Animation for Graphic Designers: How to Animate a Logo | William Kesling | Skillshare

Animation for Graphic Designers: How to Animate a Logo skillshare originals badge

William Kesling, Motion Designer & Videographer

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14 Lessons (2h 21m)
    • 1. Introduction

      1:28
    • 2. Planning Your Animation

      10:49
    • 3. Arranging Layers in Illustrator

      4:55
    • 4. Transitioning to After Effects

      7:20
    • 5. Building the Guiding Object

      14:23
    • 6. Building the Brand Element

      16:16
    • 7. Building Transition I

      21:12
    • 8. Refining Transition I

      13:11
    • 9. Building Transition II

      18:09
    • 10. Refining Transition II

      9:03
    • 11. Building Out the Type

      8:10
    • 12. Creating the Final Loop

      11:38
    • 13. Exporting and Final Thoughts

      3:38
    • 14. Explore More Classes on Skillshare

      0:37
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About This Class

Want to take your designs to the next level? Learn how to bring your logos to life with animation!

Join motion designer William Kesling to learn how to create a compelling logo animation. This class is perfect for designers who want to learn how to bring their static work into the world of movement. Covering everything from initial storyboards to animating in After Effects, you’ll see how to transform an existing logo into an enticing motion design that captures eyes and conveys a brand’s story. You’ll learn how to:

  • Make an animation plan with storyboards
  • Break down a logo into its layers in Illustrator
  • Build initial scenes in After Effects
  • Make transitions for a seamless animation
  • Create a final loop and export your project

William breaks down every tool he uses into clear and understandable terms, so no matter what level you're at you can take this class! Whether you're a graphic designer with an existing logo that you want to push to the next level or an aspiring motion designer, by the end of the class you'll have learned an essential skill that you can use with any logo.

William Kesling is a motion designer for Focus Lab, a strategic, creative, and design studio based out of Savannah, Georgie. Logo design work was done by Alex Sailer.

