Animating Liquid Trails in Adobe Animate | Marvin Te | Skillshare

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Animating Liquid Trails in Adobe Animate

teacher avatar Marvin Te, Cel Animator & Motion Designer

Watch this class and thousands more

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Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Lessons in This Class

20 Lessons (3h 45m)
    • 1. Introduction

      1:29
    • 2. Basic Terms You Should Know

      2:51
    • 3. Animate UI

      14:36
    • 4. Let's Try The Straight Ahead Method

      8:19
    • 5. Acceleration and Deceleration

      12:43
    • 6. Animating in a Spiral Path

      9:32
    • 7. The Main Blob

      7:33
    • 8. Liquid Trails

      18:20
    • 9. Your Class Project

      4:22
    • 10. Planning Your Animation

      10:13
    • 11. Entrance: Morph in

      30:49
    • 12. Entrance: Add Main Blob

      13:24
    • 13. Entrance: Add Liquid Trails

      19:35
    • 14. Entrance: Animate In The Details

      11:45
    • 15. Exit: Morph Out

      20:27
    • 16. Exit: Add Main Blob

      10:21
    • 17. Exit: Add Liquid Trails

      16:24
    • 18. Exit: Animate Out The Details

      5:36
    • 19. Exporting Your Animation

      4:59
    • 20. Final Thoughts

      1:23
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About This Class

In this class I will teach you how to animate a liquid blob effect frame by frame. You see these mostly in motion design projects and while this is an advanced technique I'll teach it in a way that beginners could understand. I also have designed this class so that it's easy to follow.

Here's what we'll cover:

- Straight ahead method

- Acceleration and Deceleration

- Adding main blobs and liquid trails

- How to animate using a path guide

- Entrance animation and exit animation.

We'll be using Adobe Animate but feel free to use a different software if you want to. You can use the concepts taught in this class regardless of what software you'll use.

Are you excited? Me too! Let's begin!

Meet Your Teacher

Teacher Profile Image

Marvin Te

Cel Animator & Motion Designer

Teacher


Hello, I'm Marvin. I'm the creative director and owner of Plainly Simple, a motion design studio based in the Philippines. I started my animation career way back in 2011. 

When I started, believe me that I was really bad at this and it took long before I understood the fundamentals of animation. I had to learn all of this on my own and over time I was able to get it. Even until now I'm still learning. And my goal with my skillshare classes is to share what I have learned with you. I will teach it in a way that my past beginner self would be able to understand. I hope this would serve as your starting point in your animation journey. 

 

 

