looks like a triangle on Do we have a d suss six chord all rights from your D chord with just simple down strums or down up strums. And once you feel comfortable flying your different versions of your D chord, we'll see you in the next lesson. 9. 9 - Country G Chord: in previous lessons. We've learned this G cordoned. It doesn't have a three tone in it, so it makes it really nice to be able to sing with because you're not competing for that three tone. What we're gonna learn right now is what's called a country Gee, corn, because it's very typical in country music to play the first finger that we're gonna play is a pinky, but it's going to go on the third front of the first string. The next finger that we're going to use is a second finger, but it's going to go on the fifth string. Second friend. So Pinky, second friend, first string, fifth string. Then our third finger is going to reach up to the six string Third fret. So I have pinky third friend, first string, middle finger, second fret of the fifth string and and then I have my G tone, which is that third fret of the sixth string, and I'm simply going to strip all my strings. All right, now that we know our country G chord, I spent some time practicing with it. Get comfortable with it, and when you're ready, we'll see you in the next lesson. 10. 10 - Country C Chord: in this lesson, we're going to be learning something called a country. See Corn and it's are typically our first C chord that we actually learn. My first note that I wouldn't play is a C tone. That's the first finger on the first fret of the second string. Then my middle finger or second finger is going to go in the second front of the fourth string, and then my third finger is going to go up to this third fret of the fifth string. Now it's one of these chords that I have to curl this finger up and over that first ring or else the E string is gonna mute out, so have to curl it over so it rings out. So again, this is my first finger. On the first fret of the second string, my second finger goes on the second fret of the fourth string. My third finger goes on the third fret of the fifth string, and I strum from the fifth string down. Here's some reasons why we might play this scene versus this. See, they sound a little different, and here's some common use cases for them. If I'm playing out of the key of G and I'm using see as my four chord or the fourth scale degree or just a chord and the key of G if we don't understand what that means, and it is very likely I'm gonna end up using this cord are seek war that we've previously learned. But if I'm in the key of C, it's very difficult to get a good sound out of this seek or that we've learned previously. So in the case of like a country song and you have to forgive my voice because his way too high, it will sound little squeaky. But if I sing Old Country song, um, and it's gonna be like, this way if I use the C court and I try to sing the same song whole Hey looking, it doesn't really sound the same or give it the same flavor as the C chord that we're learning now. So again, my first finger is in this first front of the second string. The second finger is in the second fret of the fourth string, and my third finger is in the third fret of the fifth string, and we strum from the fifth string down. All right, spend some time practicing with your new country C chord and we'll see you in the next lesson. 11. 11 - Em Chord: in this lesson, we're gonna be learning the e minor chord. We're gonna be starting with our index finger on the second fret of the fifth string and the middle finger on the second fret of the fourth string where the middle finger is touching the front and our index finger is touching the middle finger and we're gonna strum all the way down from the six string to the bottom. Ah, variation of how to play this e minor is to use one finger or the second finger using both frets. So you have to be able to get the finger in the middle of the front to be able to achieve this and have it all the way up to the front. So you're getting both of these tones just like you were with two fingers, but with one finger or sometimes I'll do it with the second finger as well. Some other variations that will do is if we're playing out of G on. Remember we took this G court in. We only moved one finger at a time to move to the C chord, one finger at a time to move to the D chord in this case, I'm gonna take my index finger and use that e minor using both of these notes. The second fret of the fifth string, the second fret of the fourth string and still keeping these other two fingers down the ring finger and the pinky just is if I was playing G. Except I'm using this finger now and playing the diviner becomes on E minor to cord. Here's an example of using that e minor as e minor suss to way. All right, practice your e minor chord and when you're ready, we'll see you in the next lesson. 12. 