Anyone Can Paint: Learn to Paint 10 Easy Watercolor Sunsets | Zaneena Nabeel | Skillshare

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Anyone Can Paint: Learn to Paint 10 Easy Watercolor Sunsets

teacher avatar Zaneena Nabeel, AURORABYZ - ARTIST AND INSTRUCTOR

Watch this class and thousands more

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Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Lessons in This Class

19 Lessons (2h 12m)
    • 1. Hello & Welcome Back!

      1:56
    • 2. Class Projects

      1:20
    • 3. About Watercolors

      2:28
    • 4. Materials You'll Need

      4:34
    • 5. Watercolor Washes

      8:06
    • 6. Class Projects

      3:00
    • 7. Preparing the Paper

      4:30
    • 8. Taping the Paper

      2:45
    • 9. Orange Sunset

      10:22
    • 10. Glowing Lights

      9:41
    • 11. Palm Trees Sunset

      10:01
    • 12. Purple Sunset

      10:22
    • 13. Golden Yellow Sunset

      10:37
    • 14. Fiery Red Sunset

      10:21
    • 15. Violet Ocean

      10:49
    • 16. Sunset Drive

      10:13
    • 17. Purple Beach

      9:44
    • 18. Red Sunset Lake

      10:17
    • 19. Thank You for Joining :)

      1:07
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24

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About This Class

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​​If it’s been a long time since you had fun expressing yourself creatively and if you don’t know how to begin, I’m here to help you. I’m thrilled to invite you all to a beautiful beginner friendly watercolour class where we are together painting 10 mini sunsets and the best part is that each of them can be done in 10 minutes.

Sunsets are so beautiful, it is indeed a magical moment to witness the sky turning into a huge canvas. Sunset are a great inspiration for all the artists, you can learn about wonderful color combinations, light and hues and so much more. I love watching sunsets as well as painting them, you can do it too.

It's okay if you are an absolute beginner. There are a lot of misconceptions about art. Some believe that you have to be born with artistic talent to be an artist. Some others don’t consider themselves to be gifted artistically and feel there is no point in even trying since they won’t be satisfied with the results.

In fact anyone can do ART and everyone should do ART.

There is no need to feel intimidated about creating art since it’s the process of creating that provides the benefits, not the quality of the results. Creating art trains you to concentrate on details and pay more attention to your environment.

In this way, it acts like meditation.

Through this class I’m gonna take you through a beautiful journey where you are going to experience watercolors like never before. I want all of you to get more friendly with the medium and get more confident at it. Through this class I want to raise awareness that anyone can paint even if you are trying art for the first time, you just need some passion and patience. Alright! Let’s dive in!

You don’t have to have any particular artistic skills to get started. Ready to give it a try?

Materials you will need  

  • Watercolor Paper – I recommend to use an artist grade watercolor paper which is 100% cotton 140 lb cold pressed paper.  I will be using Canson Heritage Cold pressed 140 lb. You can use loose sheets/ a readily available sketchbook. I'm doing my paintings on an accordion sketchbook , take a look at the next video to know how to make one of your own.
  • Brushes - Round Brushes Size 8 and Size 2, Flat Brush - 1/2 inch
  • Watercolor - There is a color palette section included , please refer to that to get the complete list
  • A palette to mix your paints.
  • Masking tape
  • Any kind of board to fix your paper (if you are using separate sheets for each painting)

Meet Your Teacher

Teacher Profile Image

Zaneena Nabeel

AURORABYZ - ARTIST AND INSTRUCTOR

Teacher

Hey there! Myself Zaneena Nabeel, an architect by profession and an artist by everything. I'm originally from India, currently based in Dubai. I experiments and enjoys all sorts of medium. For me art is a therapy and I find immense happiness playing with colours.

Since early childhood I loved to draw and paint. when I joined for my architecture studies I totally gave up on art as I got so busy with my studies, but the love for art was growing deep inside me. Once I graduated and moved to Dubai I started investing little of time on art. I started visiting art events and talks and realized the endless world of colours waiting for me. Within no time I took my tools and came back in action and started an Instagram page and here I'm :) 

