Animation for Lettering: Making Morphing Word GIFs with Photoshop | Chris Piascik | Skillshare

Animation for Lettering: Making Morphing Word GIFs with Photoshop

Chris Piascik, The illustrator formerly known as designer.

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9 Lessons (2h 7m)
    • 1. Intro

      1:34
    • 2. Assignment

      1:12
    • 3. Sketching Lettering

      7:45
    • 4. Finalizing Word Illustrations

      14:03
    • 5. Simple Shape Morph Exercise

      17:29
    • 6. Script Exercise

      11:52
    • 7. The Morph, part 1

      34:00
    • 8. The Morph, part 2

      37:30
    • 9. Conclusion

      1:38
16 students are watching this class

About This Class

Hi, my name is Chris Piascik. Im an illustrator. In this class I’ll show you my process for making simple looping animations morphing one word into another without using any complicated animation software or features. This animation can be created in Photoshop or in Procreate using the same process. I am not an animator, and I barely know my way around After Effects—actually, I still get lost everytime I use After Effects. The reason I am telling you this is to prove that if I can do it—so can you! 


That said, I’m not a complete hack, I’ve worked with clients like Cartoon Network, Google, McDonalds, The Washington Post, Nickelodeon, and FX. Social Media advertising has become a huge market and simple animated GIF’s are highly desirable for that application. 

The animations we’ll create will have a loose, playful appearance, and vibrate a bit like old-school traditional animation. If you’re looking to make smooth, clean animations with tight vector artwork you’re likely better off with an intro to After Effects class. I’ll loosely touch on my lettering process in the first lesson, but if this is your first time working with illustrated type I’d recommend an intro to Lettering class first. My pal Mary Kate McDevitt has a great one!