12 - A Chord: we just got done learning the e minor chord. Now we're gonna play a very similar chord. But a major called the a major chord just like the e minor chord that used two fingers We're gonna take dese two fingers that are close together and I'm going to move them one set of strings down where I had the e minor. I'm going to move my a one set of strings down So I have my index finger on the second fret of the fourth string in my middle finger on the second fret of the third string where my middle finger reaches up and touches the front and my index finger touches my middle finger . And if I played on Lee, these notes from the five string down it's an A major suss to cord. A CSTO we're gonna do is we're gonna use one more note and we're gonna take this finger and pull it back so that we give enough space to add our third finger and we're gonna have a completely a major chord where we're gonna have our first finger now is gonna be in control of the ah, second fret of the fourth string middle finger is now in control of the second front of the third string, and now my ring finger is going to be in control of the second front of the second string, and I'm still going to strum from the fifth string down. Now when you're learning this, A. If this feels uncomfortable to you and you want to use different fingers and different positions is long is you get on a using the second front. Second front. Second fret. If you find something that's more comfortable for you and your fingers go forward and there's there's no set rule on what fingers to be able to use for an accord as long as you use the second front, second front or second fret of the fourth string third string on second Street. What I like to do as a shortcut for my accord is take my middle finger and place it on the second fret of the second string and now my index finger is in charge of covering both strings, the fourth string and the third string and we barred it. We get got the finger just a little bit flat and replace it right in the middle of the two strings so that we can end up using two fingers much like we did the e minor chord. We're just going to use that same feature for the A major chord. As always, we're going to strum from the fifth string down for an accord because this is an a note. Uh, all right, now that we know are a major chord, take a moment to practice that when you ready, we'll see you in the next lesson. 13. 13 - E Chord: in this lesson, we're going to be going back to a e core. Except that won't be e minor. It'll be e major. We're going to start out using our second finger on the second fret of the fifth string, followed by our ring finger will go on the second fret of the fourth string. Then our index finger is gonna go on the first fret of the third string. So one second finger goes on the second fret of the fifth string. Third finger goes on the second fret of the fourth string, and I strum from the sixth string down. 14. 14 - Am Chord: we just got done learning r e major chord on We're gonna use this familiar shape and learn on a minor court Now that we know are e major chord we're gonna do is we're gonna take these notes that we have the same shape exactly as it is and move it One set of strings down. So where it was one set of strings up for E major chord. I'm gonna move all of the fingers one set of strings down And then I'm going to strum from this fifth string down and he's gonna become an a minor chord. Let's talk this out. I have my index finger on this first fret of the second string My middle finger on the second fret of the fourth string and my third finger on the second fret of the third string , strumming from the fifth string down strumming from the fifth string because this is my a string open. All right, spend some time getting to know your aim. Minor chord. And when you're ready, we'll see you in the next lesson 15. 15 - Bm Chord: in this lesson, we're gonna fuse a familiar shape of a minor that we just learned, and we're gonna move on and play a simple version of a B minor. We just got done learning an a minor chord and we're gonna take this shape as it is and move it. One, two frets up. I'm gonna use this and play from my fifth string down here was the A minor on Here's the B minor. Uh, here's an example. So even though we're not playing a full B minor quite yet, it still sounds neat because we have the a tone in it. So that means it's a B minor. It's with us to suspension in it or the to suspension inversion. We don't need to know what that means yet just that is a two suspension. So be minor says to one way we can do this if we're going toe. Think about playing a full B minor chord is we're going to take these same notes, which is the first finger on the third front of the second string, the second finger on the fourth fret of the fourth string and then the third finger on the fourth front of the third string on and I'm just going to switch these fingers, so I'm gonna replace my index finger with my second finger. And now I have these two fingers available above it My ring finger and my pinky. So now we're my second finger is on the third fret of my second string. My ring finger is now going to be on the fourth fret of the fourth string, and my pinky is gonna take its place where now it goes to the fourth front of the third string. I play the same notes. I'm gonna make this into a partial bar chord. And now my index finger is freed up to play and notice how my finger flexes backwards. It's actually