Now I conduct local/... See full profile

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Transcripts

1. Hello & Welcome Back!: Some people believe that you have to be born with an artistic talent to be an artist and there are some other people who feel like there is no point even in trying, because they won't be satisfied with the results. In fact, anyone can do art and I think everyone should do art. Hello everyone. My name is Zaneena Nabeel. I'm a model, an artist, and an art instructor. I'm originally from India and currently residing in Dubai. Today, I'm here to take you all through a beautiful journey, where we are going to experience watercolors like never before. Watercolor is a very familiar medium to all of us. Starting in kindergarten, we all have tried watercolors at least once in our life. We just need that little knowledge to start this course. Creating art is not just about the end result, there is a lot more benefits. It is more like a meditation. Creating art trains you to focus on details and pay more attention to your environment. Creativity is more than just art. Albert Einstein described creativity as intelligence having fun. If it's been a long time since you had fun expressing yourself creatively and if you don't know how to begin, I'm here to help you. I'm [inaudible] to invite you all to a beautiful beginner-friendly watercolor class, where we are together painting 10 minutes sunsets. The best part is that each of them can be done in 10 minutes. This class is specially designed for beginners, as for last intermediate artists. Even if you're using watercolors for the first time, you can join in. I'll be talking about each and every material you will need in detail. This will help you understand the medium and get comfortable with it. Also, I will be explaining about the techniques and how you can incorporate that in your paintings. You don't have to have any particular artist experience to get started. You just need some passion and patience and of course some watercolors. Let's dive in. 2. Class Projects: Before we deep dive into the class, let's have a quick look at all the projects that we're going do today. We'll be painting a series of 10 gorgeous mini sunset. We'll start with a simple orange sky. Here is the second one. We'll be seeing two colors for the sky, and we learn to paint those glowing lights. For the third one, we'll use three colors for the sky, and along with that, you'll also learn to paint those gorgeous palm trees. The fourth one is a magical purple sunset. The next one is a golden yellow sunset. It's a very simple yet an elegant painting. Then we have a bold and beautiful red sunset. You're going to allow this painting. It is very easy to do. The next one is one o the gorgeous color combination. This one is one of my most favorite from the 10 mini sunsets. To compliment this gorgeous color combinations, we're going to add some street lamps. The next one is a really pretty beach sunset. This one is one of the best from the collection. Then we have a purple beach. It's another simple and easy painting. Finally, we have this gorgeous red sunset. That's a collection of many gorgeous sunsets we are going to create in this class. I hope you all got a better idea about what to expect from this class. Now, it's time to go with our first lesson. 3. About Watercolors: Watercolor is one of the most unique medium for creating art. Its unpredictability and unique characteristics makes it the dearest medium of most of the artists. I have been using watercolors since childhood. My love for the medium has grown over the years and so has my collection. Watercolor paint is made from a color pigment dispersed in a suspension that binds the pigment and allows it to adhere to a surface when it's dry. You might have seen expensive watercolor brands as well as very cheap ones. Some brands are so expensive that you get only buy by ml tube, whereas you can buy a whole set from another brand for the same amount. Brands charge the watercolor according to the amount of pigment they use. Some of them use high-quality pigments without any fillers or impurities. This is exactly what makes them more expensive. It's the actual amount of pigment in the paint makes a difference between the student grade and artist grade paint. The artist-grade paint contain more pigment. There are several types of watercolor paint available in the market, the most common as paint in a metal tube. You can squeeze out the desired amount of paint freshly from your tube. Then there's paint that comes as a dry cake and a small plastic pan that requires more water to make it a good consistency for painting. These are travel-friendly and best-suited for plainer painting. The next type of watercolor is the watercolor that comes in a liquid form. It comes as concentrated liquid watercolors. These are highly pigmented compared to the watercolor tubes and watercolor pans. They can be used to create stunning effects and beautiful blends. There are many more variety of watercolor paints. There is watercolor paint that comes as a dry color sheet. You can pick the paint directly from that color sheets using a wet brush. Then there is watercolor sticks. Just like the name implies, watercolor comes as a stick form. But the most commonly used watercolor paint are ones in the tubes. Artist find watercolor paints in tubes easier and convenient. I'm someone who loves to work with freshly squeezed paint. But there are times I prefer using watercolor from pans as well. It all depends on the artist or brands for their painting session. If you're a beginner, I would suggest you to use the colors you have with you already and get familiarized with the watercolors, learn the techniques on how the medium works. Gradually switch to good-quality artist-grade paint. 4. Materials You'll Need: Let's have a look at the materials you will need to follow this class. We'll start with the books lovely poll. For this entire course, I'm using my Canton totaled each cold press, watercolor paper. This one is a 100 percent cotton. It is cold pressed and it is wonderful to be. So you will find student grade paper and artist grade watercolor paper in the market. The artist grade paper is made from 100 percent cotton and the student grade as mostly a mix of cellulose on cotton. To get the best results, I would suggest you to Colbert a paper which sub 100 percent cotton. Now this one is cold press watercolor people, you can't see that picture of my people. This one has mightily textured. When you're looking for watercolor people, you will find three varieties. The app cold pressed or rough and hot press. These names defines the texture of the beef grow. A corporis were declared before as mightily textured, badass, the draft green, just like the name says, it is more rough on a task, dark mood, texture. And the last one is hot press. This where I do or develop people doesn't have much texture. It is quite flat out. It is not trigonal recommended for watercolor landscapes. So I would suggest you to go with cold press watercolor paper. The third thing we need to keep in mind when you're choosing your watercolor paper as the thickness of your people, you might have no Does numbers like 90 LB, 140 LB on your watercolor paper, this is actually the thickness of your people. The more Judaism or the more that MBB you'll paper will be more tick. And again, 100 manipulates or water. So if we are watercolor projects to get the best yourself, it is good to go with a 100 percent cotton watercolor paper that has to be cold pressed and that should be Hoffman when 140 LB. Now to fix my people, either be using a backing board. This one is a piece of cardboard. You can use a clipboard or a piece of plywood or any of the silk is that it can fix your people on till now to fix your paper, you will lead a masking tape. This oneness of wind inch masking tape. You can use a big industry far washi tape or masking tape. Next, let's talk about the colors you will need for this entire course. Either be using tubed watercolor, you can either use two watercolor. Our pants were declared, and both of them and walk. Here's the entire list of colors I will be using throughout this course. At the beginning of every painting, I will be talking more about the colors you would need for that particular project. Now, don't stress out if you don't have the same color that I'm using q, try to go with any of the colleague card with this nearly similar. Now let us take a look at the brushes you will need. For this class, I will be using four different brushes. The first one is a wash brush. It is 1.5 inch in size. So this is mainly to apply a coat of water onto your paper. Then I'll be acquainted with a bet on wet technique. So that's supposed brush. Now the second one is another flat brush. This one is a half inch flat brush. This is the main brush I'll be using for this class. This is to apply that background washes. So you can go with any of your medium, two Pico sides, flat brush. If you don't have a flat brush, feel free to go with your round brush. This one is from silver black velvet brush. Okay, so that's a second brush. Now the third one, a strong push. This is size number 6, strong fresh from Princeton. We'll be using this brush to add in the slightly bigger details like mountain. Go with any Orpheus smaller to medium-sized brush. Then the last rows you will need as a detailing brush. Our Amy other brush which has a pointed tip. This one the size number to a DOM Crush, Again from Princeton. I'm going to be using this brush to add all the minute details. Okay, So those are the four brushes you will need. Now to mix your colors. You will need a palette. This one is a CIT omic palette. You can either use a plastic palette or a ceramic palette, or even a dinner plate. Next to the lead, two jars of water. One has to stay clean and the other one, a server and soft to paint from your brush. Next, you will need IT people or Tableau to dab off the excess amount of paint from your brush. You can also use a cart on clot. Next, you will need a pencil and an eraser. Now for some of the details we're adding an eval painting. It is better to go with the pen rather than using your brush. This was a black ink drawing pin. If you don't have a blackface, it is absolutely okay. You can use your detailing brush and adding the details you've seen your brush. Next you will need a wide sharpen. This is also optional. If you have a white gel pen, you can totally add the sun and the reflection using your children. Otherwise, you can use your brush and use your right What the color. All right, so those are the materials you will need to follow this class and get them ready. 5. Watercolor Washes : In this session, we're going to discuss about the main watercolor techniques, as well as watercolor washes, which is going to help you in the class projects. In watercolor, there are two major techniques, which is wet-on-wet and wet-on-dry. Both the techniques are really important in watercolor and they are used to create different kinds of effects. We'll start with wet-on-wet, which is one of the most loved technique in watercolor. Just like the name says, wet-on-wet technique simply means applying the wet paint on a wet background. You might have seen artists applying a coat of water on the paper before they start applying the paint. This is done to make your background wet so that you can apply the wet paint on that wet background. I'm taking some wet paint, my background is already wet, now I'm applying that wet paint on the wet background. You can see how beautifully the colors are spreading. This is exactly what the wet-on-wet technique is. With watercolor, the major task is to make your background wet for a longer time. When you have applied a coat of water on your background, this becomes a little easier. It will stay wet for a longer time and you'll be able to blend the colors a lot more easily. Wet-on-wet technique is not just about applying that coat of water and adding paint onto it, it is also about adding details using a wet paint on a freshly painted background, so you're using a wet paint and you're applying the details on a wet background, that is also wet on wet technique. The next technique is wet-on-dry. I think you can already guess the difference. Wet-on-dry means you're applying the wet paint on a dry paper. We're not pre-wetting the paper. As you could see here, I'm applying the wet paint on the dry background. As we are not applying the paint on already wet background, the colors tends to look a little more brighter compared to wet-on-wet. Now, wet-on-dry is also about adding details using a wet paint on a dry background. I have already applied paint on my background and it has completely dried. Now I'm adding a mountain using a wet paint. This is also called wet-on-dry. Both the techniques have its own beauty and its own importance in watercolor. Depending on the style of the painting and the result you're looking for, you can choose to go with any of these techniques. Your first step in mastering watercolor is to master wet-on-wet and wet-on-dry technique. If you get comfortable with these two techniques, you will automatically get comfortable with watercolors. Now let's have a look at different watercolor washes. We'll start with flat wash. I have fixed a piece of paper on my board already and I have some colors on my palette. I'm going with crimson. I'm using my flat brush. Now, I'm simply applying this color on the entire paper. I have prepared a mix of wet paint and I'm applying that on the dry paper. I'm going to fill up the entire paper in this color. The main object of a flat wash is to get a smooth even finish across the whole surface of the paper. It can be any color. You have to prepare a mix in advance so that you won't run out of paint in between, and apply that paint onto the entire surface. To get a clean and smooth finish like this, you will have to load your brush with enough of paint and you need to keep on dipping your brush in that wet paint before it gets dry. That is the first technique, which is called flat wash. We applied a solid color onto the entire paper. We didn't apply coat of water, we applied the wet paint directly on a dry people. That means it's a wet-on-dry technique and it's a wet-on-dry dry flat wash. The same can be done by wet-on-wet technique as well. You'll have to pre-wet your paper, apply coat of water, and then apply the wet paint on a wet background. That becomes wet-on-wet flat wash. That was the first type of watercolor wash. Now let's go over the second one, which is a variegated wash. For the flat wash, we went in with a single color and we applied that color onto the entire paper. For a variegated wash, we're going with two colors. I'm starting with yellow. Almost in half of my paper, I will be applying yellow. Now, I'm going to switch to orange. I'm blending that with yellow. Now, for the rest of the area, I'm going to fill up that with orange. For a variegated wash, you will have to use two or more colors. I started with a flat wash of yellow, then I introduce orange and I blended those colors well, and for the rest of the area, I used orange. You can see how goldish that blend is looking. This one is obviously wet-on-dry variegated wash. The same can be done by wet-on-wet technique as well. Pre-wet the background and apply your colors on that wet background, and go with the same process. You'll have to be a bit more careful if you're going with wet-on-wet variegated wash because your background is already wet and you're applying the wet paint on an already wet background, so the colors will start flowing into each other, so it becomes a little unpredictable. You may not have this much control over the paint if it's wet-on-wet. Try both the techniques, wet-on-wet variegated wash and wet-on-dry variegated wash, and understand the difference. Orange and yellow are much safer colors when it comes