Transcripts

1. Intro: Hi, my name is Chris Piascik, I'm an Illustrator. In this class, I'll show you my process for making simple looping animations, morphing one word into another without using any complicated animation software features. This animation can be created in Photoshop, or in Procreate using the same process. I'm not an Animator, and I barely know my way around After Effects. Actually, I still get lost every time I try to use it. The reason I'm telling you this is to prove that if I can do it, so can you. That said, I'm not a complete hack, I've worked with clients like Cartoon Network, Google, McDonald's, The Washington Post, even Nickelodeon. Social media advertising has become a huge market, and simple animated GIFs are highly desirable for that application. The animations we'll create, will have a loose, playful appearance, and vibrate a bit like old-school traditional animation. If you're looking to make smooth animations with tight vector artwork, you're likely better off with an intro to After Effects class. I'll loosely touch on my Lettering process, but if this is your first time working with the illustrated type, I'd recommend an intro to Lettering class first. My pal, Mary Kate McDevitt, has a great one. Thanks for tuning into this class, and let's have a good time. 2. Assignment: Me again. Just going to read you your assignment on my phone here. Your assignment is to create a looping, animated GIF, morphing one word into another word. I recommend choosing words that are similar in length, as it will make the process a bit easier. The easiest solution will be to use words with the same amount of letters like, butt and fart. Actually, I have that written down here. This is very unprofessional. Doing this way will allow you to morph one letter into another letter, as opposed to morphing multiple letters into a single letter. The letter isn't significantly harder, but it can get a bit confusing at first. We want to keep things simple to start out. Then you can experiment and get crazier as you go. The second part of the assignment is to have fun. It's also should be the first part. Step zero, have fun, most important part. Then the butt and fart part. Talk to you later. Bye. 3. Sketching Lettering: Did you pick your words? Or did you just pick your nose? The first thing you want to do, on starting to consider what this animated GIF is going to look like is how your words are going to look. You could consider different ideas, maybe the way the word looks could reflect its meaning, maybe the word fluffy could look fluffy, maybe it's some furry letters. You can think about how different line qualities or shapes can affect the way it works. To start this process, all you really need to do is just start sketching. You can do this on your iPad and Photoshop or on some tracing paper. Recommend tracing paper so that you can use what you've started with and do variations based on that. In fact, you really could do this whole entire process on sketching paper and then just scan them all in at the end and compile them in Photoshop. It's a little more difficult, but it would absolutely work. The key to this part is just experimenting and playing with how the words look and playing around, and as I mentioned before having fun. Let's have fun. I'm just going to grab a pencil brush here. As you can see, I use Kyle Webster's brushes because they're fantastic. I'm just going to grab a pencil. Because even though I'm working digitally, I need it like a pencil when I'm sketching. I'm just going to start sketching out some words that aren't necessarily the ones I'm going to do, but just playing around and trying out different words of how they could look to maybe give you some ideas. I don't know, as I mentioned, the word slime, maybe if that was your word, you could try to make it drippy. Maybe if you're doing the word slime, you could sketch it out and make some drippy letters. Doing this thing is fun to animate because you can slowly make the drips go down and looks gross. But keep in mind, the more complicated it is, the trickier it will be to animate. Since we're animating frame by frame, we're going to have to redraw this over and over again, if it's really hard could be pretty tedious, that said, if you got some fun drippy type, it could be worth it. You'll also find that animating this way because it's vibrate and it's going pretty quickly, it's more forgiving than you might think. That's just a quick sketch for how the word slime could look. Let's try something else. Maybe if your word was boom, maybe it could just be like really bold and big solid shapes. Maybe it's on a bit of a curve that, I don't know mix the sound of boom, I don't know if a curve would do that, but it feels that way to me, then go for it. Maybe you could enhance it even more by giving it like a 3D effect, like it's coming at us. Again, at this point we're just playing around, trying different things. Sometimes, well, usually I'll sketch a bit looser than this, but they can look a little chaotic, not very good for video purposes because maybe I'm the only one who can understand that. Another fun thing to do is doing thinner lines for things and making them wiggle a little bit. I like to try that effects sometimes, maybe some lines if we're going to talk about thin lines, maybe the word skinny, just letting the line wiggle a little bit as you're drawing. This can have a really cool effect when you're doing most of these and animating them, it'll vibrate quite a bit. The tricky thing though is that, if the word is too long it can be a bit hard to read, maybe that's something you want to play around with. This part of the process like sketching. You want to make sure that you have a fun, good idea, and that you're enjoying doing it. Oftentimes I'll spend more time here doing the sketch stuff than I do on the actual finished piece because you want to make sure that you've got your design locked down and planned out before you spend all the time tiding it up. Remember to have fun. Let's draw some fun letters. Fun. Another thing to think about is maybe there's some little graphic elements that you want to do like sometimes having some little squiggly lines on the side are fun to animate. Take your time at this stage, have some fun, do some sketching. Once you get your first word lockdown, will use that as the starting point to do the second word. The reason for that is we want to keep them roughly the same size. They can change the way they look pretty dramatically. As you experiment more of this, you can change things in size pretty dramatically, to get things started and to do it in the most simple way, we'll want to keep them roughly the same size, because it can get confusing when you're first starting. I got to go. 4. Finalizing Word Illustrations: Okay, so once you've narrowed down your sketches to a solution you're happy with for each word. You'll want to do final versions of each. Generally my sketches are small, so open them up in a Photoshop document like I have here and make them bigger so I can trace over them with a little bit more detail, tightening it up as I go. This is pretty much how I do all my work. Sometimes I do it a whole bunch of times but right here you'll see that we have my sketch still pretty loose, and I still have a little bit of the grid there. But it's just to give myself some, reference for how I want this to look. So what I'm going to do now is take that sketch layer and bring the opacity down low enough that I can still see it, but it's not going to interfere with what I'm doing. I'm going to do a new layer and I'm going to go ahead and grab a brush to draw with. Let's see, I think I'm going to just go with one of Kyle smooth inking brushes to keep things simple. So let's start inking. I'm just following along with my sketch here, and I do this the same way, even when I'm just in the sketch process. If I'm trying to get something to look better, I'll just keep doing sketches over sketches, trying to make it look right. But I will speed this up so you don't have to watch each and every line. I guess just a few thoughts while I'm doing this. I'm keeping in mind that these are Script form. So though these are loose and playful, I'm still paying attention to the idea that I'm a downward brushstroke, the width is thicker and then upstroke is thinner. For example, on this S coming up and it's thin, and then it will get thicker as it comes down and then out. This is obviously a dramatic version of that. But again, it's still helpful on having a basis in reality even when you're doing playful lettering. All right, so I'm going to go ahead and just use the paint bucket to fill this in and then it'll give me a better idea of how my letter forms are working out. See if I need to make any adjustments. Then I will turn off my sketch layer so I can see it on its own. Now that I'm looking at this I can see that there's a few little areas I need to clean up. This part of the S. I think this the N is looking a little thin compared to the S and all these other letters. So just go in and beef that up a little bit. Beef is a technical topography term so if you don't have that design background, you may not know that. This is called the beef factor, usually measured in [inaudible]. The other thing to keep in mind is that these are going to be animated and wiggly and stuff. So there is little imperfections can be a good thing. I wouldn't worry too much. Cool, I think that's going to work for our purposes. So I can go ahead and delete that sketch. As I mentioned, we're thinking about this as a digital flip book. So everything is going to have that vibrating look to it. That makes sense when these things are transforming. But when we're transforming words, we need to hold on each word for a second or two