Autumn in Acrylics: Paint 3 Beautiful Landscapes Inspired by the Season | Payal Sinha | Skillshare

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Autumn in Acrylics: Paint 3 Beautiful Landscapes Inspired by the Season

teacher avatar Payal Sinha, TheSimplyAesthetic- Artist & Instructor

Watch this class and thousands more

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Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Lessons in This Class

16 Lessons (2h 2m)
    • 1. Welcome to my Class!

      3:13
    • 2. Materials Needed for the Class

      4:42
    • 3. Acrylic Overview & Color Palette

      2:38
    • 4. Basic Acrylic Techniques

      8:37
    • 5. Elements Part 1: Branches, Leaves & Foliage

      6:44
    • 6. Elements Part 2: Pine Tress & Snowy Mountains

      7:45
    • 7. Project 1 Part 1: Painting the Background

      8:17
    • 8. Project 1 Part 2: Painting the Middle Ground

      8:38
    • 9. Project 1 Part 3: Painting the Foreground

      10:11
    • 10. Project 2 Part 1: Painting the Sky & Mountains

      9:25
    • 11. Project 2 Part 2: Painting the Pine Trees

      6:11
    • 12. Project 2 Part 3: Painting the Autumn Foliage

      9:59
    • 13. Project 3 Part 1: Painting the Sky & Snowy Mountains

      11:16
    • 14. Project 3 Part 2: Painting the Autumn Foliage

      11:22
    • 15. Project 3 Part 3: Painting the Branches & Leaves

      11:22
    • 16. Conclusion! See you in the next class

      1:39
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About This Class

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Autumn is the season that tells us that endings can be beautiful too. It's a season that we all long to enjoy by drinking hot chocolate inside our homes and burning candles to bring warmth as the season of winter is getting closer. 

Don't you think it's beautiful to watch the leaves gracefully age and turn into beautiful shades of Yellow, Orange, Red, Purple & Browns. If you're someone who enjoys the Autumn Season and wants to enjoy painting with these beautiful warm colors then this class is for you!

The medium of choice for the class is Acrylics and I will be walking you through the whole process of painting with acrylics. This class is beginner-friendly so even if you have no poor knowledge of the medium, you can still join in and learn how to paint beautiful autumn landscapes.

We will be discussing the materials in detail along with the colors palette, We will learn different techniques & elements that will help you understand the medium better. Using the combination of techniques & elements we will learn how to paint 3 beautiful Autumn Landscapes.

Alright, Let's jump right in and start our Acrylic Journey together.

Meet Your Teacher

Teacher Profile Image

Payal Sinha

TheSimplyAesthetic- Artist & Instructor

Teacher

 

Hello Beautiful People! I am Payal, an engineer by day and an artist by night. I am an Indian currently living in Bahrain, a small island in the middle east. I love exploring different mediums and subjects. For me, art is a therapy that keeps me going and helps me keep my creative side running.

You can find all my works on Instagram by the name @thesimplyaesthetic . 

I have always been a creative child, constantly looking for ways to DIY stuff but with time life happened and I lost touch with this side of me. In 2018, I finally decided to bring back this part of me and I haven't looked back since. It has been a crazy journey since then.

I now conduct private classes, workshops and also make youtube videos. I feel that it's never too late to explor... See full profile