to blending. You can try out the same with blue and yellow, you will get a green in between. Here is the finished result. You can see that gold is just blend of yellow and orange here. For the first one, for the flat wash, we used a single color. We applied that color on the entire paper. For the second one, we used two colors, yellow and orange, and we created a gorgeous blend. Now let's go the third type of watercolor wash, which is the gradient wash or the graded wash. We'll be using single color and we'll be making the color lighter by adding clean water. For this technique, having a jar of clean water is very important. If your water's dirty, change that into clean water. I'm going to start with a darker tone of blue and I'm going to make the color lighter as I come down. I'm going with wet-on-dry graded wash. You can try out the same thing with wet-on-wet technique as well. Just like I mentioned earlier, you need to add a coat of water on your entire background, then add your paint. I have added a darker tone of blue almost to half of my paper. Now I'm going to wash off the paint from my brush. I'm going with clean water. I'm going to make the color lighter. You can see, as I come down, I'm making the color lighter. In this particular watercolor wash, you're playing with different tonal values of a single color. On the top, you have a darker tone and as I'm coming down, I'm making the tonal value of the color lighter. Now, I'm running my brush in a horizontal manner, from left to right, to make the blend more smoother. You can either go with light to dark or from dark to light according to the result you want. The key in getting a clean blend is having enough of paint on your brush and you will have to finish that entire grading in one go. You shouldn't be taking breaks in between. If you take breaks in between, the paint will dry and you wouldn't be able to get a clean blend. You will be able to see the brush lines. To get a smooth blend, you will have to finish everything in one go. That was wet-on-dry gradient wash or graded wash? We used a single color, which is blue. I used cerulean blue here and I applied a darker tone of blue on the top. As I progressed down, I added clean water and I made the color lighter. Here's the three different watercolor washes we tried. The first one is a flat wash. We used crimson, and we applied an even tone of crimson onto the entire paper and created a flat wash. Now, for the second one, we used two colors, which is yellow and orange, and we created a beautiful blend of those two colors. This one is called variegated wash. The third on we tried is gradient wash or a graded wash. We used cerulean blue. For the top, we went in with a darker tone and as we progressed down, we made the color lighter by adding water. For all the three different watercolor washes we tried, we went in with wet-on-dry technique. If you apply coat of water onto the paper in advance, if you pre-wet your paper and try out the same technique, that becomes wet-on-wet technique. By pre-wetting your paper, you can change all of these into wet-on-wet technique. You can try out a wet-on-wet flat wash, a wet-on-wet variegated wash, and a wet-on-wet gradient wash. If you're new to watercolor, I would recommend you to try out all these exercises in wet-on-wet technique as well so you'll get to know the difference between these techniques and also you will get more comfortable with wet-on-dry and wet-on-wet technique. 6. Class Projects: We learned how to do a flat wash. We used a single color and apply that onto the entire paper. Then we tried a variegated wash using two colors. We used yellow and orange, and we created a clean blend of these two colors. Then we tried a gradient wash where we use just one color. We made the color lighter by using water. We try the three main watercolor washes. These watercolor washes are going to be the foundation of our class. We're going to build our class from these basic lessons. Now, I'm going to quickly introduce you to the projects that we're doing in this class. Here's the first project. As you can already see, we'll be using a flat wash for the sky. I'm going to be adding nucleotides onto that. In our first project, we'll be applying the flat wash technique we learnt. Now, here's a second project. This is one of my few bleed from the 10 paintings we're doing in this class, it's very simple yet an elegant painting. For this project, we'll be applying the variegated wash technique. That's the second one. Here's the third project. For this one, as well we're going with a variegated wash, but this time we're using three colors. In this project you will also learn how to do those easy-peasy palm trees, which you can use in your future projects, and here's the fourth one. We will learn to paint a magical evening sky. Again, we're going with a variegated wash for this one as well. We'll be using two colors and will be in the sky and the water together in a single wash. Now, here's the fifth one. It's a common pretty golden yellow sun. For this one, we'll be painting the sky and the water separately. We'll be going with two sets of variegated wash. That was the fifth one. Now, for the sixth project, we'll be painting this bold and beautiful red sunset. For the sky will be going with a variegated wash, and for the water we'll be going into a flat wash, and we'll add details under that using wet on wet technique. The next one is one of my favorites. We'll be painting a beautiful blue and red sky. It's another beautiful color combination. We'll be going with the variegated wash, and we'll add those street lamps and a road to make it look more pretty. The mix centered is quite different from the rest of the class projects. We are going to paint a beautiful violet beach. For the sky we'll be using a gradient wash, and for the water, we'll be going with a flat wash, and will add details onto it. Trust me, it's got to be a magical experience painting, there was glowing reflection. It's really easy to create this effect. The ninth was a very simple project. We'll paint the sky and the water separately. For both of them, we'll be going with a variegated wash of three colors. Here's the last one from this mini [inaudible]. We'll be playing with wet on wet technique and we'll create a gorgeous background. Onto that we'll add all those details. All the projects we're doing in this class is based on this watercolor washes we did. Give it a try. Get comfortable with the wet on wet and wet on dry technique, also with these watercolor washes. If you haven't tried it yet, give it a try and join me in the next section. 7. Preparing the Paper: As I mentioned in the Art Supply Section, I'm using my Canson Heritage Cold Press watercolor paper. Here, I have one sheet from this watercolor pad. This one is 26 centimeter by 36 centimeter. Now, I'm going to cut this sheet into little squares, which is of ten by ten centimeters. The size, I'm going with this ten by ten squares, you can go with any size that you prefer. This paper has got nice texture, it is one of my most favorite watercolor paper. You can use any of the paper that you use normally, it doesn't really need to be the same paper. Okay, I'm going to grab a ruler and a pencil and I'm going to divide this paper into little squares of ten by ten centimeter. I have my ruler and a pencil here. Now, I'm going to divide this paper into ten by ten little squares. I'll start from the side. I'm marking a ten, another ten. Now we'll mark from the other side. The first ten and the second one. Now, I will join these lines. That's my firsts square. Similar way, I'm going to connect the next ones. You can either use a scissors or you can use a paper cutter and cut them into little squares. We'll be painting some simple sunset, so it is better to go with a smaller size paper. You can go up to 15 by 15 centimeter. But it doesn't really need to be a square size, if you want to go with a polaroid size or if you want to go with a landscape mode, that's totally up to you. Okay. I have made four little squares here, now I'm going to grab a scissor and I'm going to cut these into separate pieces. If it's a huge size, I normally use my paper cutter. But this one is a tiny squares so just a scissor is all we need. I'm going to cut the next piece. All right, so here we have our first little square. This is the size of the painting we'll be doing in the entire class. As I said earlier, feel free to go with the size which you are comfortable with. If you have a small sketchbook, you can readily use that, you don't need to cut your paper like this. Yeah, feel free to make those kind of decisions. Now I'm going to cut the other piece. We have two squares here. As we are painting ten little sunsets, you will need ten such pieces. You can cut one or two extra just in case if you make any mistake. But these ones are quite easy, I'm sure you won't be making any mistake, but just in case. Also, the paper that I'm using here as a 100 percent cotton. I used both the sides of the paper. Even if I make a mistake, I can use the other side. All right, go ahead and grab any of your favorite watercolor paper and cut that into ten equal pieces. 8. Taping the Paper: There are very rare situations where I don't fix my paper onto a board, so here I have a backing board. This one is our old cardboard piece and I stuck a piece of wallpaper onto it. This is my backing board. First, let me show you the masking tape that I normally use. I got this from my local supermarket. You will find different, but I do have tapes. You could find masking tape, painter's tape, washi tapes, sellotape, clear tape, there are many varieties. Not all of them work on 100 % cotton watercolor paper as it has got some textures. It's always a great idea to try out your masking tape on your paper so that you can be sure that it won't rip off your paper. The one I'm using here is a one-inch masking tape. You will find this in different sizes as well. Take out a piece of masking tape and apply that onto your paper according to the size of the border that you want. This one is like half a centimeter. We have applied masking tape on one side. Now, just run your thumb on top of this, you just need to apply some pressure and run your fingers on top of the four sides once you have applied your masking tape. When you're applying your masking tape, there are chances there might be some little gaps in between. So when you're applying the pressure and when you're running your fingers on top of the masking tape, you're actually filling all those gaps. If there are gaps, the paint can seep in through and you won't be able to get that clean bottom. Now, I'm applying the tape on the second side. Just like how we did earlier, apply some pressure. Now, I'm going with the next side. We have one more side left. There are three main reasons why I always love fixing my paper onto a board using a masking tape. The first one is the most obvious reason, you will get a clean border. The second one is this can prevent your paper from buckling, and the third one is, it is much more comfortable while you're painting. You can lift your paper, you can turn it around and you can do all sort of things while you're adding the details because sometimes I would love to lift the paper and bring it closer to me while I'm adding the details. When you are fixing your paper onto a table, this is not at all possible. For all the 10 paintings we're doing today, this is going to be the first step so I'll now be repeating every time. Quickly fix your first piece of paper onto your board and join me in the next section. Let's start with our first painting. 9. Orange Sunset: It's time for us to start creating. Here's the first little sunset we're painting, it's a very simple one. The first step is to paint the sky, then we will add the details. Let's have a look at the colors you will need. you just need three colors for this painting, which is brilliant orange, black, and white. The one I'm using here is a bright yellowish-orange, you can use any other orange that you've got. You will need an orange, black and white. Let's start the process. I have fixed my paper already. For this painting, we're going with a flat wash. We'll be using brilliant orange, and we'll be applying a flat wash of that color onto the entire paper. First, I will squeeze out the color onto my palette, you can use any other orange of your choice or you can use any other color, it doesn't really need to be orange. To apply the background wash, I'll be using my flat brush, this one is a half-inch flat brush. First, I'm going to prepare a wet mixture of this orange color, I'm going to add few drops of water and I'm just mixing that with the orange color. Prepare this wet paint in advance no matter which color you're using, this is the first step. This way you won't run out of paint in between, you will have extra paint and you can really apply that onto the paper. This is the color I'm using, it's a very bright and pretty orange. The first step is very simple, you just need to apply that paint onto your entire paper. We're using wet on dry technique. We haven't applied a coat of water on the paper, we are applying the wet paint directly on a dry paper. This one is a smaller-sized paper so it isn't really necessary to apply a coat of water. We can manage to apply the paint on the paper in a very little time, so it isn't really necessary to apply a coat of water. Let's wait for the background to dry, you can either use a blow dryer and speed up the process or you can wait for it to dry naturally, just give it some time. My background has dried completely, you can see that beautiful orange background; we applied an even wash of orange. Now, it's time to add the details. For that, I'm using black. The one I'm using here is peach black, you can use ivory black or mass black or any other black. Let me squeeze out a little of black onto my palette. I'm switching to my size middle hand brush. To add the details, you will need a brush that has a pointed tip, this one is size number 2. When dipped in paint or water, it comes back to a very nice pointed tip which makes it perfect for detailing. This is the brush I'll be using to add all the details. You can either use a detailing brush or you can use any other brush which has a pointed tip, it can be sized number 2 or size number 3 or size number 1, any of the smaller-sized brushes. I'm loading my brush with black watercolor, we need a torque and Indian's tone of black so don't add a lot of water. We're going to create a group of trees over the bottom, this is going to be our foreground detail. We'll be filling that entire line in a cluster of plants and trees, it's going to be a very abstract sheet, then I'm going to detail each and every bit. First, I will start with the right side. I'm pressing the tip of my brush and I'm creating some leafy patterns. This is the outer shape. Once I've created the outer shape, I'll be filling that entire shape in black. You can see how pretty it is looking already. You just need to keep on pressing the tip of your brush. If you're using a bigger-sized brush, these patterns will look too big and it will look out of proportion. It is better to go with the smaller-sized brush so you will get these teeny tiny patterns. As you could see here, keep on pressing the tip of your brush and create some random patterns. At some places, I'm intentionally making them a little taller, this would make that group of plants look more natural. Go with a very organic shape, don't add them symmetrically. At some places make it higher, and at some places make it lower. We will have to add some low group of plants on the other side as well. Don't add it like a mirror image, or to the left, you can go with a different arrangement, maybe you can add a much more taller group or a much more shorter group. Our intention is to make them look more realistic, you can go with any arrangement