so that someone can actually read it. The problem there is that because of that loose nature, if we just hold on the word as it is, it'll look weird because it'll be static and not moving. So to get around that, what you do is draw each word three times, and then we can loop those three frames a number of times depending on how long you want to hold on the word. Just doing it three times will allow it to naturally vibrate without looking like two things flipping back and forth. I would say three is the minimum to have this natural vibration. You could do more if you want it to look more intricate, but three usually works fine. So that's what we're gonna do for this. So for that, we're just going to do exactly what we did for the sketch phase. We're going to turn down the opacity of that layer and make a new layer. I'm just going to trace it and you can try to stay pretty tight to it and that will give you minimum vibration or you could experiment with getting a little bit looser and having more variation, and that'll obviously vibrate more. What I found is that if I just try to do a pretty decent job tracing it, it works just enough for me. All right, one thing I would mention is that you should, instead of doing the same thing and turn down the opacity of this new layer and tracing that, I recommend turning that layer off, doing a new layer and tracing your original again. The reason for that is because you don't want to be tracing the slight variations that you just made because then it'll look too much like an e-vamp. Maybe getting a little bit fatter as you are tracing it. It won't have a real natural vibration because it will seem more sequential. If you trace the original for both of them, it'll be unnatural back and forth without feeling like it's changing in a weird way, if that makes any sense. Now we have a three variations of our word nasty, what I'll do now is go back to the original and I will bring the opacity back up. Let's be responsible adults and name our layers right here, so we can keep track of them when we start animating, because it can get a little confusing when there's a lot of layers. I will name this, NASTY 1 and then NASTY 2 and NASTY 3. We'll do this so that we can keep track of them so that we have the natural vibration that we're hoping for. What we can do now is test this out to make sure that it looks right. Go ahead and go to window and open up our timeline and click on Create a Video Timeline and then let's click on these little boxes in the bottom corner to make it simple. What we can do here, like we did in the previous exercises is make frames from layers. We'll go ahead and delete our background layer, and then hold shift to select our three layers, and then turn the background layer back on. If you want to have a background. But we're just doing this for testing purposes so it doesn't matter. Since we have these all selected, we can change the time as I recommended, 0.1 seconds is a good choice for subtle variation like this and we can go ahead and press play to test this out. Cool. That has a little bit of vibration to it. I think it looks kind of cool, maybe a little bit more than I wanted to. The vibrates is quite a bit, but I think because of the words nasty and gross. I think this is nice because it pulse rates a little bit. It feels a little gross, it goes well with the color, feels a little slimy, so I'm happy with this. We'll stop this, I'm going to go ahead and delete these frames because we're going to be having changes there down the road, so I don't want to confuse things. The next step is to do the same thing for gross. I'm going to go ahead and open up a new layer and grab my sketch file. See here SKILL SHARE sketches, gross, cool. Bring this into my photoshop file, place that, and going to turn down the opacity like we were doing before. Before I start drawing, I want to get the size right first. I'm going to turn on one of my nasty layers and double-check. Looks like the sizing is pretty close, my adjust, shift grows up a little bit, that seems pretty good. I will turn that off and then we will do the same process we just did but for gross this time. Now we have our three grosses, so again, I'm going to go back and bring the opacity back up. Going to name my files like a very smart young man or young woman, or just a very smart person, so smart. GROSS 3. Let's test out our gross letters. Let's open up our timeline, instead of doing the make frames from layers, let's just hit this little duplicate thing a few times. We got our three layers. I'm going to go ahead to the first one and make sure it's GROSS 1 is turned on and now I'm going to the two and I'm going to turn off one and turn on two. I'm going to go to frame three, and I'm going to turn off one and turn on three. One has GROSS 1 turned on two, has GROSS 1 turned on and three has GROSS 3 turned on. It's the same thing we were doing before, it's just as making the frames from the layers, this is just doing it manually. Our settings is already set because we did it last time, and let's just hit play. Cool that looks pretty gross, I'm happy with that. We are ready for the next step which is the whole reason we're here, to morph these two words together. I'll see you in the next exercise. 5. Simple Shape Morph Exercise: For this first exercise, we're going to do a simple morph just using two shapes, a triangle and a square. We're going to do this because it will allow us to go through the process in the most simple way without worrying about the nuances or intricacies of the letters involved in morphing two words. I'm going to get out my iPad, hook it up to Photoshop, and then you can follow along on screen as we work through this first simple animation. To get started, we're going to open up our layer palette and then do a new layer, and we're going to draw our starting sequence and then our finish sequence, and what I mean by that is where it's going to start and where it's going to finish. What we're going to do to test this out and to get a feel for how this morphing process works, I'm just going to morph a triangle into a square. To start, we're going to make our starting point, so I'm just going to draw the triangle. We've got a triangle there, just going to fill it in, make it solid. Now I'm going to turn the Opacity down so that you can still see it, but then I can draw on top of it and see something else. The next thing we're going to draw is where we want this to end up and since we are morphing a triangle into a square, we're going to draw our square. We kept the opacity of the triangle down just so that we can make the square the same shape because it'll make it easier. Not the same shape, the same size. I'm just going to use the height as a guide here. I'm going to fill that in. Now we have our two shapes, we've got our triangle and we've got our square. In order to animate a morph between these two, we need to do the in-between frames. The in-between frames are key to making the animation process work. Think of it as a flip book, if you looked at a flip book one page at a time, you would see just changes ever so slightly, and then when you go through it quickly, it moves. We're going to do the same thing. What we want to do is turn the opacity down for each of them so that we can still see both of them, and we're going to make a new layer on top of that. What we want to do is slowly change the triangle into the square. It's really just as simple as that. What I would do is trace near the triangle, but maybe we make it a bit wider now and maybe that point starts to square off, but it's getting closer to the square. We'll turn off that first one, and now we'll bring down the opacity on one we just drew, and then we'll do the same process again. We'll start a new layer and we will just make that triangle closer to the square. You can have fun with these processes, it doesn't just have to be slowly moving it, we don't have to just slowly move this line. You could experiment with different ways of doing it, and this is part of the process that I really like. I like trying different ways to morph things and doing it in different ways, so instead of maybe just extending this line straight, what if we make it more organic? But it's still a subtle change, so it's not going to look completely out of whack when it's animated. Fill that in, we'll turn off the previous one, but we're always leaving the final one on because that's where we're trying to get to, so each step is a little bit closer. Let's again bring the opacity down, do a new layer, and since we started doing this organic shapes situation, let's keep going with that. Maybe we can get a little lucky when we're starting to build out that square. We could almost make it look like it's hitting the side and splurting a little bit. I'll block this off and then let's fill that in. At this point you have to decide, is that enough or do I want to do another one? I think this is probably close enough to the square that we can stop. This animation would likely work pretty well getting us to the rectangle. You could make this a loop by just repeating the process and just reversing these layers, but what I like to do is try to do it in a different way so it doesn't just look like just like a rewind. I like to make it more of an organic loop where it's a full cycle sequence. Well, that's a mouthful. What we're going to do now is go back. Let's, so we don't get confused, move the rectangle back to the top because we want to start with the original image and then end with that final image. Now to loop back, we're going to do the same thing but in reverse order. We're going to take this square and bring it back to the rectangle. What if we could try something different where we draw the square again. Then maybe we try doing some