Transcripts

1. Introduction: I think my style in general is pretty simple. To really being able to tell that story through a certain type of energy that conveys emotion. Hi, how are you doing? My name is William Kesling, and I'm emotion designers and today I'm going to be teaching you how to create an animated logo lockup in After Effects. So today, we're going to be diving into the start and finish of a motion design process and that really starts with getting the logo lockup, going into storyboards, going into animation and really giving that animation up into a couple of different scenes with transitions, and then from that, doing a polish phase and then doing export and delivery. You don't need any experience in After Effects to be able to take this class, its something that we're going to be diving in to the basics from start to finish, from Illustrator to After Effects and then to the final export. I mean, a big thing with motion and design, I think it allows a designer to be able to sell their idea to a client. I think a lot of times you're working with clients that have this idea of what their design needs to be and then you show them with several different designs. They don't understand quite what you're conveying because sometimes it can just be simple objects, but to be able to put that into motion, with motion design really helps sell that idea. So, whether it's logo lockup that you have or something that you're working with a client on, this class is something really great to get you started into how to understand After Effects and how to understand emotion through motion design. I appreciate you guys coming and watching this class and I'm really excited to see what you guys create. 2. Planning Your Animation: So today, we're going to be creating motion design around the rebrand of Fathom, which Fathom is a financial reporting software. So the client Fathom came to Focus Lab which is a Brand Studio in Savannah, Georgia to get a complete rebrand of their company. But they also wanted to be able to convey and have a little bit of storytelling through motion design, and so that's where I stepped in to the process that we're going to be showing users today. So once the design phase is finished, I'm tasked with taking the design and taking the story that our strategists and designer have created, and trying to convey that through the logo lockup that I have in front of me. It's then my job to be able to take that logo lockup and convey that same story that we've been doing through the brand through motion design. So the first step to that is really kicking off with some storyboarding. I'm going to be showing you how to do that very simply and almost in a sketch type style. So how are we going to be approaching this motion design process is really through concentrating on three components of the brand logo lockup that we have here. So the first component is going to be really choosing that guiding object, almost the main character for your animation you can think of it as, and then really diving into the brand and the brand story, and what the brand actually does, and picking our brand element that you want to convey as the second component, and then your third component being that final logo lockup and how you're going to make this thing full circle and get to that. So we're going to start with the storyboard. So the purpose of storyboarding is to really give you a guide for your motion animation, and to really put down these three components onto paper and then design the transitions between those three components to be able to get to your final logo lockup. So the first thing that you want to do once you're given the brand from the designer, from the client, is to really want to understand the brand and what the brand does and what they're trying to convey. For Fathom, we're really working with a company that handles financial data and they also use a lot of graphs within their company and for their clients that they're working with. So the brand here is obviously utilizing a graph within the mark and really utilizing a Gantt chart within the mark itself. So right from the start, we understand that we want to have that initial brand element that's going to be the second component, be something about a graph. But we want to take a step back and understand how are we going to get to that graph and really being able to design around a guiding object, almost like a character that you can add emotion to through motion design, is really where we're going to start off. The first thing that you want to do is look at the logo lockup that you have, and see what it's made out of. So the Fathom logo lockup has a lot of hard edges, so to really create that contrast is really important in motion design. I want to use something that's a little bit softer for that conductor, for that guiding objects throughout this motion design process. So something like a circle will work really well because it's easy to add characteristics to and also key frames to once we get into the animating process. We're going to start with storyboards and it's important to remember when you're starting your storyboards, that it doesn't need to be perfect at all but you want to have a sense of the composition and your frame that you're going to be using in After Effects. For the circle, since it is just going to be starting with the circle, you can almost give yourself rough animations to understand that the circle is going to be in the middle of the frame. But then also add some arrows to understand the movement that is going to be happening, whether that's for yourself or for the client, especially when you go to deliver this, you want to be able to have something that you can talk about. So being able to literally direct the motion with this arrow, be like it's going to start from the bottom, be a little bit smaller and direct up to get to the full size of that guiding object. Since the Fathom deals a lot with charts, I know that I want the brand element to be some type of chart. So we can pick a bar graph, and so right below this, we're just going to draw another 16 by nine rectangle here, and work roughly again, understand how I can use this circle and understanding where that bar graph would land. Since I want to stick with the center composition, I'm going to have a structure of the bottom here to give the bar graph something to lean on, something to stand on, and adding blocks of color throughout your storyboards is something good for you. I just roughly draw a bar graph, maybe in varying heights here, and maybe keep it to where we have some elevation. So if I want to be able to take this circle, and if I want to compositionally place that within this brand elements scene, I think that'll look really nice to be able to have it almost weighted up here at the top, and maybe a little bit smaller than we have it in the first scene, understanding the motion that could possibly happen throughout here towards like swooshing motion. It's something to keep in mind when you're going through your storyboards. All right. So now we're going to move on to the third component, and to that third component is the final logo lockup, and so once again, just roughly draw a nice, beautiful rectangle here and be able to visualize where you want that compositionally within the rectangle and I want it to be a little bit smaller, but being able to have in almost visually tracing, the mark here, having this rectangle. I think it's important to have some of the elements structurally sound within your storyboards. But then when it comes out to like the logo type, sometimes that can be really nitty-gritty for the storyboards. So just to be able to have it to where it's just a block. So you know that that's where the logo type will be able to stand, and then one just adding a little bit like filling this in. This could be for you or this could be for the client to be able to help them visually understand the composition in which you're working through. Being able to go from this, you can see what we're working with in the three different stages and the three different components that we're going to be working through within the storyboards and then the motion design process as well. All right. So now, once you have your three components laid out within a storyboard form, rough storyboard form, you got to have to figure out how you're going to get from one component to the next. So now I know that I have this circle, but I need this circle to somehow initiate this bar graph that I've drawn, this brand element, and so I know that I want the circle once it's in the middle of the frame over here, I want to swoop down almost and hit the bottom of this mark, or the bottom of this graph and start that initiation process. So I'm actually going to have this ball being up here, but swooping down and as it swoops down, this bar graph down here is going to start with that foundation element building out. So, you can see how I'm drawing the arrows to show the motion as I'm talking through it, because this is exactly how I'll talk through it with the designer or the client that I'm working with. So you can even get a little bit more detailed and show that the bar graphs are going to be starting from the bottom, and they're going to be growing to the top here, and doing that really roughly. Then, also showing where that ball will be, and maybe it'll get a little bit smaller as it comes around, but showing that that continuous motion is going to happen all the way through, and that'll be a transitional element into this frame. So now, going from here and how do we get from here, this component to the final logo lockup. So once again, I am just going to draw our rectangle, rectangles are getting better as I do them, and so I know that I have the ball up here and the graph has been built out, but now I need to collapse the graph and get to this. So I know that I want to utilize, maybe utilizing a different brand color which we can maybe use that teal, and having that TOB that transitional elements. So we have the ball being up here, and drawing that slightly, and we have our foundation element once again down here, and just try and do it really sketch like, we have all this happening. So now I know that I want this ball. Since then it's been up here, I want to maybe swoop down and come back around. As it comes back around, it almost does the reverse effect of what we did in the last transitional element, comes back around, collapses all of the bar graphs. As it collapses the bar graphs, maybe we have another shape that comes up from the bottom. So using a pen here, you got to get creative. So we have this shape coming up from the bottom, and you can use striped lines to reference that that's going to be a new shape coming up, and giving that shape its own arrow, and understanding that this circle is going to come up and around and collapse those shapes. As that new teal object comes up from the bottom, it'll start to build out this mark that we have here. So now for the third transition, I know that I already had this transition leading to the final logo lockup, but now I need to get from the logo lockup back to our guiding object or conductor. So what I'm going to do is, I'm just going to once again roughly draw maybe a little bit more compact mark as if it's collapsing on itself to get back into that circle, and then maybe that logo type bar is actually sliding behind the mark, and the mark is sliding over the logo type to once again collapse everything. So I'm going to go ahead and fill that stuff in and that's just to create that visual consistency to really help you sell your idea. Then, also this is a great place to add some simple arrows just for yourself or for somebody else to really understand what motion you're working with and how that's all going to happen, and there you go. So now we're going to be able to get back to this guiding object. All right. So now once you have your full storyboard out, you can look and see what you've created and see if everything makes sense and to really understand and just reiterate for yourself too, repetition is key. So understanding that we have our circle which is providing that contrast to the more hard edged logo with lockup that we have, and that is really going to be the guiding object for this entire animation. So going from the circle, to building out this brand element, this graph and showing that the circular motion of it coming around, the graph finally being built and having that brand, that guiding object rest up at the top there a little bit, show the brand element for a split second, and then having that brand element collapse, which we have here going on, which it comes back down, and having that brand element once it collapse to really be able to build out the brand logo type, and really understand that we just told a really good story about the brand. Then, getting from the brand logo type, to logo lockup, to the starting object where it's going to have, we're going to do a simple collapse with some ease on it to really get back to that circle. So the goal of the storyboard I want you to really remember is that, it's giving you your guide. It's helping you really dive in to After Effects and have a starting point rather than diving in to After Effects and having a question mark of what to even start to create. So blocking out the three components and the transitions that you're going to be utilizing within your motion design process, really give you something to work towards, and to really show you that progress that you're going to be making throughout your motion design and also the momentum to keep you on track. 3. Arranging Layers in Illustrator: So the first thing that you want to do once you can dive into After Effects, you probably receive an AI file from a designer or from a client. So we're going to open that up into Illustrator and see what we're working with. So now, once we've opened up the branding that we have for Fathom, we see what we're working with and understand if you just select it all see what it's made up of. So one thing that I found out that it's more simple to do in Illustrator is to break out all the elements within illustrated that you know that you're going to be animating. So if I know that I'm going to be animating all of the type forms, then I want to break those out into their own layers. So right now, if I go into Layers panel of illustrator, we'll be able to see that we're working with layer one which is this mark here. So what I'm going to do is I'm going to do "Shift+Command+G" to ungroup those right there. So now, we have all of these elements within their own container. But what I want to do is you can see it's still on the same layer. So what I'm going to do is I'm just going to create a new layer down here, and I'm going to start working with the mark. So I'm just going to select the mark "Command+C" "Command+X" to cut it. Then on layer two, I'm going to do "Command+F" to be able to paste that into its place. So this is a really important thing because in Illustrator you'll be left with a lot of layers, and it's really important to label your layers whether it's a mark, whether it's a letter, whether it's a color. So when you get into After Effects, everything will be converted, and you'll be able to have something that's a lot more organized in layer one, layer two, layer three, and so on. So now, I know that I'm going to put all of the individual letters of Fathom on their own layer as well. So I'm going do that same process that I just did with the mark right now. So Command+C, Command+X, make a new layer. Put that on there. Just put an F. So now that you can see we have everything over here broken out from the mark to all the letters of the typeface, then I'm going to go into this mark itself because I know that I actually want to utilize all of these individual shapes like this. So I want to be able to utilize these, and since these two are stuck together, I wanted to just break out those two shapes. So I'm just going to do that really quickly here. So basically, what I'm doing is I'm pulling from the elements that we already have because I know that this was designed in uniform way. So I'm basically just holding down Option and just dragging, and that will allow you to duplicate an image. I mean, it'll allow you to duplicate a vector within that layer that you've created. So now, I have those two pieces duplicated. Now, if you see I have these two separated. If I were to select those, put those to the back by holding "Shift+Command" and back bracket. They'll send it to the back, and now I can delete that top layer that was one shape to now where I have two shapes created, just out of sampling from the mark itself. So now, if I go out, we understand that we have all of these layers broken out, and I can even get to the extent because I know that I'm actually going to be using the mark and I'm going to be using those four individual shapes, individually. So I can break out this mark into four individual layers, and so I'm going to do that right now. One thing that's cool about the relationship between all the Adobe software that we're going to be using is that the container size here that I'm working with on my art board can reflect the composition size within After Effects. So if I were to click "Shift+O", in Illustrator it'll open up the art board size. If I click "Enter", I can adjust that art board size. So usually, our board size is designed around print or something that's going to be used on Web. So when it comes down to using pixels, you can literally go into the width and the height of Illustrator and say, we'll work within 1920 by 1080, and it'll give the size here. So this is important because now, you can see the container size that we're going to be using for our composition with After Effects. You can really understand that the composition of the final logo type is a lot smaller than we actually want. So to be able to combat that before we get into After Effects, you can literally select everything, hold "Shift+Option" to keep everything uniform when you scale, and to get it in a nice area. This can be adjusted afterwards, nothing's really final with any of this, and to maybe just adjust it to the size that you think works best for you, and that's looking fantastic. All right. So now, we're going to go into the saving process of going from Illustrator into After Effects, and how to create a simple folder structure for yourself just to keep everything organized for the relinking process. 