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Transcripts

1. Introduction: Hi, I am Marvin Te, I'm an animator and Creative Director, and in this class, we will be animating a liquid blob effect frame by frame. You frequently see this in motion design projects. If ever you saw one and thought, Hey, I want to make something like that." Then you're in for a treat because I am going to teach you how. This effect falls under effects animation and usually the classes that features effects animation are geared towards advanced animators. But not to worry, because I'm going to teach it in a way that beginners would be able to understand. We'll start first with something that is easy to grasp like a ball and I will slowly introduce more and more complex topics. By the end of this class, you will be morphing this plant frame by frame. That's actually our class project, to animate the morph in and morph out of this plant using the liquid blob effect. This class is for beginners. It's also perfect for illustrators who want to get into animation and illustrators who want to bring their illustrations to life. Also, if you are an animation enthusiast and you don't know where to start, then you can consider this class as a starting point. Let's begin. I'm really excited what you can come up with. 2. Basic Terms You Should Know: In this lesson, we will be going through some basic terms. If you have taken my other animation classes before, or if you already know the key terms, then you may skip this video. But if this is your first introduction to animation, then please stick around. First, what is animation? It's basically the illusion of movement. It's not really moving. It's a series of sequential images shown to you at a certain speed. With it, gives the illusion of movement. You can think of it like a flip book. On one page you draw a certain pose, and on another page you draw a different pose. Flip them back and forth and you'll have an animation. What are frames? You can think of frames like pages in that flip book. Going back to our previous example, this is the drawing on frame 1, and this is the drawing on frame 2. We have two pages or two frames on this animation. A typical animation sequence has more than just two frames like this one. FPS, or frames per second simply means how many frames is being shown to you in a second. Twenty four FPS would mean 24 frames is being shown to you in a span of one second and 30 FPS would mean that 30 frames and it's being shown to you in one second. As you can see, the higher the FPS, the smoother the animation is. But it would also mean you need to draw more. One thing to remember though, is that good animation doesn't necessarily mean more frames. You can create a good animation even with just a few frames. It doesn't mean that if you're working on a low frame rate that it would automatically look bad. Eye for one and more comfortable animating at 24 FPS other than 30. For this class we will be using 24 FPS. What is animating on one's or two' s? Animating on two's would mean that one drawing would consume two frames. Animating on one's would mean that one drawing would consume only one frame. In a 24 frames per second, animating on one's would mean you need to draw 24 drawings for one second animation. Animating on two's on a 24 frames per second would mean you only need to draw on every other frame. Meaning the total drawings that you need to make for a one second animation would only be 12. For this class, we'll be animating on two's and our frame rate is 24 FPS. 3. Animate UI: In this lesson, I will be walking you through the Animate UI. The software that we're going to use for this class is Animate. But if you are currently more comfortable with another animation software, then please feel free to do so. But if you're going to use Animate, then this video will be helpful for you. I'm currently using the latest version of Adobe Creative Cloud, and this is the latest version of Animate. This is the first screen that we're going to see once we open the Animate software. To create a new file, click the create new button and that will open up the window right here. We have different presets that we can see right here and we're going to use this full HD. The resolution for that is the 1,920 by. You could also manually input the resolution right here and this is the frame rate. Make sure you are using 24 frames per second, so make sure this is 24. For the platform type, you can disregard that for now, and then if you're done, click "Create". Now this is the whole Animate UI. In the upper right section right here, this icon, this is the workspaces. If you click that, you will be given different options, there's animator, basic, and classic. What this does are the different layouts for the UI, so currently I'm on the small screen. If we click the animator workspace, it's going to change the layout. If I'm going to click "Classic", it's going to change the layout. So that you and I would be looking at the same thing, just choose small screen. I'm currently using a small screen, my screen is a bit small. Even if you're not using a smaller screen, I would suggest you still use this layout so that you and I would be the same. We'll be looking at the same thing. The one on the left side here, these are our tools. This is where the brush tool is and other tools that you're going to need. This one here at the center, this big white rectangle, that's our Canvas. We could zoom out. This is our whole canvas. The one at the bottom is our timeline. Currently, we have one blank keyframe and I'm going to discuss that more further later on. Now to draw on this, we will select our brush tool. The brush tool is this one right here or the shortcut for that is b and we could now draw on this. I'm going to undo this. If you want to look into the properties of the set tools, so currently we are on the brush tool. If you want to look into the properties of that, in the right side here there are properties. If we click that and we're currently on the brush tool, so these are the settings of my brush tool. You can adjust the size or you could change the shape. You can make it a square, if we're going to zoom in. We're using a square shape. I'm going to click the properties and change this back to the circle. We could also increase and decrease the brush size right here. The shortcut for increasing and decreasing the brush size, it's going to be the right bracket to increase the brush size. If you want to decrease the brush size, it's the left bracket on your keyboard. With the Animate UI, you can also adjust the sizes of the panel. For example here, I can adjust this. For example, if your screen is too small and it's cutting off below it, for example, right here, you can just adjust the size of that panel so that it would now fit, the same with the other panels. The timeline could also increase the size or move it up or down. I'm going to go back to my brush tool. If you want to change the color, you could click this icon right here, this red color, and choose any color that you want, so now it's blue or cyan. If you want a custom color that isn't in the default swatches, you could click this icon. If you click that, it's going to open this window and then you could choose any color that you want. Now I will introduce the frame, so currently we have one blank frame. Think of it like the frames are pages. Currently, we have one page to draw on. I'm going to change this back to red. Currently, if you look closely here, that circle is black. But once I create any drawing, for example, a circle, that one is black, meaning that frame has already a drawing. It's not anymore an empty page. If we are going to add a new page, the shortcut for that is F7. Once you're at the timeline, if I click "F7", what that does is it added a new frame. Or you could think of it like now we have two pages. This is page 1 and page 2. I could draw here a different drawing that I want, for example, and then I could go back and forth. The shortcut to go back and forth in the timeline, you don't have to always click on this. The shortcut for that is the comma and a period on your keyboard. If you're going to click the period, it's going to go forward in time and if you click the comma, it's going to go back in time. Now we can flip back and forth for our animation. If you want to delete this, you could just click this one and then click "Delete", and that will not delete the frame, it will just delete the drawing. If you look here, now I have a blank keyframe. What if we want to expose the frame? If you click this and the shortcut for exposing a frame is F5. If I click "F5" once, what this does is that one drawing now consumes two frames. This is frame 1 and frame 2, but it's still the same drawing. One drawing is consuming two frames. Now let's just draw anything here, for example, a circle. Currently it's one frame and one drawing. If I'm going to click here, I'm going to press "F5". What this does is for two frames, the one drawing is not consuming the two frames. We will be animating on twos so what you will see is that one drawing should consume two frames. Now, we have three frames and one drawing is exposed for two frames, and I'm going to go back and forth, so that is the animation. The next that I'm going to introduce is the