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Transcripts

1. Welcome to my Class!: Autumn is the season that tells us that endings can be beautiful to. It's a season that we all long to enjoy by drinking hot chocolate inside our homes and burning candles to bring warm as the season of winter comes closer. To, to think it's beautiful to watch the leaves gracefully each and turn into beautiful shades of yellow, orange, red, purple, and browns. If you're someone who enjoys the autumn season and wants to enjoy painting with these beautiful warm colors, then this class is just for you. Hello everyone. My name is biased. I'm an artist and art educator based out of Boston, originally from India. And welcome to my Skillshare class. You can find more about me and what I do in my Skillshare profile. And you can also follow me on my Instagram at this simply as theta1, to enjoy my artworks that I post their daily. The medium of choice for today's class is acrylic. This is my first class using this medium. So I'm very excited to share the class projects with you. Acrylic is a fun medium which is very beginner friendly and highly forgiving as well. So even if you make a mistake, you can always cover it up. If you are someone who has just painted with acrylics a couple of times or even has no prior knowledge to it. Don't worry, I will be guiding you through each and every step. We'll talk about the right art supplies we need to pick along with the right color palettes that we need to select for our class projects. So we have a bunch of yellow, orange, red, and browns on our list. We will then learn a few of these basic techniques that will help you understand the acrylic medium better off. These techniques are very important because we will be using a combination of these techniques to paint a few of the elements that we will be using in our class projects. These elements are very simple to paint and you can also use these elements not only for our class projects, but a lot of your future paintings as well. Using the combination of the techniques and elements that I'll be teaching you will be painting three beautiful autumn landscapes. They're going to be using different combinations of the elements and techniques. So each of these paintings are going to be different from one another. Everything in this class is explained in real time. So you can take your own time to finish these class projects and enjoy the entire process of painting them. So without wasting any more time, let us talk about the supplies that we need in the next lesson and start our acrylic painting journey together. 2. Materials Needed for the Class: Let us talk about all the supplies that we need for today's class. The supplies that I'll be telling you about, a very easily available and the most basic ones that you need for painting with acrylics. So the first item on the list is a canvas board. I'm using this one from the brand scholar. And this is a six-by-six inch canvas board. Now you can use any Canvas sofas that you want. It can be a sheet, it can be the wooden framed ones, or it can be a canvas board like mine as well. So whatever you want and whichever size you want, you can select that. That is completely up to you. Just make sure that you have three different canvases or gambling sheets because we need them for three different projects. Next item on the list is this canvas pad, which is basically your canvas sheets bounded together. So there are like 10 or 12 sheets in one book. So I took the sheet just to show you the techniques and the elements. So it's easier this way for me. Now you can use your watercolor papers as well, or you can use, and you discarded cardboard or any basic surface on which you can use your acrylic paints, acrylics as very versatile on the surface, right? So you can use any surface for your acrylic paints. And it can be a rough surface. You don't have to keep it with you. Use whatever is easily available for you. So the next item on the list are obviously acrylic paints. You can use any brand of acrylic paints. That is not a problem at all. I'm using these acrylic paints from the brand Neff skier polyhedra. And this is the masterclass CD. So these are the extra fine thick acrylic paints, but you don't have to worry about it. You can use any brand that's available with you. And we're all going to have fun. So any brand of art supplies is completely fine. Next we're going to talk about the brushes. So for the brushes I have some long handled brushes and some shorthand and brushes. So for the non handled brushes, let us talk about that first. I'm going to obviously use a combination of flat brushes, round brushes and some detailing brushes. So let us talk about the flat brushes first, I've taken decides for 68 for the flat brushes. Or you don't have to have the same brushes. You can be using any flat brushes off around the same size if you don't have the exact same size. But yeah, next is this round brush. This is a size two round brush. So this is another long handled round brush. So you can take a size two round brush of any brand. Of course, the next thing that I wanted to show you are these round brushes. So along with the size two round brush, I'm using a size one liner brush. And if you don't have a line and it's fine if you use a size 1 round brush as well. A size triple 0 round brush and a size 1 round brush. Now, I'll be using these for adding finer details to our paintings, the small dots and details that we need. So you can add them by using these brushes. So you can use something around the size if you don't have the exact sizes as well. The next cool brush technique that I'm going to show you in this class is how to use your old synthetic spoiled brushes to create beautiful textures and beautiful details in your painting. So if you have small brushes with you, you are going to win this class. Basically, make sure that you have spotted brushes. I'm sure we all have spoiled crashes, but if you don't have brushes, you can use your fan brushes for adding the details that will do using these brushes in our painting. Next item on the list is obviously your jar of water, which is very important. So take any container for LET halfway with water and you're good to go. And next, I'm going to show you my mixing palette. So I'm just basically using an acrylic sheet and I've added a piece of white paper at the bottom. So you can see the colors when I'm mixing them. So you can use any mixing powder that you generally use for your paintings and bureaucratic pain. So that's completely fine and don't forget to keep a cloth rag with you to wipe off your paint and dab off the excess water. And yeah, that's pretty much it. These are all the supplies that we need. So let's get started. 3. Acrylic Overview & Color Palette: Before we move on to learning the different techniques using acrylics, I thought of giving a quick overview about the medium along with the colors that we'll be picking for our class projects. So acrylics is actually a very versatile medium and let me tell you why. So acrylics is water-soluble when we are painting with acrylics to make the consistency slightly loser. And for easier blending purposes, we had a little bit of water to it. At this time, the acrylic paint acts as a water soluble material, right? So you can easily mix water to your acrylic paint and it'll, you know, losing its consistency a little bit. But when the acrylic paint dries out, so when the layer is completely dry, it becomes water resistant. And at this point, you can add another layer to your painting without disturbing our reactivating your underlying layer. And that is why this is one of the most important characteristics of acrylics. So you can have multiple layers of paint without reactivating the underlying layer. At the same time. Acrylic paints can also act as watercolors, or we'll give you a similar effect when you add more water or certain mediums to loosen its consistency so it becomes fairly thin and it'll act like watercolors. Now let us talk about the different colors that we'll be using for our class project. So the list of colors that we need, our titanium white, cadmium yellow, medium orange, vermillion, cadmium red, deep, permanent red, sap T or collide burnt umber, ultramarine like cobalt blue, quinacridone, lilac, and lamp black. So these are all the colors that we'll be using. Of course, we'll be making a lot more different colors while painting. And as you can see, the paint that I'm using is from Netscape polyhedra. And it has a really thick paint. It's an extra flying beam, so the consistency is really thick. So with this paint, you can also do different acrylic techniques like Impulse 2 and adding texture to your paintings. But we're not going to be doing any of those things. We will be doing our simple acrylic painting so you can use any brand of paint that you have available with you. Now, let us learn the different techniques of extra legs in the next lesson. 4. Basic Acrylic Techniques: All right, So let us loan a few techniques that are going to help us understand the medium acrylics a little bit better. They're going to be using these techniques and atlas projects. So it's better to just understand what each of these mean. So we're going to learn blending, layering, the dry brush technique and the brushstrokes, taken three different colors, very basic. We have cadmium yellow, titanium white, and the ultramarine blue. And I'm going to take them out on my mixing palette. And the first technique that we're going to discuss is the blending. So there are two different types of blending of the two different types of ways in which we blend colors. One is your direct color blending, and the second is your blending with white. So I'm going to show you direct color blending first using my size four flat brush. I'm going to take, or this is a size 6 flat brush. So I'm going to take some yellows. I've loaded my brush with some yellow and I'm going to apply it at the bottom. I'm going to rinse my brush, get, come, get my brush completely rid of the yellow color and loaded up with some ultramarine blue and put it on top. Now one thing that you need to remember is you can add a little bit of white to your acrylic paints to make them a little blend. So if you think that your paint is drying and in a little bit of water, this is the most basic technique in which we actually blend or make our acrylic paints that it will blend a bit. So just add a bit of photo and it will loosen up its consistency. And you can blend using the water and you can blend the colors together. So as you can see, I've moved my yellow upward and bought the ultramarine blue downwards. So when I do this, since the colors are directly blending with each other, they form this little green band. And this is the direct color blending. So in data color blending, you're always going to have a middle color. But when you're blending with white, I'm going to show you. So I've taken the yellow, similar to the first step of taking the yellow and the blue at the top. And I've left that little white space in between. And here, I'm going to blend these two colors together using white. Now again, load your brush with some water to make it blend tool and just move up and down in this to and fro motion to blend the colors together. So can you see how this difference between the two blending? In the first one we have this green gap. So whenever you're blending primary colors, in the color blending, you will have a secondary color that'll form in the middle. But if you don't want a secondary color to form, you can always blend the colors with white. And this is the blending that will generally use for our skies or in places where we did not want the middle color to form. Next technique that we're going to learn as layering. So as you know, acrylics is a very opaque medium, and it behaves as an opaque medium as long as we are controlling the amount of water that we're adding to it. So I've taken yellow and I've just created a block, like a square block. And as you can see, when I load my brush with some blue and make random strokes on it. You can see that since the paint is really opaque and thick, you cannot see the yellow beneath it. And this is one of the best qualities of acrylics. And that is that you can nail, you can have multiple layers without showing the bottom left. So this makes a perfect choice of medium where you're working with so many layers, especially for landscapes. The next technique that I'm going to show you is the dry brush techniques. They are going to take your brush and rub it against your Claude to get rid of any water contents on your brush. We want it to be completely dry. And then what I'm going to do is I'm going to dip it in paint directly. So I'm not adding any water to the paint is just direct paint and I'm going to rub it from the sides to get rid of any