strategic erasing. Wrong tool, I meant the eraser. What if we try doing some erased lines. I think those are a little fat, but maybe we can put some middle ones in here, so it's a bit of like it's dissolving. We'll turn off that one and then we will bring this opacity down, and then we can see that we can go little bit further. When you are starting to dissolve things like these lines that are pretty big, maybe the next one they're thinner, it's like a slow evolution. Then the ones that already thin, they just become pieces of lines, maybe a little dots or something. Then maybe we can get this shape a little bit closer and then go back and add those line dissolves on the sides. As you can see, I'm not being that particular with the edges because it'll give it a natural vibration which I really like, and you'll see what I mean when we go to animate this. I'm going to pull some more lines here, so it's a slow dissolve. All right, let's turn that layer off and bring this one down so we can see what we're doing. They come just about to the edges of the triangle for this one. These ones that were just little lines, I'm just sort of put in some little dots in there. Since this is just an exercise, maybe let yourself experiment and see how little you can show or maybe how big of a change you can do and have it still read. Okay? All right. Let's turn off this early one. Let's bring that this opacity. Then this is going to be I think our final before we go back to the original triangle. I'm going to draw the triangle pretty tight to the edges. Fill that in. Then just sort of turn these lines into little pieces. All right, so since we've been bringing down the opacity on all these lines, we want to make sure that they are all at 100 percent. Fills like them all and then just like bring them all to zero or something and then you can bring them out of a 100 to make sure they're all in the right place. The next step is to go to your window and find the timeline window. This is where we're going to actually do our animation. When you open up your timeline, you'll get this window. We're going to click on this thing that says Create a Video Timeline. We're going to look at this and go, "Oh my God, that's confusing. I don't know what it is." Then you're going to go to the bottom corner and you're going to see these little squares and you're like, well, this little frame animation that looks nice. Click on that. You're like, wow, one square that seems so much less scary. Here's where the magic trick happens. If you click over on the right on these little lines over here, we're going to click this magic setting called mic frames from layers. What this is going to do is it's going to take all of our layers and turn them into the frames of our animation. Boom, the Center Mall here. The first one is our backgrounds. What you can do is just delete that layer. Then let's go ahead and hold shift and select all of these frames. We can go over to our layers and turn that back around that gone. What that does is it just turns on that layer for each of these frames. Underneath each square you'll see a time setting. For this kind of animation, I've found that putting it on, on a 0.1 second delay works out pretty well. You can experiment with different things, but anything above that starts to get a little bit slow. This sort of gives you that natural animation look. 0.1 seconds. Then you just want to make sure this is set on forever. What that means is in a loop. Here's the moment of truth. Lets see if this actually worked. We're going to hit play. We've got a cool morphing animation. I think this is kind of fun because since when it's getting smaller here, those lines are sort of like falling towards the center. It has a cool vibration to it. It's almost like a weird heartbeat. But that's it. We made a little looping morphing animation. Good job everyone. In order to actually use this on the web, you're going to want to save this as a animated GIF. Or you can export a movie whichever you prefer. But to save it as a GIF, you would just go to File Export. Then you can do say for web. Once you're here, you just want to change this to GIF. Here's where you can change the size. As I mentioned earlier, I like to work at 2,000 so that I have the ability to draw easier when you're working at lower resolution, it's hard to get good lines. Here I'll make it smaller. This is just an animated GIFs we're not going to want it too big. Maybe we do 800 pixels. Something to keep in mind is you want the file size to be smallest and since these are met for the web. If you see over here, this is only 50K that is tiny. There's no need to worry there, but as you start getting more complicated with these things and introducing colors, it can get pretty big. I generally try to keep things under 500K, or at least under omega fits like a super-complicated one. Once it gets above that, you're really better off using a movie file than a GIF. We can save that. Let's save it to the desktop. Then you can go check that out. We have a GIF, excuse me. If you want to export it as a movie, you can just go to export render video. This is helpful if you wanted to bring it into like after-effects or something like that. Then you've got your different settings here. I'm not going to talk about that because that's a little complicated and not necessarily for this class. Okay. I'll see you in a little while. 6. Script Exercise : Hi. In this next exercise, we're going to do a simple animation, just spelling out a word. This isn't necessarily a morph but it's a way to show how this frame by frame animation can work with type. It's a cool effect that you can use in your final morphing animation or in any other type animation thing. I'm going to do this one in Procreate because as I mentioned, the process for creating these animations is the same in both Photoshop or Procreate. We'll do this exercise in Procreate so you can get a feel for doing it in a different application. Even though it's essentially the same thing, and you can do it in Photoshop just as easily. Let's look at the screen, and stop looking at me. What we're going to do is use a script, a word written in script, and then we're going to have it write itself out for the animation. Let's get started. I'm going to use the word okay as our example. Would that be okay with you? The easiest way to start this process is to just write out the word like we did here. Then just like we did in the shape morphing exercise, we're going to turn the opacity down, and we're going to make a new layer just the same as Photoshop. This is just a simple application without all of the features that Photoshop has, but it's plenty to do in animated GIF like this. What we're going to do now is we're just going to start at the beginning. When you're doing this with script, you want to think about how you would write the word, and how it would go. You can experiment with how much you do at a time or how little. But what I like to do is start out with just two little stroke, and sometimes I'll round the end like that. What you can do now is do a new layer, but you could either keep starting from fresh, and keep tracing over, or a quicker way is if you just duplicate that layer, and then you just go ahead, and add a little more to it. This is faster for sure. The only issue here is that you won't get that same vibrating quality because the beginning is going to stay the same, but then again, as it's spelling out, you might not notice it not vibrating because it's in movement anyway, but for simplicity sake, we're going to do it this way here. Go a little further. It's, whoops, that's the eraser. I'm going to undo that. You can experiment with where and how long you make each addition, but what I like to do is pay attention to where there's like loops and stuff like that. So it seems natural. I'll often go rate to where the top of the loop is, so that it doesn't just switch to where a full loop is completed because then it won't look like a natural movement. I'm just duplicating the layer again. Go a little further. This one, we'll bring it up to the top. Then the next one will loop down. Duplicate that layer. Again, turn them off as you go, but it gets confusing. Then here, just like I like to do with the loops, oftentimes I will come to stop before it crosses over because sometimes it looks a little weird if there's just like a finished loop out of nowhere. It's moving pretty quickly, so it's pretty forgiving. You can experiment, see what works best for you. The same here where it like comes to an end point, and then has to backtrack to go up. Because as you're writing this, you loop up, and then straight down to the bottom. I'll usually stop there, and then go to the next one, and maybe bring this down. Duplicate. There is it. When I have things like an exclamation point or maybe if it's transitioning to another word, one thing that I like to do is to do like a fun little jump with a line to try to make the exclamation point. Sometimes it'll be as simple as just extending the line for a minute, and carrying it onto the next word. Since we're trying to do the exclamation point here, the angle doesn't really lend itself that well. I guess it could seem like it hit an imaginary wall or something like that, but you could play around, and get fancy. I think I'm going to make it do like a flip or something like it's doing a cool stunt. You didn't know this class is about stunt type, did you? This is basically the lettering X games. What we're going to do, we're going to hit this sweet jump here. Do we get around there at yet? I don't want to get carried or extra again, we're going to get an R in a minute. I'm going to loop this. We're flipping over here. It's getting crazy. Actually this might be a double flip. It's hard to know, but