onion skin. If you look at here this icon, if you click that it will turn on the onion skin. The onion skin is an essential tool for animation bit because it will let you see the frames before and after. For example, I'm just going to delete this, and we draw this. Now, we go to the next black frame. Now, this is now the black frame. With the onion skin I could see the frame before it, so that it's easier for us to draw the next frame. If I'm going to click here this one, see I could see the frame before it, making it much easier to animate. Now, if I'm going to go here at the middle, as you can see, we can see two images. If you look at the onion skin right here, the ones that are added with blue color that are the previous frame. The ones that are added with the green color, those are the after frames. I'm just going to draw anything right here. With this, you can also adjust the onion skin up to what point you want to see. For example, here, this are all of the frames after it. Now for the previous frame, currently it's set that we don't see anything, but I could also extend this blue one here so that we could see the frames before it. You have control up to what point you want to see. For example, I'm just moving it just one frame after, and one frame before. If we're going to hold this, hold and then it's going to open this panel. Click the advanced settings, and you'll have here the settings of your onion skin. You could change the starting opacity if this one is too much for you and it's somehow distracting you, you could always lessen the starting opacity. Currently I'm just going to leave this to 50 percent, but feel free to adjust this to what is more comfortable for you. You could even change the color. My previous frames are blue color and my next frames are in the green color. You could also change to this. I could change this to yellow like that, but let me just go back to blue. The blue and green has the standard color for animation. Just stick with that. If you want to preview your animation, the shortcut for that is the Return key or the Enter key, and if you want to export an SWF, the shortcut for that is on a Windows, it's Control Enter. On a Mac, it's Command Enter. Now, we have exported the SWF file. Sometimes when you're working in a team, a different part of the animation production, they would need the SWF file. But for this class, you may not really need the SWF. You don't need to worry about that, but just in case you want to export the SWF file, it's Command Enter on a Mac and Control Enter on a Windows. But for previous preview purposes, you could just click the Enter key. Now to select the drawing, the shortcut for that is V or this icon right here. This is the selection tool or the shortcut is V. Once I'm at the selection tool, now I could click this and I could drag this one. Just in case you want to change the position, then you click the selection tool. If you want to adjust this, for example, scale this up. The shortcut for that is Q, or this icon right here. What that does is once you first need to select your drawing and then press Q, and it will reveal the bounding box. Now, I could make this bigger or smaller. Now, this is just one layer. To create a new layer, you could click this button right here. So if I'm going to click that, now I have two layers. Currently, what we have is we have a black frame that is exposed for this amount of frames. If I'm going to draw something here, for example, a rectangle. What this does is, as you can see, the single drawing of this rectangle is being exposed until here. This is just one drawing so it doesn't animate. For example, you want your drawing to pause in that place, you just need to expose it by clicking the F5 key. As you can see here, the direct angle is gone because if you can look here, this frame only is up to this point. Here it's already nothing. So that we could extend this, we could also click the F5 key and match it with the one below. That is just the basics. Now, what if you want to color your drawing? I'm just going to create a different layer. If you are going to color, for example, we are going to draw a circle here and you want the color that, the shortcut for that is K, and it will be at this field tool, or you can just click this icon right here. The paint bucket tool, I mean. Once we are in the paint bucket tool, just click that and that will color the drawing. But take note that if your drawing is open, for example, right here, I have an open space. This will not color it, it needs to be closed. Now lastly, if you want to erase, there's this eraser tool, or the shortcut for that is E, and you can erase your drawing. 4. Let's Try The Straight Ahead Method: There are two ways to animate. The first method is called straight ahead. It's the more natural way to animate. It simply just means that, for example, let's animate a circle going from left, going to the right. It just simply means that they're going to draw on the first frame. Then since we're going to animate on tools so I'm going to skip a frame. Then proceed here and click up to two. What straight that means is that I'm going to draw an X circle right here and then proceed to the next frame, and then so on until we reach the endpoint. That's what straight ahead simply means. Pose to pose. Let me just undo this and I'm going to show you the pose to pose method. It simply means that you would start with the first frame and then the last frame, and then do the in-betweens later. Using the same example. For example, we are going to animate our circle from left moving to the right. In pose to pose what you do is you start with the first frame. In our timeline right here, we're going to skip a few frames. For example, we're going to stop at frame 20, and I'm going to click "F7". This would be our last frame. Then we're going to draw the endpoint. Now we have the first frame and then the last frame. Currently, the first frame is exposed this amount and this is the last frame. What pose to pose means is once you're done with that, you're going to do the in-betweens later. For example, here I'm going to go to the in-between here and click "F7". We're going to add a new frame there or a new page. Then what pose to pose does as we create a circle right here. Then we're going to do the in-betweens here, and also the in-betweens here. I'm not anymore going to complete this. But you get the idea that once that is done, we're going to do also the in-betweens here. That's what pose to pose simply means. You animate the key poses first, then do the in-betweens later. This is usually the method for character animations that you start with the key poses and then do the in-betweens after. For this class, we'll be using the straight-ahead method. One advantage of pose to pose is that you already know where the endpoint is. Start with the first frame and then the last frame. You have some guide on where your animation would lead to. In straight ahead method, you don't have that, right because you start with the first frame and then just move forward as you go. Sometimes that could be confusing or sometimes you could get lost. What you do is we can create a path guide. Let's do that. Before we do anything, let's try out the straight add method. Open up animate. Once you have this file, create a new layer. This would be our guide. For our guide, I'm just going to create a straight line. I'm holding the Shift key so that it's a straight line on my brush tool. This would be my path. This would be our first exercise. You can make it into a curve if you want. But for me, I'm just going to use a straight line. This would be my guide. I'm just going to click this lock right here so that I don't accidentally draw on it. If you see this rectangle right here, the purple one, you could click that. What that does is this is an outline mode, so click it again to go back to the original one. If I click it so that it's much clearer to see what's below it. Now I'm going to go to layer 1 because this is where we're going to create our animation. Let's try the straight ahead method and we're going to animate on twos. Let's do that. Let's animate a circle from left to right. Let's start first here. Make sure when you do the circle try to make the shape of the circle as consistent as possible. Try to avoid, when it reaches the last frame, it's going to get smaller. Try to maintain the volume of that. We have here and we are going to animate on twos. Let's skip a frame. Let's go directly to frame 3 and click "F7". Notice that when I click "F7", the guide is gone because if you look at the timeline, the guide frame here is only up to this point. Let's expose this. I think we could just expose this through a big amount and just delete that after. I'll show you how to delete the frame. For now, just click this frame and click "F5" and click "F5" multiple times until it reaches one second, that's already good. Now we go here. Let's go back to our Layer 1. Now just animate this moving forward until it reaches this point. Let's do that. Try to maintain the shape of your circle that it's not getting small. With our path guide, it helps us anchor the movement. Make sure you skip a frame, will be animating on twos. What happens is that we're still not at the finish line, but we already reached the endpoint of our guide. If that happens, just extend your guide. Also for this, let's skip a frame then click "F7", and until we reach the endpoint. Now we're reaching the end, and that's it, that's the end. If you look at the frames here, everything here is on twos, but the last frame is on ones. In order for this to consume two frames, just click "F5" and we have some excess frames here for the guide. In order to delete this, you just select, drag this one to select the frames, and hold the Shift key and F5 to delete it. Now let's try and play your animation. Click the ''Enter'' key on our keyboard, and there you go. That's how you animate using the straight ahead method. That will be your exercise. To do this, you need to create a guide and then animate a circle moving forward. 