excess paint on my brush as well. I want to load it up with pain but not too much paint. Right? And when I rub it against the surface, it follows the texture of my Canvas. So you know, the canvas is not a smooth surface, right? It has some texture to it. And because of this texture, we can use this texture, texture to our benefit and then create this beautiful rough look on it. And your paint is going to be following the texture of your canvas and have this nice dry brush strokes. Now your brush strokes and the dry brush strokes actually dependent how much paint you're picking and if the paint has water or not. So if your brushes really dry, you can get a nice dry brush stroke on your Canvas. The next technique that we're going to learn is basically actually learning the different brushstrokes using your flat brush around brush and the spoiled brush that I was talking about. So talking about the flat brush first, I've taken my size full flat brush. Now I'm just loading up some paint on it and I've added a little bit of water. And as you can see with my size four brush, with the maximum pressure that I apply on my brush. This is the thickest flat brush stroke that I can get. Now, the next job that I'm going to show you is I'm going to slightly reduce the pressure and I'm going to be turning my brush sideways. All right, So since The first one was flagged. This one is going to turn 180 degrees and I'm going to use the sides of my brush. And I'm going to hold it at 90 degree to the paper to have a nice grip on it. Hold your brush 90 degrees to the paper to have a nice grip on it. The third stroke that I made is basically the sideways true, but I have reduced a little bit of pressure that I applied. The next thing that I'm actually showing you here is how to transition from a flat stroke on this side, we tense true. So that is basically your brush dancing. All right, so you are holding your brush flat and as you move you slightly do with steel brush. And you know, you've pushed your brush 180 and you bring it sideways. Now to understand this brush stroke, you'll have to practice this a couple of times because it's a really useful brushstrokes, especially when you are being thing the mountains and you want to go flat and you want to go thin strokes at the same time using the same brush so you don't have to, you know, keep switching your brushes and make sure that you have a nice grip on your brush, right? And you are holding at 90 degree to the paper. The next drug is using the down brush. So I've taken my size two round brush and the maximum pressure that I apply on my brush. This is the thickness of the stroke that I get. Now, with this same brush, you can walk with different pressure points, right? You can reduce the pressure you can meet completely lose in your hand so that you get ten strokes. And you can practice this a couple of times to understand how much pressure you apply on your brush. Now the round brush plays a very important role and filling up spaces, making different stippling strokes, right? So the stroke plays a very important role in making your folly at your autumn foliage or your leaves, basically closer leaves. So these bodies dot or this stippling dots that are making are basically very random. And as you can see, there are different pressures that are applied to it. Some of them are thicker because I'm applying more pressure on that stroke. Some of them are 10 now because I'm applying lesser pressure on that. And I'm basically just touching my tip of the brush with the paper. The next brush stroke that I'm going to talk about is the one with the spoiled brush. Now, this one is really fun. Instead of the spotted brush, you can use your fan brush as well if you don't have a brush that's ruined. So what spoilt brush? I'm going to pick up some paint, make sure that you are kind of using the dry brush technique here as well. Your brushes dry and does not have any water. So when you pick up the paint and drop it on a canvas to get this nice textured look. Now, I'll tell you where and how we use these brushstrokes and techniques in the next lesson. So make sure that you understand your brushstrokes majorly and the other techniques you can give them and tried to understand your paints as well. And so let us move on to the next lesson where I'll tell you how to apply these techniques to learn the elements. 5. Elements Part 1: Branches, Leaves & Foliage: Let us learn how to paint a few of the elements that we'll need to know before we move on to our class projects. We are going to learn how to paint the branches and the leaves, the foliage, which is just all your leaves clustered together and Lego, Porsche or something. Your pine trees and destroy mountains. And I've taken some lamp black sap green and cadmium yellow on my palette and have taken toothbrushes. That is my size one line approached and size triple 0 detailing brush as well. So using my liner brush, I'm going to load it up with some blacks of mixin water to loosen up the consistency of the black. And I've taken or loaded my liner brush with some black and when to make the straight line. And as we move, move upwards, I'm going to slightly blended. So this way you are basically, you know, moving upward and reducing the pressure on your brush to release these branches. If you take a closer look at, look at the way I'm creating the branches. I am basically starting off with more pressure on my brush and slightly releasing the pressure as I move upwards. And anthracene time. Each of the branch that I'm making is usually a continuation of the previous one, just in slightly different angles. All right. So make sure that you are not making them completely in the opposite direction. But Father, you're making them slightly, you know, at different angles from one another, but mostly at an acute angle from one another. And as you can see, I started off with the liner brush, but I move to my be dealing brush to add the smaller branches as well. Now, I've already taught how to make the trees in my previous classes in a lot more details than I am now. But yeah, this is pretty much the basic of how you make a tree and add the branches. So you're just working with different pressures and releasing the pressure each time you create a branch. Then the next thing that I want to show you is how to make your branch and have some leaves on it. So this is basically a closer look of your brand. So this is just one or two branches together. So I've made the browns just the way I word for a tree. All right, and I'm going to load my brush with some sap green. And using the stippling method that I taught you in the technique lesson, we are going to be using that same stippling technique, using a liner brush and make these dots on our branches. Now you're going to be clustering them together in the areas where you have to branch. But in case you don't have a branch on that data, that does not mean that duty not be adding your leaves are like because some branches that really smaller for us to see from a distance. And that is why we'll just add these random strokes wherever we like on our tree. And mostly at the tip of the branch that we have. So one area is covered with your leaves are right. And next I'm going to add a little bit of yellow to my mixture just to give it more layers and depth. It just doesn't look like black branches and just green leaves. But I want to give it more highlights and make it more colorful. And that is why I'm adding these yellow leaves as well. So you can do this by waiting for your green layer to dry before you move on to the yellow layer. Or you can just do them while they are wet so that they blend together and have the slightly greenish yellow colored leaves as well. So this is one of the ways in which you walk with your branches and your tree trunk and your lease not they can be different color combinations as well. Next thing that I'm going to show you is how to paint the foliage. And by foliage, I basically mean your leaves, are your bushes clustered together. So for that, for us, I need to create a base which is really dark. So using my black paint and my spoilt brush, I'm just going to create this random blob shape. There's no particular reason why I did that. I was going for the bush shape in my mind and that is why I created this random shape. And the first layer that I'm going to do on my brush. So I'm going to load my brush with some sap green color directly. And I'm just going to tap. So you remember the brushstroke that I taught you in the technique class with a spoiled brat. You just want to load your brush with some of the paint and tab and wait for that layer to completely dry. Now I'm adding a little bit of yellow to this green mixture, the sap green mixture, and where I assumed for the light to fall on my foliage. So let us say from the top right side, I'm assuming that the light is falling on my bush. There. I'm going to have the lighter colors are the highlights of my bush. So each time that I meet these random strokes, I'm going to be adding a little bit of yellow and white to the mixture to give it highlights. Now here I'm just tapping it randomly so that each layer that I build, It's going to look more obvious on which side the light falls directly on my bush, basically. All right, so now once this layer has completely dried, I'm adding a little bit of yellow more to my mixture. And as you can see, as I told you, the light, I'm assuming light to fall from the top right. So top right of my bush is going to have the highlighted part or the more vibrant part basically of my bush, right? So if you notice a bush, it, it is not today, right? It is 3D when you look at it. Anything is 3D when we look at it. So that is why we want to paint it in that way as well. So your leaves are going to be from all around the bush. And that is why we have these different layers. So there are like three different sections where you've see me applying the highlights. And that is why, because for the 3D look, I'm applying it on three different layers so that it looks uneven. It looks like the liver or lower the brush. And you're just applying the highlights of this as my fourth layer. And each time I wait for my previous layer to completely dry before I start tapping on my next layer. And so that is how we learn how to paint autumn foliage. 6. Elements Part 2: Pine Tress & Snowy Mountains: Now the next thing that I'm going to show you how to paint these pine trees. So we are going to be using the pine tree structure, just half of the pine tree structure for one of our class projects. So that is why I thought it's important for us to include how to make pine trees as well. So it's a very simple. Again, how much pressure you apply on your brush plays a very important role. So you need to learn to handle your brush basically, learn how to apply different pressures on your brush. So I'm going to start off by making this word line. And as you can see, the bottom is thicker because applied more pressure and the top is thinner because there's less pressure on it. And I'm going to use my liner brush. You can use a size one or science tupled 0 brush wherever you wish, and start making these dots basically again, your stippling that stroke, you're going to be using that drove. And you're going to be making this left and right branch. So you are just stippling and making a branch rather than meeting a branch and then stippling around it. So as you can see, I'm not making a line or a branch directly. Then, you know, stippling around the branch. But rather I'm just making these strokes and stippling to give you an illusion that it is a branch. So basically, each time you move down, you're going to be increasing the size or basically on length of the stroke that you're making. Alright, because the pine tree Isn't this beautiful conical shape, right? So that is why we are going to be starting off with very small size difference at the top of the branches from both sides. And as we move at the bottom, going to be increasing the size. All right, And each time, don't forget to add a few little extra leaves or the dots, stippling dots in the middle. Because you're going to be showing that. Again, it's not to be. So you'll have some branches that are facing us well, and some that are facing at the back as well. So that is why I don't just leave it empty in the middle. Do add some smaller stippling strokes in the middle as well. Move at the bottom. We don't want to now make it really large. So I'm going to slightly reduce the size and add a few of these little branches that do not have any leaves on them at the bottom. So you want to make a few branches that I leave less and they are basically the old branches that were there on our tree. And here, and this is one of the most simplest way to make buying trees. I'm sure you had fun painting this because this was basically the most