4. Transitioning to After Effects: So when we go into the saving process, basically it's as simple as what it seemed. So you go into File, Save As. This is just if you have that document saved on your desktop or some random hard drive, and you want to save it, let's say on your desktop. Let's make a new folder here called Fathom Motion Design. All right. So now we're going to create this folder, and we're going to call this one. The Fathom logo lockup AI, that works fine.We can kind of create a new subfolder within this master folder, and call this one AI. So you know that that is the illustrator document that you're going to be working in. Make sure this is all good, you want to make sure that it's saving as an AI folder. I mean, AI file and click Save. You don't have to worry about much about this, click okay, and we're saved. Now, we can start moving into After Effects. So now we're into After Effects, and now we have the craziness, the After Effects is, which if your first time looking into this, you're probably wondering what everything is, and why it's all organized like this. Really what you're probably looking at right now is something like this. So this is kind of how it starts, and as you saw I kind of switched back and forth between different layouts, because it is nice to where I can drag and drop different layouts of how I want this to work best for me, and maybe on a small laptop, or a larger desktop. Sometimes you don't know exactly what you're going to be utilizing more within your design process, but it's important to note that you can just easily click the composition up here, and drag it over to decide and literally have it over here. So now this is the composition, this is where your main action will be happening. So I know that I wanted to kind of be on the right side, and I want to have all my other modules over here. There or I can get to my effects and again gets you a couple of the plugins that I have, meant I want to have my timeline on the bottom just to utilize that space. Then to the left I want to have all my project files, where I'm importing and exporting, and dragging and dropping files that I need to be able to use in my motion design process. So now once you have your layout to what you think you would need it, and sometimes this process happens after you do a couple of projects. I'm going to go ahead and add some of the plug-ins that I've learned to really like, and use it almost every project. So if I go up to window, and go down here once you guys have these installed, and which are really easy to install. I might always use Motion2, I mean Motion2 allows you to do a lot of things. I use it a lot for aligning certain things, and really putting a center point to an object for rotation and position changes as we get into that. So it'll open up a new module, and you can literally click this module and drag it into this panel right here, and you can organize these panelists however you want. So I know I'm going to be using that a lot. So I'm going to put that out to the top. So now we're going to go into the, how to import into After Effects. So there's a couple different ways to import into After Effects, and it's important to understand that there's not really a wrong or a right way to do anything in After Effects. It's just based on, I would say efficiency, and efficiency comes with time. So don't worry about doing everything perfect the first time. We can just double-click in this product panel right here, and it will pull up a folder. It'll pull up your finder and then you can go ahead and search for that, for the AI file that you just saved. So since I know that I saved under my master folder, Fathom Motion Design, I went in there. I have my AI folder, and then I click Fathom Logo Lockup. I know that that's a photo that I just organized everything in. One thing to take account, and when you do this, is to go down to the settings, the import settings down here. It has it as default as footage, and you want to say Composition Retain Layer Sizes. So that'll retained a layer sizes within the composition, the art board that you designed within illustrator. So that's all you need to worry about, create composition, so that'll create that composition off of that art board that you created in Illustrator. You can go ahead and click Open, and so as you see as the imports, we'll get our new composition, and then we'll also get our layers within the Illustrator document that we had broken out into the individual letter forms and Mark. So now I can literally double-click on this. I can double-click on this composition that I created for itself, and it will pull up the Illustrator document within the composition module. You'll see that it has a black background. So now this is something that can be kind of confusing when you get into this, when you get started because you've gotten, you are working in Illustrator, illustrator had a white background. Is this something easy to control by doing command K? Command K will pull up your composition settings, and from that composition settings, you can quickly change the background color from black to any color you want. But let's change it to white, we'll go ahead and click okay. Click okay. So now what we're going to do once we have our all of our layers kind of laid out here. You're going to know that they all have this little AI badge next to them. That means that they're linked to illustrator. So what I always do when I get into this, is basically I keep this as my master composition, and I select all of the layers that I know I'm going to be putting position changes on, and scale changes on, if so if you select them, you right-click. You got to create, you go to create shapes from vector layer. Click that and it'll basically do its magic, and it'll create another layer on top of those AI layers, that is now a vector layer that you can work with the paths. You can completely change it as if it was an illustrator so you don't have to worry about pixels and all of that. So this is one of the really important shortcuts, holding Shift Command and right bracket, will take all your layers to the very top. So just if you hold Shift Command, and left bracket, it'll take them all the way to the bottom. So this is something that we'll be using throughout the course to really structural layers and easily organize them too. Now that I have all the layers in a vector outline, I'm going to take these layers, and I'm going to put them into a new composition that I'm going to be working in. So I'm going to basically click the composition that we imported into from Illustrator to After Effects, I'm going to click command D to duplicate it. I'm going to relabel that and call that Fathom Motion Design, and I'm going to click into there and all I'm going to do is just delete the Illustrator file, Illustrator layers that we had imported, and knowing that I have them on the Fathom logo lockup here. So what you can do to kind of keep this organized, because this is where you're going to be dropping in a lot of layers in a lot of pre-comps you end up using, is you just kind of make subfolders for yourself. So an easy way to make a folder is just right-click within this module, New Folder and let's call this Master Files. So I know that these will be all the master file is that I'm not going to have to worry about, unless I really need to go back and correct something. Now that I have everything imported and I kind of have something's broken out, and I'm in my master folder, I'm going to click command S. Since I haven't saved yet, because I haven't saved my After Effects file, if I click command S, it's going to prompt me to save it in a location. So this is once again where you want to keep organized. So I want to go back, I want to navigate back to that master folder, the Fathom Motion Design. So then you're going to get a new, then you're going to make a new folder for yourself and just like I made one for AI for illustrator, we're going to call it AE for After Effects, and we're going to save this After Effects file in there. 5. Building the Guiding Object: The first thing that we want to do getting into our animation is to work within that guiding object that we wrote down in our Storyboards, which we're going to be using a circle. Basically, what I'm going to do is, I'm going to create a new object. So I'm going to stay right within the composition that we're working within. I'm going to do Command A to select all the layers, and I'm just going to move those over to around 10 seconds, just to give myself some space to create that new circle and work through the process. But note that they'll always be over here, so you can always reference the brand or the colors that you're going to be using. One thing to note is that if you see right here, you'll see that they all have their bounding boxes around the individual shapes. To hide that, you can hold Shift Command H, and that'll hide it so you can see what you're working with. So now, we're going to go to the beginning of the composition or to the beginning of your timeline, and we're going to go up to layer, new, and make a new shape layer. You can do this a couple different ways. That's one way to make a shape layer. Another way, if you know exactly what kind of shape you want to make, we can go ahead and delete this. You can go up to this object up here, you can hold it down, and you go to the ellipse tool, and then, you can go to your composition after hitting the ellipse tool, holding Shift and Command to make it so that the size holds its proportion. You can make the circle to whatever size you think would work for you. So right now, we're just going to make it a medium size, and you'll note that everything is white. If you go to the top of After Effects, you'll see that you are able to adjust the fill and the outline of this stroke of the object that you just made. So we have our circle layer selected. I can go up here, and I can make this a bright red if I want to. If I want to turn off the stroke because we don't need the stroke, all you do is just click the stroke right here, you can go to the options panel that pops up, and click none, and click okay. So I want to work with that teal color that we have that defines the mark. So I'm going to go back just a couple to around 10 seconds on my timeline, and right there, I have the mark, and I have the circle over it. I can use the ink dropper. So what I'm going to do is, I'm going to choose the red circle, and I'm going to ink-drop the turquoise color so we can match that color perfectly from the branding. So now, if I go back to the beginning of timeline, we're working with our circle. So the circle right now, the center axis point looks like it's in the center. But sometimes, when you create objects, the center axis point gets off, and that'll really determine how your animation goes when you do rotation and when you do position change. So we just want to make sure that that center axis point is in the middle of the object. So an easy way to do that if you don't have Motion 2 is to click Y on your keyboard, and then, you'll be able to move it around. If you hold down Command on your keyboard, you'll see it locks into place. So it'll lock into the center, to the right, to the top, wherever you really need, and we want that to be into the center. Now, if you do have Motion 2, you're able to basically click any layer that you have, go up here to the side panel, click that, and you're able to choose where you want that axis point to go. So you can see you're jumping from the top and the bottom, and we want that to be right in the center. So that's what I'll be using throughout this class. To be able to get this object now in the center of the composition, and something that we're going to use, and it's called align. This is very similar to Illustrator to where we have the line. We're going to align it to the composition. We're just going to make sure that everything is aligned to the center of the comp. So now, we have our layer. So you'll see that our layer's the same color as the other layers that we have within our timeline. So for some people, it's really important to label by name, for some people, it's really important to label by color, and for some, it's both. For me, I'm more of a visual person. So for me, it's been great to just do, if I [inaudible] know I'm going to have three different circles and I'm going to have two squares in a triangle, I'll label those different shapes, different colors. So visually, I can see that, and I can access that quickly. So what you've got to do to be able to change the color of the shape is you go over to the little blue blocks. All you do is, you click it, and you're able to pick what kind of color. We'll give this a red color, and then, we're working with a red outlined circle. I can go ahead and change the name of that circle. Right now, it says Shape Layer 1. I can change that to circle if I need to just by clicking Enter and then changing it to Circle_001. Then, I also have that labeled within the name and the color. Now that we have our guiding object design that we picked from our storyboarding process, I'm basically going to bring that into the frame. So we talked about having it come up from the bottom with the scale change and using position. So I'm going to get into the nitty-gritty of how to use some shortcuts to basically do position change and scale change and make it really quick in your process as well. So the first thing what you can do to do a position change, if we want this circle to come from the bottom of the composition to the top of the composition, we can click down here on this arrow, click into contents, go to the ellipse, go to transform, and then go to position, and make and click this stopwatch, and make a keyframe right here. That's one way to do it. Now, if we click Command Z to undo, another faster way to do it is to hold Shift Option P, and then, I'll make a keyframe for you to where this is now one keyframe within your composition. That's a position that's going to be keyframed out. Let's just move that down just a little bit, just a couple seconds. I know I wanted to start on the bottom of the frame. So I'm just going to move this down, and you'll see that it's starting to show the motion that's going to be happening. Now if we play, we have a nice, simple animation going on here. One thing to note within your timeline, since we have a timeline that's a duration of 20 seconds and if you want this to loop, you can either drag this bar at the top to the point to where you want it to loop. So if I were to drag this all the way over here and have a loop, I can let it play out in a loop back just by having this top bar determining that. So another way to do that is basically thinking of as the B and the N key as the beginning and the end of that looping time signature on your timeline. So I go to around five seconds and I click N. It'll make that looping point right at five seconds. So we're going to keep it right around. Two thirty, click ''N'', that seems good. So now, we've got a simple animation happening with our circle, but I know that I went that circle to be a lot smaller. I know that I wanted to start with a scale change where it's almost coming out of nowhere. So what I'm going to do once I have that layer selected is I'm going to hold Shift-Command-S, and that's going to make once again a keyframe on that layer, for the scale. So the scale at this point will be around 100 percent. Let's say I wanted to start out at zero. So I'll just click zero, on Scale, right here, and then I've got an animation of it growing, really simple, not the greatest animation, but we're now moving shapes and where it's getting exciting. It's an odd go into this even further, another really nice shortcut is ''U'' on your keyboard. So ''U'' on your keyboard if you select the circle layer that we've been working with in, and instead of twirling down this arrow and the twirling down this one to be able to get to the key frames that we have been working in. A simple thing that you can do is just click ''U'' on your keyboard. So ''U'' will bring up the keyframes that you've been working within and After Effects, whether that's 17 different types of keyframes or maybe just a position change, it'll pull it out. So now, we've got our two position keyframes that we're working within, that are just a simple position change, click End, to make that looping space a little bit shorter here. So what I want to do is right now we're working with a linear movement. So what I want to do is introduce something called Easy Ease. Easy Ease introduces a whole new thing into graphic design which really makes motion great motion, and really how you work within your project, and then diving into a deeper and deeper as projects go on. So one way to start an Easy Ease to make changes keyframes into Easy Ease keyframes is to select them both, right-click on one of the other, and go to keyframe assistant and go too Easy Ease. So now, this will basically if you look at the movement that we're getting, it'll start off a little bit slower, and get a little bit quicker as it goes on. It's subtle, but it has a little bit better feeling to it, it's not as stagnant, it's not as linear, and I'll take this even further what we can do is we can go into the Graph Editor. So the Graph Editor really allows you to see the motion that is happening between two to three to 25 different keyframes that you're working within. It really shows you the motion that is happening, whether it's a slow to fast motion or fast to slow. So we're going ahead and click into the Graph Editor, what we're more interested in is the speed graph. So we're going ahead and click this little thing down here, which says choose graph type and options. We're going to see it's on the value graph, we want to go to the speed graph. So we're going to click the speed graph, and you'll see that we have a Easy Ease slope we can call it here. So one thing that you know when you look at this graph is that this is basically a ratio to where it's on the y-axis is talking about speeds. So we have pixels per second. So this is going to be at the top of its peak, it's moving this fast, and then on the x-axis is basically showing the duration of that motion. So how long that motion is going to last for. So really where you want the main motion to happen is going to be defined by where this peak is on that timeline. So for instance, right now we have a nice just default Easy Ease motion that we applied to this position change. So I wanted to start off maybe a little bit slower. So I'm just going to move this first keyframe. So if it's not selected you can just go ahead and click it, select it, and it'll highlight yellow. So you'll get a little anchor point right here to where you can drag that anchor out, to make a more inclined slope to where you can see now the motion is all going to happen here at the end. It'll start off really slow and will come out gradually go up through the motion will happen here. You can see how it spikes. There is really where animation gets interesting and to where you really make add that characteristic to the simple shape like a circle, and you'll see me using this throughout the entire class. But let's say for this one, I wanted to come in really fast. So I'm going to take that anchor point, and I'm going to drag them both this way. So all the motion happens in the very beginning of my timeline to where it shoots up from the bottom of the frame there. So now, we can just click the graph editor to get right out of there. Now, since we've done that one thing that I always remember when you're on After Effects is save your project. Adobe likes to quit on you, and I think we all know that. So now, I want to work with the scale, because obviously I don't want the scale to be the size that it is right now, I wanted to start small as we have it right here, but I wanted to grow to be about 50 percent of the size that is at. So I'm going to click ''S'' on my keyboard once I have the circle layer selected, and then I'll pull up the scale change. So right now, we have no scale change, so we're going to add a scale change. So we're going to go to the beginning of our timeline, we're going to have our scale selected, when I click the metrics here and click zero, and then the circle will be at zero, the size. So now, if we play, it we'll see that it grows, and it's growing. The scale is growing very linearly, and then the Easy Ease on the position is providing this type of effect. So we want them both to be Easy Ease to almost work together. So what I'm going to do is, I'm going select the scale, and I'm going to do the same process that I just did. I'm going to right-click on those keyframes, I'm going to go keyframe misses, I click Easy Ease, and now you'll see that it'll be a little bit more of an ease on the scale change that we have. Still not lining up perfectly with the position just because we altered the position in there. So now, what I'm going to do is I'm going to go into the Graph Editor once I have my two scale keyframe selected, I'm going to go into the Graph Editor, and I'm going to make sure that the scale change also happens very similarly to the position change to where it spikes in the beginning, and I'm just going to do that by dragging these anchor points over to the right. So now, you can see that the motion of both the scale and the position are happening similarly and lining up which really allows this shape to give it a little bit more consistency within the two keyframes that we're working within. I'm going to go back to my timeline here, once I have my layer selected, I'm going to click ''U'' on my keyboard, and that's going to pull up like I said before both the position and the scale keyframes that we've been working in, and I'm going to go to my second keyframe here, and one thing to note which is really nice once you have several keyframes on your timeline, you can click ''J'' and ''K'', and ''J'' and ''K'' on your keyboard will allow you to jump from keyframe to keyframe, instead of trying to drag the little cursor to the keyframe that you want to animate, or that you want to adjust. So I know that I don't want this circle to be as big as it is right now within the center of the composition. So I'm going to click the scale keyframe that I want to change, and I'm going to change that to around 50 percent. Now, it looks great. So now, we've got this animation that we're working with. So I know from looking at my storyboards, that I almost want that circle, the character to go a little bit higher than the center point of this composition. Now, one thing that's really convenient that After Effects allows is to get a grid on your composition, but will it really allow you to lay out your composition nicely and evenly to have a nice way, and also for you just to understand where the center point is, especially when you're working with something that's designed like a logo type, you want to be able to work within a system for yourself and really keep that on a grid system. So if I go down here to the setting where I can choose grading guide options, and if I click that I can show proportional grid, and it'll pull up a green line grid that will allow me to see where the objects are that I'm actually putting on the composition itself. So I actually want this circle, it will, as it shoots up from the bottom, I want it to go, let's have it come maybe in between there in the top of the screen, and then I as it comes up there I wanted to hang out up there a little bit maybe for half a second, or just a split second. Then I wanted to come down and that's really where we're going to get into the next transitional phase, to where we're going to build out that brand element. 