5. Acceleration and Deceleration: When you did the straight the head method, frame by frame, you may ask that how big should the space in each frame we should give it to? For example, I'm just going to create a new layer, I'm just going to hide the previous animation we did and I'm going to animate here at Layer 3. When we start our first circle right here, like that. I'm going to skip a frame because we're animating on twos. Here I'm going to click "F7." Now, you may be wondering, like, where should we put the next circle? Is it here that is too close to the previous circle or a bit farther apart. Once you have decided that, and we click "F7" to go to the next frame, the one after this. You may be wondering, should I place it here, place it here or here? What's the space between the last frame? How much space would we give it to? To answer that question, I would like to introduce to you the concept of accelerating, maintaining speed, and decelerating. In the real-world, so let's just say our driving a car. We're going to use the car as an analogy. Currently, it's on full stop. Then we hit the gas and we're going to move forward or we're going to start running the car and the car won't go to top speed immediately. It's not an abrupt change. It's slowly going to pick up speed. Once you reach the speed that you want, you will maintain the speed. If you hit the brakes, the car would not abruptly stop. It's just impossible to stop at that point, the car will gradually decrease speed until it comes to a full stop. In animation, we could also apply that. We could apply the concept of accelerating, maintaining speed, and decelerating when we are going to stop the animation. Let's try that out. For this, we're still going to use this guide, and we're going to use the acceleration-deceleration concept. We first start here. That's our first frame. Then we go to the next frame and hit "F7." I have my onion skin set, so that's good. Now for the next frame, since we don't have anything else to base this to, it's up to you. What is the starting speed? You can put that here if you want. But if we're going to apply the acceleration concept, it shouldn't be that farther to the original position. It would just be somewhere, maybe somewhere here. That would be our second frame. Now I'm going to move forward and hit "F7." So I have that. What I'm going to do because we need to see two drawings before it, not just one drawing. Currently, what we could see is the drawing before our current frame. The frame that we're currently in, it's a blank frame and with the onion skin, you can see the frame before that, but we need to see two drawings. I'm just going to do that. What I did is this blue color here. That's the previous frame that I'm going to see. I'm just going to extend it so that I would be able to see both drawings. These both drawings. You're seeing the acceleration concept. Just keep in mind that if you are accelerating, you will double the spacing. The spacing between these two, you double that. That would be our acceleration. Currently, this is the distance. If we're going to double that, so multiply it, or just estimate it, doesn't have to be the correct calculation or measure it. I'm just doubling the length. This one, that's what I'm going to add next. My next circle would be here. Let me just delete that and let's just draw the circle. I'm just going to estimate. I'm going to accelerate. I'm going to double the spacing, the distance. It's going to be somewhere here. Now I'm going to move forward in time. I'm going to click "F7" so I can see both of them. Now, let's see. We're still far from the destination. We could still accelerate. Now to accelerate, we're going to double. This is now the distance. We're just going to double that. We're going to double that. That's what we're going to add to this, the spacing. We're going to put the next frame or the next circle around here because it's going to be double here. I think that's just too much. Let me move that backward. I think the double is right here. It doesn't have to be exact. You don't have a ruler and measure everything, that is not required. I'm going to move here, next frame, and click "F7." Now let us see. We're so far from the destination, so we could still accelerate. I'm going to double this distance. It now would be somewhere around here. Let's proceed to the next frame, hit "F7" and take a look. What we could do, we could accelerate this again. If we double that, it would be somewhere around here. The next frame would be here. But we're too close. If we do that, we're already going to be too close to the destination, and we still need to break. If we're going to slowly decelerate this, we're going to go off of the guide. What I'm going to do is I'm not going to accelerate any more. I'm just going to maintain speed. In order to maintain speed, we just copy. We're not going to add any more, we're just going to copy the previous distance. This is the previous distance. We're just going to use that. We're just going to maintain speed. Roughly, it's going to be somewhere here. Now we're going to move forward. We're going to hit "F7." Now we are almost nearing the end. What we're going to do is we're going to decelerate. In order to decelerate, decelerating is the opposite of accelerating. If in accelerating we double the distance in decelerating, we divide the distance into two. What that means, if this is our previous distance, we're just going to cut this to half. This is going to be that. Our circle would be around here. We are already decelerating. Let me just undo that. To decelerate this, we divide this by two. That would be around here, I think. Move forward, skip a frame and click "F7." Now, again, we're still not at the end. We're still going to decelerate. To decelerate, we divide the previous spacing or distance by two. If this is the previous distance, we divide it by two. It would be around here. We're just going to cut down into half. Then next frame, again, we're going to decelerate until we come at a full stop. It would be around here. Hit "F7." I think we could still decelerate this further. As you can see, if you could already visualize this, that it's slowly coming to a stop. I think this would be our full stop frame. Now let's take a look at what we have done. Click "Enter." As you can see, it has a better animation than what we did before. Because here we applied the accelerating, maintaining speed and decelerating concept. That's what we did before. This is what we did now using the acceleration-deceleration concept. This is what we did before. This is just a free-flowing, see, it's not speeding up or slowing down. It's just like that. This one has a better animation. Now one thing to note, though, that I will just show you, it's much better to explain if I just show you. For example, I click "Create a new layer" and I'm just going to hide this. Try to avoid mixing acceleration and deceleration, so accelerating, decelerating, accelerating, decelerating. Because the equivalent of that is, think of it like, you're in the passenger seat and the driver is hitting the gas and the brake simultaneously. It's like stop, go, stop, go, stop, go. You're probably thinking, "Oh, this is a very terrible driver." The car is going to stop, go, stop, go, stop, go, and we don't want that in our animation too. So let me show you what that looks like. For example, this is our first frame and then our next frame, again, since this is the next frame, you don't have a speed to base it on. This would completely depend on you. For example, I'm just going to do this. For the next frame, I'm going to accelerate, so I'm going to double that. It would be somewhere here. For the next frame, for example, I'm going to decelerate. I'm going to divide that by two. For the next frame, I'm going to decelerate. Next frame I'm going to accelerate. Next frame I'm going to accelerate. Next frame I'm going to decelerate. The next frame I'm going to accelerate. See how this one would look like. It's not going to have that coherent flow. It's like it's stopping here at the middle. So that you know when to use acceleration or deceleration, just think of it like this. If this is your starting point and this is your endpoint, so here you're going to begin accelerating, accelerate, accelerate, accelerate. Probably here you're going to maintain speed. Once you're nearing the end and you want to stop, you decelerate, decelerate, decelerate, until you come to a full stop. 6. Animating in a Spiral Path: Now let's try something a bit more