that you prefer. Here's a closer look, you can see those leafy patterns along the outer shape. In a similar way, I'll be adding a group of plants on the other side as well. You can see the size of those patterns I'm adding, they are really small. The more smaller the more better, so you have to use a smaller-sized brush to get those patterns in a similar size. You just need to keep on pressing the tip of your brush and create these patterns in the group. When you add them close to each other, when you add multiple of such patterns, it will automatically look like leaves. Just keep adding them until you reach the other end. As you could see here, over the middle, I went in with a shorter group, compared to the right, they're looking much more shorter. It is not at all looking symmetrical. Onto the left-hand, I will make it a bit more taller. Go in with any shape and composition that you prefer, you don't need to follow the same shape and the same arrangement that I'm doing here. It's totally up to you. We just need to fill this entire line and a group of plants, that is the only thing we have to do. Let me quickly finish this. That's done. I tried my best to make it look asymmetrical. The next step is to add a street lamp. First I will add that poll, it's a very simple street lamp. First, you need to add a straight line. Again, make sure to use a smaller-sized brush or any other brush which has a pointed tip. This poll shouldn't be too bored, go with the similar thickness. The first step is to add a simple straight line. I think I'm allowed to feel more of leaves over here, and maybe I will take this a little more higher. Now, I'm going to go back to my street lamp. To add the remaining details, I'm going to switch to a pen. This one is water resistant sketching pen not a drawing pen. You can use any of the black pen you have got, it doesn't need to be water resistant. First, I will add a small straight line. From there, I'm going to take that line in a curvy way, and I'm going to make it made the poll, now adding a little thickness here. That is it; that is the skeleton. We need to light this up. For that, I will need a little of titanium white color. I'm going to squeeze out the titanium white color onto my palette. Now, I'm going to add the light. Use a clean white paint and add in your light. That's our whole lamp. Using the same white paint, I'm going to add a moon. I don't know why it's so cool, a smaller one. You can add it wherever get you want to, but make sure to go with the smallest size, don't make it too big. I'm adding the moon over to the left side, because on the right we have the street lamp and a taller cluster of plants. That area is well composed, the left side is looking not too blank. Once you have added that white circle, wash all the paint from your brush. If your brush has a lot of water content, dab it on a paper towel. We're going to make the outer shape of the moon a little blurry. Once you have dabbed your brush on a paper towel, run that pressure around that circle and make the outside border a little blurry. This will make your moon look more realistic, and it will make it look like it is glowing. You can already see the difference. That is it. We're done with the whole first project. For this one, as the biggest layer, we used a flat wash. We simply applied orange sheet onto the entire background and we waited for that to dry, and then we added all the remaining details. Now, it's time to peel off the masking tape. Wait for your paint to dry completely before you peel off your masking tape and remove it at an angle, otherwise, it will rebuff your paper. Here is the finished painting. It was easy. You could try out the same thing with any other color of your choice, you don't really need to use orange. That's our first project where we used only a single bush for the sky. In the next project, we'll be using two colors. I'll see you there. 10. Glowing Lights: We have finished our first mini sunset. Now it's time to go with the second one. Here is our second project. It's a very simple yet a beautiful painting. You can see those glowing light. That's one of the major element of this painting. It's a very easy technique. You can use it in your future paintings as well. We'll start by painting the sky. Then we will add the mountains. The final step is to add the light. Now let's quickly take a look at the colors you will need, for the sky I will be using two colors, which is crimson and brilliant orange. You can use any other orange or you can use vermilion. Now to add the mountains, I will be using black. This one is peach black. You can use Ivory black or mass black. Then to add the lights, I will be using white and yellow. The yellow I'm using is cadmium yellow, but any yellow would work. You will need crimson, any orange, black, yellow, and white. I have fixed my people, for the sky we'll be using two colors, we'll be going with a variegated wash of orange and crimson. First, let me squeeze out the colors onto my palette. This one is crimson and the second color is brilliant orange. You can use any other orange you have got. If you don't have an orange, you can mix a little of yellow to your vermilion or scarlet and create a similar color. We have the color is ready. For this painting as well we are going with the veteran dry technique. But if you prefer adding coat of water, if feel like that is more comfortable for you, you could go with that method. You can simply apply a coat of water and apply the paint directly on a vet background. Now, I'm going with my half-inch flat brush. I'm going with a very bright and bold on off crimson. I'm not adding a lot of water. I want a very dark and Indian stone. Now I'll apply this bright tone of chromosome on the top of my paper. You need to keep running your brush in a horizontal way. That's crimson. Now I'm going to wash out the paint from my brush and I'm switching to brilliant orange. For orange as well, I'm going with the very bright and intense stone. I want this sky to be very bright and pretty. Again, see the color I'm using here. I added that right where I stopped the crimson and I'm blending that color as well. Again, see how pretty that blender's looking. Now onto the rest of the area am simply applying orange. You can see the way I'm moving my brush. I'm only taking my brush on a horizontal way. This will give you a clean blend. If you've done your brushing multiple direction, you won't be able to get a clean blend. Just stick to horizontal movement. Once you have applied the paint, keep running your brush in a horizontal way until you get a clean blend. You can see the way I'm running my brush. See that blend. It looks so pretty right. I went in with a very intense dawn of crimson and brilliant orange and that is a reason why the colors are looking so vibrant and pretty. Let's wait for the background to dry completely. After that, we'll be adding the mountains using black. Onto that we'll be adding some lights to make our painting look more interesting. Let's wait for this to dry first. The background has dried completely. You can see the colors are looking a little faded compared to earlier. This is one common thing with watercolor. When the colors are wet, it will look really bright and pretty, but when it dries, it will fade a little, which is a very common thing with water glass. Don't worry about that. This is not in our control. To add the mountain. I'm using my size number six round brush. I've taken some paint already on my palette. First add in the shape and fill that in black. You can go with any kind of mountain that you prefer. If you want a more taller mountain, you could do that. You don't need to follow the exact same shape for your mountain. Feel free to alter the shape. Go ahead and decide on the shape of the mountain you want. Add in the shape first and fill that in black. I'm really loving the way our painting's progressing. That background color and the black mountain. That contrast is looking so great. The mountains are in. Now, let's wait for this to dry completely. We cannot add the light on a wet background. If we add a light on a wet background it wouldn't look opaque, so we'd have to wait for this to dry completely. It looks like most of the part of the mountain has dried. Now to add a light you will need white and yellow. You can use any yellow. It doesn't really matter. I'm going to squeeze out both the colors onto my palette. The yellow, I'm using here is scattering yellow, as I said earlier you can use any yellow. We have the colors ready. Now to add a light, you will need any of your smaller size brush, typically a brush which has a pointed tip, so you could use a detailing brush as well. I'm using my size number 2 round brush. First, I'm going to pick colored love orange. I'm going to mix that with a little love, yellow and white. I want a light orange which is opaque. To make the orange opaque, I'm adding some white. That's the color I'm going with. Whichever the orange you're using, add in a pinch of yellow and then add a little of white into that to make your paint more opaque. Now using that orange, I'm going to add some dots. You can see the size of the dots I'm adding here, that is not too big and not too small. I'm not going to add a lot of them. Just few here and there. You don't need to continue then until you finish the entire line. Just like I'm doing here, I didn't feel orange dots in a scattered manner. Add them however you want to at some places you can go with a cluster four four or five light and maybe at some places, you can just add two or one. Along with these, you can add some teeny tiny dot as well. Using the same color, this will make our painting look more interesting. Again, go with the various scattered manner. Don't add them close to each other as a straight line. Go with a very organic and scattered manner. That is the base layer. Now I'm mixing some white with the yellow, and I'm creating an opaque version of yellow. Now using that opaque yellow, I'm going to add a few more dots. This has to be really small, not like the orange dots. You can't see the size of the ones I'm adding here. Adding a few dots randomly and also add a teeny tiny dot onto the center of these orange dots. You can see the ones I have added here. Right now they really look like they're glowing. This is what we're going to do with the other orange dots as well and to the center. Just add a small yellow dot. Along with that, add few around that and in a very scattered way. We can see the size of those dots am adding here. It has to be really small. The size is very important. Please make sure you're using a brush which has a pointed tip or use any of your detailing brush. Size number 0 or size number 1 will really work. You'll get these miniature brushes, which is actually very good for these kind of detailing. Just get one miniature brush, which is going to be a really good asset. It'll be really easy to add these teeny tiny details. Now I'm going to add few more dots here and there. At some places I'm creating a bigger cluster and at some places I'm adding just few. I'm going in a very organic way. I'm adding few more here. Now maybe we can add few onto the top of the mountain just to make it look like there are some settlements over there. I'm adding some yellow dots here adding one or two over here. I love adding these lights. It's a very simple technique, but it has a huge impact on your painting. Those mountains were looking quite flat and lifeless. Now when we added these lights, it has a different wipe, and we are done. You can see how gorgeous our painting is looking. Now it's time to peel off the masking tape. I'm going to peel off the masking tape. Before you peel off the masking tape, you'd have to make sure you're painting has dried completely. Otherwise your paper may rip off along with the masking tape. That is one important thing you need to keep in mind if you need a clean part of hikers. We hardly used 10 minutes for this painting. You see how gorgeous it is looking. You could try out the same thing with any other color combination. I cannot tell you how much I love this little sunset. The colors that's smooth plant and that perfect amount of detailing. It turned out to be the most prettiest and easiest sunset that I have ever painted. Give it a try and join me in the next section. Let's go ahead with our third sunset. 11. Palm Trees Sunset: Here's our third mini-sunset. We'll start by painting the sky. We'll be going with a variegated wash of three colors. Then onto that, we will be adding the palm trees and also a teeny-tiny moore. Now, let's have a look at the colors you will need. As you can see here, we'll be going with a variegated wash of three colors. For the sky, those three colors I'll be using are Prussian blue, permanent rose, and brilliant orange. Along with that, to add in the palm trees and to add the moore, you would also need black and white. Let's start with the project. I have taped on my paper already. Now, I'm squeezing the colors onto my palette. As I said, we only need Prussian blue, permanent rose or crimson, and any orange. Now, for this one, we're going to go with wet-on-wet technique. The first step is to apply a clean coat of water onto your paper. I'm using my 1 1/2 inch wash brush. You can use any of your bigger size flat brush. Keep running your brush multiple times, just to make sure there's no puddles of water in-between. The coat of water has to be even. For the first two projects, we went in the wet-on-dry technique, which means we didn't apply our coat of water on the paper. We applied the paint directly on a dry paper. But for this one, we applied a coat of water. Now we're applying the paint on the wet paper. I'm going with Prussian blue first, I'm going with a very dark tone. I'm applying that on the top of my paper. When you're going with wet-on-wet technique, the colors tend to fade a little compared to wet-on-dry because there is already some water content on your paper. Go with a darker tone and the first layer itself. Now, I'm going to wash all the paint from my brush, and I'm dabbing my brush on a paper towel. This is just to make sure we don't have much of blue on our brush. Otherwise, when we go with the second color, which is permanent rose or crimson, it will create a violet in between. I don't want a lot of violet over here, I want that rose to be very bright and pretty. I'm applying permanent rose right to [inaudible] top Prussian blue, and I'm blending those colors together. I'm using a very bright and bold tone here. If you would like to go with lighter tools you can add some water into your paint and make the colors more lighter. I'm someone who loves working with bright and bold tones that you can see from my painting already. Now I'm going to wash out the paint from my brush and I'm going with my third color. The one I'm using here is brilliant orange. This one is a very bright and pretty orange. You can use any of the orange you have got. If you don't have any orange shade, you can use vermilion. Maybe you can add a pinch of yellow into that to get a similar color, or you can use your vermilion directly. We have applied the three colors on our paper. Now, our task is to make the blend a little more smoother. I'm switching back to permanent rose. I'm adding that over here and blending that with the orange. Now I will run my brush towards the top and blend that with the blue. That transition from permanent rose to Prussian blue was not looking that smooth. I'm just running my brush in a horizontal way and blending the rose and Prussian blue. This is how our background has turned out. We used three colors for the sky. We used Prussian blue, permanent rose, and brilliant orange, and we created a viewer for the variegated wash of those three colors. Now, we'll have to wait for this to dry. If you're in a rush and if you want to speed up the process, you can use a heat tool