6. Building the Brand Element: So now, since we've introduced the guiding element circle, we're now going to dive into the next component which is the brand element. For our specific motion design, we decided to do a graph, a bar graph. So what I'm going to do is, I'm going to jump ahead within on my timeline. Now that I have this starting point of this animation, I'm going to jump ahead a little bit and create what I think the bar graph would look like within the animation. One thing you're going to know when you're going through your animation, you're making more and more layers. When you make a new layer, it will make it as the duration of your timelines. We have 20 seconds, so it's going to make every layer that we create around 20 seconds. So one way to cut your layers instead of going all the way over here and dragging this all the way over, you can use the cursor that we have right here. You can set it on the timeline to where you want to break it, and hold option right bracket and it will cut it right to that point. So this becomes really useful when you have multiple layers in your cutting, and reorganizing, and sequencing different layers within your timeline. Now, I'm going to drag out the looping work area and I'm going to start to build our bar graph. So what I'm going to do for this is, I'm going to deselect everything just by clicking anywhere in the gray space, so nothing is selected. So if you see, if I have circle one selected and I click in it, just anywhere in the gray space, it'll deselect. So now I'm going to go up to the top of the After Effects panel, and I'm going to click again on the shade maker, and I'm going up to the rectangle tool. So you will see it gives you right here, tool would be the shortcut for the rectangle tool, and so this is something good to note that we'll be using down the line. So I know that I want the referencing my storyboard, I know that I want the bottom, I know that I want the bar graph to have a type of structural element, and that's where we're going to create first, and that's going to be a small rectangle at the bottom of the bar graph. So we're going to use our grid that we have organized here, and we're just going to roughly make a rectangle down here. You'll see that on the timeline, it's After Effects has made a new layer for us. Then, to click out of that, you can click a V, enter, keyboard and just click on the gray space, and you can see what we're working with. Now, if you want to get rid of his grid, you'll be able to see a little bit more neatly, I mean you can go down to here and deselect that off so you can see what you're working with. But for setting this up, we're going to use the grid, just so we can make sure that everything is neat. So within my storyboard, I have around four different bars, but I think six would probably look a little bit better. So what I'm going to do is, I'm going to go and click the rectangle tool one more time, with no other layers selected, I'm going to go into my composition and I'm simply just going to make a rectangle. So now you see here that we have a rectangle in our composition. One thing to note is that the center axis point is within the center of the composition and we want to make sure that that center axis point is within the center of the rectangle that we're working with. Because if you see, if I were to do a scale change, it would grow and, the scale change would be determined by where that center axis point is. So I want to make sure that, that's the center axis point is in the middle of that rectangle. So I'm going to go to my motion two panel, I'm going to click that, click this center axis point right here and it's going to move that to the center right there. I'm going to do the exact same thing for this bottom structure layer as well. For right now, let's make sure that we label these. I'm just going to do colors for right now and so, I'm going to select both of them just by holding down shift and selecting both the layers, and I'm going to click on the blue box, and we'll label these yellow, so I know that this is starting of this sequence. Another thing to note is that, since I have these now two layers started in the start off my bar graph, you'll see that the layers go all the way to the beginning of the timeline. One thing that I know is that, I know that I want this to come after the circle and the circle animation. So what I'm going to do is, what I'm going to click is the left bracket on my keyboard, and that's going to bring those two layers directly to my cursor. Starts with to my cursor so then I can know that those layers are going to show up right then. As we play it, you can see that they show up right there. So right here, what happened is, when I created these shapes, they basically pulled the colors that I was using with in the past. Since I was using the teal circle, it pulled that same color. So I'm thinking that I want this to be more, maybe utilized that navy color within the brand for this brand element. So I am going to basically do the same thing that I did for the circle, and I'm going to go over to layers that I have here, around 10-seconds in my timeline. I'm going to just go up to the fill once I have the layer that I want to change the color to, I'm going to click the layer, and go to the fill, click the box, click the eyedropper, and go over and find that navy color so I can make that exactly what I want. So I'm thinking that it might be nice to have this be a stroke as well. So I'm just going to click the stroke right here, go over here, it'll pull up this module panel. Make sure that you click the stroke color to turn it on, and click okay. So you'll note that it automatically goes to y, so what we're going to want to do is the same thing that we did for the fill and we're going to want to make this, that navy. So one thing about After Effects is, the big thing of doing and learning from and figuring out the best ways to create. So I'm trying to think, how can I make this too where it's just outlined? Maybe it has a fail, so you can't really see the things behind it just in case I go through an animation to where I want things to pass behind the shape. So I'm going to have the same layer selected, and I'm going to go up to the fill, and all I'm going to do is just make that white so it matches the background color. So now, I have a white outlined shape, perfect. So for the bottom, let's make this the solid navy once again utilizing different colors and allowing our conductor really own that teal color. So now what I'm going to do since I have this rectangle, the first bar on our bar graph selected, what I'm going to do is just, click Command D five more times to be able to have six rectangles. They'll all be on one another. So one thing I like to do is, when I have multiple shapes for one senior for one component, I'd like to be able to know that the bottom layer is going to be on the far left, and the top layer is going to be on the far right, that one just works for me. You can do it vice versa, but it's good to know that, if you were to click through these layers, you would be able to have them organized and the way that you would understand it best. So I'm going to go ahead and keep this bottom layer on the far left, and I'm going to keep this guy button, and I'm going to put that up by holding Shift and the arrow key to the right. I'm just going to move this over until it lines up perfectly right around there. I'm going to do this for all of them until they all basically line across this bottom structure bar. Now that we have all the colors and we have the graph set up to what we think is right, we have all of the six bars of the bar graph laid out next to one another. You noticed the size isn't perfect to what that structure bar on the bottom is. But that's no worries, what we're going to do is we're going to start to get into nulls which are really great and can really be a lot of help for you in your animation when you're working with doing position changes, and rotations, and other key frames on multiple different objects. So, what I'm going to do is I'm going to click the top layer here, and I'm going to hold down shift, and I'm going to select all of the bars that we just created. I'm going to go to "Layer" and I'll go to "New", then I'll to "Null Object" and then it will create a null object. Then what you would do is you would select all the layers that you want to pair to that null object, and that null object will give you the ability to apply key frames or position changes or rotations to that null object that will affect all the layers that are connected to it. So, now what we're going to do is we're going to be using Motion 2 for this and so I'm going to take a step back here. So, with Motion 2, it's actually great because you select all the layers that you want to be grouped, and you go null on Motion 2 and it connects all of them right there and it gives you this nice null layer that is the same length of all the layers that you have below it, and you're able to move the layers all at once to the left and the right. So, now you'll see that we have all the bar graph. We have all the bars in the center of the composition. But maybe we want this bar down here to be a little bit thinner, or maybe not as wide as it is right now. So, what we're going to do is we're going to take this bar, and we're going to do a scale change on his bar just to scale it up just so it's a little bit shorter than what it is right now. So, we're going to go down to content. I'm going to go to rectangle, we're going to go to the rectangle path. We're just going to click on the rectangle path, and we're just going to select that and we're just going to roughly go over just a little bit on both sides here to make it a little bit more compositionally sound with the adjustment that we just did on the bars. That seems great. Now, you can zoom out and see what we're working with. So, now we've got all of our bars laid out here, and you can turn off the grid and see what we got, and it's looking great. So, now we have to think, well, obviously we don't want all the bar graphs to be at the same height of each other, and so let's just take them, and what we're going do is we're going to each of the bars and we're going to go to each one of their paths, and adjust their path to be able to do the position, I mean, to be able to do their scale. The one thing we're doing scale is that you can do the scale by taking the bounding box of the shape, and moving the bounding box like this as I'm doing. But you will see that if you scale it, you'll see that the it also changes the diameter of an outline when you're using outline shapes, which will start to look really nasty when you get into it. So, what you want to do is you want to go in going into content, go into rectangle, go down the path and have path selected, and then it will give you these corner points that you can click and select to be able to adjust the path and design this bar graph to how we want to design it. Another way to get into that is to have your layer selected, double-click on the bounding box, you'll get this different bounding box, and click one more time and you'll be able to get in that too. So, this is a much easier way to do it instead of twirling down all of these content rectangle on the path. So, I'm just going to go through here and design these by holding shift and moving them down, and just design more of a slope of what I think I'll be using when I do my transition. So, one thing to note as I'm going through around designing each one of these bars and giving them their own characteristics and elevation, and size. Instead of going working here and then going back over here and clicking the layer that you want to adjust, you can do command and up and down on your arrow keys, and select the bars that you want to adjust. So, if you start at the bottom in the way that we organized it, it'll be at the far left, and then if you use command and your up and down arrow keys, you can go up accordingly to be able to get to your far right one which is going to be the top layer. That's just how we organized it, but it's an easy way to keep things organized and on track. We have a nice elevation, a little bit of variation within this bar graph getting a little bit more of an interesting design. I think it would be nice to be able to have one of these bars have a different type of characteristic or style to them. So, what we're going to do is we're going to choose this far right bar, and we're just going to do an easy effect. If we go into our effects panel which is right here, Effects & Presets. If you don't have Effects & Presets, what you can do is you can go up to "Window", pull-down "Window", and you can pull out Effects & Presets and you can click that and it'll pull it up. So, we're going to go to Effects & Presets and we're going to search Venetian blinds transition. Once you have the layer selected that you want to apply the effect, you can either drag and drop the effect onto the layer that you want it to go to or you can just have the layer selected that you want to apply the effect to, and double-click on the effects and it all pull it up into your effects panel. All right. So, now that we got the effect on, it'll pull up in new Effects control panel, and we've got the Venetian blinds. So, what you can see when we transition completion. It's at zero percent. So, if we turn it up right now, you'll see that since we only have this on an outline with a white fill that all we'll be able to see if I do shift command H to get rid of those bounding boxes so I can see the effect happening, it's only affecting the outline right now because that's the only color. So, what I want to do is I actually want to make this a navy, let's say. So, I'm going to go ahead and I'm going to select just like we did before. I'm going to make that fill navy. So, now I can see that the effect is happening on everything within the box. But maybe instead of this being vertical, let's maybe rotate it a little bit just to make it a little bit more interesting, and have it be at an angle there which looks a little bit more interesting, and then maybe working with the outline box here since it's overlapping since it has that outline, maybe working with it having no outline would look a little bit better, and there it's fitting nicely, very nice. Just make sure that this line is still lining up at the bottom, and just moving that down a little bit. Remember, shift command if you've have turned that off. That shift command H will turn that back on. So, you can see which object is selected. So, now if we zoom out, we'll see that we have another additional element to our bar graph which makes it a little bit more interesting. The overall brand element that we just created is a little bit larger than the composition. So, I wanted to do a large-scale change on everything, and this is where null shapes will really come in handy. So, right now I have a null shape that's connected to all of the bar graphs, but I also want to adjust the size of this structure bar at the bottom of the bar graphs. So, what I'm going to do is I'm going to click that structure bar down here, and I'm going to grab this little twirly thing right here it's called a pick whip. This is what you use to parent layers to other layers or layers to nulls. So, null is really just a universal layer that you can apply key frames on, and using that key frame, it'll adjust the size and proportion of any of the layers that it's connected to. So, I'm going to pick whip this up to the null. So, now I have all of these components controlled by the null, and I'm going to just click "S" on my keyboard, and I'm going to just take this down by maybe let's take it down to 85, and that seems about right, and I'm going to pull up my grid just to make sure it's within the grid, and I'm just going to move it down just using my arrow keys while having the null air selected, I'm just going to move it down just a little bit so it feels proportionally even. So, what I know about this animation is that we have a lot of white space and we're actually utilizing that to our advantage because we're anticipating through our story boards that that guiding character, the circle that we created, is really going to be working and moving throughout a lot of this white space. So, just thinking about that design and how you're actually scaling it within the composition is something to really take into account when you're designing your brand element. 