challenging. This would be your exercise. I'm just going to delete all of this, including this line, just going to delete that. First we would create our flow. I'm going to just zoom this out so we could see the whole canvas. For our flow, try to do a spiral and it's just going to contain one loop. It's going to be like this, just one loop and it's going to break around here. I want this one to fill the whole screen, so I'm going to click ''V'', the selection tool, I'm going to select this and I'm going to press ''Q'' so that the bounding box would appear. I'm going to hold ''shift'' and scale this up, and bring this to the center. This would be our guide. I'm going to click the lock icon and this outline tool so that it's going to be something like that, and maybe I'm just going to go to this one second right here and click ''F5'' so that it's already exposed for the duration of one second. This would be our guide. I'm just going to double-click this, and then I'm just going to rename this as my path guide. Now I'm going to create a new layer. I think I would want to bring this down, and this one would be our animation. Let me just deselect the outline mode here and let's analyze a bit the path, and let us decide when we're going to accelerate and when we are going to decelerate. Its most logical to accelerate at the start, here we are going to accelerate. We're going to use the car analogy again, if there is a steep curve, naturally, as a driver, you are going to slow down, because if you're going to speed up, accidents would happen. So whenever there's a steep curve, we're going to decelerate. Here we are going to accelerate and maybe probably here, we're going to just maintain the speed and once we reach the steep curve right here, we're going to decelerate and slow down. Since here it's like almost a straight line, we're going to again start to build up speed, we're going to accelerate here, and then this is our final destination, so once we hit this part, we are going to decelerate. Let's do that. I'm first going to click the ''Outline mode''. The effect of the outline mode is this, it's going to have that effect so that we could focus on our circle animations. We're going to start with the circle right here. That will be our first frame, I'm going to skip a frame because we are animating on twos and I'm on frame three, click ''F7''. Since this is our starting position, you decide the space. Just make sure that your first frame isn't abrupt like this, the space is too big, it's not natural to do it like that. I think it's going to be somewhere around here. This will be the basis of how we are going to accelerate and decelerate. Move again forward in time here and click ''F7''. Now I'm going to accelerate, I'm going to double the distance, it's going to be somewhere here. Again, make sure that your circle is the same volume, it's not getting smaller, but just in case it does get smaller, it's okay. Consider this as some sort of just practice. We're going to move again forward in time and click ''F7''. Since we're too far from our stopping point, our slowing, this is where we slow down. We could still accelerate. I'm going to accelerate, so I'm going to double this distance to around somewhere here. I think that's a bit too much, I think somewhere here. Don't worry too much if your circle isn't a perfect circle. What we're trying to practice here is the accelerating and decelerating concept. We're going to move forward in time, click ''F7'' and I think we're still far from our slowing down phase. This is where we slow down. If we are going to accelerate, I'm going to double this, it's going to be somewhere here. I think we could just maintain the speed, because I think if we're going to double this, If we're going to accelerate further, the circle won't have enough time to slow down. I think we could just maintain the speed, so we're just going to up this distance. It's going to be somewhere here. Let me zoom that in. Then, since there's already a steep curve, what we can do is we can start to slow down. We're going to divide this into two, the distance should be around here, and then decelerate again, going to divide the distance again by two, I think around somewhere here. Just to make sure that we're not going to make it into a full stop, we're just slowing down because we want to stop right here. For here, we're not really going to be at the full stop, we're just slowing down. Here I'm going to click ''F7'', we're going to decelerate further, it's going to be somewhere here. Now here, I'm not anymore going to decelerate, because if I'm going to decelerate, it's almost like this ball is going to a full stop. I'm going to start accelerating. here I'm already going to double this, double the distance. This is the distance, double that, this is one, then two, it would be somewhere around here. We're going to accelerate and we're going to accelerate. We're going to accelerate, so we're going to double that, around I think somewhere here. From here, I think we can't anymore accelerate because if we accelerate, we're going to go beyond our stopping point, and if we're going to maintain speed, it's going to be around here. We have a little distance to, if this is a car, to break and have a full stop right here. What we're going to do is, starting from here, we're now going to decelerate, we're going to divide this into two, that's going to be somewhere here. We lack a data frame for our path guide. Let's go to our path guide and click ''F5'' multiple times. I think to be sure, let's make it to two seconds. Now for here, we could skip frame and then click ''F7'', and now we are going to continue decelerate until we come to a full stop. We're going to divide that into two, it would be around here, then move here, I'll click ''F7''. Again, we're going to decelerate, divide the distance again by two, and here we're going to decelerate, so we're going to divide this again into two, I think somewhere here, and here I'm going to decelerate even further. If we are going to be off the target stop point just by a little bit, then I think that's okay. I'm going to move forward in time, Click ''F7'', now decelerate this a bit further. I really want to show that slowing down. I think we could have one more frame right here, and that would be our full stop. Now if you look at the timeline, see we have a black frame here. I mean, there's really nothing. What we could do is we could click ''F5'' or we could jump to this frame and then click ''F5'', it's going to have the same effect. Now let's take a look at what we have done. 7. The Main Blob: Now we are going to try to animate the liquid blob effect. A liquid blob has two elements: the main blob, and the liquid trail. Let's first discuss and do the main blob. In order to do that, let's first color our circle. To color our circle let's click the paint bucket tool or the shortcut for that as K. Then let's just fill up our circle with color. I'm going to move to the next frame. Again to traverse our timeline so that we don't have to continually click this, it's on your keyboard, the period and comma. The period is going to move forward, the comma is going to move back in the timeline. I'm currently on my paint bucket tool so I'm just going to do this. Now again, one thing to note is that this paint bucket tool would only work if your path is closed. For example, if your circle is like that, is an open path, it won't work. If you click the paint bucket tool and try to fill it up and it doesn't work, one reason for that would probably be your path is open, so you need to close that up. For example here, see I can't do that because, I'm going to zoom it in, it's open, we need to close this. Again, this one too, we're done. Let's have a look at our animation. What we're able to do is just to color this. Now let's add the main blob. We're still going to use this layer, we're not going to create a new layer for the main blob. I'm just going to show you, I'm going to move forward in time. The blob is the main trail, and I'm just going to click "K", so that is the main blob and since our blob is liquid in nature. I want the shape to be this at the end. It could be random because if it's liquid or water, the trail is a bit random so it doesn't have to be like that, you can do it like this, a bit random. How long should the main blob be? Let's just go through this one by one. Here as you can see, I have my onion skin turned on and what you see here is the frames after. This one is the frames before. We don't really need the frames after so I could just adjust my onion skin so that it's like that so we could only see just the frames before it, not after. Or we could even put like that. For the main trail, what we have to look for or what you need to understand is the faster the movement, the longer the main blob is. The slower it is, the shorter the main blob is. For example here, this is my current frame, this is my previous frame so this is the speed. This one is going to have a longer trail than the one before it. How long it should be? It should be just about the previous position. If I'm going to make a trail, it's going to be like that. I'm just click "K" so it's not going to be in the same position as the previous one right here, it's not going to be that. It's just going to be here just