easiest way in which you can paint a pine tree. We're not going to go in and complete depth because we just want to learn how to make the structure. The next thing that I want to show you is how to paint snowy mountains. And this one is one of my favorites actually, because of how beautifully the snowy mountain turn out and how easy it was to make a story mountain. Now, I've taken my ultramarine blue and added a teeny tiny bit of black to it, just to give it a nice indigo looking color. All right, and I'm going to be making that at the base. So that's going to be my base color for the mountain. We can have different base colors. It can be black, brown, gray, whatever. But I was just went with this nice blue color at the base. And I'm going to make this conical shape, but I don't want to make the tip really sharp. So as chamfer on it a little bit at the top. So one thing that I'm doing, your, as you can see, once I'm done spreading the colors everywhere, I'm using this motion that is in line with the shape that I'm creating. And I've added a little bit more paint towards the left side of my mountain, which is going to be the darker side of my mountain, as compared to the right side, in which I want to show that the light is falling directly on that side of my mountain. So make sure that you're making it like that too. For the left side to be slightly darker. And next I'm going to load my brush with some white. All right, I'm just mixing some white, adding a little bit of water to loosen up the consistency. And I'm going to make the snowy cap for it. Now. The snow is going to be all around the mountains, right? The right side is going to be lighter since the light falls steady click on it, and the left side is going to be darker. And that is why when you add water to your titanium white is slightly became, becomes a little bit translucent or lighter in color. And that is why it shows the color below it. All right, and as you can see when I added up to bite, you can see the blue or it gets nice blue tint. Now you remember how I showed you the transition between the flat strokes and the thin strokes with my same brush. That is exactly what I'm doing. So I've started from the top and I've started off with some flat strokes and then slightly moving towards the thin strokes. And how I'm making them is the top is completely covered with the snow. And each time I bring it down, I make the strokes slightly tunnel. Now there is no perfect way to do it. You can make it as thin as you want and make them random. Your mountain does not have to look like my mountain. You are free to make them look like your mountains. All right, so once I'm done with the first layer, that is just bring up this irregular shape in which the snow has fallen on my mountain. So once that is done, I'm going to load my brush with some titanium white this time did not add water to the mixture. And when you do not add water to the mixture, you are titanium white becomes more opaque as you can see. This time that as I applied on the right side of my mountain, as I applied on the right side, you can see it becomes more white. So that looks like the sun is directly falling from the sunlight directly falls on my snow is going to be really wide as compared to the left side in which the sun does not fall a lot or the sunlight does not directly reaching that area. And they're going to repeat this step maybe three times just to make your titanium white or the place or the ADL where the sunlight directly falls and my mountain to be virtually nice and wide. You might want to do this, take maybe two or three times just to get the vibrant color. And over here, along with the transition and the brush stroke, you can see that there are places in which I'm applying the dry brush technique as well. So once I'm done making the media strokes, I'm slightly rubbing off the excess paint to get a nice dry brush look. And that is it. These are the four elements that we need to learn for our class projects. They were very simple. You can practice this a couple of times just to understand them better and let us paint our first class project. 7. Project 1 Part 1: Painting the Background: Let us begin our first class project. So the color palette for this class is titanium white, cadmium yellow, medium orange, vermillion, permanent red, cobalt blue, burnt umber, and lamp black. So I'm going to be taking these colors out on my mixing palette. And here are the swatches so that you get a clear idea of the colors that I'm using. If you don't have the exact shades, don't worry, you can use similar shades to the colors that I'm using. And this is going to be the reference picture for the first painting. As you can see, we have three components here. We have a background, a middle ground, and the foreground. So first we're going to paint the background. That is our sky part, the lake part, and also the far of mountains that we have. Using my pencil, I'm going to first start off by making a basic sketch. So using your reference picture, looking at the reference picture, we are going to be sketching the elements out. So I'm gonna make a line around 2 third of the painting to the forest. Third area is going to be for the sky, and the remaining is going to be for the league, the mountains and the little trees that were supposed to be adding in the middle ground. So I've made a basic sketch looking at the reference picture. Now using my size eight brush, I'm going to mix the colors that I need for the sky. So I'm going to mix equal amounts of dominant red and cobalt blue. Now, if you see my mixing palette, the color looks more red. So when I add white to it, it becomes pink, right? It doesn't look poeple that for this guy, I need bumper. And that's why I slightly increase the quantity of the blue that I'm adding. So if you think that your red is more overpowering and your mix looks more pink, you can add blue to tone it down and make it more puppet or like a paste to Bob Gallo. So yeah, and a white to make it pasted. All right, so using a mix of three colors, that is your palm and dread, cobalt blue and white. So once you're happy with this nice space to purple color, we're going to start going in this left and right motion and cover the top half of the sky area that we had sketched out. Now we're going to be blending this color along with the pastel yellow that will come in the middle. And then again, we'll have the space to poeple at the bottom part of the line that we do. So near the mountains, we're going to be having the base to poeple again. So now mixing a base to yellow, that is basically just mixing your yellow with two white. Alright, and I'm going to blend it with the bubble. So again, for blending, you're going to be using the to and fro motions. You're just going to go left and dry and just keep blending. If you think that your brush feels a little bit dry, then don't worry, you can add a little bit of water to your mix or your brush and then continue with the blending. The easiest way to blend with acrylics is adding water. Purchase. Make sure that you're not adding too much water. Otherwise, it's going to make your paint slightly translucent and we don't want that. We want it to be nice and thick. So I felt that my beam luxury early pink and the top. So I added a little bit more blue to make it slightly more puppet. And for the bottom one, I'm using the same mix that I used earlier, but I'm adding a little bit more bike to make it more light and color near the horizon line that I have made basically. And then again, just using my door and fro motion, I'm just going to blend these three colors together. And act. Act, and act. And act. For the mountains. I'm going to make a mixture of like an indigo color. So for that I'm using my cobalt blue and I'm adding a little bit of the bond amber color. Now this is not the exact indigo color, but I slightly want a darker blue color. And that is why I'm mixed my burnt umber and cobalt blue together and then I'm adding a little bit of white. So if you take a closer look at the reference picture, you can find the reference spectra from the resources part of the class as well, so that you can have a look at, look at the reference picture on your own. So there are two different colors there. So we have slightly the far-off mountains which are slightly lighter. And then the one that is still closed zone near the horizon line, the bushes or the trees, they are of a darker color. And that is why I added white to make my color lighter at the background. And then while the paint is still wet, I am going to mix it with the bushes part of the beat. So you don't have to wait for the layer to dry completely. We want it to be slightly out of focus. And that is why we went with this method of painting. Are applying the paint when your previous layer or the previous stroke is still wet. So there's a slightly blend together. So if you can see I don't have sharp edges. I do have, you know, you can see the different stroke that I made. But they're not sharp like they would if I painted when the beam or the LEA would be completely dry. So yeah, you're going to just mix your paint and just make the strokes and make these little mountains of bushes near the horizon. And the father of mountains. And add, add, add, add, add, add for the leg. I'm going to be using the same color that I made earlier or used for the sky. So your water is basically the reflection of the sky, right? Most of the times you can see whatever the sky holes on the water and the water reflects the colors of the sky and the elements that are around. Using the similar color palette, I'm going to just spread it over the leg area. And since this lake is in the background or the river is in the background, we can't really see the details of our painting. So I'm not going to be adding a lot of details. We're not going to be working on the waves and the extra details. We will add some darker parts of the league. And that will do by adding or making a dark purple mixture. So if you just mix your cobalt blue and your permanent tread with a slightly little white, you'll get the color that I'm using. So using that will just add the darker parts of wildly. And that is just slightly blended out because it's in the background. We will not be able to see the details of our link. Using my to and fro motion. I'm just going to blend out the strokes about they don't look really sharp and I'm happy with how the background looks. So we're just going to wait for this layer dry. And in the next lesson we are going to learn how to be in the middle ground. 8. Project 1 Part 2: Painting the Middle Ground: Let us now paint the middle ground of our painting, which are basically these trees. Alright? So they're not exactly in the background. They're not exactly in your foreground. So that is why they're in the middle ground, right? So for that I'm going to use a mixture of the bond amber color and I'm going to add a little bit of permanent tread, basically a teeny tiny bit of permanent red. And simultaneously I'm making another mixture which is off the bond, amber and the lamp black color. So we'll need to make these two mixes of colors for our branches. And I'm using my size, one brush, my detail brush. And with that brush, I'm going to go ahead and start making the trunks and the branches. So this is following the similar method that I taught you in the elements lesson. Alright, so this entire process is very productive. You can have a look at your reference picture just to get an idea of how the branches look, where they go, which direction they are in, which are the tiny branches, which are the thicker branches. So you'll get most of that idea from your reference picture. And you're basically going to be just to replicating this idea onto your painting. Now, you know, the thick branches and the thin branches, you can make them using a single brush as well. So that is why the brush stroke lesson that I was talking about was a little bit important because you need to learn how to control your pressure on the brush. Alright? So the two colors that we made are basically going to be used one after the other. So your main trunk, which is at the bottom, so you have your Tivo branches. They are going to be with the mixture of the bond, amber and the black and the tiny branches that I want to add, the extra ones that are all over the place, they're very small, very tiny. I will be making them using the mix that I created with the bond amber and the permanent tread. So this whole process, like I said, is rapidly native, so I'm just increasing the speed. But if you wish to slow it down, you can always change it in the settings and reduce the speed of the video. Aq aq aq aq aq aq aq. Aq aq aq aq aq aq aq aq aq aq aq aq aq aq aq aq aq aq aq aq aq aq aq aq aq aq. Act and act at, at, at, at, at, at, at, at, at, at, at, at. Add, add, add, add, add, add, add, add, add, add, add, add, add. I