7. Building Transition I: So now that we've designed the main brand element that we're going to be using in the motion design, we're going to go back to that guiding character, the conductor, and we're going to figure out that transition element. Now one thing to note is that this isn't perfect. It's a lot about refining and creating progress for yourself, so then now you have the momentum to keep on moving forward. So it's about not getting too hung up on the design of a particular element or a particular scene, but really just being able to move forward. For us, that's now going backwards a little bit to work on that transition from the conductor to this now brand element. If we go back to the animation we have, we have this circle coming up and then it goes right into the bars. So what I'm going to do is I'm going to move my work area to around two and half seconds, three seconds, just by clicking on the keyboard. What I want to do is I really want to have this circle shoot up and I want to shoot back down. As it shoots back down, I want to build out this structure bar at the bottom of the bar graph. So basically to do that, I'm going to go down here to where our layer is for our, and I'm just collapsing these layers just by selecting them pressing U. So I'm going to go down to the circle area here and I'm just going to make another position keyframe to where it gets towards to where the position will then shoot back down to the bottom to around right here. So to do that, all I'm going to is select the layer, select this and just have it shoot back down. You'll see as I start to move this down, it's something that After Effects likes to do by having these little anchor points extend. That's something that will be a little bit problematic and I'm going to show you guys how to fix that pretty easily as you guys go through. This is something that happens when you do position changes after already having Easy Ease on a layer. It likes to almost make a curve. So if I were to drag this out, you'll see that almost has a curve to it. But now you'll see that we have a simple animation of it coming up and then shooting back down. So that's really what we want to get and we want to almost stay up there just for a split second, and hang out and then shoot back down. But I want the scale change to where it gets big while it's at the top. Then as it comes back down to us, it's going to build out this bar graph, that structure bar at the bottom. I want it to become a little bit small. So what I'm going to do is I'm going to do another scale change to let's go around 30 percent to make that circle around that size. So now to get rid of so I don't have anything selected, all I did was just click into the grey area. So now if we watch it, it will have something to where it shoots up and shoots back down and then it gets smaller here at the end. You'll see that it's nothing beautiful, nothing polished but it's getting the idea of showing the motion that we're trying to get to where we can start the transition into the bar graph. So the one thing that I think would be really nice to have is to have the circle as it shoots down, and then spikes back up, and starts the motion of the bar graph that we're going to be using. But so as it hits that bottom layer, what I'm going to have to do is I'm going to select all of my layers from my bar graph, and I'm going to move them over just by clicking the left bracket to move them over to the playhead right here. So now as you see as the circle comes down, it'll hit right as that playhead goes open, and you'll see that it starts all the bar graphs. You'll see that the size of the circle is almost a little bit too large for this bar graph. So I can either make the bar graph just a little bit larger which I think I'll do, say 85 or pump it up to 90 right now, just a little bit larger. I'm going to make that circle just a little bit smaller when it's at the top here, and this is just working within the composition. So we'll go from 50 to 40. So I just have a little bit of a smaller circle as it comes down. So don't worry about it interfering with anything here, we're going to be polishing this all up later on. But now one thing to note is that I want to be able to see this circle as I'm animating. Since we made those filled in shapes which we might change later on, I will want to move the circle layer up to the top. So what I'm going to do is I'm going hold "Shift+Command" in right bracket and that'll move the layer all the way up to the top. Now let's say I wanted to move this just one by one, I could hold command and do a left bracket, and left bracket will move it just one by one. So I'm doing command and left and right bracket to move this up and down. So now as the circle comes down, I'm going to adjust the graph editor a little bit so I can get a little bit more of the motion that I want. Right now it's not shooting down as fast when it's up at the top here. It's not shooting down as fast as I would like it to really start to initiate this bottom structure bar of that graph. So what I'm going to do is I'm going to select the position keyframes only, and I'm going to go into the graph editor here and it's going to pull up the keyframes. So you'll see we have three keyframes just like we did on our timeline. Because we designed the first two keyframes this way, when you make a new keyframe, it will design the next graph editor, the next trajectory the same as the one previous. So that's just something to note that you'll have to go in and adjust these for each one. So right now you'll notice that we have it spiking here and going really fast at the beginning, slowing down and then it spikes again here and slows down. So actually what I wanted to do is spike, slow down, be slow all throughout here and then spike at the very end. So what I'm going to do is I'm going to grab these. I'm just going to move these over just like this. These anchor points over just like that. Now if you see it, that'll be a lot slower at the top and then shoot back down at the end. So let's watch that again, and then it shoots back down right there. One thing that you can do to make the process a little bit quicker for rendering, you can go over here and you can change the quality of what the render is going to be, and we'll change it to about half. So this will be a preview will be about half, and then you can go up to this panel here and you go to the preview section, scroll down and make sure that this is also around half or third of the resolution that's going to be playing at. So now you know that we have a little bit of anticipation within that circle giving it that emotion, that characteristic that we were going for. One thing to note though is that since it is holding a little bit longer up there, the animation is innately going to become a little bit longer. A good thing that I've learned is that animation really sells well when you can get everything compact within two to four or five seconds. Anything longer than five seconds I think becomes something that is just not utilized by the company, especially long-term once people start to recognize the new brand. That's something that a lot of motion design and bumpers that we're going to be creating and even this one, help sell the brand to not only the client but then also to the clients users, whether it's being used in a looping animation, on a website or a video. So to keep it within that five second range is really the sweet spot. So does note that as you're creating this anticipation with your graph editor that you don't want anything to really be too elongated more than it really needs to be. So now to get out of the graph editor, we're just going to click the button again and now you'll see what we're working with. So the first thing that I'm going to do, I'm not going to worry about any of the bar graphs right now. I'm just going to worry about this bottom bar because that's going to be the first element that we see as this bar graph everything grows from the bottom. So what we're going to do is we're going to select that bottom bar right here, and I'm going to give this now a new color just for visual for me, and I'm going to do this orange just so I know that that's the bottom of the bar graphs. That's something that once again you can go through and label all these. I just choose not to because I'm more of a visual person. So what I'm going to do now is I'm going to try to figure out how to have this come in. So since I think the circle is coming in from the top to the bottom and kind of shooting down, it would make sense to have this structure bar, the bar graph come maybe from right here to middle of the screen. Come down a little bit further and pop back up into the section that it is right now. So another shortcut that really helps when you're working with multiple layers is I. So I gets you to the front of the selected layer that you're working on no matter what that is. So if I click the red circle shape and I click I, it'll take me to the front of that layer. Now I know that I want to start animating the bottom layer of that structural layer, so I click the orange layer right here which I know that it's the bottom layer, and I click I and it'll bring me right there. So I know that I want the position change. The position change is going to be the easiest one to control, so I'm going to do that one first. So just as before, I'm going to hold Shift+Option+P, and that's going to give me one one starting keyframe and so sentence. Now I made the position change and I know that I want this to end here, I'm going to drag this over a couple of frames. So I know that I have a little bit of working space right here to make the position movement on this bottom structure. Now one thing to know when you're working with keyframes is that anytime you've initiated the stopwatch, anytime you move this layer or any of the layers that have a stopwatch initiated, it will make a keyframe for itself. So if you watch right here as I hold down "Shift" and the "Arrow Key" to make a position change on this, After Effects will make a new keyframe on that. Because now if we zoom in, you can see that motion happening once again. So now I know that I want this to start here and as the circle comes down, I want the bar to be down below the circle. Then down below its starting point, and then it's going to come back up to the starting point, the first keyframe that we made. So now, if we watch this, you'll see that the bar will pop down and do a quick animation. All right. So now, we're getting a little bit of a balance. We're getting a little bit more personality to the overall animation and showing how the conductor object is initiating the movement within these shapes. That's really what we're going for throughout this whole animation. So good thing is, if you're having trouble seeing is because we've had these bars in front of them, what you could do is really simply select all the bars and just move them over a little bit. Now, all we're seeing will be the bar and the movement that the bar is making. So this is where really adjusting that work area to get a looping is important. So clicking N and maybe B right there, so you can adjust that work area. So then, you can work and replay this a bunch of times to see the motion that you want to be able to to get. So now, what I'm going to do is I want to be able to design the motion a little bit around the velocity that I want this bar to be moving at. So what I'm going to do is I'm going to apply Easy Ease to all of this. So what I've learned is just, when working with motion design, especially simple shapes, you're using the Easy Ease a lot instead of right-clicking and going to a Keyframe Assist and going to Ease Ease or using any of your F keys at the top of your keyboard, if you like listening to music or anything like that. An easy thing is to go into your System Preferences and make your own shortcut. What I've learned is that Control One is a great way and a great two keys to utilize to be able to make that shortcut to apply Easy Ease to any selected keyframes that you have. So now, if I see the motion that we're getting, it has a nice Easy Ease bounce to it. But I know that I want that to bounce really quickly. So now, what I'm going do is I'm going to go into, once again, the Graph Editor and I'm going to adjust these Easy Ease keyframes and make it so all the action is happening right in the beginning, similar to the circle, to where the circle or our character object, our conductor object is coming down. As the circle object comes down, it'll shoot the bar down as well. So what we're going to do is we're just going to grab these and we're just going to move them over to the right here. So all the action will happen right there, and then we're going to do a little easy, so it slows down right here. Then we want some of the action to happen right here, but we want it to ease into the final position. So we're going to let a ease in to the final position like that instead of pointing it all the way to the right to where it would just be a hard stop. So now, if we watch it, we see we have it shooting down and easing into that final position where it's at right now, which is looking great. But I almost want it to start maybe a little bit not as wide as it is and maybe even smaller. So what I'm going to do is I'm going to go into the paths of the object. So I'm just going to twirl this down, go into Contents, go into Rectangle, click the Path, and then I'll get this object. What I'm going to do is I'm going to twirl it down one more time, and I'm going to click the stopwatch on this, so I'm going to make a keyframe about the paths. So I know that I want the final shape to be that size, so I'm going to move it over here so it aligns with the final shape of the position that we just created, and I'm going to click U on my keyboard to condense everything. So now, I can just see where I'm working in, what I'm working in. So now, what I'm going do is I'm going to pull up my proportion grid and align these two sides to the middle section right here. So I'm going to click my path and then I'll click this. You'll see once I have my path selected, so whether I click here, the path, or whether I click the keyframe that's on the path, it will bring up the bounding box of the path and it will also bring up, if you'll see on the cursor, a little rectangle next to it. That really allows me to just drag, so I'm clicking and dragging to be able to select those, too. So now, I can even hold Shift and do the arrow keys, and I can move those over, and you'll see even on the timeline here, After effects made another keyframe as I moved that over. So we're going to move it over pretty much to the center there. I'm just going to click on that keyframe and it'll allow me to have that bounding box again. I'm going to click and drag to select those two on the right, and I'm going to use Shift and the left key to just move this over to where I think it's good. So now, if we watch this over, you'll see that as it comes down, it shoots out and grows by itself. So a way to think about this, and what will make it a little bit easier to you guys how motion happens and really keep that tempo is, the guiding object, the circle right here is what's initiating this bottom bar. As you see as it hits, you can even see the keyframes, they're aligning at the same time. As this keyframe ends, the keyframes of that structure bar at the bottom are starting. So it really gives you a start point for new objects that you're creating to really create that momentum and then that progress throughout the entire motion design. So now, the path as, you'll see, also have linear movement. I actually want those to be fast right when the circle hits just as before. So I'm going to select these two and I'm going to do an Easy Ease on both of these keyframes right here. I'm going to go into my Graph Editor once again, and I am going to select this right one and just move them over so everything happens in the very beginning here. So it'll expand, that rectangle will expand quicker than it was before. So now, if we go back and we make our work area a little bit larger, we can see what we've created and what we're working with. So now, what we can do is we can bring back the other element that we're going to animate. Remember, this isn't perfect but it's giving us a starting point to where we can start to animate our whole second section, which is the brand element, and we can start the animation or process around this. So let's see what we've got. So we have this circle, the conductor coming down, the guiding object coming down initiating that structure. What I want to do is I actually want to make these rectangles, I want them to be see-through. So right now, what we did when we made the rectangles is we gave all of them a fill background. So what you can do is you can actually select all the ones that you want to take the fill off, go up to Fill, and click None, and it'll take the Fill off. So visually, it didn't do much. But now, if I were to move this circle by holding command in the left bracket to move that layer down below, you'll see that the circle starts to go below the shapes, which in my mind, it makes it a little bit more dynamic and a little bit more interesting to show the circle going behind the shapes instead of in front of the shapes and showing that they're transparent. So now, what we want to do is we want to make sure we want to start as this circle comes down, we also want to initiate the bar graph's growth. We want all the bar graphs to grow from the bottom, and so what we're going to do is we're going to go into each one of the layers of the bar graph. We're going to make a path keyframe and we're just going to have a start path keyframe of it being on the bottom, and then ending the path keyframe similar to where we have designed it from the beginning. So now, what we're going to do is we're going to go into each one of these layers. A quick way to get to the paths, if you don't want to click each layer, and twirl this down, and then twirl this down, and then twirl this down to get into paths, what you can do is you can select all the layers that you want to adjust the paths, and you can go to the Search Bar right here. You can click in it and you can type in path. So then, what it will do is it'll allow you to just then go through and easily click the stopwatch and make that first keyframe that you want to have on that bar graph. So now, what we're going to do is we're going to select all of those layers that we just made a keyframe on. We're going to click U to collapse them to just the keyframe that we're working within, which is that path. We're just going to select those and we're going to drag those over just a couple of frames, because we know that we want to end on that. So visually right now, maybe you think, okay, well the outline is a little bit too thick for the design that we're going for. So it's as simple as selecting the ones that you want to adjust the outline on and going up to the stroke here, and adjusting that to, let's say, instead of 10, let's make it around eight. So visually, this is a little bit better to the brand and to the motion that we're going to be working within. So let's say that now, all we're going to do is we're going to basically take the path of each one of these layers and we're going click the layer. I'm going to click I, and we're going to go into the path, and we're going to select just those top two layers, and we're just going to bring it down all the way to the bottom and literally collapse that shape that we just created. I'm going to do this for each one of those layers. So I just collapsed all the layers right there, so I collapsed them so then when the guiding object comes back down, everything will shoot up from this point. So if we were to play this right now, although they're linear, you'll see that everything shoots up from that starting point and I can zoom out here. An easy way to zoom out is just if you're using a track pad just to scroll, you can also hold Option and scroll out, or you can go down here where it says 50 percent or shows a percentage, and you can go up to fit, and that'll fit the composition to the size of the panel that you have open. So right now, we're going to watch it. You can see that our guiding object is coming down and shooting all of those bar graphs up, and initiating the entire motion sequence through the transition. So now that we have everything shooting up, what we want to do is we want to realize that the ball is coming down. But what it should be initiating is that maybe this graph should be designed a little bit differently for this first stage when it pops out to where all of the weight of the graph is centered similar how to the guiding object came straight down the screen, waiting that graph within the momentum of this guiding object, and allowing that to really define the motions. So what we're going do, simply, we're just going to redesign how we have this graph laid out. So we're just going to move everything down a little bit so the graph spikes right in the middle. Now, when we play it back, you can see that the guiding object is really allowing the momentum to happen right in the middle of the graph. Just before, we're going to apply Easy Ease to all of the graphs so all the graph bars shoot up just as everything else has as that ball comes back down. We're going to select all, we're going to make sure we have all the keyframes selected for our bar graph, and we're going to go into the Graph Editor. We're going select them all by clicking and dragging, and moving this to the right, and moving this one to the right as well to really have that speed happen right as the ball hits, and so they all shoot up. So now, you see we're trying to get some momentum and really starting to see how that ball or that guiding object is really controlling the motion of this entire animation. Now, since we have the basic transition from the guiding object to the brand element, the next thing is to further refine, and polish, and then go to the next transition, which is going to lead us to our final element, which is going to be the final logo lockup. 