over the edge of the previous frame and I'm going to click "K", color that end. For this one, I choose not to add the trail because the distance or the distance with the previous frame is just too small. It doesn't matter anymore it's too small to notice anyway so I'm not going to add liquid trail or the main blob here. This one is good. This one is a bit long, so we could now create our blob and just make sure that it's not a straight line like this. Remember our path is a bit of a curve so we could draw the main blob to be a curve and it could be in any shape you want. It could be like this, it could be like that, you could try to be as random as you could be. This one's a bit over, we don't want that so I'm going to do it again. I think that's good. We're going to create another blob and I don't want to use the same pattern over and over again, I don't want to use that over and over again. I could have a different, something like this, it's a different pattern than before. Now it's slowing down. The main blob here is going to get shorter. See the end of the blob, is just right here at the previous position. This one would be here, it's just here, this is the previous position, it's right here. It's not over the previous position, but just on that position. This one is already too close. The spacing is too tight. I think we could still add a bit of a blob, just a small one. The distance a bit bigger so we could add that in, this one too. Again, this is a curve so when we draw this, make sure it's not straight like that but a curve, you follow the path. Let's just add a very small blob and we could now stop doing that. Now, let's have a look at our animation. You're going to click "Enter". Let's have a look without the path guide, how does it look? It looks good. 8. Liquid Trails: Next, what we're going to do is add liquid trails. It's a different process than the main blob because we need to add a liquid trail and animate that out so that it will disappear. We're going to repeat that process because the main blob is leaving multiple instances of the liquid trail. This is the finished version of the exercise. I have color-coded this so that I could be able to explain this better and show you that these are the multiple instances of liquid trail, that each of those colors is a different instance. For example, this, see that blue color? That's one instance of the liquid trail. We need to animate that out. And then this green color here, that's a different instance of liquid trail, that's a different set. Once we have created that, we are going to animate that out. As you can see, the blob is creating multiple instances of that liquid trail. We need to animate them one by one. For example, I'm going to hide the other layers. Then we're going to play this. See? That was one instance. That was one instance that the main blob created, one set of liquid trails. Then this other color here, this green, that's a separate layer, that's a different instance. Once we have created that, we need to animate that out. This is another instance. Here, it created a different instance and we need to animate that out. The same with this. Let's have a look again with the finished version of this exercise. Now, let's go back to our unfinished version. I'm going to walk you through how to do this. I'm just going to rename this as our main blob. This is our main blob, I'll play that again. That's our main blob. Now I'm going to create a new layer. Now let's move forward in time and let's observe this. When does the main blob leave a liquid trail? It's usually, the longer that the blob is, the more chances that it's going to leave a trail. You need to observe the animation and take a look at where it is the longest. In this section right here, from here to here, because here it starts to slow down, the longest one is this frame. Actually, this one is, I think it's a tie. This blob and this one, I think they are the same length. We can add a liquid trail to this. Now I'm going to move forward in time here, this, and let me just adjust my onion skin that it would only show just one previous drawing. Not two previous drawings, just one previous drawing. Now here, I'm going to click F7 so that the animation would start there because I'm just going to undo it. Because if I start drawing here, see, you will have this frame exposed to the whole whole? I want this drawing to start here. That's why we click here and then click F7 so that if I draw an additional blob, it would start here, not at the beginning. That's the reason why we need to click F7 to this. So I'm going to click F7. Now, whenever you see this one, meaning it has a bigger length. Wait, I'm going to reveal back the path guide. We have the path guide because we're going to need it. This one is going to leave some trail. If we're going to look at the shape, we could consider this as having three blobs. One thing to note, whenever a main blob leaves a liquid trail, at the liquid trail, their movement is going forward. All of them are going forward. Don't draw a liquid trail and it's going to go back like that. Don't do that. Even the liquid trail is all going to move forward. What I'm going to do now is we're going to leave a blob here and maybe another here. Here's one thing also to note that the farther away from the main blob, the smaller it is. When you create those liquid trails, the nearer it is to the main blob, the longer it is. The farther away it is, the smaller it gets. For example, this is our main blob. The secondary blob is going to be a bit longer. The farther away it is, the smaller the blob should be. Just keep that in mind. Here, we could leave a blob like that and then a different blob here. Let's just keep it simple for now, just an additional of two blobs. Now we need to animate this forward because once the liquid trail would leave the main blob, we need to disappear it. It's going to evaporate somehow. We could still apply the acceleration and deceleration technique that we have learned in the previous lesson. I'm going to move forward in time, skip a frame because we're animating on twos, and click F7. Now we're just going to focus our attention on those additional blob that we made. Now I'm going to animate this. It's going to decelerate. It's going to get smaller and smaller until it becomes nothing. This one too is going to get smaller. I'm going to click K. You're going to switch between the brush tool and the paint bucket tool. Have your hand ready on the B and the K in your keyboard. Now that's good. Move forward in time. We're going to click F7. Don't think about the other instances of liquid trails yet. Let's just focus on this specific instance of liquid trails first and make it disappear. Now it's going to get smaller. Move forward in time, and smaller, and then smaller. I think this one is already small enough, that's going to disappear in the next frame. I'm not going to draw that anymore in the next frame. That's already disappeared. But this one, we still need to keep going. Let's have a look at that. It's going to have that effect. Now, let's continue. Here, I'm going to traverse through the timeline. Here we need to add another instance of liquid trails and we need to animate that to disappear. We have a new layer here. Right here, I'm going to click F7 because it's going to start this point. One thing also to note, since this is moving forward, the blob shouldn't be in the exact position. Like that, it shouldn't be in the exact position. It should be something like that. Now let's focus our attention on this specific instance of liquid trails that we just created. Now we are going to animate these three animate blobs and make them disappear. Move forward in time. Now let's focus our attention on this additional blob that we have made. I'm going to make this smaller. All of these three additional blobs, they're all going to move forward. This one is already too small that we could make that already disappear in the next frame. But these remaining two are still going to continue making them smaller and smaller. Again, the overall movement is going to move forward, not back, but forward. I'm going to move that forward. As it moves forward, the size is also going to be smaller and smaller. This one, I'm not going to draw anymore because it's small. It had already evaporated or something. This effect is tedious, but once you have finished this, it's rewarding as well and it looks nice. It's a bit tedious because you need to draw a lot of blobs, the liquid trail. I think those two are already small enough. I'm going to zoom out and let's have a look at our animation. It's looking good. Now let's again, create a new layer. That spot, where else you could add a blob? This one here. That's another blob. It's going to start in this. I'm going to click F7 because the drawing should start from here. I think we could just add one blob for this because the life is not too big. We could just add one blob or two. I guess we could add another blob here. Then let's make the newly created blob disappear. It's going to get smaller and smaller until it disappears. I think that's good. Let's have a look. That's good. Now let's traverse our timeline and spot where else we could add those blob. I'm going to create a new layer. I'm going to zoom it in. This one is too, I'm