I'll duplicate this. We want to make sure with other layers turned off so that we can see what's happening. The key is because this is jumping, we want to have it separate. What I'm going to do now is have that separate off, so it's breaking off of our word. Then I'll finish this. So it ends right where we want it to. We're going to continue this loop. I'm going to shoot this up. I don't want to shorten their tail. Hold a little bit. This crazy. I usually don't go this crazy. We'll see if it works. I'm not sure if it's going to, but this is the result out experimenting and having fun. We're going to erase this tail. Now we're just at this point. Then we're going to shoot this into our exclamation point. It is not an exclamation point, so you've got to make sure it's very exclamatory. Is that all? I'm not sure if it is. I bring this down, finished our exclamation point, erase the end of it. Then maybe we'll put the dot at the end there so it can shoot off in the next one. Duplicate that, erase the end. Then we could find where it's maybe splut it out wider like it's hitting a wall, and smashing a little bit. We'll duplicate that. Well, erase it, and then draw it normal. That loop was a little chaotic, but let's see how it did. The one thing you have to remember with Procreate is to do the animation. You have to make sure all of your layers are turned on, which is a little different than the Photoshop technique. We're going to turn off the first one because that was just our starting point. Now, to make your animation, you're going to click on this little wrench up here, and then go to Share, and then Animated GIF. Then you'll get a cool little preview. Nice. That's fun.. Let's just do Web Ready, export it. We can Save our image. Export is successful. 7. The Morph, part 1: Let's get started with the main event here. Let's morphs some words. The first thing you want to do is turn on your first word. What we're going to do is bring down the opacity. We're probably going to come back and adjust this. Process of morphing can be a little confusing, especially at first when you haven't done it before. There's some different tricks that you can do to make it a little easier. I'll show you some of the ones that I like to do. We're also going to turn on the word gross. What we need to do is overlay them enough that we can see both. I think it's helpful to see the word you're starting with a little bit more than the other word. You can see nasty a little bit more. A quick tip that I have is because these are the same color, it makes it even harder to distinguish between them. What I do sometimes is I'll click on one of them and I'll go ahead and do command I and invert that color. That way we can easily toggle back and forth to put it back when we're done. Making this purple color, makes it a lot easier to see the differences between these letters. It also allows us to bring it down a little bit lighter too. We're going to make a new layer, and this is going to be our first morph layer. The key here is to make step-by-step changes from our word nasty into the word gross. Now, obviously if you're using different words you can use your words there instead of nasty and gross. We're taking our first layer, which is nasty, and changing it a little bit to get closer to gross. These are going to look weird, but you need not worry about that because they're just like a process of moving. They're only going to see them for a split second I think just getting started drawing it will make this a little bit more clear. For example, we're looking at this end, the first part of nasty here, and we see that this G is quite a bit taller. What I'm going to do is start drawing this line here to come out a little bit so I'm just going to subtly bump it out there. Then come down, follow this line, and then thump that out a little bit. It looks like it's going to come in so I'll cut some of that out. Then this is going to come down to get closer to the G so I will extend this a little bit. Changing it subtly to get it closer to the next word. I'm going to come up here and we see we have this crossbar here which we don't have on the G. We could do two things; we could make this thinner and eventually have it disappear, or shift it up to become the top of the G. I think that might be actually a better idea. What I'm going to do is bump this up a little bit, extend this up to get it closer to that top part. Here, I'm just going to bump this up to get that closer. We've got this tail that need to go away so I'm going to make this tail a little bit shorter. I'm going to bring this whole line over here. Make that a little bit fatter. Just getting in between the two can make this come out a little bit. We have that same situation here where there's going to be a gap. For this one, let's have the end come in a little bit there and get a little closer. I wouldn't go all the way out there that might be a little bit jarring of a transition. As I mentioned, it's a little confusing at first, but it's changing it a little bit. It's like a step-by-step thing, a little bit at a time. Since we've got this connected lines, I'm going ahead and make that connected line a little bit thinner and eventually have it disappear. We've got this little situation here where there's this empty gap from the G. I'm going to pull this in a little bit, because our words are nasty and gross, they're slimy. Having some little undulating and weird crevasses is a good thing. Let's move along here. Because the a is lowercase and all the letters in gross are uppercase. We've got a bigger gap here, but that's fine. It's no big deal we can make some subtle changes. I'm going to bring this up a little bit. We've got that same situation going on where we have this empty counter up here. But I think it makes more sense to use this part of the A as the legs. Because this shape is very close to this shape at the bottom of the R. Lets just give this a shot. I'm going to pull this in a little bit, pull that up a little bit, and then take that out a little bit. I'm closing that counter a tiny bit. As I mentioned, I'm going to split the bottom of the A, almost like an uppercase A. But I don't want to completely cut it off immediately. I'm going to thin out that bar and bring this down a bit. I'm going ahead and fill these in to make it less confusing to look at. I mess that up there. You want to make sure you finish your shapes before you willy-nilly the paint bucket. Now you can see why I recommended choosing words that have the same amount of letters to get started. Because this way we can focus on morphing one letter to another letter. You can definitely experiment and try other things. It's the same process to morph a word with less letters to one with more letters. It's just a little trickier. We've got this s and that's going to be an o. It might make sense to widen the s to get it closer to the o. What I mean by that is, I'm going to pull this out a little bit more, extend this, and then pull this in and I think we can eventually join the counters. What I'm going to do is make that counter bigger up there and then get this one to get closer. Then we'll join them together to make the counter on the. We need to assure this t a little bit getting a little wider can make the cross on the t a little wider as we're shortening it. It take this connecting thing and thin it out at the beginning, then make it get wider so we can use it for part of the s. There's definitely wiggle room here no pun intended. Because this stuff is happening so fast that you can get away with quite a bit and have it still read okay. I'm going to let part of this s go over to the top of that s so I'm thinning out that bar a little bit. I'm going to come back and fill these in. It looks a little less crazy. If you start getting confused, you can follow along and look where they overlap. I've got this purple and this line here, so I'm just going to draw in between them. That will be the difference between the two just budging that gap a little bit. Here we have this thing. I'm going to shorten this whole thing as a unit and then let it split up here. Then again, for this tail like we did the other one, we're just going to shorten it a little bit. Cool and now we have our first transition frame. What we can do now is go over and we can turn off our original nasty frame, which is just where we started from. Let's turn off so we can see, so that's where we started from. I'm going to move our first transition layer on top of that so we can see here and you can look at them back and forth. So we go from this to this. As you can see, it's a bit of a subtle change. You can still see where it came from, it's not very dramatic, but it's getting us closer to this. Now, we're going to take this first transition layer and do the same thing we did with the other one and bring the opacity down, except this time we're going to be closer and make a new layer. We're going to do the same process again until it's closer. Typically, you can do this in three frames. We didn't change that much, you could actually get away with doing more dramatic changes and you can experiment with this as you go, it depends on the look you're going for. But three is generally enough to have it look plenty believable. For this second one, I'm going to go a little more aggressive. I'm going to bring this all the way up to here. I'm going to shorten that more and then I'm just going to get pretty close to fall on these lines here. I might even just join these up pretty closely because we're not having to move that much to get this to work. Because we didn't have anything here before, I'm just making this a little thinner and then I'm going to start using that abstract like shape that I made there and just making a bigger version of it. I