going to go like this and come back. This is how I get that extra space to be able to get that be minor chord. I have these fingers here just like we won't mention. And now this index finger comes back and now is available toe, take my finger and press it up. It's kind of a weird angle, but I press it up to the fifth string. Second fret and strong from the fifth string down. If it was any other court and I moved it up, I wouldn't be strumming the open string on the E. I would simply take this part of my finger, the meaty part of the back side of my index finger, and set it down on the strings to mute the first string. It would sound like this. Who knows how it doesn't ring out. Go sound awful. So we're just muting it on now. We have a partial see court now, and that's moveable anywhere. So C, chord C sharp and so on. But what's important now is to actually go back to this closed, partial, closed to be minor and play that with open or using it without the finger. We can do that, too, or as the same fingers as the aim under and moving it up to friends. Now that we know are B minor court, do some practice with it, get used to it, and we'll see you in the next lesson. 16. 16 - F Chord: in this lesson, we're gonna be learning on F chord for rs cord. We're gonna be learning this a couple of different ways in the entry version of this court is a three finger cord. So I'm gonna use my index finger on the first fret of the second string. My second finger on the second fret of the third string and my third finger on the third fret of the fourth stream on. And I'm gonna strum from the fourth string down and adds an e tone to the F, which makes it a suspended chord. We can take our middle finger off, and now we have another suspension where our index finger is on the first fret of the second string and our third finger is on the third fret of the fourth string. And I have this cord. The next version of this court is a little bit more difficult where I have to be able to try to get this part of my hand and this knuckle to arch back so the finger is not forward anymore. But arches back noticed the angle there and the finger. And now how my push or put my pressure on my strings is now taking the pad of my finger, curling the finger back and now putting pressure against this part of my hand, you can put a fair amount of pressure, even if I just want to grab my pick. I can put enough pressure there where it squeezes it pretty good. Now the same thing happens here. You're gonna take the back part of this part of your hand, touch it on the bottom part of your neck so you can't see the back part of my neck. But I'm squeezing about right here but on the back side of the neck so it touches and then my finger gets curled around and in that same shape as I did before squeezing with my index finger squeezing on the second string and the first ring both on the first rep and you, we should have these two notes. It is very common. I have a hard time getting this done. But if we make sure that we have the right form, it makes it much easier. And if we get our fingers to be able to go all the way up to this front and makes it even easier. Yet once I have these two notes, I'm gonna have my second finger on the second fret of the third string and my third finger on the third fret of the fourth string on list from From the fourth String Down, another version of my F chord that I have comes very similar as the B chord, the full B chord that we had B minor chord. So it's a common shape that we have for almost all power cords. Except instead of taking the shape here, we're going to move it. One set of frats down. So it was at a B B minor, and then I move it one set of fronts down in one set of strings upwards. So now my index fingers on the first fret of my sixths string. My ring finger is going to be on the third fret of the fifth string where my pinky is on the third front of the fourth string, and now my middle finger is going to be on the second front of the third string. My middle finger is also going to mute the second string, and the media part of this finger is gonna touch this string the first round and mute dad as well. Way call this a partial barred F chord. It was fully barred all of these strings would ring out. But because we're thinking more on the beginner line of this f chord, we're gonna have a partial board f All right, take some time to get comfortable with your F cords and we'll see you in the next lesson when you're ready. 17. 17 - D7 Chord: in this lesson, we're gonna be learning the D seven chord and shapes go. The D seven chord is an inversion of triangle of our full record. So I'm going to use my index finger. I'm gonna put it on the first fret of the second string. My middle finger goes on the second fret of the third string and my third finger goes on the second fret of the first string and I strum from the fourth string down. Now that we know are d seven chord get used to it and I will see you in the next lesson. 18. 