not going to add anymore blob to that. This one could be, but this one is bigger, this one is shorter to leave a liquid trail. If you're a bit lazy, you could already disregard this and just focus your attention to this. But we could also add this end because I think this is long enough to leave a bit of trail. I'm going to click F7 right here and maybe just one. Just one trail like that. Now let's focus our attention to make this blob move forward and evaporate. It's going to move forward and become smaller and smaller like the rest of the liquid trails that we've already done. Now let's have a look. Looking good. Now let's add this. This one is going to have a liquid trail for sure. Let's create a new layer. Click this frame to where we currently are and click F7. Now, let's create a blob for this. Again, the rule is, the further away it is from the main blob, the smaller it would get. I think because this is long, I could add an additional three blobs there. Or let's be a little bit ambitious and let's add a bit more blob to this, something like that. Then let's focus our attention to animate this liquid trail set, let's make them disappear while they move forward. They're all going to move forward, but they're going to be smaller and smaller. They're going to be smaller in size. But this one is already small enough you could leave that, I'm not going to draw it out because it already has evaporated or something. I'm going to move forward, click F7. This one's going to be smaller. This one too is going to get smaller. This one is going to get smaller. This one too. Again, the movement should be forward, not still. Right position should move forward. It shouldn't be in the same position. It's both making it smaller and moving forward. Always keep that in mind; forward and making it smaller. It's movement should be moving forward. I think this is too small. Don't draw that. It's also better if you're blobs would not evaporate at the same time. Then I think that's going to look good. We have that. I think we're almost done here. Let's take a look where else we could add. Here, see? We could see the onion skin and this one don't have a blob there, let's add the blob there. I'm going to click F7. It's not too big, the length isn't too long, so maybe just one additional blob or two, and now let's focus our attention on making that disappear. Because this one's already smaller, let's evaporate that first. Both of them are moving forward. Take note that the path always follow the path. That would look more natural that way. I think that's already it. Again, I'm going to create a new layer and let's just have one last look where else we could add a blob. This one is already too small. Actually it depends on you, try to feel it. If there are some trail for example this, this one is long. It's short to leave some trail. But do some of these, a short trail that's up to you. If you feel like adding more details, you could choose to make an additional liquid trail in there or you could also not. Because it would also still look okay even if you don't do that. But just for the sake of demonstration, let's just do this one last time. They're moving forward. I'm not anymore going to add this one. This set is going to be the last one. We could already evaporate that, that's already small enough. I think we're done. Let's have a look what we have finished, and that's really looking good. Now I'm going to hide the path guide and let's have a look. That my friends is how you do a liquid blob trail. Save this file. I'm going to teach you how to export this already. If you want to export this, click the "File" here and click "Export". For this project, for this class, let's just export as an animated GIF. You could click that and when a pop-up window will appear, and then click "Save", and that's it. You can upload this to Giphy or wherever you want. I think once you're done with this exercise, you'll be ready with your class project. Do this first and once you're done, watch the next video. 9. Your Class Project: For your class project, you will be applying everything you have learned so far. I would like to give you a heads-up on what you're going to do with your class project. Your class project could be divided into two steps or two categories. The first one is the entrance animation and the second one is the exit animation. Under the entrance animation, first, you're going to do the morph in, and then you're going to add the main blob. Then you're going to add liquid trails, and then you're going to animate in the details. For the exit animation, it's going to follow a similar process. You're first going to do the morph out, and then you're going to add the main blob. Then you're going to add the liquid trails, and then you're going to animate out the details, and that's your class project. I have provided you with different plant designs to choose from. If you go to the Resources Tab, you can choose and download the plant design that you want, or you could also design your own. This is the designs to choose from, and what I'm going to pick is this one at the middle. This one is categorized by difficulty. This one is the easy mode, this one is the medium mode, and this one is the hard mode. Let's dismantle each of this illustration so that it would help you decide which design to choose from. The reason why this is the easy mode is that you have fewer elements to animate. Remember the steps I mentioned before? You're going to apply that to each of the parts here. We have two main parts for the easy mode. Just an example, you're going to create the morph in of this and the morph in of this. Then you're going to add the main blob to this and main blob to this, and add liquid trails to this and liquid trails to this. The details, animate in the details, it only has one detail which is this one. That is the reason why this is the easy mode because there are fewer parts to animate. For this one, this is the main parts of this, so one, two. We have this leaf and this one's detail. Currently, the medium illustration or difficulty has one, two, three, four, five main elements. This is five blobs and for the details, we have three main details to animate. For the hard mode, let's have a look. One, two, this is a main part, main part. This one is a main part, and this one too, and this one. So the main elements for the hard mode is one, two, three, four, five, six, and seven. You have seven blobs to animate, and for the details, one, two, three, and four details. If you're still starting out, you can just go with the easy mode. Basically, the concept still applies regardless of what design you would choose. It's just that there are designs that have fewer parts and therefore, it's much easier to animate because you only need to animate a few parts. For example, this design, it has a lot of parts and therefore, a lot of things you are going to animate. But of course, the more parts there are, it's more amazing to look at because there's going to be a lot of liquid trails that we're going to see. If you're still starting out, you could go with this, or you could go with my direction and go in between, which is this medium option. But if you want to have a little bit of a challenge, you could take this hard mode. 10. Planning Your Animation: Now we are going to start your class project. I'm going to use this specific design. No matter what design that you will choose, you will have two versions of it. You will have the illustrator file and also the JPEG. What we're going to import and animate is the JPEG file, but I also have provided the illustrator file just in case you need to open it and study it. This is the illustrator file, so here it's properly layered. I have provided this so you can look what the specific elements really look like. For example, if I hide the pot, it's going to look like that, and we have this petal, also we have two petals set. The petal 1, the one in front and the one at the back and that's the actual shape. But what we're going to import in our animate file is the JPEG. Let's do that. Let's open our animate file. For your class project, you need to create a new file. Don't use the one you did in the previous exercises. You will need to create a new file and let's import the JPEG. To do that, let's click "File" and click" Import", then this import to stage and locate your files. It's here, the plant 1 JPEG, and I'm going to click "Open". Don't import the AI file, just the JPEG. Then we have here the image. This would be our guide, so I'm just going to double-click the layer name and rename this to reference or ref for short. Now let's analyze this illustration and let's analyze how we are going to animate this. I'm going to create a new layer and I'm just going to use the brush tools. I could draw on this and I'm going to click "Lock" on the reference layer so I don't accidentally draw on that. Now the first thing that we need to do is when we animate an illustration, we need to decide which of these elements are the blobs. One indicator is we need to divide this by element. This petal is one element, the leaf is one element, and this one is another element, and the pot is also another element. But how about this? The petal behind this. Is that part of the main petal? You can look at the colors. If it's a different