don't want to get rid of this gap completely, so I'm going to still keep this bridge area a little bit, we're going to jump this up. Already almost looks like a G. So can bring this down pretty close, bring this down, come up a little further with that. So we had this little bridge here, so I'm just going to make it thinner and we'll do the same thing here, but a little thicker. Let's see. Sometimes it's helpful to just forget about what the words and letters are and just try to bring the green a little bit closer to the purple or whatever colors you are working with on yours. I think I'm just going to close this whole area up for now and I'm going to let these join. I'm going to actually make this a little bit smaller so we can start bringing this in closer. Cool. I'll bring this in a little bit but I want it to feel like a natural evolution opening up that space. So we can get close here but we still need to close that connection. When there's a full separation like we just had there, it seems if you let them join with a thinner line and then fill it out, it [inaudible] a little more naturally. In this one, we need to get rid of the green in the middle, so I'm just going to take some of it out without just erasing it altogether so it slowly feels like it's changing. Just realize that we can go in tighter here, there's no reason to have that much. Do a thin line there, thin this out, shorten it. Let's go ahead and fill these in. Cool, so let's see where we are. So I'll bring this down, turn off the gross layer, let's turn back up the opacity on our first morph layer and then look at that, you can already start to see the word gross. You can go through the evolution there and if you're skeptical at this point, you can always open up your timeline window and make a couple of frames and start to see how your morph is working. Let's add another one so we can turn the first one to one of our nasty layers and then turn the second one to our first morph, third one to our second morph. No, that's not right. That's our second morph. Then we can change this one to one of the gross things and then turn off this fourth layer because we don't need four. So let's turn this to ones, so it doesn't loop and look confusing. Can it play? See it's already working like that. We don't even really need a fourth layer, but I think I'll do one so that we can do couple little effects with it. But as you can see, just using these two layers, that morphs pretty naturally. All right, so let's turn this off and get back to where we were. This right here is our current morph level, so I'm going to bring the opacity down, put the gross below it and then we'll make a new layer to do our third one. So a way you can add a character to some of these morphs and give it a little more energy or style depending on the kind of literature drawing is by maybe hinting at the form or how these are made. So since this is slime, we can play around with how things disappear as they're separating. What I mean by that is, for example, this tail over here, maybe we can have it be little [inaudible] and maybe there's some splat as it's coming apart and maybe here you can have it feel like it's a little splattier as it's separating, almost like it's snapping and there's some goo spots. But maybe if your word was made out of glass or sand or something, you could have it instead of slowly changing like this, maybe the letters come apart in cracks but that's not what we're doing here, so I'm going to erase that. Another thing you can do is as this is coming up over, I did one part that drips down a little bit and you can even exaggerate that more like have another drip falling that would just fall into the rest of the word. Can make it stringy a little bit or something. Some of these drip down. Maybe it's that drip is what pushes this bottom down. Helps that fill in and we can just have a few little dots from where that line is to be as like some splatter. Letting the shape build with a little bit of a splashy, slimy thing. As you can see, some of this was like pretty far off from the final, because it happens so fast, it's still read pretty well. That gives you a good example of how much you can get away with not showing and have the morph still read okay. Now because we are so close to our final place, but we still need one more transition layer to finish these little splats to make them feel natural. How you do that, it's just making them disappear in a more natural way and you can do that by just like making them a tiny bit smaller and then they'll just evaporate or just flow naturally into this other word. But instead of redrawing it all over again, what you can do is just take one of your three final words for gross and using that as a starting point. I'm going to go ahead and use the third one. Because we're going to start with one and that'll give us some room to loop without it looking like it's pausing for a second if that makes any sense. If it doesn't just trust me. I'm turning on layer 3, selecting all and copying it. I'm going to make a new layer and I'm going to paste it in place. Now we can use this as a starting point. We can go back to our first gross, bringing the opacity back to a 100 percent and then Command I to invert it back to the right color. I'm going to drag this backup to be with the other gross words. Since we have a bunch of transition layers, we should be smart and label this. I'm just going to call these, morph 1. This is a good time to make sure that your opacities are all back at a 100 percent. See, we already confused. Layer 3 is morph 3. Then my 4 which is our copy of gross three, see how this can get confusing. If you label things it's less confusing we call that four. No. Yes. Okay, cool. I got confused because it looks normal because this is normal because we have to add a few things to it still. What we're going to do now is turn on morph 3, bring that opacity down so we can see some of its other stuff that's happening, and we can add those to this fourth variation. We're just going to do some subtle stuff here just to finish the sequence of some of these little splat things that we had going on. I'm going to make my brush a little bit smaller and just address these dots so they're pretty big there. I'm going to make it look like they're falling and disappearing. This one right here, I'm going to just do a little spot there. That one is falling and then this one is just going into the flatter. Then it's like showing us that they're just going to fall into it and become part of the slime. With this, I might just pull this over, looks like it's going back into itself again. Just addressing them a little bit so that they seem like something happens to them. This end do the same thing, over here pull a little dot there, this dot there and then maybe that just becomes the strip. We have that, and then maybe this is just you can tell that it's falling into itself. This we can have it finishing up where it fell from and maybe just make that a little skinny connector. This thinner can just let these disintegrate a little bit. It's subtle, but it's enough that it will make it look a little more believable. Let's go back in. We've got four morphs. Let's just test this out and see how it looks. We’ve got four layers for the morphs and then two more for the start and finish sequence. Number 1, let's go ahead and turn on a nasty. Number 2, turn off a nasty, turn on a morph 1. Number 3, turn off nasty, go to morph 2, turn off that, go to morph 3 and then we'll go to morph 4 and then our final iteration with just gross. Cool. You can see how those little drips look like they just finish their cycle. They fall back into the word but adds a little bit of character to it. It's going to look even better when we use our repeated cycle for each letter at the beginning. Actually at this point, you could just reverse this and be done. Let's go ahead and do that so we can see how that would look. For our final here, I'm going to do a different sequence looping back. It's not just a back and forth. But if you want it to be just done now you could. Let's go ahead and make frames from layers. Do that same process where we turn off that back layer. Let's turn on the background layer here. The first three frames are the nastys and then the three grosses. What we can do here is select those three nastys and duplicate them a few times. That way we have more time to read them and then we'll go ahead and grab our final three gross layers. Select all those and let's duplicate that a couple of times. In order to make this loop, we need to transition back. In order to do that, we can just do a reverse of the Morph sequence. Let's make a new frame and then we'll go ahead and turn on the last morph. This is going to bring us back to nasty. I'll do a new one, turn off four, turn on three and then go down to two, go down to one. This will allow us to morph back and forth but it'll just repeat the same process. Sometimes I think it looks a little better when you have a different sequence back and forth. It doesn't seem just like a play and then rewind. You'll see what I mean when we play it. I'm going to go ahead and select the first frame, then go to the last frame, select them all and then we'll go back to our 0.1 second thing. Then we can change ones down here to forever because this loops. If we hit play, hopefully this will work. Cool. We have a full on happy day loop here. At this point maybe you want a background color for this, I think that would be helpful. I’m thinking purple will be good maybe this purple. To do that, we can just go ahead and select our background layer, make it purple and it'll make all of the layers purple. Now that's super neon and really exaggerates that slimy green. Let's play it now. Cool, we did our morph. One thing about looping it back like this, it's a little weird is when you get to this point down here, those splats that we made, when you reverse them, doesn't really make sense because they're like rewinding back to where they started. But again, it still works and most people wouldn't notice that. If you didn't have that transition, it would be fine as well. Cool. Well, let's move on to the fancier finish. 