18 - B7 Chord: in this lesson, we're gonna be learning the B seven chord. We just got done learning the D seven chord. All we're going to do is take those fingers and move them up one set of strings and now move them up. One more set of strings. So two sets of strings. Traditionally, we find the B seven in books, including this pinky. My first finger is going to be on the first fret of the fourth string. My middle finger is going to be on the second fret of the fifth string. My ring finger is going to be on the second front of the third string on now My pinky is gonna go all the way down to the first string and that's also gonna be on the second Fret. I'm gonna strum from the fifth string down for a short form B seven chord. I'm going to remove the pinky and Onley Play these four notes This'll Last note is muted by this string On the bottom part of that meaty parts will end up and touch that string Some plain five, The fifth string, The fourth string. The third string on a muted second string. I can also mute the eastern this bottom string with the back part of this finger touching here. I mean, do some practice with your B seven chord, get used to it, and we'll see you in the next lesson. 19. 19 - Example - Boom Chuck Strum: in this lesson, we're gonna get started off with strumming with the boom Chuck Strom with this example of a boom chuck strum the boom just means the bass note up a court. In this case, we're using a G chord, and the chuck simply means the three or four bottom string list. So if I use a boom, that's a bass note than a Chuck. Is that stream of the bottom strings? No, what? I use a bass note. It's going toe bounce a little bit like bouncing up and down on a trampling. That same motion, you're gonna go through the strings, jump off the strings. Now that movement is quite a bit just exaggerated for your view. But we're gonna make a smaller Rubin and then as the pick is away from the strings, then I'm going to come down on swoop through the strings two chords that I'm going to use in this example R a g chord and a c chord where my boom or my based out is on my five string thing, Chuck is still the same Boom, chuck bottom three or four strings. So when I count my boom Chuck Strom is gonna be one followed by two being the Chuck 34 and I'm done with my measure. It's gonna happen again. Chuck. Chuck, if I count two measures, it's gonna look like this. 12342234 At the end of those two measures, I'm gonna go to a C chord or this finger comes down One string And now I'm booming Or the bass note being the third front of the fifth string Someone had a boom 1234 to three on. That's two measures of a C So if I go back and forth between my G for two measures and my C for two measures it looks like this g on I switched to see on my way up through the strings My finger comes down So my hand comes up for my strumming in in my middle finger comes down at the same time Watch All right So they do a slow motion So this is 1234 the I get ready for the sea And then the boom happens 1234 On the way up the finger comes up back to the G chord and No. 1234 to 34 They switched together, 1 to 2 on on. Then they both come up together for the G chord. All right, here's your example. Along with the backing track that will be using. And this is at 120 beats per minute. So this is an example. So just listen, we're gonna count. 12342234 Change chords. Go ahead and practice your boom Chuck. Strum along with your G and your seat cord to measures of peace. And when you're ready to practice it together, we'll see you in the next lesson. 20. 20 - Practice Session - Boom Chuck: welcome to the boom chuck practice session. We're gonna be playing along with a backing track, and it's going to be used at 80 beats per minute. There's going to be two beats that are clicks big long ones. Click, click, and those beats air just to get us aware to get us ready to play. So we're getting our fingers in position and so on. Now, after that, there's gonna be four faster click. So there's the too long clicks. Click, click and in the fast clicks click, click, click, Click and that's our count in a beat of four. So accounts one whole measure for us, for it us to be able to do nothing and just get ready for that one against a 1234 bone. And then we use our boom or a bass note on RG. We're using two measures of G and two measures of C. One thing to keep note of is that if we were doing it on a D chord, our moon note or a bass note would be the fourth string or for an F court, same thing before string. If I'm using, uh, let's say a C chord for us this sick or my boom is gonna be on my five or 1/4 Or let's say I'm gonna do a B minor chord That's still the same thing. That five. So any chord that its root tone is on the five string I have boomed the five. If I'm using a G chord, my boom is on my six or my F chord. Anything that has an e route like my e chord myself is gonna be boomed on the six. Just something to keep note of. All right, let's get to it. And we're gonna be playing this at 80 beats per minute. Here's the four faster clicks Shot 34 now switched to see 23 four back to G 234 Now to see in the sea one Teoh 34 back. 1232234 Switch way ! Last time we're gonna end on Jean. All right. This particular backing track was at 80 beats per minute, But at the bottom of this course in the course tools, you'll find a various amount of backing tracks that are both slower than