or a blow dryer, and speed up the process. Or, again, wait for it to dry naturally. Just take a walk or have a cup of coffee and come back, by the time your painting will be completely dried. My background has dried completely. For the next step, you will need black. I'm squeezing out some black watercolor onto my palette. You will have to use your smaller size brush. This one is size number 2 round brush. You can use any of the brush which has a pointed tip. We're going to add some trees and plants over the bottom. Along with that, we are going to add some palm trees as well. Your painting shouldn't be too watery. We need a really bold and top tone of black, so don't add a lot of water. First, I will add that cluster of trees and plants over the bottom. This one has a very rough shape. You can go with any kind of shape that you prefer. Just add in a random shape, and fill up that shape in black. Now, when you're adding this cluster of trees and plants to make it look more natural, go with a very organic shape. Don't make it too symmetrical. Also onto the outer shape, just add little bumps like this, so that it will look more natural. All you need to do is just keep on pressing the tip of your brush on that outer shape, and create some random shapes like this. It doesn't need to have any particular size. Just keep on pressing the tip of your brush. Now in a similar way, I'm going to fill up the other side as well. As you could see here, only on the right end, I went in with the taller groove. Over the middle, I have reduced the height. Now on to the left side as well, I will make those a bit more taller. When you're adding your group of plants, go in a similar arrangement. At some places make it higher and at some places make it lower. We're nearly done. You can see how pretty our painting is looking already when we added the foreground details. It really has a great contrast. These little details instantly added a lot of difference in our painting. Now the next step is to add the palm trees. It's a pretty simple palm tree, but I would suggest you to try this on a scrap piece of paper first. When you are getting it dried, you can try that on our painting. It's quite easy, but when you're trying it for the first time, you might not be really confident so it is better to try it on a scrap piece of paper. First, you need to start by adding a tree trunk. It is just at the cline. This is the one which is more closer to you, so maybe we can make it a bit more taller. I'll be adding four of them. Now we need to add the palm leaves or maybe we can add all the tree trunks first, then we can add the palm leaves after that. Now, I'm going to add the second tree trunk. If you would like to add a line using your pencil first, you can do that and then drag your brush on top of that so you have a reference line there so it might be a little easier for you to understand the height. Now, I'm going the third one. When you add a smaller one in the background, it will automatically bring that sense of distance in your painting. It will make it look like this one is far away. The taller one will convey an idea that it is closer to you. This is our tallest palm tree. I have added four of them here. Now it's time to add the palm leaves. Just watch it carefully from the center. I'm just dragging some lines outward. You see that? [inaudible] height. This one is the one which is more closer to you, so I'll make it a little more denser. From the center of your tree, just drag your brush outward and create some messy leaves like this. We're not going to go with a very detailed look for our palm tree. This one is really far from you. I'm not going to show each and every minor detail for our palm tree. We're going with a more abstract shape. This tree is really easy, you just need some practice. Take out any of your smaller-sized round brush and load your brush with black watercolor. Start from the top of your tree trunk and simply keep dragging your brush outward. Start from one point, repeat the same until you reach the same point. There you have your palm tree. Now, I'm going to do the same for the rest of the two palm trees. You can see it's a very simple process. From the tip-off that tree trunk, keep dragging your brush outward, and stop it when you reach the same point. It's like a circular movement. Easy. Now, if you would like to, you can add a similar batch of trees on the left side as well. It will look like there is a vanishing point over there, and the trees are getting smaller as it goes towards a vanishing point. Here is the finished painting. I think we can add a teeny tiny moon. I'm squeezing out the [inaudible] whitewater color, and I'm using the same brush and I'm adding a teeny-tiny moon over here. You will have to use a brush which has a pointed tip, or you can use your white gel pen. Now it looks complete. Such a beautiful color combination. I hope you guys enjoyed painting this mini sunset with those gorgeous palm tree. Give it a try if you haven't tried it yet. I'm very sure you are going to love the result. Once you finish that, you know what to do. Join me in the next section, we'll start with our next sunset. 12. Purple Sunset: We've finished three mini sunsets already. Now it's time to go for the fourth one. The first step is to paint the background. For that, we will be using the variegated wash and when the background dries, we will be adding the mountains and the reflection. It's a gorgeous color combination. Let me show you the colors that I'm going to use. You will need two colors for the background, and they are permanent violet and crimson. You can mix and create your own violet if you don't have a violet watercolor tube, that's okay. Then to add the mountain and to add the setting sun, you will need black and white. Those are the full colors you will need, now let's start with the process. I have fixed my paper already. For this one, we'll be painting the sky and the water together. We'll be using two colors, and they are permanent violet and crimson. If you don't have permanent violet, you can mix and create your own violet. You can add Prussian blue or any other blue with crimson and create a violet, so don't worry if you don't have a violet watercolor tube. I'm someone who paint a lot of night skies and violet is one of my most favorite color to use for night skies, but most of the artist doesn't get a violet watercolor, as such they prefer to mix and create their own violet. It isn't that necessary to have a violet watercolor in your collection. You can always mix and create your own violet. I'm going to start with violet. I'm going with a very intense tone and I'm using my flat brush here and applying that onto the top of my paper. I'm using a very bright and poor tone of violet. Now imagine your paper has three different divisions. On the top and over the bottom, we will be adding violet, and over the middle we will be adding crimson. Now it's time to switch to the second color. I'm going with a very bright tone of crimson and I'm adding that right where I stopped violet, I'm mixing those colors well. You can see I'm running my brush across [inaudible], and I'm blending the colors with each other. So the second portion is filled with crimson. Now I'm going back to violet and I'm filling that remaining area. This one is a wet on dry technique. We are applying the wet paint directly on a dry paper. If you prefer going with the wet on wet technique, if you feel that is more comfortable for you, you could apply a coat of water on your paper first, then add the paint on a wet background. But if you're using the wet on wet technique, go with the very bright and intense tone on the first layer itself, otherwise, when the background dries, your painting will look a little faded. So keep that in mind if you're going with wet on wet technique. So I'm done with the background. You can see on the top and the bottom, I have a bright tone of violet and over the middle, I used crimson. So the key here is to run your brush in a horizontal manner and blend the colors with each other. That is the main thing you need to focus on. Now, I'm going to wait for this to dry. The background has dried completely. You can see the colors are looking a little faded compared to when they were wet. As we discussed earlier, watercolors tends to do that, so don't worry about that. The next step is to add the mountains. I'm going to squeeze out a little of black watercolor onto my palette. To add the mountain, I'm going to use my size number 2 round brush. Use any of your smallest size round brush. To add the mountain we will need a very dark and bold tone of black so don't add a lot of water, go with a very dark tone. First I will add the shape then I will fill that shape in black watercolor. On the left and the right end, I'm making my mountain a bit higher. As it comes towards the center, I'm reducing the height. Now if you prefer to go with a different composition for your mountains, feel free to do that. You don't need to follow the exact same shape of my mountain. You could see here on the left and the right end, I have made my mountain taller and it is sloping down towards the center. I'm going to slightly alter the shape of my mountain. I'm adding some ups and downs here and there so that my mountain looks a little more realistic. I have added the mountain, now it's time to add this reflection. You don't need to wait for this to dry. We can add the reflection directly. I'm going to mix a bit of black into violet to create a darker tone of violet. Now add your reflections as a mirror image of your mountain. You can start by adding a line, leaving a tiny gap between the reflection and the mountain. This way the colors won't spread into each other and you can add the reflection right away without waiting for the mountain to dry. Go in a similar shape of your mountain. Just imagine it as a mirror image. So when you are adding the reflection, try to follow the same shape of your mountain. It doesn't need to be exactly the same. Don't stress on that. Focus more on the depth, therefore if you have a taller mountain make your reflection more deep, especially on the either ends. As you could see here, I'm making my reflection more deeper on the left end and the right end, and I'm trying my best to follow a similar shape. That is the reflection. Now let's wait for that to dry. We can see how easily we created a gorgeous sunset here. Everything has dried completely. I'm not really happy with the reflection, it is looking really faded. I wanted a bit more darker tone of violet. I think I will go with one more round, I'm mixing a little more black with violet. I'm following the same shape and I'm adding another layer on top of this to make it look darker. I have added the reflection again. I hope this will look okay. Meanwhile, we wait for the mountain and the reflection to dry, we can add some rocks over the bottom to make our painting look more interesting. I'm adding a big rock on the left corner. I will add one or two more. So just try to make a shape and fill that in black. We can go with any shape that you prefer. That's the first one. Now, I will add another one on the water. I think I will add one more. You can decide on how many rocks you want on your painting, but don't make it too busy. Maybe you can add some tiny ones. I'm adding the third one right over here, and this time I'm going with a very small rock. I'm not going to add more. I'll just stop it with three. So I have a huge rock on the left corner. Then I have a medium-sized and I have a smaller-sized rock. I'm pretty happy with the composition. Maybe along with these, you can add one or two smaller ones in the background. That's done. Now the final step is to add the setting sun and its reflection. For that, I'm going to squeeze out a little of white watercolor onto my palette. I have cleaned my brush thoroughly and I have got rid of the black paints. Now I'm loading my brush with white watercolor and I'm adding a teeny tiny circle over here, which is my setting sun, and now we're heading towards the last step which is adding the reflection. Go with the little loose consistency of white paint. We don't need a thick white paint to add the reflection. This is because I don't want the reflection to look too prominent. I want a very subtle looking reflection. You can see the lines I'm adding here, they are not too prominent. Add in your sun first then right underneath that, add some white lines. Go with subtle and delicate lines. Don't make it too bold. Add in white lines underneath the rocks as well, just a few. Don't add a lot and make it too prominent. You can see I'm going with very delicate lines. So there are two things you need to keep in mind. The first thing is you should be using a smallest size brush which has a pointed tip, so that you get some thin lines, and the second thing is you shouldn't be going with a very bold and thick tone of white, go with the little watery paint, otherwise those lines will look too bright and prominent. You can see the lines I have added here, they are very light and subtle. This is the kind of reflection we need, and that was the last step we are done with our fourth painting. I'm going to carefully peel off the masking tape. Those mountains and rocks are yet to try, but I will remove my masking tape in a very gentle way so that it doesn't disturb the paint. Now just in case if you have missed that line in between the mountain and the reflection, just like I have here on the left side, there is one thing you can do. Just mix that leftover crimson with a little of white, and create an opaque version of crimson and add a new line back. It's an easy fix. No one's going to know. So with that, we are done with our fourth sunset, I hope you guys enjoyed painting this quick and vibrant sunset. The next project is a much more exciting one, and I'll see you there. 