hope you'll enjoy this step adaptive process of making the branches, that thick branches and the tiny approaches. To me firstly, I find making these branches really tell a biotic. Because you know, you're not really thinking and aren't right here just looking at the reference picture and trying to mimic it. And even if you're not able to mimic the exact each and every branch, but you are able to get the idea on your paper. So I really liked that process where you're just in another zone because this takes sometime, right? So you're just in another zone just having fun, just enjoying the process. So I've just sprayed my beam to put a little bit of water using my spray bottle just to keep it nice and moist and from, you know, to avoid them from drying out. And I'm using a mix of the bond on both yellow and white to get this nice base to look kind of like a base skin tone color basically. And I'm going to be using that to make the boundary walls, that remaining white speeds that we have, that is going to be our boundary wall. So using that column, I'm going to be making like a thin border at the top. So that is going to be the front part or like the top part of the boundary wall, which is flat and the bottom we'll have the vertical for what he called part of the boundary, right? What stat? So the one I'm making now is basically the top flat part of our boundary. Using the mix of the yellow, the bond amber, and white. You're going to just go ahead and use our flat brush sideways to get a nice side stroke. And he shall be able to get it done nicely and easily. It's not a very difficult process and just fill in any spaces at the top that you have and wait for it to dry. Once that has a dried using my brown mix that I made earlier, I'm just going to go ahead and fill up the remaining of the whitespace. Now you'll see me mix it with a little bit of the base to the base color that I made earlier, right? So I'm just going to mix it to make it look nice and even and not just flat. So this just gives it a little bit of depth which is going to mix it. You can go ahead and do it with just brown as well. There is no perfect way to do it since it's just small portion of a boundary wall. So you can just go ahead and do it however you like. And once this layer dry it, we are going to just add like outline, the final outline your boundary one. So just to show the shadows of the flat part on the vertical part. So just using my black color, I'm just going to use my size 0 brush and just outline the border as you can see here. And that is it. This is the whole process of painting on middle ground, which is very simple. We will just adding a few little elements that we could see. And once this layer has dried, we are going to go ahead and paint the foreground. 9. Project 1 Part 3: Painting the Foreground: Finally, we're at the final part of our class project, one. That is to pin the beautiful tree that we can see on the top part of our painting. So this tree is just so beautiful and all I can think about a standing under the street to enjoy the autumn season. So we are going to be using our black and burnt umber mix. And we are going to be making the major tick trunks first. And some of the tiny or branches On which we'll have to put out our leaves. Alright, so to understand the structure of our tree, we are going to be looking at our reference spectra of closely. And we're just going to, like I said, mimic what we see and put it on our painting. So as you can see, there are these two trunks that come from the left side. One goes up, one goes towards the right, and we have some more thinner branches. So what I see in my reference picture is what I'm going to depict and put it on my painting as well. Now, don't worry if it doesn't look exactly the same, I think it shouldn't look exactly the same. And if it looks a little different, that is where it's your painting and it's your magic. So don't worry about giving it the perfect look. Just go ahead and make a few of the main branches that you see. And if you can get the main branches to look like the beam being well and good. And then you can add these random smaller branches wherever you like and continuation of with the main branches that you made. So we just need to make these tiny branches that it easier for us to understand the structure of the leaves where we want to add the cluster of leaves on a tree. So you can just add these random tiny branches as well. Once we are done adding some of the branches, we're going to go ahead and start making the leaves. So for the leaves, they're going to be working in different layers. So if you remember the elements section, I taught you how to use the stippling method to add the leaves. And that is exactly what we are going to do over here. So for the first layer, I'm going to use a mixture of the permanent red color. Makes to wait a little bit of black. So I get this nice thick dark maroon or very dark maroon color. Basically it's really dark red. And we are going to be using this color as our base layer. So this processes again, recitative. You're just going to use this stippling method. They're going to be adding dots basically of different sizes around the branches that you made. So just follow the structure, doesn't have to lie exactly on the branch. They are around the branch. And they lie on these tiny branches of the tiny stems of our leaves that you cannot see from this file. All right, so just make these dots of different sizes all over. And then we'll wait for this to dry before we move on to our next layer. I'm slightly going to increase the speed of my video now. And we're not doing anything different over here. We're just using the stippling method to make the leaves. And you're just going to follow that for the upcoming layers as well. So the process is just replicative. You're just going to work in layers and basically be doing same thing. So each time I do something different or add a different color, I will mention it down. But otherwise we're just going to use this doubling method and just add leaves everywhere on the branches that we created. For the next layer, I'm going to be using a mix of orange along with a little bit of bike. So we're just showing the different autumn colors and our tree. So we have the dark red, the lighter red, the orange, we'll have the yellows. So we're just going to be trying to put all these colors together in one painting are on our tree, right? So this one, you're going to be using the same method to stipulate over your dread that you've created. Now make sure that you're not covering all of the dead because we want to see the previous layer as well. Just go around it, maybe make smaller dots in places of where you've made bigger dot. All right, and let's go ahead, follow the same stippling method and you're going to be covering the entire surface in this orange layer as well. Hi. Once we're done with that and the fame slightly gyrase, we're going to go ahead and use the space tell yellow color for our next layer. So I'm actually adding a slight KPI, any tiny bit of brown as well, the mix, right? So I've used my yellow and white and a tiny touch of brown to it. And again, using my stippling method, I'm going to go ahead and add this layer on my leaves as well. So for my final layer on my autumn leaves, I caught it missed a little bit of the red color. So I'm using the permanent red color and I'm going to go ahead and add it in places that I feel looks a little bit empty and needs a little bit of the red leaf magic there. So just go ahead again. The process is same. We are just using the stippling mentored and the element I taught you earlier on how to make the list, the first one, just using that method, we are going to go ahead and add these leaves everywhere to make our tree look even fuller. Some extra leaves, you know, hanging down because we'll add some details on that in the end just to join them and give up, give our cheese and finer details. So do make some leaves hanging, dangling downwards. So this is the whole process against dumplings, dumplings doubling the whole idea for making your autumn t is just the stippling method with your brush. Just go ahead, have fun, make your brushes dance and enjoy the whole process. I think I'm actually just happy with how the tree looks now. So I'm just going to go ahead and add some final last details to it. So using my size 0 brush, I'm going to bring out these tiny branches hanging so that, you know, you'd get an idea of where the branch was. Just a few tiny branches at the bottom to understand better how your leaves were dangling. Which branch ends where just finally dance, you're just using the same branch method that we did earlier. Start your tiny branches fixed sum, add some details on the top, finer details. And that is it. We are done with our class project number one. And I think just looks so beautiful and I love how the tree has done out, along with the beautiful background. And those trees that have lost all their leaves waiting for winter to come in. So let us move on to our second class project. 10. Project 2 Part 1: Painting the Sky & Mountains: Let us paint the second class project. This project we are going to be using the colors titanium white, cadmium yellow, medium, orange, permanent red, quinacridone, lilac, sap green, or collide burnt umber and lamp black. So we're going to be using these eight or nine colors, will be mixing them to clear different, other different colors as well. And here are the swatches of the colors. If you don't have the exact sheets, don't worry, you can use the similar colors that you have available with you. So we are going to be painting this beautiful autumn landscape. So as you can see, we have three major elements that we have to keep in mind. So we have this beautiful sky. We have the mountains define cheese, and the beautiful autumn foliage. So we're going to start off by making a basic sketch. So as you can see in the reference picture, you're just going to be replicating the mountains. So it doesn't have to be exactly perfect. Like I told you, you can mix and match. You can change a few things here and there. It doesn't have to be exactly like the picture. But we're just going to be making these mountains that are one after the other. So the first one is the one that is really far distance away from the observer. While the ones that I am sketching towards the bottom is the one that is closer to the observer. So here I've made a set of six mountains that are continuous and irregular in shape. All right, and we're going to start off by making or mixing the color for the sky. So for this guy, I'm taking white and a little bit of quinacridone violet, and I'm adding a little bit of permanent red to it. So why I'm doing that is because I don't want that to be Jolie, just Bhopal. I wanted to have a tiny bit of pink undertone. And if you think that your paint has become really pink, you can add white to make it nice. And base two, we're going to start off by making it sum the area above default set of mountain that read it. And to blend it out more towards the mountain, we're going to use wide and we're going to blend the colors together. And if you think your paint is dry, don't forget to add a little bit of water to your paint or your brush. This makes a nice consistency for your pain to get easily blend double. The next color that I'm mixing is white, orange, and yellow to get this beautiful light based on orange color. And that's going to be at the top. So as you can see, I'm trying to create a, create a similar color palette to what is in the reference picture. And I'm going to apply it at the top in this to and fro motion and slightly bring it down. Now to blend these two colors together, I'm going to wet my brush and then I'm going to load it with a little bit of white. And I'm going to just go ahead with this left and right motion, this, so this is basically your blending with white that I taught you in the starting. Now, we are going to be using the to and fro motion to just create a nice and beautiful blend between the colors. If you think you want to add more pink or more orange to your sky, go ahead and add the paint and nice, he just blend these two colors together using white. So remember, we are doing the blending with white method here just to have a nice and beautiful transition between the colors. For the next step, I will be using my size four flat brush. Once we're happy with how the sky has done out, we're going to let it dry and then move ahead to add a few little clouds in the sky. So for the clouds, I'm going to be using my Quinacridone lilac mixed with white. So I'm going to create two different tunes. One's going to have more wide than the other so that I get a nice lighter based hello. So with the darker 1 first I'm going to make the stroke. So I