this. 80 beats per minute and faster than the 80 beats per minute. So if you will feel like you need to be challenged and you want to go faster with your boom chucks, go ahead and go down to the bottom of this course and simply play along with a faster track . You'll be able to match up the backing tracks with this practice session with the course tools because they'll be labeled as the section and be labeled for the lesson that they're used for. All right in the next video is simply going to be and backing track by itself at 80 beats, but per minute so you don't have to see me play, and it gives you an opportunity to play without a visual stimulant. So you're going to have to hear where the boom is and the chuck is. So do some practice with that, and when you're ready, we'll see you in the next lesson. 21. 21 - Class Tools #1 - 80 BPM: 80 beats per minute. 22. 22 Example Boom Chuck 4321 Strum: in this lesson. We're gonna be learning the boom, Chuck. 4321 strong. We're gonna play the boon shot on. And now we're only going to focus on playing the fourth string, then the third straight and on the second string in the first. And it's very important that my pick goes down. Then up then down, up, down, on down. Now let's take the boom. Chuck away for just a second. And we're simply going to practice the 4321 part for one. All right, practice that at your own speed taking Get it up to that speed that I just played it at. Then we're going to take the boom shock. And added, along toe are 4321 and it looks like this for 34321 shot for 3 to 4321 shot four through. Uh, it changes slightly. We moved this C chord. Since our fourth string is muted, we're going to change our fourth string to playing a down on our fifth strings and out sounds. 53 Teoh Bull, Chuck 532153 to 53 five And And if we were going to play a D, which we aren't in this particular version or practice session. It would simply be D String, the fourth string shot, 432 or any other corps that has its root on the fourth string. All right, practice your boom Chuck 4321 strum and we'll see in the practice session. 23. 23 Practice Session Boom Chuck 4321 1 ss 1 small: in this practice session will be using a little bit of ah, pop type of a feel with an 80 beat per minute backing track. We're gonna take two measures of G and two measures of see, just like we've having the previous sessions to make learning these strumming patterns. Easiest possible. You're you're 435315 53 thistles there last time. Great work. Go ahead to the next lesson where we're only playing that backing track. 80 beats per minute. As always, it is a little too fast for you. Go down to the course tools, find a slower one. If you want to challenge, just find one that's a little faster and do a lot of practicing. Were you ready for the next strumming pattern will see in the next lesson. 24. 24 Class Tools #2 - 80 BPM: 80 beats per minute. 25. 25 - Exercise - Sweep Strumming Pattern: in this lesson, we're gonna be learning a sweep. Strom, this is much different than a melodic sweep. But this is going to be a chord based sweep. And for our g chord, it looks like this. All right, we have this G court and we're going to use a down on six string down on the fourth string down on the third string. And after I get that done, sounds like this. Once I have that, the next step is it's going to be an up on two bottom strings or three bottom straits. Once I have that, the next step is gonna have three ups in a row. 123 I could if I was on Lee intending to use that much of my strum. I could move on to the next court if I wanted Teoh. However, we're going to use to full measures of G. So we're gonna hang out on that court for a while. So we're gonna end up doing the strumming pattern that sweet followed by, um after I do, the three ups unloaded you 71234567 Up, down, up, down, up, down. I'm gonna put it together and I'm gonna count after my sweep. Here's a sweep. 123456714567 Here it is. A little quicker. Up, Down, up, Down, up, Down, up, Down, up, down, up, down, up! 1234567 Put it together a little slower. Now we're gonna play our C chord. But the strings that we use for our C court are are fifth string, the third string, the second string. And then I followed up with those ups. So real slow is about those seven tones. Again, The up, down, up, down, up, down, up, down, up, down, up, down A Ah! A little slower now for my d chord That's gonna be 43 to a what downs again, followed by my up up followed by those seven up downs The other court that we're using this exercise the e minor and it looks like just like G where we used 643 in the song that we're going to use or the back on track we're going to use to measures of G second measure on two measures have seen. Now we're going to do? Ah, half measure of e minor, 1/2 measure of C, 1/2 measure of D and 1/2 measure of G, and those moved by pretty quick. So it's just that sweep followed by the scene, The thing D Way. Then I'm going toe end my backing track with D One measure on. Then I'm going to play d seven and we've learned this in a previous lessons. A D seven on on the Whole Thing repeats two measures of G two measures of C two beats of e minor, two beats of C two beats of D two beats of G, then ah, whole measure. That's four beats of D and then four beats of that d seven chord practice a lot. Get comfortable with your new sweep strum and we'll see you in the practice session. 