8. The Morph, part 2: As I mentioned, I would like you to get a little fancier with the morph back and use that little script exercise that we did earlier. My game plan is to let GROSS just drip into a pile of sloppy slime on the floor, and then we're going to you use that slime to spell out the word nasty. Sounds like a good plan. Hopefully it works out and let's give it a shot. What I want to do is, I'm going to pull a guide by dragging from my ruler down. I'm just doing this to give myself a floor of some sorts to aim for when I let this slowly drip down. You'll see what I mean in a minute. I'm going to make a new layer, just like we've done for this whole process, and I'm going to bring the opacity down on my gross layer. Actually before I do that, I need to get that color back, that green, so I'm drawing with right color. Now I'm going to bring the opacity down and click on my layer. What I want to do here is slowly drip this type down into a pile. That's easy enough. We're just going to do what we've been doing in the past, or we subtly change it a little bit. Because this is dripping down, I'm going to start making this line a little bit lower. Starting to just have this feel like it's starting to melt. I'm softening these curves like they are dripping down into themselves, bringing this down and maybe part of this drips into the top of that G. This is getting a little bit longer. This dripped into itself. It's very disgusting. Just oozing, dripping down, Make some fun, drippy shapes. Just like it's completely melting. You just want to make sure that you don't make any point higher up than the original so that it all looks like it's falling. Let's build that in, that looks drippy. You could go ahead and, if you want to exaggerate the grossness, maybe have some thinner gross lines. Give it some variety, so it's not all the same. Then we're just going to go ahead and do the same thing for the others. We've got our first one, just like we did before, go back and put that original back to a 100 percent and bring this opacity down. Instead of getting it closer to another word, we're just trying to get this closer to a pile on the floor. All we have to do is just keep moving it down and remembering that it's just going to be a pile so that these letter forms can slowly just dissolve into blobs. We've got this guide here, so we can at this point let some of these bigger drops hit the ground. A little bit of a splat. When you're doing drips like these, if you want them to look extra gross, you can have them drop at different rates. There's thinking about the idea of the viscosity, where this one is so thin, so maybe it didn't fall as fast or this one has caught up and passed it. Now that it's starting to melt, maybe it can go a little bit faster. Now that we've got some of it on the floor, we can let it start to build up and pull out a little bit. I'm going to start down here for this part. Put this fill in some, obviously being bigger in areas where it had first hit the ground. Because we want our slimy type physics to be accurate. At this point I'm really just letting this puddle, pool out. Let this come down pretty far this time. I don't really need to drag it out too slow, because it's just a blob at this point. It's going to be pretty forgiving. Probably I only need to fill little separations here to hint at what was there before, but it can also blend together at this point. I think I'll just do one more layer to finish it up so it doesn't look like it's still falling. I will still let it be lumpy but just a little bit smoother like it's ended up in a pile. We can preview our slime sequence. Same way, just open up our timeline again. Let's find our final gross layer, turn that on, make a new layer, turn on our first drippy layer. You guys know this process now. You guys are animating experts. I think we could have gotten away with a few less transitions here, but it was fun to draw some drippy slime, so I went for it. You probably only need three to make this look good enough, but let's turn this to one so we can just watch it drip into a pile. See it looks pretty natural. The benefit to doing more frames is that it has a more natural effect when you're trying to do something that's just really drippy and fluid, because it makes it look more soft, as opposed to a more harsh vibration. That really gives the fill of slime, which is nice. On to the next step. What we're going to do now is turn this slime into some nasty script. Are you ready to get nasty, what are we going to do? We're going to do what we usually do, we're going to turn the opacity down. We need to go to find our final iteration. We've got our nasty term here, a nasty word, we bring the opacity down there and then make any frame. We're going to start bringing this slime slowly up to the top of the beginning of the end. Then this is just going to be the same process as we did in that exercise when we animated the script word Okay. What we'll do here is we'll just make an ark, bringing the slime up in here. What I'm going to do is just trying to make a wave apart to get it started. So it's like point where we need to go and just make a gross slime wave. Now that we have that, I'm going to just bring this slightly closer, like it's starting to move. It's reaching and climbing forward. I'm going to pull this thing in a little bit and just slowly we are going to make it a little bit smaller, because we're going to shoot it up into the sky. We can go back in and turn off that previous layer, and bring the opacity down. I'm doing this on an iPad and it's small, that's why that's happening. New layer. Now we can take that slime trail, and bring it right up to start making the N. I'm going to go up here and just have it start to curve over the top. Maybe make that a little more natural to differentiate or something, and I'm going to pull that down to our path that we're following, and now that I've got that curve, can sort of play around with having more slime coming up the wave like it's on its way to start the rest of the word. It's just like flowing upward, and then for the body of slime, I'm going to do the same thing where I just make it a little bit smaller so we can tell that it's moving up the page. It's pretty much the same process, as we use in the exercise, but we just got this pile of slime to deal with as we go. I'm going to go back and fix our opacities all at once later, so we don't have to keep doing it each time, I'm going to do new layer, turn this one down so we can see what we are doing. This point, I'm going to finish the bottom, the first part of the N, and then maybe have the starts of a second splat coming up to move into the rest of it. We want this slime wave to change a little bit so it looks like it's flowing, so I'm doing that by extending that part where it's coming out a little bit, pushing that up further so it looks like it's flowing, and then maybe we can start a new one down here. Push that one, maybe one on this side, just so it looks like it's constantly moving, and then again, the process here, moving this forward, making it slightly smaller. As I mentioned, I would like to get a little fancier with the morph back and use that little script exercise that we did earlier. My game plan is to let gross just drip into a pile of sloppy slime on the floor, and then we're going to use that slime to spell out the word; nasty. Sounds like a good plan. Well, hopefully it works out, and let's give it a shot. What I want to do is, I'm going to pull a guide by dragging from my ruler down, basically I'm just doing this to give myself a flow of some sorts, to aim for when I let this slowly drip down. I think you'll see what I mean in a minute. I'm going to make a new layer, just like we've done for this whole process. I'm going to bring the opacity down on my gross layer. Actually, before I do that, I need to get that color back, that green, so that I am drawing with right color. Now I'm going to bring the opacity down and click on "My Layer." What I want to do here is slowly drip this type down into a pile. That's easy enough. We're just going to do what we've been doing in the past, or we certainly change it a little bit. Because this is dripping down, I'm going to start making this line a little bit lower, and starting to just have this feel like it's starting to just melt. So I'm softening these curves like they're dripping down into themselves, bringing this down, may be part of this drips into the top of that G, this is getting a little bit longer. This dripped into itself, it's very disgusting, just oozing, dripping down. Make some fun drippy shapes, just like it's completely melting. We just want to make sure that, you don't make any point higher up than the original so that it all looks like it's falling. That looks pretty drippy. Could go ahead and maybe if you want to exaggerate the grossness, maybe have some like, thinner. Gross swans, give it some variety, so it's not all the same, and then we're just going to go ahead and do the same thing for the others. So we got our first one, just like we did before, go back and put that original back to 100 percent, and bring this opacity down, and now instead of getting it closer to another word, we're just trying to get this closer to a pile on the floor. All we have to do is just keep moving it down, and remembering that it's just going to be a pile so