remember how I taught you about the side strokes and starting. So we're going to be using that stroke method and just go sideways with your brush without applying a lot of pressure on it. And we want our brush to be slightly dry so that we get a nice rough texture as well. So the two kalos we are going to be using because the darker one is going to act as the shadows of your clouds. And the lighter lilac color is going to act as your highlights in the Cloud. So just go ahead and make these random clouds, they're not perfect. So just go with it however you like. And then we're going to move ahead to our first set of mountains for that in the same lilac color that I made the sky with, I'm adding a little bit of permanent red to it to get a nice pinkish color. And then I'm going to go ahead and just outline the mountain that I already have. So the first set is going to be, I'm just going to outline the border at which it is, you know, and covers some area. And then load my brush with some white paint and blend this together. And why we're doing that is because we want to show that the bottom part of the mountain is it has lot of missed or it's like a misty mountain. Alright? And that is why we are blending this Gallo. The base of the mountains with white. And then this process is going to be jeopardized. If you're going to repeat this same process for all your mountains. And each time we make a mountain, you're going to be adding a little bit more of the quinacridone lilac color to your mix. So as you can see, I added a little bit more quinoa lilac to my mixture, so it's a little bit darker than the previous one. And then I'm just going to cover some area, bring it down slightly. And then to do the planning part, I'm going to go ahead and use white and nicely, just blend them together. So that's it. This is the whole process. So you're going to be repeating this a couple of times. I have slightly increased the speed of the video so that it's not too long and boring because we're just doing the same step. And if you wanted to follow me along, you can slow the video down and then see how I am doing it. But the process, like I said, is replicator, right? So each time I make another, make another mountain, I'm just adding more lilac duet. So if I reach this point wherever this is the darkest color of my lilac. So I start adding a little bit of black to it. So I'll show you how I do that as well. Keep in mind that you're making these mountains, so you move onto your next mountain only after your previous layer has dried. So in this this mountain that I'm making the color that I'm using, it's basically a Quinn lilac color, does directly from the tube. So this is your pure Quinn lilac color, so it's nice and dark. And I'm using this word calcite stroke with my brush just to show like this far off, She's, so you cannot really see the shape of our trees, but you can see that there are irregular mountain. All right, so for that look, we can just make these vertical side stroke with your flat brush. So for this whole process, we'll be using our flat brush. And you're just going to go ahead and do the same method, bring it down then blended but white. If ever in-between, you feel that your blend has made your mountain to look a little bit awkward. You can go ahead and make the vertical strokes again just to give it a nice finished. And now that I have reached the second last mountain, right? So this one I've already surpassed the dock when lilac color. So in this one I'm adding a teeny tiny bit of black to get a darker tonal value of the same color. And I'm going to go and follow the same step. I'm going to make these vertical strokes with my brush to get these nice far off irregular mountain shape. I'm just going to follow the mountain that I sketched earlier. And if you think your sketches gone, don't worry, you can always catch your shape again over your acrylic paint and you'll be good to go. So now let us move on to the next part that is making your final mountain and adding the pine trees, do it. 11. Project 2 Part 2: Painting the Pine Trees: Let us now been the final layer of our mountain and then add the pine trees that he can see in the reference picture. Okay, so for that I'm just taking a mix of my bond, amber and lamp black. And using my size six flood brush, I'm again making that bought goods trope that I talked about, just to give it an uneven look. And I'm just going to cover the entire whitespace that we have with the Scala. So you're not, you're not doing anything extraordinary, or you're just going to mix your paint, add a bit of water to get a nice consistency, and then just cover up your entire whitespace at the bottom that we have remaining. Once we're done making the base, we're going to go ahead and make our pine trees. All right, so I'm using my size 1 detailing brush. And I'm going to go ahead and make the pine tree serve meat of mix of my permanent tread and the lamp black color to get a dark maroon color. And mostly it's towards the black side. All right, So it's really dark as well. And we're just going to go ahead and make a pine tree. So to understand the placement of your pine trees, you're going to go ahead and look at your reference picture to get a better idea of where you want to place them. And that is it future's going to use the same method in which I taught you how to make the buying trees. The only difference here will be we're not going all the way till the bottom. We will be only going until the last layer of mountain underground part that we need will only be going on that area. So you're just going to follow the process of making the pine trees that we learned earlier. And then maybe three pine trees. Hi, and and, and, and, and, and, and, and, and and, and, and and and, and act and, and, and, and, and and act at, at, at, at, at, at, at. The idea of having a reference picture and painting from a reference picture is really helpful because you understand the placement of your elements better, right? So if you think you're getting confused on how close or how far away you want your elements to me or your objects to be. You can have a look at similar reference picture to understand how the whole composition of your painting is. So how there's a bug ground is a middle ground and the foreground, right? So just look at the reference picture, tried to understand. So in this reference picture, you must have noticed there is one pine tree that is really at the back. The second pine tree is actually closer to the observer. And the torque pine tree is somewhat in the middle. And that's how you play with the sizes. So the first one that we made is really tiny, so it shows that it's at the back. The second one that we made is really closer. That is why the strokes are a lot clearer. You can see the branches since it is closer and the third one is far away. So I mean slightly in the middle. It's not as far as as far as the first one. All right. So it's in the middle and that is why it has this medium size. So that's how you play along with the different sizes, different shapes and reach. So even the ship release the shapes of your leaves and branches Wally with the distance at which enters from the absorber. And yeah, that's pretty much it for the pine trees. So in the next lesson we are going to be painting the autumn foliage. And yeah, so once you're done with this, let us paint the foliage. 12. Project 2 Part 3: Painting the Autumn Foliage: Let us be in the final part of our painting and that is our autumn foliage. Now, this whole process is a little time consuming because we are going to be working in maybe four or five layers. But hang in there because the final result is just beautiful. So you're going to be using the spoil to brush. If you don't have a spoiled brushed on 20 are going to be using a fan brush that's going to do the job as well. And the whole idea here is to build up your colors. So I like, as you can see, there's a black background at the bottom right. So we're going to build that up and have different colors stand out. So for the first one that you see me dabbing your is the red color. So that's actually red mixed with a little bit of bond amber to get a nice dark maroon color. And I'm going, just going to randomly dab it. That's going to be my first layer. Similarly, a half the sap green and black mix to get a dark green color. And so that you can see like you're basically going lighter from the darker colors. Alright, so you're just going to go from black to like a dark green then to a normal mid green light, then you're going to have more yellow or green. So that's exactly what we're doing. Here. We're just going to dab in the colors in different locations, like randomly. So you'll have a few red blotches, you'll have a few green blanches and a few brown or like, you know, your muddy color blotches. All right, so for that, I'm going to mix my orange with a little bit of brown to get the brown color. For the lighter green part, I'm going to add a little bit of yellow to it. So you're just going to play around with different autumn colors, basically are right, and you're going to go lighter with each layer. So I'm going to wait for one layer to completely dry before you go ahead and tap in your next set of layers. Alright? And using your spoilt brush plays a very important role because you get this really nice rough texture, exactly that we want for our foliage, as you can see in our reference picture as well. So you're going to have three sets of sections. One is going to be a red section, one is going to be your green section. So here you'll see me mix more green to the mix that I get a nice greener color, which is lighter than the previous stroke that I made. And I'm just going to tap in to build the layers. So I'm going to have a red layer of green layer are yellow layer, which is going to be slightly lighter than the green one. So for that I'll be adding a teeny bit of yellow to make it lighter. And then I'll have this orange layer, which is basically a brown layer. So that leaves that have Dawn Brown. Those come under that layer. All right, so that's basically your orange mixed with burnt umber to get that color. And yes, you're just going to build a less. And with each layer, you're going to wait for it to completely dry before moving on to the next one. Now once a second layer has dried, I'm going to add a tiny bit of white and a bit of red to my mix because adding white directly was making it a lot being cut or more red and a little bit of white. And I'm going to start tapping it. And this time I'm not going to cover the entire area. All right. I'm going to cover the top part of my strokes that this is because this is going to be your highlighted part of your painting, right? So when you look at a bush, right, you cannot see the light fall in the depths of your bush, right? You can see them on the top and you can see the colors that are on the top. But in that like deep down, It's like it gets darker, right? So that's basically the idea that we are using here as well. So once you're done with the Dred one, we're going to add a little bit of a white and yellow to the green mix. And we're going to just apply it randomly on my green area, the green set of branches that I made. So they're very random. You just stopped. The whole idea is to tap. One thing to make sure while you're tapping with his spoiled brat Sharjah Fan Brush is to not apply a lot of pressure on your brush. So you have to be really light handed for this. Just be like just be Floyd, Just have fun. Next, I'm adding a little bit more orange and white. Did the mix for that orange section or Lego brown section that I told you about for the blushes. And I'm just going to go ahead and tap. So each time the mix of colors that you're going to make for the, for your autumn foliage. We're gonna go ahead and add tiny bit of white to it to make it lighter. So this one is again, my yellow and green mix in which the quantity of yellow is slightly more than the quantity of green and yellow. So I'm just gonna go ahead, tap it and like have fun with this stabbing process. It is slightly long. Like I said, it is a long process. But the end result is really turned out really beautiful. So you have addressed me on those and go ahead with this. Again. I've added a little bit of white to my dread, made the mix. Again, I'm tapping in the same way like I told you on the top, trying to go ahead and, you know, not covered it completely. You should still be able to see the shadow or the dark parts of the bush. And then I've added again a little bit of white to the mix. And I'm going to go ahead and tap it on the greener area. Another thing to keep in mind while you are tapping the grass is to make sure that you're not picking up a lot of paint as well. All right. You don't want to pick up a lot of paint. He wanted to slightly just touch your brush with