8. Refining Transition I: So now once you've added the motion to the brand element using your conductor, what you're going to want to do is kind of revisit what you've just created and see if there's anything that you can change to kind of create that momentum for yourself, to kind of move forward, and see if you can polish anything. So right now, what I'm kind of seeing is that this beginning brand element. It's a little bit slow especially if we're trying to keep this whole bumper within four to five seconds. So what I'm going to do is I'm going to basically go into this and I'm going to click U to pull up the keyframes that we have and I'm just going to select those, and I'm just going to kind of move them over just by a couple of frames and kind of see the motion that we're getting. I know that I want that beginning kind of pop up from the bottom here to be really quick and to have it kind of settle down after it kind of pops up. So we have a nice quick motion right there. So now I kind of have adjusted the speed to this beginning circle to try to keep it within that five-second range. What I'm going to do, which is really simple since we lined everything up to these final keyframes, is I'm going to click K on my keyboard which will take the playhead to that keyframe that we want to work. If I click J, it will take it to the previous ones. I'm going to select all the layers I want to match up with that. I'm going to have them all selected and I'm going to use the left bracket to move all those layers to the front of the playhead. All right. Just like that. So now we've got this. If we play it, we can kind of see that the motion happens a little bit quicker but everything is still lined and that conductor is still kind of starting that motion. So now, the next thing that I'm kind of noticing is I want to add a little bit of visual weight to this bottom structure line or structure bar that we have down here, almost as if when it comes down here, it almost gets a little bit wider and it kind of grows a little bit. So what I'm going to do is I'm going to expand this layer by clicking U to kind of see the keyframes that I'm working with and I'm going to zoom in by holding Option and kind of zooming in on my track pad or mouse, and I'm going to hold the Space Bar to kind of get the moving hand to be able to move it around and kind of get organized here. So what I'm going to do is I'm going to adjust the path on this so I can make this shape a little bit wider as it comes down to this position down here. So I'm going to click on the path, and then I'm going to select these two keyframes down here by clicking and dragging, and I'm just going to move it by holding Shift and the Arrow key down once to add a little bit of visual weight. Maybe that's a little bit too much. So I'll just adjust it and that seems about right. So now when we look at the animation, you can see that it kind of has this visual weight to it as it kind of grows and then kind of pops back up when it goes into its resting place. It looks good right now, but we can make it a little bit nicer by going into the graph editor. So what I'm going to do is I'm going to select the path and I'm going to go into the graph editor here. You'll see that with the path, it looks a little bit interesting and that's because we created a new keyframe within the two already existing keyframes that we created previously. So that then entails on it looking a little bit interesting like this. But all you need to do is just click and drag to select these and then just drag them down to the line, zoom in by holding option, and zooming in on your keypad or track-pad. So now what we see is that the motion of that path is happening on Easy Ease and it's spiking right here. So what I want, I want this to be kind of slow so that this width happens when the position change happens at the same time and it holds as well. So I'm just going to drag these out a little bit to give myself a little bit of a hole there at the bottom, and then play and see what we have. So that's looking pretty nice. So now one thing to note about the graph editor. When a key point is at the very bottom, that means that it's completely stopped. So what I want to do is I don't want it to completely be stopped. I want to move it up just a little bit. Maybe even a little bit more to make sure that it doesn't stop all the way, it allows more of a fluid motion to happen within that path change of the width. So now we're adding that visual weight which is making the overall animation a little bit more interesting. So those are some good polishing steps that we just did there, and now we're going to do the next motion on the circle. The next motion on the circle is to compositionally set it, if we were to zoom out here, is to compositionally set the circle maybe up in this area, maybe right above this square, or right above this rectangle that we have similar to our storyboards that we had drawn up earlier. So what we're going to do is we're going to select our circle and we're going to move the circle. As it kind of hits, we want to kind of move the circle maybe right after everything is expanded. We want to move this circle just up just by selecting the layer and moving it up to this area. So you'll kind of see that right now we have the motion. It's being indicated by these two lines to where it's going to come straight down and then go straight up. We'll play that just so you can kind of see what we're working with. I'll change my work area by clicking here B, and clicking over here N to the beginning and end. So now we can kind of see what we're working with. So now all that looks great. We can make that look even better by adding some Easy Ease and also working with the overall motion path on the position. So we've got our basic animation and a motion for us for our guiding object. But now what we want to do is I want to kind of zoom in here. You'll see, as I talked to you before, After Effects likes to create these anchor points when you're working with Easy Ease keyframes. So what you want to do is you want to click G on your keyboard, and G on your keyboard will actually pull up the Pen Tool. You want to just click on those keyframes to get rid of those. So you'll see that I have this slope right here, and that's because After Effects is making these anchor points. I just want to click on those to make everything so they're more linear and don't have much of a slope. So now if you watch the animation, you'll see that the ball is going straight down and then straight at an angle. But now what I want to do is I almost want to have this ball kind of have a swooping motions. So what I'm going to do is I'm going to click K on my keyboard to take the playhead to that keyframe that I want to adjust, and I'm going to click G on my keyboard to pull up the Pen Tool, and I'm going to click on this area on this keyframe right here, and I'm just going to drag down, similar to Illustrator, to kind of create that slope motion. So now if we were to zoom out a little bit, you'll see that now we have a nice slope motion to the circle. I almost want to have this circle kind of move over just a little bit right above this bar because I cannot imagine it kind of sitting above the bar and almost initiating the bar graph change. So what I'm going to do is I'm just going to move that playhead by clicking J now on my keyboard and I'm just going to move that over just a little bit. I'm holding Shift and the Arrow keys, and we can have that come up a little bit higher. Then I'm going to grab this anchor point and I'm just going to kind of have that kind of be a little bit more accentuated down, and maybe even a little bit of a scale change on that circle just to give a little bit of variety. So right now we're at 30 percent of the scale, so let's go down to around 20 percent to make it a little bit smaller as it goes up there so it fits right above that rectangle and just fits nicely within the composition. Within the composition, you kind of see that we've already created this graph. So to be able to use that as a guiding element for where I want to place the conductor, it's something that is really useful that you can do. So right now I'm kind of giving myself a guiding element to it, that I want to have this conductor be lined up with this striped element because I know that the striped bar is going to be raised here in a minute. We have a nice Easy Ease on the circle and it kind of hits down here and then initiates everything that's happening. But what I really wanted to do is I wanted to kind of have more of an Easy Ease and I wanted to kind of have a more spike as it kind of comes up and sits at the top, sits in its resting position up here. So what I'm going to do is I'm going to select that position Keyframe and I'm going to go once again into my graph editor, and you're going to see that the motion of the graph is just very Easy Ease. But we're just going to drag this over to kind of get a more resting and then it a kind of to spike up right there. So it kind of initiates itself, and it kind of comes down and initiates the overall motion on all the graphs, and then it kind of spikes up. So one thing to do again is right now it's going to complete zero. So what you can do is you can click and drag just to select this, this keyframe, and you can drag it up just a little bit so it doesn't go to complete zero. You can do the same for this guy right here. So now it kind of moves through. It doesn't completely stop down here. It kind of moves through and kind of has a nice motion, and maybe you wanted to kind of ease a little bit more into that final resting position. So what we're going to do is we're going to have the final motion, the motion happening right here, and then ease out as it kind of goes into its resting position. All right. That's looking great. Now since I have the conductor of the guiding object within the spot that I want it to be resting in, I want to reflect that motion within the bar graphs as well so that the bar graph motion reflects what is happening with this slope of the circle. Almost kind of thinking as if this guiding object right here, this circle is almost kind of dragging these bars up and over and into this new position that these bars are going to be resting in. So now what I'm going to do is I'm just going to take some time to design these bars so that there's more of a upward slope to these bars to where it starts off, really low down here, and it kind of goes upwards. So now we've kind of designed this. We kind of made it a little bit irregular but still giving it that slope, and we can kind of play it back. You can see that it's not quite lined up with the motion of the circle, but we're going to change that once again by going into the graph editor. So I'm going to select all these guys that I just made the change on within the bars, and I'm going to kind of zoom in here and select just the ones I want to change and kind of go through and kind of make it so the motion happens lined up with that. So the motion of the circle is happening right around here. So what we want to do is we actually don't want to move that that way, we want to move it this way, and I'm going to go back out. One thing to note is that what is happening is that this is all growing. So all the bars are growing right there. Then as they kind of grow, we want the motion to happen. So what we're going to do is we're just going to select all of these and we're going to actually move them over to kind of reflect the motion that is happening here. Because of the tempo that we were working at, changing the speed is something that I went through first. But then being able to go through and actually change the duration of how an object expands and how these path layers were expanding, we're just selecting them all and kind of adjusting them slightly to be able to align to the spike of the guiding object here to kind of make those aligned. So now if we watch the full animation, we're starting to get somewhere. There's a couple of small things to note and just kind of thinking about the composition when you're going through and designing this, and a part of the motion designer's job is to also be conscious of design and kind of weighted design too since we're working with a lot of whitespace kind of allowing this guiding objects to kind of own its own space, and this space right here could be adjusted just a little bit. So I'm just going to give that guiding object a little bit more space to live. What I'm doing is I'm just making sure that the playhead is at the keyframe that I've adjusted. What I'm going to do is then go back and just adjust a couple of these just to give a little bit more variation between the circle. I'm going to go then to the circle, the guiding object, click here on my keyboard, go to the position. I'm just going to move that up just a little bit and maybe this over a little bit more so it kind of goes off to the side. So now visually, we've given it a little bit more space to live, which gives it a little bit more weight and hopefully keeps the viewer's eye there and keeps it following. 9. Building Transition II: So now, since we have build the overall motion to the brand element using the guiding object, what we're going to do is we're going to reference our storyboard and kind of understand that we want to now bring that guiding object back down and around and kind of repeat what we just did within the overall motion. So, I'm going to extend my work area just by a little bit and start by moving the guiding object down and up and around the graph to where the guiding object will end up at the top of the graph. So, to do that, simply we're just going to bring it way over here, we're going to drag, we're going to grab this anchor point right here, clicking the G key on your keyboard, point with pen tool and we're going to move the anchor point. We'll see when I move the anchor point, it likes to move both of the angles here. So, if you hold down option and move just anchor point, it'll just move that key point. So, the thing with motion and applying motion to shapes, and this is similar to like designing an IIlustrator, the fewer key frames that you're using, the smoother the motion will be. So, I'm going to go over here and I'm going to click on this key frame and I'm going to hold down option with my pen tool and I'm going to drag down to kind of create this slope, and now just these while holding option to kind of adjust them and just make sure that we're getting the slope that we want. So, now we can kind of play that back and see kind of the motion that we're getting. We've got the conductor kind of going up and around. We want to be able to get it right up here. So, what we're going to do is we're going to make another key frame and we're just going to move it up here, and we're going to once again adjust this. I don't really mind that it's moving both just because we're working with fluidity and we're trying to make everything. So, this is something to worry, it's kind of like a polishing stage and just kind of working with these, all right. So, you'll see that now since we added the other key frame, we have a little bit of a stop right there. So, what we want to do, just kind of adjust this just a little bit, make it a little bit longer here. We want to go into our graph editor while having those key frames selected. We want to select those and kind of just bring them up. So, they almost are like one movement. This is where you kind of play around with it to see kind of the momentum that you want to be able to get in kind of the wrapping around. So, now we're showing the momentum of the guiding object, kind of shooting through all those bars that we have and kind of hitting the key frame right here and kind of easing into this next position at the top. So, that looks pretty good to me right there. So, now what we're going to do is just as we did before to adjust the momentum and reflect that momentum to the circle, we're going to adjust the momentum of the graph again and reflect the motion just as we did before to that circle, so have everything kind of rotate back up to here. So, I'm going to once again redesign the bar graph. We're working to make it look a little bit organic not as neat and organized as maybe you would think it should be. Then kind of seeing the animation starting to happen. So, once again, we kind of want that bar graph to reflect the motion and right now it's dragging a little bit behind. So, what we want to do is we want to select all these key frames that we just created. We want to go into the graph editor. Once again, we want to select those and we want to have the motion kind of happen right where the circle goes. So, the circles kind of shooting through right there, right about here is where we want all the motion to happen until we can literally line up this peak with the playhead. Just like that. You'll see that now we're getting this fluid motion that is reflecting the motion of the guiding object. So, since now we've reflected the bar graphs to match the motion of the conductor, what we're going to do is we're going to try and figure out how to get everything to transition into the final logo mark. I know that the logo mark is made up of those four different shapes and those are all rectangles. So, I think that we could use this bottom structure bar right here, kind of designed off of the storyboards that we created and kind of have that overlap all of these other bars and have everything collapsed underneath of that bottom structure. So, what I think would be cool though is to kind of switch of the elements, switch all the design of this bottom structure just to make it more interesting similar to how we did for this striped bar right here, and make this bar as it kind of transitions up and over all these other shapes, have this bar transition into an outlined shape. The guiding object in that sense would then be guiding the motion and really providing the momentum for that bottom structure to kind of overlap and collapse these bars. So, we can have that transition element into the final logo mark. So, we're going to start that right as this guiding object kind of comes from the bottom to the top as if it's kind of bringing this over. But I want to change this into an outlined shape. So, what we're going to do that is I'm going to have this kind of collapse on itself. So, I'm going to select just these two bottom lines right here, make sure I'm selected on the layer. I'm just going to have this kind of select right there. So, now you'll see as it kind of comes up and over, the bottom bar is kind of collapsing on itself, but I want that to be Easy Ease. So, the motion of that bottom bar kind of collapses as the circle comes from here down to here. So, what I'm going to do is I'm just going to select these two, go into my graph editor and I'm just going to have that happen here at the end portion. So, now as it comes up and over, it kind of collapses in on itself and as it collapses in on itself, actually I want to do a complete new object. So, what I'm going to give it that complete new object because I'm actually going to cut this shape into two different shapes right at the playhead. To do that, you hold shift command D and that'll cut it right at the different and it'll make two different shapes, but it'll cut it right there. So, now I have another shape that I can work with. So, this other shape I know that I wanted it to be the outline and I know I want it to be the same width as this, which I can click on one of these shapes right here and see that's an eight pixel width. So, I can go to the new shape that I've just created off of that layer down there. I can make that outline just by clicking here, clicking there, hitting A and then now I can change the fill to where there is a fill because I wanted to overlap all of