13. Golden Yellow Sunset: Next we're going to paint a beautiful golden yellow sunset. We'll start by painting the sky then we will paint the water. After everything dries, we will add in some mountains, and we will add in some reflection. Before we start with the process, let's have a look at the colors you would need. For the sky and water you will need the same colors, which is permanent yellow orange and permanent brown. We will be doing a medicated wash of these two colors for the sky, and for the water we'll be going with a flat wash. Finally to add the mountains and to add reflections, you will need black and white. Those are the four colors you will need for this painting. The first step is to fix your paper onto the board. Grab a masking tape or the washi tape and apply them on the full sides. I have fixed my paper. Now, for this painting, we are going to paint the sky and the water separately. I'm going to add another piece of masking tape, a little below the center of the paper, somewhere like this. First we will be painting the sky, and when that dries, we will remove the masking tape and we'll paint the water. Now, I'm going to squeeze out the colors onto my palette. You will need two main colors for this painting, permanent yellow orange, and permanent brown. To paint the sky and the water, I'm going to use a half-inch flat brush. You can either use a flat brush or a round brush, it doesn't really matter as the size of the painting was quite small. First, I'm going to go with a medium tone of permanent yellow orange. I'm going to apply this shade almost to 3/4 of my paper. Go with a medium tone. Just run your brush in a horizontal way and bring it down. Now, I'm adding a brighter tone of orange, just reduce the amount of water and go with a much more concentrated portion of the paint. Now, onto that leftover area, I'm going to go with brown. I'm going with a brighter tone of brown and adding that over here. I'm going to blend that with the orange. On the top we have a lighter tone of orange. As you come down, you have a brighter tone of orange, and along the horizon line you have brown. This is how you sky should be looking. We have applied the colors. I think I'll make the orange a bit more brighter over here. I'm going with a brighter tone of orange and adding that right over the middle. Now, going with a bit of brown. Now, I'm going to blend the colors well. You should be running your brush in a horizontal way. Don't add any other kind of strokes, that may spoil your sky. We have our sky ready here. Now, let's wait for that to dry. You can either use a blow dryer and speed up the process or you can just wait for your painting to dry. My painting has dried completely. Now, I'm going to remove the masking tape. Be really gently and remove it at an angle. Now, it's time to paint the water. I'm switching back to permanent yellow orange. This time I'm going with the lighter tone. Now, I'm going to apply that lighter tone off from vanilla orange onto the anterior bottom area. It's just a flat wall, just for that up. Be a little careful while you're adding paint along the horizon line. Take it slow, don't add any paint onto the sky. We have applied the first layer. Our next step is to add some darker tone onto this, especially onto the right side. We're going to add the mountains over there. I'm going the permanent brown, going with a medium tone. I'm just dragging my brush from right towards the center. Simply add some lines using a medium tone of brown like this. Now, we can add a little on the left side as well. Over here, we're just adding a small mountain along the horizon line. With just a bit as all we need. Now, again, we have to wait for this to dry. I just took a walk and I came back and the water has completely dried. Now, I'm going to squeeze out some black. I'm going to switch to my smaller size brush. I'm loading my brush with black watercolor. Now, I'm going to add the mountains, a bigger one on the right side, and a smaller one on the left side, so that it will bring a sense of distance in our painting. I'm going to start with the one on the right side. You can go with any shape. You really don't need to follow the exact same shape and the curves I'm adding here. Just adding a mountain however you want to. I will first add the shape, then I will fill that in black. You can see how our painting is getting alive. All I do is looking quite flat as we didn't add any full ground or background element. Now, it is slowly starting to look like a sunset. Just add a new mountain and fill that in black. Now, when you're adding a mountain don't add them in a very smooth flowing curve, add little bumps here and there so that it will look more natural. You can see the way I have added it here. I added my mountain in a very organic shape, it is not at all symmetrical. I think I will add a teeny bit over here as well. I'm focusing more on the right side, on the left side, I'm not adding a huge mountain like this, I will simply add a small mountain. The main reason being I don't want to make our painting look too busy because it's a really small painting. If we add a lot of elements, if we make it too busy, we will lose it's essence, so let's keep it simple. Now, I'm adding under piece over here, add in the shape and fill that in black. Along with this, I'm going to add some small practice as well. To make it look like there are some rocks over there. This will make our painting look more interesting. Just add some teeny tiny pieces like this. We don't need a lot just few here and there. I'm really loving the way this one is progressing. It's a very simple painting. You could try other same thing with any other color combination. You can try out a blue and purple sky instead of of orange and brown. Now, let's add the other mountain. For that, I'm using my size number 2 round brush, and I'm going back with black. This has to be really small, otherwise we won't get that sense of distance level painting. We're going to make it look like that there are some mountains far away. When you add something in a smaller size along the horizon line, you can automatically bring in that sense of distance in your painting. I think I'll add one more tiny piece here so that when we add the reflection our painting look more interesting. Now, I'm going to wash out all the paint from my brush, and it's time to switch to brown. Go with the lighter tone. Now, we're going to add the reflection. Just take your brush underneath the mountain and add some brown line over here, we are concentrating on the area that we have added these mountains. Go with the lighter to medium tone of brown, don't make it too dark, and just add some lines right underneath the mountain. You can see the way I have added them. You just need to follow the shape of your mountain and add some brown lines. You can see how pretty our painting is looking already. In a similar way we'll be adding reflection onto the smaller mountain as well. It's a pretty simple painting. You can see how easily we managed to paint a beautiful sunset. Now, I'm going to add the reflection on the left side. Over here we don't have such huge mountain, so just few lines underneath the mountain is all we need. We're nearly done adding the reflection for the mountains. The next step is to add a sun and its reflection. For that, I'm using white watercolor, and I'm adding a teeny tiny circle on the sky. Make sure to use your smallest size brush, we don't want the sun to be to big. The next step is to add the reflection of the sun, just adding some white lines right underneath your sun. Make sure to use a smaller size brush, these lines shouldn't be too prominent. If you use a bigger size brush there are chances your lines may look to bold. We want some softer lines. It doesn't need to look too prominent. Now, you can bring it down. These are just some random white lines that you need to be adding right underneath the sun. From that horizon line, you can't take it to your masking tape. Some of the lines can be a little wider and some of them can be shorter. As you could see here, they are very random. All right, so we are done with the reflection. Now, I'm thinking to add a similar piece of rock over here. I just felt like this area is looking a little empty. Just take a look at your painting if you want to modify the shape of your mountain, or if you want to add another piece like what I'm doing here, this is your time. Adding your shape, and fill that in black. That is done, now it's time to add the reflection. I'm going to wash all the paint from my brush and I'm switching to brown. Just like we did earlier, I'm going with a medium tone, and I'm adding some brown line to the right, underneath the shape have added here. When you're adding the reflection, make sure to go with a lighter to medium tone of brown. We don't need the reflection to be too prominent. Just keep that in mind, go with a medium to lighter tone, don't make it too dark. All right, with that we are done with our mini sunset. Now, I'm going to peel off the masking tape. Just wait for your painting to dry completely. Don't peel off the masking tape while your background is still wet. Here is the finished painting. I really love the colors we used. Ideally is a magical golden yellow sunset. 14. Fiery Red Sunset: It's time to paint a fiery red sunset. This is the painting that we're attempting in this section. We'll start off by painting the sky, then developing the water. Then we will add the waves, and finally, we will add the reflections. It's a pretty simple one, even though it looks a bit intimidating. Now let's have a look at the colors we'll need. The two main colors you will need to paint this fiery red sunset is obviously a red and an orange so I'll be using permanent red and brilliant orange, you can use any of the red and orange you have got. Then to add the waves I'll be using permanent brown and also a bit of black. Finally, to add the setting sun and the reflection, you will need some white. Those are the five colors you will need to paint this beautiful red sunset. Let's start by taping down our paper. You can use a washi tape or masking tape and just tape down the four sides of your paper. Next, I'm going to squeeze out the colors onto my palette, you will need permanent red, brilliant orange or vermillion, permanent brown and black. Now for this painting aspect, we'll be painting the sky and the water separately so you will have to apply a masking tape almost at the middle of your paper. The top half is the sky and the bottom half is the sea. Now I'm going to grab my half-inch flat brush and I'm starting with permanent red. If you don't have permanent red you can use any other red that you have got, you can use scarlet. I'm going with a very bold color, I'm applying the paint directly onto the dry paper. I haven't applied any water because I want the colors to be as bright as possible. That was red, now I'm switching to orange. I'm not washing my brush, I'm directly going with orange and I'm applying that over the leftover area. You can see how gorgeous those colors are looking together. Just run your brush in a horizontal way and make it a small [inaudible]. That is the sky, now let's wait for this to dry. Before we go with the next step which is painting the sea, you'll have to make sure your sky has dried completely. Otherwise, when you peel off the masking tape that can rip off your paper. The sky has dried, now I'm going to peel off the masking tape. Remove it slowly, don't rip it off too fast. Now let's paint the sea, I'm switching back to my flat brush and I'm going with permanent red. Again, going with a bright tone. Now I'm applying that along the horizon line. We need to get a straight line here, so be a little careful. Now you can bring that color almost until half of this portion. Apply a flat wash. Once you have reached almost half of that section, you can switch to permanent brown, and fill up the remaining area. For the sky and the water, we went in with a variegated wash. We used permanent red and brilliant orange for the sky and for the water we used permanent red and permanent brown. Both of them were a variegated wash but on dry variegated wash here. That's the base wash. We can keep our flat brush aside, wash it and keep it aside. Now I'm switching to my size number 2 round brush. We need a brush which has a pointed tip. I'll be using this one to add the waves and also to add the sun. The first step is to go with permanent brown. Go with a medium tone and add a few lines on the water. The water hasn't completely dried, it is still a little wet but not too wet. Again, see the lines I'm adding here? They are not spreading too much into the background, which means our background is not too wet. Go with a medium tone and just add some random lines like this. Adding these lines are what make your water more realistic, otherwise, it will look too flat. This tip is quite important to give some realistic character to a painting. Go with any of the brush which has a pointed tip, these lines shouldn't be too bold. Closer to the horizon line I added some thin lines. Now I'm going to make my line a bit more thicker. This is going to be one wave. For adding the wave you can go with a bit more darker tone of brown, it can be brown scene or permanent brown, or any other brown. Or you can simply mix a little of black with your red and create a similar color that looks a little light. I want a bit more darker tone of brown, that looks fine. Now I'm adding the wave on the top. This one I'm just topping it halfway, I'm not taking it to the other end. Now I'm going to add another one. It is a bit more thicker. You can see the color I'm using, it's a darker tone of brown. Along the horizon line, we used a [inaudible] tone. Now to add the waves we are using a darker tone. Now we can add the shoreline. I'm using brown [inaudible] and I'm adding a very simple shoreline. First, you can define that shape, and we'll be filling that in a darker tone of brown. You can see how bold and beautiful this sunset is looking already. Now to fill up the shore, I'm going to go with that darker tone of brown so I'm just mixing a pinch of black with brown, and I'm creating a darker tone. If you have burnt umber you can use that readily or you can create a darker tone of brown by by adding a little of Payne's gray or black to your brown. Now just fill up that area in a darker tone of brown. This one is a really easy sunset anyone can do. You could actually try out the same thing with any other color of your choice maybe you can go with blue and crimson, or maybe you can go with orange and yellow. This is where we have reached. Now, I'm going to add a little of darker tones onto the waves, I already have a darker tone of brown on my brush and I'm just a little of that onto the waves. As you could see here, I'm not running my brush throughout that wave, I'm just adding a little here and there so that the waves will be a little more prominent, you can see how they are looking right now. Earlier it was looking a little dull. I really love this color combination. I think our painting is already conveying that fiery red sunset vibes. Now, if you want to add more lines on water or more waves, you could do that now. Maybe you can add one or two waves far away. I just want this area to be a little more darker so that we have a nice contrast so I'm going back with black, and I'm adding that along the shoreline. We have a really nice contrast now. The colors are looking really vibrant and bold. The sky is done and the water is done, now the last step is to add the sun and its reflection. We need to squeeze out some white and also a bit of yellow or a yellowish orange. I'm adding a yellow sun this time so a pinch of white and a pinch of yellow or yellowish-orange. The one I'm using here is permanent yellow, orange, you can either use a yellowish orange or yellow directly. Both of them will work fine. Now we have to mix a bit of white with permanent yellow orange to create an opaque version of orange. This one is a yellowish orange, you can see the color here. Now I'm adding a teeny tiny circle. That is our bright yellow sun. Now we can add a reflection. You will have to use a brush which has a pointed tip, otherwise, it will be difficult to create a tiny cell like this. Now let's add the reflection. I'm using the same brush and I'm using the same color and I'm adding some lines on the water right underneath the sun. My paint is not watery, I'm using a dry version of this yellowish orange and you can see the lines I'm adding here, they are very dry. This is lines we have to add so that it will look like reflection is shining so go with a dry version of your paint, don't add any water, and just add some random dry brush lines. You can take it until the bottom. Skip the waves, let them stay as it is. You can add these reflection lines in between those waves. Now bring it down until you reach the shoreline. I'm really loving the way the painting is turning out. Those reflections are looking as if they're shining. Only a dry brush lines can bring this magic so go with a dry version of your paint, don't add a lot of water. You can see I'm not adding any water, I'm using that dry paint and I'm just scratching my brush on the water and I'm creating these dry brush lines. If your paint is too watery you won't be able to get this effect. If you feel like your paint is watery, you can tap your brush on a paper towel. Now it's time to remove the masking tape and admire our little pretty sunset. Wait for your painting to dry completely before you peel off the masking tape, otherwise, you may rip off your paper along with the masking tape. Here's the finished painting. I hope you all enjoyed painting this bold and beautiful sunset. 