that these letter forms can slowly just dissolve into blobs. We've got this guide here, so maybe we can, at this point, let some of these bigger drops hit the ground. A little bit of a splat. When you're doing drips like this, if you want them to look extra gross, you can have them drop at different rates, so there's like, thinking about the idea of the viscosity where this one is so thin, so maybe it didn't fall as fast or this one has caught up and passed it, and now that it's starting to melt, maybe you can go a little bit faster. Now that we've got some of it on the floor and we can let it starts to build up and pull out a little bit. I'm going to start down here for this part with this fill in some obviously being bigger areas where it had first hit the ground. Because we want our slimy type physics to be accurate. At this point I'm really just letting this puddle pool out. Let this to come down pretty far this time. I don't really need to drag it out too slow because it's just a blob at this point, it's going to be pretty forgiving. Probably I only need a few little separations here to hint that there before but it can also blend together at this point. I think I'll just do one more layer to finish it up so it doesn't look like it still falling. I'll still let it be lumpy but just a little bit smoother like it's ended up in a pile. We can preview our slime sequence. Same way, just open up our timeline again. Let's do our final gross layer. Turn that new layer on. Turn on our first stripy layer. You guys know this process now and meeting experts. I think we could have gotten away with a few less transitions here but it was fun to draw some turkey slime, so I went for it. Again, you probably only need three to make this look good enough. But let's turn this to one so we can just watch it drip into a pile. Cool, it looks pretty natural. The benefit to doing more frames is that it has a more natural effect when you're trying to do something that's just really trippy and fluid because it makes it look more soft as opposed to a more harsh vibration. That really gives the field of slime, which is nice. On to the next step. What we're going to do now, is turn this slime into some nasty script. Ready to get nasty? What are we going to do? We're going to turn the opacity down and we need to go to find our final iteration. We've got our nasty term here for bringing the opacity down there and then make a new frame. We're going to start bringing this slime slowly up to the top of the beginning of the n. Then it's just going to be the same process as we did in that exercise when we animated the script word okay. What we'll do here is we'll just make like an ark, bringing the slime up here. What I'm going do is just try to make a wave apart to get it started. It's like pointing to where we need to go and just make that like a gross slime wave.. Cool. Now that we have that, I'm going to just bring this slightly closer, like it's starting to move, reaching and climbing forward. I will of pull this thing in a little bit. This slowly going to make it a little bit smaller because we're going to shoot it up into the sky. We can go back in and turn off that previous layer. You put opacity down. I'm doing this on an iPad that's why and it's small that's why this is happening. New layer. Now we can take that slime trail and bring it right up to start making the n. I'm going to go up here and just like have it start to curve over the top. Maybe make that a little more natural. The two different trips or something. I'm going to pull that down to our path and we're following. Now that I've got that curve can play around with having more slime coming up the wave like it's on its way. The starter is lowered like its flowing upward. Then for the body of the slime, I'm going to do the same thing whereby I just make it a little bit smaller so we can tell that it's moving up the page. It's pretty much the same process as we used in the exercise when we just got this pile of slime to deal with as we go. I'm going back and fix our opacity is all at once later, so we don't have to keep doing it each time. I'm going to do New layer, turn this one down so we can see overdoing. This point, I'm going to finish the bottom of the first part of the n and then maybe have the starts of a second splat coming up to move into the rest of it. Then I'm going to want this slime wave to change a little bit so it looks like it's flowing. I'm doing that by extending that artworks coming out a little bit, pushing that up further so it looks like it's flowing. Then maybe we can start a new one down here, push that one and everyone on this side. Just to looks like it's constantly moving. Because this is flowing a little bit, having break the line a little bit and not be fully finished. This helpful? This is another place where you can experiment with having like some splashes, things like as it's flowing and we could do that even here as well. Maybe some splats like that those really helped to give it some character. With the things that you have started to make it feel more natural like these flat things, you always just want to make sure to finish them. What I mean by finish them is, so this is a splat fine floor, and so find the endpoint on the next frame, and put it where it would have gone. We've got this thing here, so maybe just pulling that end point down and letting it flow back into the line that we're creating. When you're writing scripts and you have a crossbar on the t, which wouldn't naturally flow in this line we want to do, you can come up with some creative ways to solve that. Since we're working with slime here, what I thought might be fun is to have part of the splat from the a to shoot across and become the t. What I mean is, I'm going to continue this up here, I'm going to make a new layer. I'm going to let this come up on this line almost like a ramp and have it just break out. We'll have that just shoot out of here and go across and across the t. Now, we can finish this slime-line, bringing even further to finish crossing our t's. You can taper at the beginning of it to allow it to naturally separate. Normally, as I was drawing this, I would have led to a continue more into the s, but because we're shooting the slime rocket, another technical term, I'm going to wait on that so that they don't cross and make it look too confusing. As you can see here, I started using drips from across the t to start filling in this part of the y. I'm doing that just to make the transition a little bit faster, so that we're not completely waiting for the rest of this slime to catch up. Just because we did that, some of those non-traditional things with slime rockets, etc, I think the transition might be a little slow at the beginning, so I'm just trying to move it along a little bit, and I'm not sure if it matters too much, but it depends on what the application is that you're doing this for. If you're just doing it for fun, then it doesn't matter. But you could be doing something like this where it needs to match up to a certain amount of time; so little things like that can make a difference, whether it's too slow or too fast. I think that is going to work for our final layer. What I'm going to do now is make sure these are all at 100 percent opacity. An easy trick to do that is to just select all of your layers. Then, now, the background layer, because it's locked and it won't let us change it, everything but the background layer, and then just change it to like zero because they're all different and then change it to 100, and now they are all numbered. Let's put our purple background back. Let's go down to our timeline and make frames from layers. We've got a whole bunch of things, as we've done before, start at the beginning. Selecting the first layer, go to the end, hold Shift, click on the last layer, and then turn on our background. We have a background layer for everything. We're going to adjust our timing to 0.1 seconds, change this tip forever, and then we want to duplicate our three full words that are in the morphing stage so that we have some more time to read the word. I'm going to go to frame 1, hold Shift, and go to three, and then click on this duplicate button. This will give us some more time so that we can read the word. We're going to go ahead to gross and find our first gross. Let me show us the third one. I'm going to select all of those and then do the same thing. This should be ready to go. So let's preview it and hope for the best. Cool. That's fun. 9. Conclusion: Hey, everyone. It's me again, Professor Word Morfs, Worfy Mords. Worfy Mords? What is that? Anyway, thank you all so much for taking this class and following along. I really hope you had fun. If you didn't, well, you miss the point. All right? We're trying to have fun here. If you didn't have fun, just go back to the beginning and do it again until you have fun. Anyway, if you have any questions, please ask. If I missed anything, just let me know. I will try to add that on. Please post and share your work. I can't wait to see what you do with this. Remember that you should experiment and have fun. You should try things that I said not to do because I don't know what I'm doing. I'm just making it up like everyone else. Experimenting leads to fun new things, so definitely share your work. I will provide feedback and respond to all the posts on here. I'm excited about that. If you post your work on social media, please tag me in it so I can check it out. You could tag me at Chris Piascik, and we could use the hashtag CPMORPHWORDS. That way we can all follow along and see what everyone else is doing like a big happy Word Morphy family. Yeah, thank you again. I'm very excited to see what you do. I hope this was helpful, and I'll talk to you all soon. Bye.