these. So, I want that fill to be, yes, but I want the fill to be white. So, I want the fill to be white and that I know that I want this to go over all these other bars. What I'm going to do, is I'm hold command and the right bracket and that'll allow me to move this shape up and over all the other layers. So, now when I go in and I click U, I have this path right here and what I can do since I'm starting a new layer, I can delete all these old key frames that I've made for this layer that's down here. I can literally go down here and I can have as that motion is up there. I want this to start overlapping all these shapes, so what I'm going to do is I'm going to select these two top key frames just by clicking and dragging, holding Shift and Arrow key just to give me a little bit out of there and then I'm just going to drag it up and over just like so. So, now when we watch this guy you'll see that we've created something magical. All right. When you make a transition like this it's great to have the Easy Ease because it kind of allows the imperfection of that transition point to kind of go unnoticed. So, what I'm going to do is I'm just going to go to that new shape, I'm going to click I to make sure I'm at the beginning of this new shape that I selected, I'm going to select those two key frames go into the graph editor. Once again we've got a nice Easy Ease, but I want that motion to happen really quickly right here. So, just as before, I'm just going to drag that over, and boom you'll see that we have a little bit more momentum around there, but that's almost too much momentum. It'll be too much. So, we're just going to have that kind of be aligned with there, with the motion of the circle and right there it's looking pretty nice. Once again, don't worry about polishing. You think too much, try to move forward and get yourself some momentum. So, what I think would be nice considering that the mark is made up of that teal color is to, although we're having this box kind of collapse everything, I think it would be nice to have the teal kind of come from the bottom as well. So, to introduce that we could just have that start as the same shape as this shape, but just have it start a little bit later. So, what I'm going to do is I'm going to select this layer and I'm just going to click Command D to now duplicate this layer. Make sure that it's on top of the orange layer that we've just created, the outline layer. But this color since I know that's going to be teal, what's going here change the color to maybe a nice cyan teal color. Then we're going to make sure that color is going to be a fill of teal and that is going to have no stroke and then what's going to happen is we're going to have a kind of come up and over. But I wanted to kind of almost be delayed. So, to do that we wanted to kind of be a little bit delayed like this. So, you'll see that what's happening is that since we took that stroke off of that shape right there, you can see the outline from the layer below it. So, what we're going to do is we're just going to go in there. We're just going to make this a little bit wider than the layer beforehand, and I'm just using my arrow keys and selecting these to kind of go over. Now, you're going to have to do that on the next key frame as well. So, right now I'm just expanding the box just so it covers up the layer that is underneath of it. Beautiful. All right. Great. So what we can do is, we can actually have this box not go as high as it goes. Now we can see with what we're working with. Now you can see that we're getting a rectangle toward this rectangle is going to lead us into that next phase which is going to be showing and building out that mark which is made up of those four rectangles. One thing to do to add to the overall motion is to add a type of characteristic to the bars that are being collapsed upon. So have those bars all fold in on each other, or maybe you just this left one and this right one, maybe they get a little bit thinner as this bar comes in almost as it's squeezed underneath this giving building characteristics around these shapes through motion. So about halfway through here. Let's go ahead and throw these guys. Let's just make these. So what we're going to do is we're going to click these two layers right here, the overlapping layers. For the time being, we're going to turn them off and to do that you just want to hit this little icon over here. So then they're still there we haven't deleted them, but we've just turned them off and I'm going to adjust the width into these shapes so that they get pushed over just a little bit. So when the shapes go over them they almost look like they're collapsing in on each other. Now we're going to turn back on the two layers that we just turned off and I will see that we have a little bit more reflection on those things as they're coming up and over. As another way of set the shapes to overlap and collapse the bars, you can do a little bit of refining. This is where you can start to bring in those layers that we set aside. The mark to align the mark and the mark's width because this rectangle right here is what we're going to transition into the mark width. So what I'm going to do is I'm going to go over here and I'm going to select the mark that I have. Since this mark right now is aligned with the logotype that we have, what I'm going to do is I'm actually going to duplicate this. So I'm going to select all the pieces of the mark and we click "Command D" and I'm going to move that up, and then I'm going to click "Shift Command C" and Shift Command C creates a Pre-comp. So Pre-comp within aftereffects allows you to create another composition within a composition. So this is if you want to group multiple layers together, in our case we have a mark that we don't really want to move, individual elements around we just want to move everything. You can do this either by creating a null or you can do it by creating Pre-comp. For this lesson and for this scenario, we're going to be doing a Pre-comp. We're just going to call this fathom_Mark. Then what happens when we create fathom_Mark you'll see that it created a new composition within our project folder. So what we're going to do is I'm just going to move that over here. So now you'll see that it aligns and I'm going to move holding Shift Command and right bracket. I'm going to move that all the way to the top of our composition. I'm just going to move that. This is just for rough. Just to see the size that we're working with. I'm just going to move that there. So one thing that you can do, is you click "Y" and Y will change the access points. So I can move the axis right in the middle there. So if I need to change the size of this by clicking "S", I can then click "S" and it'll change the size to the fathom_Mark. So now that we've Pre-comp the mark brought it over into the composition that we're over and see the timeline area that we're working within. You can pull up the grid and make sure that we're in the center of the composition. I mean one thing to do to give this use this as your guide is to go, once you have the Pre-comp selected go into effects, and go to "Fill" just type in fill. What this will do is allow you to change the color of the entire composition, and since the only layer we have in there as the mark, this will just give you a guide. So when you're working within this you can see what you're working with since they're the same color. So now once have our guiding layer in front of TO shape that comes up and over, I know that I want the TO with match that of the mark that we put in the center. So what I'm going to do is I'm going to select that TO, select the path, I'm going to just a couple of frames afterward, and then going to just adjust the path so that it matches up with the mark here. Now, when we play you'll see that it gives if we could be the startup work area, you can see that goes from one to the next one. We want to make that a little bit more fluid, so it all happens at once. So we're going to select all of these and we're going into our graph editor, and it's not fluid right now because it's going to complete zero right here. What we want to do is we just want to select that keyframe that we just made, and we want to move that upward. It doesn't go to complete zero but almost has one complete motion. When fluid motion, and I almost want that motion happen a little bit sooner, so I'm just moving it over just a little bit to the left. Maybe having it be a little bit quicker. So just having the motion happen right around here. Maybe even moving this guy with this all the motion is happening right here. Now, we're getting more of a fluid motion which is looking better. So now what I'm going to do is I'm also going to just that bottom layer to reflect the top layer as well. But what we can do since that is going over we can almost have this after this one covers up everything. We can literally just delete everything that's underneath of it. So what I'm going to do is I'm not going to delete it but I'm going to cut everything. I'm going to select that bottom white outlined layer. I'm going to hold option and hold right bracket, and that'll cut out there, and I'm going to select all of the bar graph layers that we've been adjusting. I'm going to select them all even the normal layer that we created I'm going to hold option and I'm going to click right bracket too then cut it right there. So now when we play this you'll see that when it goes up and over we don't have any of those layers that are behind it. But one thing that I want to note is that we want to have almost think as if the guiding object that we're using for the mark right here as if this were to be collapsed on itself we would have a rectangle that was a little bit thinner than what we're working with right now. So I almost want that layer to be as thin as that is going to be. I'm going to bring that down to around here as well. Thinking of these two objects, this one down here and this one up here were to be collapsed how would it look. Now if we watch it and play it you see that we're getting this emotion of everything collapsing on each other. Once again, it doesn't have to be perfect. It just have to convey the idea which are going with because we're then going to change it even further and polish it. Now that we have lined everything to the mark into the dimensions of the mark that we want to be able to use in providing a little bit of a scale change, what we're going to do is we can disable this top guide layer and we can extend the circle. So extra circle extends pass this. Soon after working through the brand element and condensing everything into this one solo object, we're going to continue the rotation with the circle and have this to come all the way around and really start to build out the logo lockup. 10. Refining Transition II: So now that we've worked through the animation of the brand element really using the conductor to convey that motion, we're going to then try to bring the conductor full circle into now this solo shape that we've created that then it's going to build out the logomark. So to do that, what we want to is create almost a quick motion with the circle to where almost it whips around when it's sitting at the top here, and it whips around to the middle here and hits this rectangle that we've just created. As it hits this rectangle, that momentum of that circle is going to push the rectangle over to the left which will align it with the mark, the logomark within the logo lockup. So what we're going to do, we're going to go to the circle that we have. We're going to have this whip around right here. To do that, we're going to do a couple of different keyframes. We're going to do one right there. Then, we're going to do one that's right about there. So, now, if you see what we have for motion, I'm going to click B to make my work area a little bit shorter, we have something that is getting there. So, now, we're going to go into, once we have the layers figured out, we're going to add the slope two-layer. So clicking G on the keyboard and clicking it, we're going to click the layer to be able to get the anchor points to then be able to adjust the slope that we're working with. Holding down option, we're going to adjust this one so it has a little bit more of a slow count going in, and using the arrow keys here and shift to move it up and down. We're just trying to get it to where this path looks like it would fall right into that new shape that we just created. Now, let's see what we've got. So, now, the overall path is right but the speed is off and that's because we've got EZ layers, and so we're going to go into the "Graph Editor" once more. Just as we've done before, we're going to select these two and grabbing the anchor points. We're going to just drag them up so almost they flow into each other like this. We don't want that to stop as much, so we're going to also have this come up as well. You'll see that now we're starting to get somewhat more of this momentum in motion. So there you can see. Although it looks a little bit rough, it's still the main motion is happening here because that motion is where it goes through all the objects and then it kind of slows down, and almost comes to a full stop. Down here, when it comes to the top, and then as it gets right here, it slows down but then it shoots up and really hits the fast momentum value as it comes around that corner. That's really what we're looking for. So we're going to get out of the graph editor. We're going to put a scale change on this layer and also a position change. So we're going to go up to the layer. Since we have adjusted the path on this layer, the center axis point is different now but that's something that we can easily change by going to our "Motion", "Plug-in" and clicking the center access. Now, when we do a quick scale change as this path collapses on itself, we'll do a scale change right around there. We'll click "Command", "Option S". We'll do from a 100 to about 80 percent. We'll cut that out, and then we'll also do position change. So to do that, we'll do "Shift", "Option P", and since this was an object that we had duplicated before, we have the position keyframes from the past, so we can actually delete all those because we don't need those anymore, because they're on another object. We can have that position then as that circle comes through and hits it. We're going to have that. Just using "Shift" and the arrow keys, we're going to just push that over to where we think the mark will rest. So, now, we have everything moving, but obviously the timing is a bit off, so what we're going to do is we're just going to move over these two keyframes that we just made to align it with the timing of the circle. So, now, I'm going to adjust the graph editor of the position change. So right as that circle hits, I want it to shoot over to the left, so we're just going to make that more of a easy out. Don't worry about the circle. We're just going to delete the circle when it gets underneath. As soon as it gets underneath the rectangle, we can go ahead and delete that. So here's another instance where you can see that guiding object coming over and once again controlling the motion and really pushing objects and adding motion to other objects. So, now, to get the size and position correct, what I'm going to do is I'm once again going to now pull over the final. So, since we have all the keyframes up here, what thing you can do is you can click Command-A to select all the layers and click U and U will collapse all everything so it is little bit more neat to work in. What I'm going to do is I'm just going to move all these layers over to align them to the shape that I just moved. So I want to get this right in the middle of the marks, so what I'm going to do is I'm going to click U on that rectangle that we keep on pushing around. I'm going to go to that layer. So what I want to do is I want to align that shape that we've been moving around to the center of the marks. So what I'm going to do is I'm going to grab this shape and I'm going to make sure that the play head is at that position keyframe and I'm just going to move that over to around where the center of that mark is. Now, let me play this back. We'll have that circle come around and move it to the right spot to where that mark needs to be. Now, you'll see that the shape is a little bit wider than the mark itself, so what we're going to do is I'm just going to adjust the path of the mark as it moves over. It will also get a little bit thinner too. So what we're going to do is we're going to adjust that. So, now, since the guiding object has been eliminated and it's pushed this final shape into its final position, the logomark is really what is controlling the animation. So what I'm really trying to do is construct the shape so it forms around the two centerpieces of the mark. So what I'm actually going to have us do is I'm going to have the shapes right here that make up the mark, as this slides into position, I'm going to have them expand as well. So I'm going to then select all the shapes that make up the mark which we've organized in Illustrator, which are down here, and I'm going to put a position change on them so they all open up as if they were all collapsed. So I'm going to do "Shift", "Option P" to put a position change on all of them. I'm going to move those keyframes that I just made over a couple of frames because I know that's where I want it to end up at. Then, I am going to just move them up until they match with the rectangle that just slid into place. You'll start to see what we're doing here. This can be rough and refined at the end. So then, we'll go to the top one and we'll move that one down as well. So now, if we were to roughly play this, and then we're going to cut this shape. So this is that rectangle shape that just was sliding in. We're going to cut this shape right when the mark starts to expand. I'm going to get it right to where I want to cut it. I'm going to hold "Option", "Right Bracket" to cut it right there. Now, we have a rough idea of what we're working with here. So now when you zoom out, and let's play the whole thing, you can start to see that what we've created is a motion bumper. 