15. Violet Ocean: Our next project is a really gorgeous beat sunset. The best part of this project is that glowing reflection, and it is so easy to make. We will start by painting the sky, then we will paint the water, then we will add the waves, and finally, we will add the reflections. It's a very simple color palette. Let me show you the colors we'll need. For the sky and the water, I'll be using permanent violet and white. If you don't have a violet, you can mix and create your own. Then to add the waves and the mountain, I'll be using black. Finally, to add the reflection and the sun, I will be using red. Those are the four colors you will need. If you don't have permanent red, you can use vermillion or scarlet or any other red. I'm going to take all the colors onto my palette first. You will need violet. This one is permanent violet. On the back, we would also need some white. We'll be adding a little of white into violet to create a pastel tone of violet. Now, we will need to apply a piece of masking tape right at the center. The top half will be your sky and the bottom half as your water. Fix a piece of masking tape exactly at the center. Now, you will get these paste of colors readily available. This one is lavender shade. This is the kind of color that we're going to create by adding a little of white into violet. If you're not someone who don't use a lot of pastel shade, it is not really necessary to get one. You can always add a little of white and create any of the paste shade that you want. Let's just check out how we do that. I have some violet and white here. I'm taking a little of white and mixing that with violet. I have got a a pastel tone of violet here. Which will be the color you want to turn into a paste tone, add a little white and thoroughly mix the colors. I have created my pastel violet. Now, I'm going to add this on the top of my paper. As I come down, I will be adding more violet. On the top, I will have a lighter tone of violet, and along the horizon line, I will have a darker tone. Now, I added a bit more violet into the mix and I'm going with a darker tone. I'll blend them well. That's the sky. Now we'll have to wait for this to dry. I've got some more pastel colors. Here is shell pink, brilliant pink, and lavender. You will get colors readily available like this, but it isn't necessary if you are not someone who don't use a lot of pastel colors in your big painting. You just need to add a bit of white into any of the color that you would like to turn into a pastel color. Looks like our sky has dried. Now, I'm going to peel off the masking tape. Now, let's start with the water. I'm going with a brighter tone of violet. I'm applying a flat wash on entire bottom half. Prepare enough of white mixture in advance and simply apply that brighter tone of violet on to the entire water. We need a clean straight line along the horizon line. Be a little careful when you're adding a paint over here. You can either use a detailing brush or any other brush which has a pointed tip to add the paint along the horizon line. Then you can switch back to your round brush or flat brush to add the rest of the color. The base layer is done. For the next step, you will need some black watercolor. We are going to add a series of waves in the water. My background is still a little wet. Now, I'm going to take out my smaller size brush and I'm going to apply the waves directly on the wet background. Here's my smaller size brush. You should be using any of your smaller size brush. Now, load your brush with black, add in a few drops of water, and go with a medium tone of black. We're applying these lines on a slightly wet background. It hasn't dried completely, but it is not completely wet as well. We can see the lines I'm adding here. Go with the similar thickness. If you add the lines in a very poor lentic way, they will start spreading into the background and they will look even more thicker. Go with some thin and delicate lines, add them however you want to. It doesn't need to be straight or wavy or anything, simply add as many lines as you want. Next, I'm going to add some thick lines. I'm using the same brush. I'm pressing the brush and creating some thick lines. You can see here, I didn't continue my line until the other end. I left it in between. This is how you should be adding your lines. In a similar way, I'm going to add three or four waves. When you're adding these lines, there is one major thing you need to keep in mind, you shouldn't be adding them close to each other, there has to be a gap in between. You can see the second one I added here, I have left a gap in between. Now, this one as well, you don't need to take it from the left to right. You can leave it halfway through. Now, I'm going to add another one on the top. I'm adding that onto the right side. Now, adding few more shorter waves on the top, you can see how pretty our sea is looking already. We simply added some lines on our wet background. First, we added some thin and delicate lines, then we went in with a darker tone of black, and we are adding some thick lines which are the waves. In the similar way, I'm going to add few more lines. I will be adding some thick lines in between and also some thin lines. But make sure to leave some gap in between, we need to see that violet color in the background. Don't fill up the entire background with black lines. This is how our sky and the sea has turned out. The next step is to add some mountains. I'm using a really dark and intense tone of black. I'm going to add my first mountain on the left side. Don't make it too huge, go with a smaller to medium size. We can go with any kind of shape that you prefer. Maybe you can make it even more shorter, It doesn't need to be this high. I will add a similar one on the other side as well. Now, if you want this only on one side, it's totally your choice, you don't need to add them on either side, or you can completely skip this step if you don't want to add any mountain. Feel free to make those decisions. The mountains are in. The next step is to add our setting sun and the reflection. This is the most interesting step of this painting. We aren't using white or yellow to add the sun, we are going with the red sun. Take out any of your red, it can be scarlet or it can be vermillion as well. Mix that with a little of white to get an opaque version of that color. I have taken some permanent red and I'm going to mix that with a little of white. Don't add a lot of water, just one or two drops. Now, mix them well. You can see the color I'm getting here. That's a beautiful pastel tone of red. That looks really light, I'm going to add a bit more red to it. That looks nice. This is the color we want. You can see how pretty that color is looking. Now, using the same color, I'm going to add the reflection. Take out a paper towel and tap the brush on a paper towel. We need some dry brush lines. We're not going to use that direct paint. Now, just add in some lines, starting from the horizon line. You need to leave some gap in between. See how I'm doing it? You can see some violet and those black lines in between. Now, I'm going to add another reflection over here, leaving that wave. I'm going to repeat the same until I reach the bottom masking tape. You can see the way I'm doing it here. I'm skipping those waves and I'm adding that reflection on the violet shade. This is how you should be adding it. We need to see all of those colors little by little, so make sure not to add a lot of red lines and fill up the entire background. This is the first step. Now, I'm going to go with white. Again, I'm tapping my brush on a paper towel. Now, towards the center of all these lines, I'm going to add a tint of white, just a teeny bit of white. I'm going with the dry brush line. This time, I'm not making my line brighter as the red line. I'm just adding a little of white onto the center of all those lines. We can see how our sea is glowing. It is really looking as if it is glittering. See that? Pretty, right? This is an easy technique. You can incorporate the same technique in any of your other paintings. Which will be the color you're using for the sun, add some reflection lines using that color first, then go with yellow or white and add a little of that color towards the center. Here is our eighth painting. I'm really happy with the way this one has turned out. It is quite different from all other paintings. I hope you guys enjoyed it. If you haven't tried it yet, do give it a try and join me in the next section. Let's go with our ninth sunset. 16. Sunset Drive: For the next project, we're driving through a road witnessing a beautiful sunset. First, we will start by painting the sky and then that dries we'll be painting the road. Then we will add the landscape and the last step is to add the details. Now you will be adding the streetlamp, the road markings, and the moon. Now let's have a look at the colors you will need. For the sky, I will be using two colors, I'll be going with a variegated wash of permanent red and Prussian blue. If you don't have permanent red, you can use scarlet, or you can go with crimson. Finally, to add those landscape, road, and streetlamps, you'll need black and white. Those are the four colors you will need for this painting. I'm going to squeeze out the colors first, you will need permanent red, and you will need Prussian blue. Those are the two colors we'll be using for the background. For this painting, I'm going to use wet-on-dry technique, so I'm going to apply the paint directly on a dry paper, but if you would love to go with wet on wet technique, apply colder water on your background first then add your paint on a wet background. To paint the sky, I'm going to use my flat brush, and I'm going with a very intense tone of red but that, I will add a rough shape for the road. This will act as a guideline when we are adding the paint, so you know where you should have those red paint and where you should be adding the blue, that's the road. Now on either end, you'll have some trees and plants. Now, over here, I'm focusing more on red, and on the top, I want more of blue. You can go with three for the blue and just one for the red. Let's add the paint. I'm adding an intense tone of red over here. You can see the color I'm going with, it's very bright and bold. Once you have added enough of red, wash all the paint from your brush and switch to Prussian blue. Go with the intense tone of blue and add that right to where you stopped your red and blend those colors well. You create a muddy black in between when you mix red and blue together which is just absolutely okay, don't worry about that. Keep running your brush in a horizontal way until you get a clean blend. Now onto that leftover area on the top, I'm adding a bright tone of Prussian blue just filling that area. For the sky, if you have noticed, I added the color over the bottom first, I added red which is because I didn't want any blue to get into the red I wanted the red to look as bright and clean as possible. That is the reason why I added red first, and then I added blue. Okay, now I'm going to wait for this to dry, and here is the dried background you can see how pretty that red is looking. This is exactly what I wanted. Our next step is to paint the road, for that, I'm going to use a bit of white and black. I'll mix these two colors together to get a darker gray. First, let's squeeze out the paint that's black now, I will add a pinch of white. To paint it all I'm using my medium-sized round brush. This one is size symbol six. Let's create the dark gray, I'm mixing some black and white together. I need a really dark gray. So that's the color I'm going with. Now, I'm going to carefully run my brush along the line I have added here, and I'm going to fill the entire road in this dark gray. Now, even if you make any mistake with the shape of your road that's absolutely okay. We can fix that while we are adding the details. All right, so quickly fill up that road in a darker tone of gray. Follow the outline you have added there, and we'll have to wait for this to dry. Okay, so all of that has dried now, I'm going to go with a dark and intense tone of black, and I'm going to add the landscape. First, you can fill up that shape you have on either side then onto the outer line, we need to add some leafy patterns, so you need to keep on pressing the tip of your brush to create those patterns. It's a pretty simple step you will just need to keep on pressing the tip of your brush and create some brands and patterns along the outer shape. This will make our painting look more realistic. You can use the smallest size brush as well if you want more teeny tiny patterns. Let me quickly finish both sides. I'm done with the left side. Now I'm starting with the right side onto this further end go with the lower height and as you come towards the right end, make it taller. I'm not really happy with the shape of my road, so I'll fix that as well while I'm adding black. That's done. The next step is to add streetlamps. For that, I'm going to use my size number two round brush. We need a brush which has a pointed tip. First, we will add some straight lines maybe we can add a guideline using our pencil first. I'm going to add four streetlamps. On the right end, you will have a taller streetlamp and as we are approaching the vanishing point, the height has to go lower. I have added the reference lines now I'm switching back to my brush, and I'm running my brush on top of those lines I have added. The first line can be a little thick, this one is much more closer to you. That is the pole, now, we are going to add the lights. It's just that frame of the light. After this, we'll have to switch to white, and we need to add a light using white particles. So it's just an arc line. Similar way I will add another one on the left side. It's going to be like a mirror image. Now I'm going to do the same for other three lines I have added here. Now wash all the paint properly and switch to white. We are going to light up all these streetlamps. Just try to add a shape like this using white particles and make it look like all the lights are facing down. It's a very simple shape. Now do the same for the other streetlamps, as well depending on the size of your streetlamp, you need to reduce the size of this white shape too. For that teeny tiny one, you don't add a huge light so keep the proportion in your mind and adding your light accordingly. Now I'm going to add a teeny tiny more on the top left corner. We're nearly done. The last step is to add the road markings, I'm using my smaller size brush, and I'm carefully adding a very thin and delicate line. On either side, I will add a solid white line and towards the middle, I will add a dashed white line. You can use a white gel pen if you are more comfortable with that, or you can completely skip this step if you're not confident enough. Actually, you can give it a try. If it's not coming right right you can fill that road again in a [inaudible] gray. Give it a try don't just give up. I made a mistake with that first dashed line I will add another one next to it and I will cover that with the gray. This is exactly what you can do if you're not getting it right so give it a try and if it's not coming out good fill that with a darker tone of gray. To leave your painting without any road marking, that's absolutely okay. Now it's time to peel up the masking tape. Here is our finished painting. I really love this color combination, especially that bright red along the vanishing point, so it looks like it's time to go with our next project. 