26. 26 - Practice Session - Sweep Strumming Pattern: in this practice session. We're using our sweeps on, and there's gonna be two measures of G two measures of C two beats of e minor, two beats of C two piece of D back to G for two beats. And then we finish the last line with one measure of D and then one measure of D seven. - Last that was a fun funk beat along with our sweeps. What we're gonna do is we're gonna practice that a lot. We're gonna try to be able to try to get up to speed to 70 beats per minute. And for some reason, you can't no worries. You always have those selections to be able to slow down the video or go down to the bottom of the course content and go to course tools and then find a backing track to the speed of your desire. So rather be slower, Weatherby. Faster. No big deal. Just do lots of practice with the next video, which is simply that backing track at 70 beats per minute 27. 27 - Class Tools #3 - 70 BPM: 70 beats per minute. Both Now how? Well, now you 28. 28 - Exercise - Variations of Open Power Chords: in this lesson, we're gonna learn some variations of chords so that we can plan as open power courts. The 1st 1 is E. We learned e this way, and we're going to play it like this instead, our index finger is going to be on the seventh fret of the fifth string. Seventh fret over the fifth string. Our ring finger is going to be on the ninth fret of the fourth string nine threat of the fourth string. So practice just playing those two notes. For some of us, it might be a little bit of a reach. Make sure that our rest is nice and straight is always when we're doing it. Now our pinky is gonna go into the ninth fret of the third string, and I have these notes and this is my new open power cord E e open power cord. And if I have all over the notes down, I'm gonna just simply strum all the way down on. Then I have that nice e chord. The next court we're gonna learn is going to be based off this e chord. But it's gonna be a B chord. So what? I mean by that is we're going to first start to play this E. Once we're done, we're going to know where our fingers are and then base our next cord off of it. And the next quarter's it be we're gonna take these two fingers, the third finger and the fourth finger, and we're gonna move him one set of strings upwards. So I took the to middle strings and I put him up one set of strings and I have these two notes take my index center just off. So now I only have these two notes My ring finger on the ninth threat of the fifth string bond. Then I have my pinky on the nine threat of the fourth string. Now I have my middle finger here. It's gonna go on the eighth fret of the third string, and then I'm going to strum all the way down. We call these open chords because we use all of the strings. Just open ringing strings. Eso practice going back and forth between e and me as you play them, start to recognize that they're two different shapes. The next court that we're gonna learn looks exactly like this shape. But instead of playing it with an e chord on our seventh and ninth fret, we're gonna move down to the fourth fret with our index finger in the sixth Threat with our third finger in her fourth finger. Now it's the same strings and everything, but I move. 1233 frets down one to three. All right, now that I know that it's the same shape and the same fingers and the same strings, I'm going to now play my e chord followed by my beak or note these guys move up and, uh, index finger goes away. My middle finger comes down to the eighth fret of the third string and then I'm going to go down and play the sea sharp, minor chord. So those are my three just gonna play the way, then the B, then my C sharp, minor chord. My next chord is going to be an accord, and I have these two fingers coming up. One fret. They go up one set of strings and then I put my middle finger on the sixths fret of the third string. So these guys look exactly like the same shape as my B chord. Waas way e. And then these two fingers moved up and this middle finger came down. It was a big chord. I could take that. Be courting. I go one two sets of friends down and then I have a cord. But in relationship to my c sharp chord these guys go up and up so they go up one set of frets than one set of strings And then I can take my middle finger and put it down to the next string. That sixths fret on the third string and I stream it all the way down. So we're gonna go back and forth between our E then our for then our C chord C sharp or C sharp minor. And then our a cord did a couple more times e then be then C sharp. We're gonna move a a little faster. E b c sharp minor. Make sure you're learning exactly in that order. For now, the thin the being in the C sharp minor in the, um, get used to that play, um, play as much as you can try to get faster at the switching of the cords. When you ready, we'll see it in the next lesson. 29. 