11. Building Out the Type: So looking through this now and knowing that the next steps is going to be bringing the type out from underneath the rectangle. The rectangle scale change happens a little bit too soon, because I need to have a little bit of the width on this shape to be able to bring out the type. So what I'm going to do, is I'm just going to go back up to that scale change that I did on that initial rectangle, and then I'm going to have that be a little bit more of an ease into that final shape. So I'm going to select those two, which are two linear points right now, and I'm going to easy ease them. I'm going to go into my graph editor here, and I'm going to just adjust them. So the main motion happens towards the end, and it settles down in there. Changing the work area here, clicking B and N, and seeing how we can make that adjustment a little bit slower than what it is right now. So what we're trying to do is create the pacing so we have enough time to bring in the typeface underneath of that shape, underneath of the shape, underneath that rectangle that we've created. I've adjusted the time just a little bit, and we're going to dive into the typeface. I mean, start to build out the typeface. So building other typeface and what I wanted to do is work with the hard edge of the typeface. I'm going to turn off the grid for now, and then work with the hard edge of the typeface and almost have them be drawn out. But then also use some of the elements like the F. Maybe not have the F or maybe the H draw out completely, but just slightly maybe almost have a little bit of a scale change. So throughout this process, we are going to be using masks, scale change and a little bit of position to be able to build out this entire typeface. So we dive right into that. We want it to appear a little bit right around here. So a little bit after the mark get settled, we want to start to build out, and this is something that we always can change afterwards. So I'm just going to have those all selected and click the left bracket. Then I'm going to start to do the things that I can do with the paths of the shapes. So I know that for the F because it is very linear shape, I can work with the path. So I'm going to go into the path of the shape and start to add some key frames. So what I'm really trying to do here with the letter forms is I'm having them, I want them to really be able to grow as the motion goes on. So what I'm doing right here is, I'm utilizing some of them better more linear and working with their path. Then I'll also be working with others on using masks over the shapes to be able to show that as if they're being drawn out. For the F, I'm going to concentrate on just the path of the F and just collapse the two crossbars right here, just give a little bit of animation to this. Since the F will be the first thing that pops up, we don't have to add too much motion to that, and that's something you can design for yourself if you want to have a little bit more motion to it. So for the F for now, that's the only motion that we're going to really do for it. Let's dive into the A and show how many use masks to really draw out the A type form. So what I'm going to do is, I'm basically going to select the A and I'm going to, so to make a mask around the shape, I'm going to click the layer and I'm going to hold Shift, Command, End and that will make a new mask around the shape. You'll see that a new bounding box was just created around the shape. Now, if I click on the layer that I want to adjust the mask and I click m, it'll pull up the mask layer underneath the layer. Just like a lot of other things with paths and positions, I'm able to also start keyframes with this. So what I'm going to be doing is I'm going to be drawing this out with the mask. So to do this, I'm going to start the timer. I'm going to start the stopwatch, and then I'm going to adjust the mask as if I'm going to draw this out almost frame-by-frame. There's a couple of different ways to do something similar to this to where you draw out a shape. I've just learned that I'm able to get a little bit more specific with this type of method. So what I'm doing is I'm just setting up the first frame that I want to initiate this drawing process and almost having the a, b drawn out like this. Then come up and then come back down, and finish out down here. So for this, you really want to think about how many frames do you want for the entire form. So I know that like from an easy standpoint, if I want this top half right here to be a little bit quicker, I'm going to have less frames. So if I want the bottom half to be a little bit slower, I'm going to have more frames. So what I'm going to do is, I want this to initiate really quickly, so I'm only going to have around three to four frames between this starting point and this center point. So to do that, what I'm going to do is, I'm literally just going to zoom in here a little bit. Holding command and your arrow key, you can jump frame by frame. So I'm just going to jump one frame over, and I am going to just grab this mask. I am going to just move the mask and start to have this thing up here. So now, this is something to where you really need to get a little bit be patientwith this and work with the form here. So now clicking G on your keyboard, will pull up the pen tool and the pen tool will allow you to make other keyframes on the other points on the mask that you have, so you can adjust it as you go along. So then once again, I'm going to hold Command and arrow key to go one more frame forward after I have that one set, and I'm going to again just keep on revealing this a here. So now, if we replay what we just did, you can see that we have a little bit of the, we're working with paths on the f and then we're working with a little bit of that, we're working with masks on the a, and for the rest of the type we're going to be building it out with those two methods. So now, if we take a step back and look at what we just created, we used some of the masks and some of the path changes to really reveal this type as that logo markets built out. You can see what we got here, it's looking pretty awesome. You can see that we're definitely using that guiding object as the momentum and then transferring that momentum at the end to the rectangle, which then builds out the mark and fed them as a whole. We're getting a lot of speed variation, which also reference back to the brand as well. So the last step that we're going to do is, we're going to figure out a way to collapse the logo animation that we just created. So it all comes into seamless loop into the final circle. 12. Creating the Final Loop: All right, so now that we have the full complete rough animation using the guiding objects to build out the entire animation, going through the brand element, and then leading to the final logo lockup, what we're going to do now is take the logo lockup, collapse a logo lockup to be able to get back to that guiding object. So what I'm going to do is I'm going to select the layers that have all the animation on it that I want to pre-comp and add into a single layer, which is going to be all the logo type layers and then also the block layer of that expanding TO block that came over all of the bar graphs. And then I'm going to click "Hold." I'm going to click "Shift," "Command," "C" to create a pre-comp and I'm going to call this Logo Lockup. And I'm going to create a new layer, and it's going to create a new layer, and when we play it back, nothing's changed because all it's done is it's taken that animation that we just created, and it's put it into a pre-comp. So now what I'm going to do is I'm going to do something called Time Remapping. So timing remapping allows you to change the duration of a certain clip. So to do that you hold down "Option, " "Command," "T." And then what's going to happen is that you're going to see that you now have another keyframe on your timeline. So that keyframe is really the start point of the duration of that specific clip. For us it is the beginning of the animation of building out that Fathom logo lockup. So what I'm going to do is I'm just going to scrub through here and find out where that Fathom mark stops animating. I think it's around three seconds. So right around three seconds, I'm going to make another keyframe right there. And so now I have the complete duration of that motion that I'm going to be reversing, and I'm going to take this beginning keyframe right here. I'm going to copy just by clicking on the keyframe and clicking Command C. I'm just going to go a couple frames forward and I'm going to click Command V. Now what will happen is that whole process of what I just created will then reverse. So now if we play this just roughly, you'll see what we're working with here. I'll build out and they'll all expand on to each other. So you'll see that what we're working towards this all expanding and then getting us back to a central circle. So right now is getting us back to a central rectangle, because that's what we created. But what we can do is we can actually have that stop right around here. What we're going to do is we're going to curate a keyframe right around there. We're going to go ahead and delete this third one that we just made. Now if we play it, we can see what we're working with. And then it's going to stop right there. So what we're going to do is I'm going to show you how to do a quick transition from this rectangle and creating a new rectangle to then transfer that into that beginning circle that we started out with. So one thing that I want to note is that we want to have the logo. So right now the logo lockup is being built, and then right away it's being deconstructed. It's good to have this logo lockup maybe sit for a half a second to a second just so the viewer can take it in, the client can take it in, or whoever's viewing it. So what we're going to do is we're just going to copy this second keyframe which is the logo lockup being completely built out. We're going to copy that and we're going to go just a couple of frames forward and we're just going to paste it. Now this will provide a hold frame for us. So between these two frames, no animation will happen, and then between these two frames is where the reversing animation will happen. So now if we play it, you'll see that it stops for a couple seconds, and then reverses on itself and goes back to that rectangle. So I'm actually going to make that a little bit shorter. Let's just play it one more time here. So let's make that a little bit shorter. So the animation doesn't look exactly like the one that we just created, just in reverse. What we're going to do is we're going to apply easy use to these last few keyframes and that'll allow us to then go into the graph editor and allow the motion to be a little bit quicker than it's actually building out. This will give us a good transitional element from that rectangle to the guiding object, which is going to be that circle. So, now if we play it back, you'll see it's a little bit slower, and then it goes really quick into collapsing on itself. So now what we want to do is right around here, we want to create a new shape. So what am I actually going to create is I'm going to create this exact same rectangle. You can either do this by clicking Command E, or you can do the same thing that we've been doing and go up here to the rectangle tool and create the exact same rectangle that we've been using and that's exactly what we're going to do. It's important when you make this rectangle that you don't want to have any of the layer selected. If I have one of the layer selected and I go ahead and draw the rectangle, what's going to happen is it's going to create a mask over that layer that we just pre-composed. That's can get a little bit confusing. So you just want to make sure that you have no "Layers" selected just by clicking into the gray space of your timeline. And so once you've clicked it into gray space and you have this rectangle selected, what we're going to do is we're just going to trace over this and you'll see After Effects is starting to make a new layer for us, and we're just going to trace over this just like that. Now this is where you really want to be able to use your grid, because we know that that circle that we created in the very beginning of the animation was directly in the middle of the composition. So one thing that we can do is just work with the grid to line that up as well. So now what we're going to do is we're going to cut this shape that we just made by holding "Option" in the right bracket. We're going to cut it to the play head, so it starts exactly where we want it to start. Then we're going to go into the path of this rectangle, because we're going to make this rectangle into a circle. So while we're going to do that, we're going to be using the path, and then we're going to be using something called "Round Corners". So don't worry about round corners right now, but for the path basically what we want to happen, since this is all kind of coming from the left to the right. And you'll see that the round corners have already kind of rounded out those corners and that's just to help us transition into that circle. So since it's coming from the left to the right, what we want to do is actually have the left side of this rectangle slide in to make this rectangle more of a square that's in the middle of the composition. To do this, we can play around with it and make sure that both of the sides are even. And so now what we're going to do is we're going to cut the pre-comp layer that we had created before with reverse time remapping on it. We're going to cut that right here, because that's exactly where that new rectangle shape comes in. I'm going to just going to cut that by holding option in the right bracket. This layer right here we can get rid of this. This was that original red Fathom mark, and we can just move that to the bottom by holding Shift Command and left bracket to move that all the way down to the bottom. So now what we're going to be looking at if we display this really roughly, you'll see that when this collapses on itself, we have that rectangle transferring into a square, which is really going to help us get back into the circle. So what we're going to do is obviously, we want to make this a little bit quicker. So we're going to once again apply an easy ease to it, and adjust it within the graph editor. Remember to always save just in case. So now we're going to jump into the graph editor here and we're just going to make this. So, this is a really quick motion in the beginning just like that, and to have it almost build out. What we can do is we can make this even shorter over duration, so it happens a little bit quicker. Then as that hits, we can work with the round corners. So what I'm going to do round corners is automatically set when you apply it, and how I applied that remember, is just by clicking this little ad right here. You can do that a couple of different ways if you have your layer selected, you can do it within the contents right here, or you can do it up at the top right here just by clicking "Add, " you click into here, and you just click on "Round Corners," and that's going to add it underneath your rectangle path and that's going to start with a value of 10. So as you can see if I do Shift Command H to get rid of that bounding box, you can see that it's already rounded right there. So what I'm going to do is I'm going to create a keyframe, and I'm going to make that at a value of zero. Then I'm going to go a couple frames forward. So I'm going to make that a value of a 100. So you'll see when I change the value to a 100, it made all the corners round, but it's a little bit of an oval and you can just go back into it, and just by selecting on the path, and just adjusting the circle to how we want it. So I'm going to make this as much of a circle as we can and look in a little bit better there. And so now we can see roughly, we have this thing transferring into a circle. So now what we're going to do is we're going to put a position change on it to get it to a place to where it jumps, follows the motion of this rectangle. So what I'm going to do is I'm actually going to adjust not the end portion, but I'm going to adjust the beginning portion. So what I'm going to do is I'm going to have that beginning portion circle start a little bit more in the center. So, if I go back down to that circle, that original circle layer that we started with, and I click "U" to pull up it's keyframes and I see where the position starts. You'll see that the position actually starts way down here. So what I'm going to do is I'm actually just going to raise that up just a little bit. So we have the position starting a little bit more in the center rather than the bottom of the frame. Now, if I were to collapse my workspace and click "N" right around here or right before, this completely becomes a circle and maybe right as it becomes a circle and to see what the rough animation that we have going on now. So you see that we're almost there. It's one of those things to work now it's where you can go back and you can refine, since we had it to where it was a scale change. It's such a simple thing where you can go back to the original and we can just totally delete that scale change, because since we are going for more of a looping animation, we won't need that scale change. So now you'll see that this circle starting all the way down there. So what we're going to do is we're just going to move the circle up to right around where our circle begins. This is the beginning circle and we're just going to scrub through here and see what we're working with. So we really want this beginning circle to pop into place as it loops back around. So right now it should pop up. It popped down. Let's see what kind of looping animation we have now. So now without the scale change, you can see that it really loops well. You're being able to tell the story. And you have your first run through of a logo animation. 13. Exporting and Final Thoughts: All right. So, now that we have our animation all built out, the last step is to clean up the composition and then go through the exporting phase. So, what I'm going to do is I'm just going to clean up the composition, and one thing to note is that how we're setting the duration of the composition in the very beginning of the class. That's something too that you can adjust right now if you really wanted to. So, I can go "Command K" and pull it up. So, I set it to 20 seconds but really we're not going past five. So, I can go ahead and set this to zero six, and you'll see that it adjusted to around six seconds. So, what I'm going to do is I'm going to then go to here and I'm going to start cutting everything so everything lines up with this work space that I have because I know that that's the perfect loop. So, I'm going to hold down "Shift" and the right bracket to go ahead and cut that, and same with this layer down here. This is just to make everything more neat if you ever have to come back and make adjustments. Then save, and now when you export, one thing to note is that the export is only going to happen within the work area that you have set. So, if I were to set it all the way over here, it would export empty space of nothing happening. So, we want to make sure that exports right where that's going to loop. So, since that's the perfect loop and we have the work area set and everything's more clean than it was before, we're going to go up to "File", we're going to go to "Export", and we're going to "Add to Render Queue". So, that will pull up another panel and within this panel, you'll have a couple of settings. There's only really two that you need to worry about. The first one is the output module. So, we're going ahead and click "Lossless", and we're going to make sure that it's QuickTime and then we're going to go into "Formatting options". We're going to go into the "Video Codec" and we're actually going to make that Video Codec Apple ProRes 422. Now, the good thing about Apple ProRes is that it's an uncompressed version of your file. So, therefore if you're able to use this or send this off to a client, they could use this and re-export and not have any quality loss. This is something that I usually send to clients but then I also send an H264 file too which is a compressed file that would be good for social media and videos or YouTube or Vimeo. Click "Okay" on that and then we're going to do the output too. So, it says "not set yet", so what we're going to do is click that. Then, we're going into that master folder that we have created. So, Fathom Motion Design, we're going to go directly into that. Then, we're going to make another folder called Export. Let's choose "Fathom Motion Design" and then let's also put what it is. So, we're going to make sure that we know that this one is a progress file and we'll go ahead and click "Save". So, now we have that labeled, we have it under QuickTime and we're going ahead and click "Render". So, now the animation will render, let's you know it's done. So, now when we open up our folder, we'll see that if we go into the export, we have our fathom progress file. We can go ahead and play that and play it back, and see it. So, that's it. You saw everything, from receiving a design from a designer or a client, going through the storyboarding process all the way through the animation, and then to the final export for a full logo animation lockup. One thing that I want to take away from this class is that this is a class that can be used as a stepping stone to really be able to get the fundamentals of motion design and really learn how to convey emotion, characteristics, momentum, all throughout a branding experience. So, if you end up creating something in your own using this class, feel free to upload it to the project gallery so we can check it out. So, thank you for joining the class. I hope that it really was useful for you and I'm excited to see what you-all create. 14. Explore More Classes on Skillshare: way.