17. Purple Beach: Our next project is a very simple beads sunset. We'll start by painting the sky. We'll begin with a variegated wash of three colors. After that, we'll paint the water. The last tip is to add the mountains and the reflection. Now let's have a look at the colors you will need. For this one, I'm going to use purple shade for the sky, which is the main color. I'm going to create my own purple by mixing crimson and Prussian blue. Along with that, you will also need some yellow. I will be using cadmium yellow, you can use any yellow you have caught. Finally, you will need black and white. Those are the five colors you will need for this painting to create a purple, you will need Prussian blue and crimson. Then you will need yellow, black, and white. I have fixed my paper, and as I said earlier, I'll be creating my own purple for this painting. You will need a crimson and Prussian blue, and we'll be mixing those two colors together to create a purple shade. First, I'm going to take out both the colors onto my palette. This one is crimson, the next color is Prussian blue. I will add it at two different places so that the first one can be used to create purple and the other one we can use directly. Now I'm going to squeeze out some blue as well. This is Prussian blue I'm adding that right next to crimson. Now you will need the yellow. The one I'm using here is cadmium yellow light. You can use any yellow you have got. For this painting, as well, we'll be painting the sky and the water separately. You'll have to apply a piece of masking tape, a little bit on the center of the paper. The 3/4 of the painting is the sky and 1/4 of the painting as the beach. I'm going to fix my masking tape over here. For this painting, we are going to use a variegated washer three different colors for the sky. If you prefer going with a wet on wet technique, feel free to apply a coat of water onto paper first, then add in your paint on a wet background. I'm going to go with wet on dry technique. The first step is to create your own purple, I'm mixing crimson and Prussian blue, you will have to add more crimson and less Prussian blue to get that purple shade. This is the color I have created, it's a gorgeous shade. Now I'm going with a very intense tone of this color, and I'm going to apply that on the top of my paper. I'm using my flat brush and I'm just running my brush in a horizontal way and I'm adding the color. You can see how beautiful this color rise. You just need to mix crimson with any of the blue, the blue I have used here as Prussian blue, you can use any other blue. The color will be slightly different, but you will get a card, just color. I have washed over the paint from my brush and I'm switching to crimson and I'm adding that right to where I stopped purple and I'm blending them well. Now for that little bit leftover at the bottom, I'm going to use the yellow. Again wash away the paint from your brush, clean it properly, dab it on a paper towel and make sure that there's no crimson left on your brush. Now go with a clean yellow, and add that over the bottom and blend that with the crimson. I'm going to turn my paper upside down and I'm going to make the blends smoother. I'm just running my brush from bottom to the top and the rule is panel. I'm trying to create a smooth blend of these colors. I'm adding some more taco tone of purple at the bottom, which is actually the top of your sky. That looks nice, that's my sky. Now I'm going to wait for this to dry. This sky has completely dried. I'm not really happy with the blend. I can see some strong brush marks on the top. Let's peel off the masking tape and let's start painting the water. For the water, I'm using that same property we created earlier. Now when I'm applying purple, I'm deliberately leaving a layer of purple at the top especially on the right corner. I need to add a bit of crimson and a yellow over here, I have added purple. Now, I'm washing up the paint from my brush, and I'm switching to crimson. You can see the gap I have left on the top. Now I'm adding a little of crimson. Again, washing the paint from my brush and going with yellow. Now onto that little area I'm applying yellow. We just need a little of yellow towards the right corner. Then after that, we just need little of crimson, and from that, the color is transitioning into purple. I have added very little amount of crimson. If you want to add more, you could do that. You don't need to worry at all if you haven't got a clean blend here, it's absolutely okay. We just need some yellow on the top and a bit of crimson and more of purple. Now, I'm going with the taco tone of purple, and I'm applying that onto the left corner. I'm not adding any on the right side. I want the yellow and crimson to stay as it is. Just concentrate on the left side, add some taco tones purple here. There is a strong separation over there. I'm dabbing my brush on a paper towel, I'm just pulling this purple into the yellow just a little so that it doesn't have a strong separation there. Now let's wait for it to dry completely. The background has dried completely. The next step is to add the mountains, and also add the shore. To add both of it we will need black watercolor. I'm going to take out of the top black watercolor onto my palette. First, we will add the mountains, then we can add the shore. I'm using my size number 2 round brush and I'm adding a medium-sized mountain on the left side. On the right, I will add a very low lying mountain. The first step is to add the shape, and then you can fill that in black. I have taken the mountain almost in the center and as I reached here, you can see I have reduced the height of the mountain. Now, I'm going to add the shore. You can add that in one go. Don't break it a lot and make it as smooth and curvy as possible. Once you have added that shoreline, you can fill the left side in black. Go with a very organic shapes for your shoreline. Add some cores, some free flowing lines in between and make it as organic as possible. Without lifting your hand, add another free flowing line like this. That's a line I have added. Now I'm going to quickly fill that area on the left hand in black, go with a very dark and [inaudible] to on black and see fill that up. That's done. Now I'm going to add a small mountain over here, just to add some finishing touches to the painting. It's a very small mountain, not like the one we have on the left side. Wash all the paint from your brush make it clean. Now let's add the setting sun and its reflection. Let's take out some white. Go with some clean white and add a teeny tiny dot, which is your setting sun. Now in a similar way, how we added the reflection in the other paintings. Add some white lines on the water starting from the horizon line. So here we have a short line. You can take your reflection until you reach the short line. You can see the lines I'm adding here. They're not too prominent. I'm going with some random dashed lines. That's it. They are done with our night sunset. I have to remove the masking tape. Here's the finished painting that shore and mountainous yet to dry, I was so impatient and I removed the masking tape. You could try this painting with any other color combination of your choice. Now it's time to go with the last sunset of the cities. Are guys ready, I'll see you in the next section. 18. Red Sunset Lake: Finally, here we are with our 10th mini-sunset. We'll be exploring another bold color combination. We'll start by painting the background. We'll be painting the sky and the water together. We'll be using wet on wet technique. Once everything dries, we will be adding the mountains and those patches of land, and finally we'll add the setting sun and its reflection. Let's have a look at the colors you will need. You can already guess the colors. For the sky and the water we'll be using permanent brown, permanent red, and brilliant orange. You can use any brown, red, and orange you have got, it doesn't need to be the same colors that I'm using here. Then to add the mountain and also reflection, you will need black and white. Those are the five colors you will need for this painting. All right, my dear friends, we are starting with our last painting of this series. For this one, you will need permanent red, permanent brown and brilliant orange, so squeeze out the colors onto your palette. Now, for this painting, I'm going to go with a wet on wet technique. I'm using my one-and-a-half inch wash brush here, and I'm dipping my brush in clean water, and I'm applying an even coat of water onto the entire paper. Once you have applied water on your paper, just tilt your paper and see if there's any water running through. If there is water floating down, keep running your brush multiple times to make the coat of water even, we just want a shiny coat of water on the paper. Now, I'm going to switch to my flat brush, and I'm starting with orange. I'm just randomly applying up the tough orange on the center of my paper. Now, switching to red and adding that around orange. Now fill up the top and bottom in red. Your background is wet, and you can easily drop in the colors on the wet background, adding your colors quickly while you're background is still wet. This way, it will be very easy for you to blend the colors. Fill up that top and the bottom in a brighter tone of red. Now, I'm going with the last color, which is permanent brown, and I'm adding that on the top and the bottom. I want the top and bottom to have some more darker tones. Just adding a little on the top and also on the bottom. Don't worry about getting a clean blend. Simply drop the colors on a wet background. you can add them however you want to, I'm just adding some lines. Some of them are wider and some of them are shorter. I just want some darker tones on the top and the bottom. I'm not trying to focus on getting a clean blend, I'm just dropping the colors on the wet background. That is it, so that is the background. We have painted the water and the sky together. You can see how pretty the colors are looking. They have nicely spread into each other, creating a beautiful blend. Now wash all the paint from your brush and let's wait for it to dry. Here is the background. Everything has dried completely, now, as you all know, you'll need some black for the next step. I'm going to take out some black onto my palette, we will also need a little of white to add the sun and its reflection. Now I'm going to go with my size 10, [inaudible] brush, and I'm going with a very dark and intense tone of black. Make sure your background has dried completely before you add the mountains. I'm going to start with the mountain, so I'm considering an imaginary horizon line in my mind. We haven't added any reference line here. If you want, you can add a reference line using a pencil, but make sure to go with very light pencil sketch. I'm adding my first mountain, it's not that huge, I'm going with a medium-sized mountain. This one is quite far from you. Now, similarly, I'm adding another one on the left side. [MUSIC] Add the shape and fill it in black. Maybe on this side you can go with a bit more taller mountain, so that it doesn't look symmetrical, It will look more realistic and natural. Now I'm taking it till the other end. I'm just altering the shape, making a bit more taller. The mountains are in. The next step is to add the patches of land, so I'm leaving a little gap in between, and I'm adding a line. We have divided our painting into sky, and it worked out by adding the mountain. We created an imaginary horizon line over there, now I have left a gap in-between, and I'm adding a patch of land. I will extend this line till the other end. By doing this simple step right below the mountain, we have created a water body. It can be a lake, you can see the thickness I'm going with. Your line shouldn't be too thick. Also, it doesn't need to be a clean straight line. It can be a very imperfect line. Now, again, I'm leaving a little gap, and adding another line, and I'm adding a curvy line here. It is more like that short line we added in the previous painting. This is the first patch of land. On the left side, I will go with a much more bigger patch. Now let's add a similar of patch of land on the left side. First, I'm going to add the line. Just watch how the way I'm adding it. It's a very organic shape. You don't need to follow the same shape that I'm adding here. Add it however you want to. We just need a curvy organic shape here. Once you have added that shape for that in black, at some places we can take it a little outward and make it look more interesting. I'm pulling this line a bit out, and I'm creating a pocket here. You can do similar alteration wherever you want. These little details will make your painting look more interesting. [MUSIC] First, I thought I will stop this patch of land at the center. Then I thought, I will take it a little more down, and here we are. I took it through the masking tape. Now I'm adding some small patches, just to bring in a little more interest to our painting. That is it, you can either follow the same pattern for your land or you can go with any other composition. Maybe you can simply add a similar patch, like the right right and left as well. You don't need to take it till the bottom. Add in that patch of land, however you want to. Next I'm going to add some shadow underneath the patch of land. Go with a medium tone of brown and add in a line underneath these patches. [MUSIC] You don't need to add the shadow there, it is turning. Just add it where you have those lines, similarly add a line of shadow underneath the mountains as well. Now it will be the same until you finish this patch of land. You can see the way I'm adding it, I'm adding it only where I have this line. I'm not adding it where the land is turning. [MUSIC] That's done. Now the last step is to add the sun and its reflection. To add the sun, I'm not using white directly, I'm mixing a little of orange with white to create a orange sun. Just add a little white to the orange that you used and create a opaque version of orange. Now add a tiny dot over here. That's your sun. If you closely look at the painting, we have two sections of water. You have a linear section right underneath the mountains, and also you have a free flowing part at the bottom, so you need to add a reflection on both the sides. I'm starting with that linear patch. Now I'm adding some lines on this flowy area. Now I'm bringing in down. [MUSIC] Closer to the sun, you can go with a bolder tone of that color. Maybe you can add in a bit more white and make that color more bold. As you come away from the sun, use very thin and delicate lines. We don't need such sharp and prominent lines over here. That is set. We have finished our 10th mini-sunset. I'm going to peel off the masking tape, and I show you the finished painting. This has turned out really good. I really love the color combination and those patches of land. It was a pretty simple one, I think that patch of land made the whole difference, and here you go. Here's the 10th mini-sunset. I hope you all enjoyed painting all this 10 mini-sunset. 19. Thank You for Joining :): Congratulations, you made it to the end. Thanks a lot for joining. I hope you all had a great time painting with me. I really cannot wait to see the gorgeous collection of mini sunsets that you guys have created. For me, it is very much needed to spend some creative time to satisfy my inner self. But most of the days, I don't get a lot of time. The maximum I can't create from this is just 10 to 15 minutes. I love creating mini paintings like this. I have a huge collection. Depending on a little creative time every day makes me calm and composed. I believe it is very important for everyone to invest a little time doing some creative task. Each painting we did in this class took us just 10 minutes, or a little more. My main motive to this course is to make you all understand that you just need to 10 to 15 a day to build an art routine. You can continue creating these mini paintings every day, incorporating the lessons we learned from this class. If you enjoyed this class, I would really love, if you can leave a review for me, and also I would love to see your class projects. Do upload them to the class physics gallery. Thanks a lot for joining and happy painting. I really hope to see you next time.