the paint and the brush is spoiled, it will pick up just the exact correct amount that it needs to have these blotchy, textured look with your brush. Alright, so just going to take in just the right amount is touch your brush, slightly debit, and you'll be able to get a beautiful color. And like I said, you have three or four sets of colors that you are going to play around with it in or changing anything. You're just adding a tiny bit of white to it to make it lighter. And you're going to be working in layers. So mostly four to five layers is necessary to see the correct beautiful 3D effect of your bushes. So you're going to be able to see the darker parts are going to be able to see the spleen and the black through the strokes that you've made and the darker colors that you've laid down before. So that is why you've gotta have patient and you'll have to just hang in there and do it and don't forget, we had for the layer to completely dry before you move on to the next layer so that it just doesn't get completely mixed and messy. So wait for it to dry before you move on to the next layer. And, and, and, and, and, and, and, and, and, and, and, and, and, and, and, and, and and, and, and, and I'm going to leave the auto foolish Baptist life it dry before I add some final touches. Until then I'm going to add details to my pine trees, which is basically I'm using a light brown color that is your bond umber mixed with white. I'm just gonna go ahead and just add applied on some of the leaves. As you can see, I'm not going over all of the leaves. I'm just randomly going over some of the leaves just to give it a nice and beautiful highlight. So you're gonna do this for all your pine trees. This randomly go over it, It's not perfect. You can skip the ones that you that doesn't come into your mind while you're doing it. I'm not really thinking a lot while doing this. I'm just randomly applying it on some of them to give them highlights. And once I'm done with that, I'm just going to go ahead and add a few final brushstrokes and random strokes just in case if I think it looks really light and there are a lot of highlighted buds and you can't see the shadow, so you should be able to see the darker parts as well. So I'm just going to go ahead and add a few little strokes. And then using my size one brush, I'm going to go ahead and add a few bigger leaves here and there so that it just doesn't look like blushed up strokes, but it should have a little definition as well. And that's pretty much it. We are done with our painting and I'm so happy with the weight has done out. I told you to just hang in there and make your artwork and not rush into finishing it because the layers is what brings up the beauty of RPN thing. And yes, so we're done with the second class projects. So let's move on to the third one. 13. Project 3 Part 1: Painting the Sky & Snowy Mountains: Let us spend our final class project, which is a beautiful autumn landscape around the Mount Fuji. And the colors that we're going to use for this class is titanium white, cadmium yellow medium, vermilion, and the cadmium red deep. So these are the colors that we are going to be using for the foliage and the leafs part of our painting. And for the sky part we have ultramarine blue. And again for the leaves, we have sap green and lamp black. So here are the swatches for the colors. If you do not have the exact sheets, don't worry. All of these use colors that are slightly similar to the colors that I've washed out. And here is the reference picture. So as you can see, we have these beautiful leaves and branches coming from the top. We have the Mount Fuji in the background, and then we have some more branches and leaves from the bottom left and some ground covered with trees at the bottom. So we're going to start off with our simple sketch. So we're going to sketch out exactly what we see in the reference picture. So the Mount Fuji and alter the ground parts. I'm just going to cover that area and sketch roughly what I see in the reference picture. So sketch is very simple. It's not at all difficult. It's not anything very difficult TO, it's just a simple mountain and a little bit of the ground part. So using my size it flat brush. Now we're going to go ahead and paint the sky. So I'm going to start off by taking a little bit of y, and I'm going to add my ultramarine blue to get a lighter brown color. And I'm just going to mix these two colors very well together. So that is going to be my top half of the sky basically. And then at the bottom, we'll mix another color and then blend these two colors together. So slows. Let's focus on the blue part. So I have mixed blue and ultramarine ultimately in blue and white together. And I'm just going to start applying it from the top and slightly start bringing it downwards by using this left and right motion. Don't forget to add a little bit of water to your mixture to make it nice and flowy so that you can go ahead and blended nicely. And remember to be quick with the process. You do not want your paint to dry out. Because if that happens, you won't be able to blend the colors. So we want to be quick in mixing the colors so that we can do the blending part quick. Next, I'm going to take a little bit of my cadmium red and mix it with the blue and add a little bit of white. Just get this nice light gray color with a beautiful pinkish, bluish undertone. So just going to use these two colors together and blend them. So again, over here we're going to do a nice and beautiful direct color blending. You're not adding white to blend the colors. And we're just going to use this left and right motion and add in more beans. If we think we can still see the GAN was below it. And then just go left and right and just blend the two colors together. Once my Skype bot is completely dry, I'm going to go ahead and sketch the mountain again, send it as below the paint now and I can't really see the sketch that I made earlier. So that is why I'm going to sketch it again. And then we're just going to go ahead and paint the mountain parts. So for the mountains, I am going to take my algebra being low and add a tiny bit of black. And by tiny bit of black, I mean, just lightly touching your brush, the tip of your brush with the black and picking up whatever comes in with that little touch and mix your blue with it. So we just want a nice dark blue color. I'll write like the gray under dawn basically. And we're going to use the Scholar and completely cover the mountain part of our sketch with this color. So you're just going to blend the color and cover the entire portion with the color. And remember, the way that we blend the color in our elements section where I showed you how to make the story mountain. So it's just going to follow that method. You're going to be having these strokes along the sketch. Just like how you're not going to go on a correspondingly, you can blend it horizontally, but in the end, make sure that you are going in along with the sketch that you've made. If you think in between your paints are drying, you can spray them with water using a spray bottle and they will stay moist for a longer period of time. So you don't have to worry about the colors that are already on your palette. And now using my size four flat brush, just following the method that we followed for making the snowy mountains. So I'm adding a little bit of blue and red to the mix, and I'm adding white to it. That's going to be our base color. So as you can like, remember how I told you the snow is going to shine on one side and the other side is going to have the darker parts. So quite, but it will have this non-solid on it. And that is why we're creating this color so that it acts as the base color. And then using this column going to make the strokes, they're going to be flatter at the top. And as I come down, I'm gonna slight twist. My book was dry brush so that I get these nice thin strokes as well. So this way you are going to give this nice texture to your mountain to Mount Fuji actually. So that it looks like this, this irregular shaped the Mount Fuji is irregular, It's not a plane mountain, right? So that is why using the stroke you can go slow over here. Don't worry, go from flat stroke, thin straw. And you're basically just going to cover your mountain with the white and beautiful snow. And then just remember that they're going to be dividing amount and into two halves. So the left one left section is going to have the snow moving towards the left side. And the right side is going to have this NOW moving towards the right side. And then in the center, you want to just bring the stroke that is randomly going towards bought your site. So slightly to the left and slightly to the right. So now I'm assuming that my light is falling on Mount Fuji from the right side. What means, remember how I showed you in element, but also that the light was falling from the right side. And that is why the right side is going to have whiter snow as compared to the left side. So that is exactly what I am going to do. I'm going to just finish up making the mountains, the snow on the mountains. Actually. Just add some random strokes, add some thin strokes and bring them down to give it a nice and beautiful irregular shape. And once this layer is dried up, we are going to go ahead and add the snow on the right side to be darker. So we're going to add a few more layers of white so that this date nice and wide as compared to the right side. So that gives you the illusion that the sun is shining on the right side of my mountain. You might want to repeat the process of adding the white maybe twice, because sometimes once a titanium white is dried up, it tries to be slightly lighter. So adding two coats of the same color is going to help you out to me. The white stand out properly on a mountain so that it gives that illusion. And yeah, so two coats of the titanium, white on the right side and you can slightly brush it over on the left side on some of the strokes as well. Not completely, but very lightly. And next, as you can see, they are going to be some irregularities on your mountains that do not have the snowfall in on them but they're still irregularities, right. So your management is not a plane surface. So foot that is regularity. I'm going to mix a little bit of sap green, my permanent red and white together. And just like how I made the strokes for the snow, I'm going to do this theme thing here as well. Just make some vertical strokes downwards facing towards the right side and towards the left side and just slightly blended with your finger that it doesn't look like sharp strokes on the mountain that is already dry. So you can just match it out with your hands as well. It is not really clear over here, but when I move my canvas, you'll be able to see what I am talking about. And then I'm going to add a little bit of white to my same mixture along with a little bit of yellow and red. Just to add the lighter part, like I told you, the sun is falling or the sunlight is falling directly on this side. On my mountain, on the right side. From the right side you have the sun shining on it. And that is why you need to show the lighter parts to be on the right side. Just mix in a little bit of white, red, and yellow together to get this nice brown and just go with it. Three layers. You'll have your base layer and merged layer and the lighter layer with a lot more white to it. And then just slightly smudge it out with your fingers. The titanium white slightly dried out to be lighter than what I thought. So I'm going to go ahead with another code just to make it nice and a lot more wider than before. So you can do that or skip this step if you've done it properly. And now let us move on to making the ground and the autumn foliage. 