29 - Additional Material - Hammer-ons: e hammer ons. Um, hammer on is something that sounds exactly is what it sounds like. So just like a hammer hitting nail, Um, it is it's an explosive move. Um, and just like the hammer comes down, it goes away pretty far away from the nail head and then comes down real fast and hits the name. Same thing happens with their fingers. Um, and in this case, in this example, we're gonna use the third fret of, ah, fourth string. And sometimes when I do ham around, you'll see me used two fingers like this, but you can use water or both. It doesn't really matter. But as you see here, I'll use two of them two fingers coming down in exactly the same time and where we wanna have it placed on our friends. So we have this fret, and then we have something called the front base. That means everything behind the front place on the front. And so we want to have her third finger, move it, move it all the way up towards the front and touching it. So not on top of it, not on forwards of it, but all the way have been touching, and we'll get a good hammer on sound from that position, making sure that we're not in the middle of the front base or or pretty far behind the front, up and touching. So again, we want to get our finger to, ah, certain height. So for those folks with small fingers might have to get up a little higher than folks with big, powerful fingers. So just like a hammer, he lifted up and then it slams down right on the front, Um, in an explosive way since goes by faster than then it feels you should in the first couple of times. So I'll get me playin open note and just let it ring out by the explosion of our fingers downwards on. And then if for some reason you're not getting that sound or that big sound is only because that we're not hitting the front with enough velocity, right, So, uh, more velocity, more explosions, we're gonna have a good hammer on zone. And to practice this, we're going to use our backing track for the G minor pentatonic scale and utilizing both strings, the fourth string and the third string on the third front way. Uh, 30. 30 - Additional Material - Pull-offs: all right, now that we've got a chance to do hammer ons were learned how to do pull off and there's a couple different pull offset our, um, that weaken do. But in this video, how we're going to describe them is using your third finger on the third fret of the fourth string and the third string. So these are the two notes that we're gonna utilize Apoula fun. And we're What we're gonna do is we're gonna take, uh, someone note that we play from the third front, and then we're going to bend the string down toe, pull off, rolls off her fingers and noticed that when I do it, my finger catches the next string downwards, so it just sits right on the next run down. So, um, we're gonna practice that a few time. I found that musically way use pull off primarily. One were about to play an open note on a scale. So, um, from previous video, we played this G minor pentatonic scale s. So instead of playing the open, there's the three. We're gonna pull it off this time 31. 31 - Additional Material - Vibrato: so using Vie Braddock and be kind of an effective trick to make something sound pretty interesting as you're playing. And in this example, we will still be using the G minor pentatonic scale that we've learned in a previous video . And we should know at this point, while looking at this video are hammer ons pull off. Right. So what we're gonna do for ah, vibrato is taking a note after we've plucked and we're gonna think of it in cycles. So pulling down the note to a certain degree and then moving it back exactly where you came from. So, um, it goes, the string is flat and bends downwards, and then it comes back to its original position, and that's one cycle that sounds just like a little bend. So we're gonna do to cycles two cycles of a vibrato, and eventually we're gonna do lots of vibrations, right? So as we're playing along were practicing in doing several of cycles and doing them quickly . Uh, 32. 32 - Additional Material Intro to Bends small: This is an introduction to Ben's using the G minor pentatonic scale out of the fifth position. 1413 shifting with six position 1313 3rd finger is where we're gonna do all of our bending . So there's a few different ways we can do Benz one is, ah, pluck on a regular note, then a bends and we can do partial Ben's or full note bends. So sometimes I want to go towards this. No. So I'm trying to really actually hit this next note, but with have been so that's my destination tone. I want to do a whole step. I have to bend a lot further, right? So in this particular case, I'm going to pluck it. Then Ben and then I can also have it already bent and then pluck and bring it back. So version one, Version two. Now I'll could also can pluck, bend and then pluck and bend back all in one move right, Or I could just use one pluck and do both 33. Class Tools #1 - 70 BPM: 70 beats per minute. 34. Class Tools #1 - 90 BPM: 90 beats per minute. Yeah, - it's yeah. 35. Class Tools #2 70 BPM: 70 beats per minute. 36. Class Tools #2 90 BPM: 90 beats per minute things. 37. Class Tools #3 60 BPM: 60 beats per minute now. No, you well ? 38. Class Tools #3 80 BPM: 80 beats per minute. How now? - No .