14. Project 3 Part 2: Painting the Autumn Foliage: Let us move on to painting the ground part of it or like the father of ground and the fuel little trees at the bottom left. So for that I'm going to create the first mix, which is, which is a mix of my sap, green and black to get this nice dark green color. And then using my size four flat brush itself, I'm going to go ahead and cover this entire area with this column. So just like how we did in the previous class project, where we build up the foliage in layers. That is exactly what we're going to do with us. Boiled brushes here as well. Alright, so we are going to be building it up in layers so quickly I'm just going to cover this entire portion, the white band that we have remaining with this color. And then start building up this section with the foliage in layers. By the time the bottom layer dries, I'm going to go ahead and sketch the branches coming out from the top left and right corner. So we're going to look at your reference image to get a better idea, or you can just make them randomly wherever you like as well. So this is completely up to you. You can make them. Thank you. Seen that reference picture or just whatever comes into your mind. Just remember we are going to be having a closer look at the branches. So you might want to sketch it according to the closer, what a branch looks from a closer angle. So the first thing that we're going to do now is just slightly go ahead and outline the sketch of the branches, that will be it. So I'm going to use a mix of my lamp, black color with a little bit of sap green that was on the ballot already. And I'm going to go ahead and use my size two round brush. And using this mixture, I'm just going to go ahead and just go over the outline or the sketch of the branches that I made here. Just going to have a nice grip on your brush. You're going to hold your brush word glee. Take 90 degree to the canvas so that you have a nice grip on it. And just go ahead and color this entire portion with your lamp black mixture. Once we're done outlining the branches, we're going to go ahead and take us foiled brush, audio fan brush, and add a little bit of yellow and sap green together and make a nice, beautiful, slightly lighter green mix. So like I said, we will be building of the foliage in layers. All right. Snyder, just going to go ahead and start dabbing like we did before. Slightly touch your brush and start tapping these random strokes. So again, the idea is that the light is falling from the top. All right? And that is why we want to build up the layers that way. So you want to be able to see the darker parts of this whole foliage section, as well as like the highlighted parts. Alright, so just go ahead and start tapping with this color. Then we'll wait for this to wait for this layer to completely dry. And then we're going to go ahead and move on to our next layer that will be adding a little more yellow and white to our mixture. And similarly, we'll go ahead the same process and maybe four to five layers. Now once this layer has completely dried, we're going to go ahead and add a little bit of a white the mixture and a little bit of yellow. And then again, start tapping with our spoiled brush. So make sure that you have a nice grip on your brush. You're hauling at 90 degree to the paper. So perpendicular to the paper. And you're going to go ahead and start tapping again with your spoiled brush to create these random, rough textured stroke. So this way, you get a nice look and finish for your foliage and you don't have to give each and every leaf or each and every bush. It's details. So having a spoiled brush or a fan brush really helps you out in creating the deeds of your bushes. And, and, and, and, and, and, and, and, and, and now if I could layer has completely dried, we are going to go ahead and added for yellow and white at the next. And again, go ahead and tap it on, I forget. So these are basically like so many cheese, like a whole bunch of trees together. And that is why you can see these different tech sections that looks like different tree standing very close like a huge forest. Basically, alright, and the sun is falling from the top on your forest and that is why you have some light apart, some darker, but for your trees or dislike a whole bunch of, like I said, top heads off your forest trees. Alright, and once we're done with that, we're going to go ahead and paint that little tree from the left bottom corner, if you remember. So using my size two brush, I'm going to go ahead and take that black, black and slightly darker green mixture. And I'm going to go ahead and make these little branches again protruding from the left bottom corner. You can have a look at the reference picture to understand how you want to place the branches protruding out from the left side. But if you don't want to look at the reference picture, that is completely fine as well. You can just go ahead and make a few branches from the left side. And then we're going to slowly start building up the colors on the leaves, on the branches. All right, so we're gonna start off with the green mix that we already had on our ballot. Middle green that we used for the forest green at the bottom, that is going to go ahead and start tapping these little dots, the blinks step that we did remember in the elements section. So that's exactly what we are going to apply here as well. And then for the next layer, you are going to mix a little bit of yellow to the same green. And then again, I'm going to use a stippling method and build up the colors of this branch. So the leaves on this branch columnar B, is going to be off a lot of different colors. So you're gonna have dug green, some lighter greens, then we'll have a little bit of brown as well. So yeah, we're going to be just building up the colors one-by-one with each passing layer. And that is it. This one is a secondary in which you have more yellow to yellow and green mixture. For the next set of leaves, I'm going to make some vermilion in the same green and the yellow mixture and add a little bit of yellow as well, a little bit of green. So it's going to be a mix of all these colors together and adding a little bit of white as well just to give us the lighter color of the same mix. So basically I'm just playing around with different colors just to get the right colors that you would like for your leaves and just start tapping on your branches that you've already made. So you have the basic structure or the outline of your leaves are going to Stan and it is going to randomly start tapping to give your branches and leaves a lot of different colors. Aq, aq, aq, aq, aq, aq, aq, aq, aq. Aq. Once I'm happy with how the leaves look on the branch coming out from the left side. I'm going to stop working on it now and then move on to the next lesson. So in the next lesson, we will be discussing how we will be adding the leaves to the branches that are coming out from the top. 15. Project 3 Part 3: Painting the Branches & Leaves: Before we move ahead and add the leaves on the top branches, we're going to go ahead and add a few highlighted leaves on the bottom branches as well. So for that, I'm using a mixture of cadmium yellow. A little bit of the brown mix sets already on my palette and a bit of white. So I'm just going to go ahead and then just tap on using the stippling method that we did earlier on the branches, just like we did for the other previous list as well. Once I am done with the bottom branches, it's time to move on to the top ones. So for that, for the first layer, I'm using a mix of black and cadmium red to get a dark red or maroon color. And then using the stippling method, which is going to go ahead and tap around those branches that we have sketched out. There's no perfect way to do it. You're just stumbling around us creating these little dots around the branches that are basically going to be your leaves. And like I said, we are going to be working in layers. So we're going to be adding more colors to it with each for the layer that we do. So go ahead and just tap on some leaves and half. Add, add, add, add, add, add, add, add, add, add, add, add, add, add. Once this layer has completely dried, are going to move on to the next layer. So for the next layer, I'm going to take some vermilion, add a little bit of white to it to get a nice, beautiful orange color. And then using this color, I'm going to go ahead and tap on the leaves using the same stippling method. So you have your base ready, right? So you've got a clear idea of how your leaves look on the branches. So just go ahead and fill out the spaces that you have and covered a few of the red strokes that you've already made and just let some of them be seen through the orange, that orange layer that you're adding on it. So yeah, this process really time consuming. So enjoy the process of just creating these random dots forever. You unlike just don't think so much and enjoy the whole process of stippling and act. And now once this layer has dried, it's time to move on to the next one. So for that, I'm going to be adding a little bit of yellow to the same orange mix that I already have on my palate. Now I'm going to use my size two brush again. And I'm going to just make those dots like we have been doing all this time. So this time this is going to be at today and we're just going to cover it up and make a bigger bunch of leaves on the branches. Add, add, add, add, add, add, add, add, add, add, add. And add, add, add, add, add, add, add, add, add, add, add, add. Now once this layer has dried first, it's time for us to move on to our fourth and final layer, which is of this beautiful yellow color. So we have cadmium yellow, we have vide And the audience that was already on our palette. But this time it's a more yellow color. And using my size two brush again, we are going to follow the same process and tap on the leaves, on the underlying leaves as well. So you're just having fun, make sure that you're not covering up all the orange or the reds that we've already high. You're just going to be adding slightly away from one another so that you can see the previous led through your different layers. What I'm trying to say here is you should be able to see the red strokes. You should be able to see the audience strokes. You should be able to see the yellow, orange stroke and this yellow stroke as well. So you should be able to see all of these leaves, so make sure that you're not covering up your previous strokes completely. Of course you can go over a few of them just to give it more details, but just don't go over all of them. So yeah, because it's been working so hard on making the legs right. So you don't want to cover up all your layers altogether. Add, add, add, add, add, add, add, add, add, add, add, add, add, add, add, add, add, and, and, and, and, and. And. Now it's just dying for a few different. Finally, Datastore up being ink. So I'm using my size 0 brush and I'm using a mix of lamp black and a little bit of a million. And I'm going to go ahead and add these teeny tiny branches and just make the branches look a little bit defined. Just in case, you know, we have gone over with the layers of leaves on it. But make sure that you're not showing off all your branches, you know, because then that would just completely not make sense, right? So B12 just somehow outline some of the branches. So you might want to do it like leaves, a cluster of leaves then showing often a little bit of branch and then leaves again. And then at the end of these little cluster of leaves that you have, you might just want to show some branches protruding out just to show the end of your branch. So this gives your branches are really nice, nicer look so that you understand where your branches are ending, where the final branches are. Okay. This is the end of your grant or a single branch NCAR. So yeah, just add in a few little Finally deals. And that will be the end of our painting. And, and, and, and, and, and he signed any damage to our main thing was the last step. Once you're happy with how everything has turned out, you can stop working on them. And now it's actually time to admire your BOD. I totally in love with how this piece has turned out and how well composed it is. I loved the beautiful branches from the top and the pretty Mount Fuji in the background. So this is the end of your project. 16. Conclusion! See you in the next class : And we did it guys. We have reached the end of the class. I'm so happy that I got to teach you how to paint these three beautiful autumn landscapes using x-ray leg pains. As you must have learnt in this glass, that acrylics is really fun medium to paint with. And even if you have no prior knowledge, you can always learn something new while painting with them. I hope you learned something important from this class like the techniques such as the blending layering, dry brush technique, and the brushstrokes that we learn to using our different brushes. Along with the different elements such as the branches and leaves, foliage, buying trees and mountains. You can always use these elements and techniques in a lot of your future projects as well. These basics that I thought you are always used in most of the landscape paintings in different combinations. I hope you'll enjoy painting these class projects with me. And if you haven't been to the long, don't worry. You can take your time and painters based on the time availability that you have. I have structured this class in a way that each of the class project is different and you learn something new from each of them and have so much fun in the entire process of painting. Don't forget to share your paintings with me under the Project and Resources section, where you can also find the reference picture for each of the projects. If you're sharing them on Instagram, don't forget to tag me at the simply aesthetic, and I shall see you in the next class. Bye bye.