color, it's most likely a different blob. This one is another main element. How about the stem? Also, the leaf has this detail line right there. Is that another blob? Now let's just consider the stem and the leaf details as details and we will animate them later. Let's first focus our attention on the main elements that we're going to animate. Currently, we have 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5. There's going to be five different blobs that's going more into those shape. There are going to be five different blob animation. Let's do that. Let's plan the path that the animation will take. What we want to do is we're going to morph in. The blob is going to morph into this shape and then after, we're going to animate the details and then once everything is on place, we're go. When you try to decide the path, don't make it too short like this, for example. Because remember that we need to have some room for the blob to accelerate and speed up because it needs to reach a certain speed. It needs to be fast enough so that interesting liquid trails could appear. If it's just a short distance, there would be no room to accelerate your blob, and therefore, if it's not fast enough, it's not going to be that interesting. Don't make it too long like that, but just enough. Just not too short. For me, it's going to be something like this. Then let's continue this and this would be the exit. This one is going to be my first petal. This would be the path of this specific petal. For the one at the back, that would be a different path. Let's do that too. I'm just going to create a new layer. Let me rename this, double-click this, and make this as path guide 1. This would be our path guide 1, already done with that. I'm going to lock that. I'm just going to hide this, so we could just focus or maybe just turn on the outline mode right there. Then let's decide the path for the petal behind us, this white color. It's going to be something like this and this would be the exit animation. This would be the entrance animation, this part right here. This part right here would be our exit animation. I'm already done with that. I'm going to rename this layer to path guide 2. I'm going to lock that and create a new layer. I'm going to turn on the outline mode. Now what else can you animation? The leaf. This leaf, we're going to animate that. I'm going to try to do the same or similar shape with regards to the path guide. I'm going to use this, still that direction in the path. Now the exit animation would continue and it's going to have this. Let me just undo this, clean this up a bit. That's going to be our exit animation for this specific leaf and I'm going to rename this to path guide 3, lock, and turn on the outline mode. I'm going to create a new different layer and then this small leaf, we're also going to animate that. Also going to have this motion and then I'm going to rename this to path guide 4, lock, and turn on the outline mode. For the pot, let's create a new layer and then it's still going to have that direction. I'm going to double-click this and rename this to path guide 5, lock, and then turn on the outline mode. This is going to be the direction of how we would morph in and morph out our illustration. We're going do that part by part. For example, I'm just going to make a pseudo animation. For example, if the blob is going to come from here until it would reach up to this point. Also for the petal at the back, it's also going to start from here, we're going to follow the path, and then it's going to morph into this, morph into place. The same would happen for other elements, like the leaf, the pot. Once they have finished animating and once they are on phase, we would now create the exit animation. From this, it's going to exit into this direction. It's going to morph out and that's going to be the same with the other different elements. This is what you're going to do. You're going to import the design that you have chosen or you could design your own if you want. Once you have imported it, create your path guide for each of the element. For the details, don't worry about the details. For the stem, don't worry about the stem, we will animate that later. Try to look for something more solid. The stem is like a line. Let's just consider the lines as a detail, and details, we will animate later. Focus our attention on the main objects. Once you are done with this, then you can proceed to the next video. 11. Entrance: Morph in: Now what we're going to do is we're going to do with the morph in. Let's focus first our attention on just one element at a time. This is what I'm going to animate first. Let's hide the path guide that we're not going to use yet. I'm going to hide everything except path guide one, so I'm just going to focus on that. Like in the previous exercises, what we did was we first animated the circle, so that was the first step. The second step was to do the blob, the mean blob. After finishing the main blob, the next step was to add the liquid trails, and we're also going to do the same for this. The path guide is just a guide that's not the layer where we will create our animation, so I'm going to create a new layer here. Let's just rename this to petal-1. Let's first add a frame to this. Currently, we only have one frames. Let's just expose this to about four seconds. Why it's that long? Because we're going to do both the morph in and the morph out. That could take a bit of time. Let's just expose this to four seconds, so let's go to the four-second mark right here. Let's drag and select all of the layers, so I'm going to drag this up and then click "F5" so that they would be exposed up to that point. For our reference, we could change the opacity of this. In order to do that, you can right-click and click "Properties" and it's going to open this window and click "Opacity". Fifty percent is fine and click "OK" because we can't use the outline mode for our reference because the reference is one whole image. If I'm going to click the outline mode see going to disappear, so what we can do is we could just lower the opacity. Let me bring back the opacity to 100 percent because we need the color of the petal. Let's open the properties panel, and then for opacity, let's increase this to 100 percent, back to its original opacity. Let's just get the color of the petal, so to do that, we can use this eyedropper tool or the shortcut for that is "I". So click this layer, click that image and it would get the color right here. Now I have that color, I can turn this back again to 50 percent for the opacity, so right-click, click "Properties" and change the opacity to 50 percent. Also, we need to modify our path guide, so let's unlock the path guide one. Because unlike the previous exercises where we're going to animate a ball to move to a certain position, here we're not anymore going to animate a ball. We're not going to start with this ball because what we want is we want to animate from nothing to something. We're going to start the frame with just a blank frame and then the blob is going to appear. In order to do that, we need to modify this path guide. We need to add a bit of paper. What do I mean by that? This would be the peak of our paper, and then let's draw something like this. It's going to taper at the tip of that. Let's turn off the outline mode first so that we could see our guide. Then from here, from the tip, let's draw a path to here. Now for the bottom part here, we're also going to draw or taper this from here, to that. Here, this would be our indicator of how big the shape would be, the circle. If we do that, we could have this from small to big until it would reach this size. With this now we could start animating. Now instead of a circle, I'm just going to animate like an oval-like shape. I'm also going to use "K" to fill this. Also, let's not start at frame one, currently, I'm on frame one, because remember we want to animate from nothing to something. I'm just going to click and drag this to frame three because remember we are animating on two, so we're skipping a frame, so we're going to start from frame three. Now we could skip again another frame and then click "F7". Let's turn on our onion skin. Since we don't have a previous frame to base it on, it's completely up to you where your next frame would be. I'm going to maybe add it here, or maybe that's too much. Somewhere here would be good, and then I'm going to fill that, move forward in time, skip a frame, click "F7". Now let's adjust our onion skin that it would show two drawings. Currently, it would show one drawing. We need two drawings, so I'm going to adjust the onion skin a bit back so I could see both of them. Now we're going to apply the acceleration concept. Now let's double this distance. Double this distance it would be, I think somewhere around here. Don't do a circle, make it a bit oval in shape. I'm going to fill that, move forward in time, click this frame, click "F7". Now we're still going to accelerate because it's still far from the destination. I'm going to double this distance. It's going to be here plus here. I think it would be somewhere in this spot. Now we have to fill the whole guide. Not like that, because we already have a guide that's going to be this big. Let's use our guide and try to make it into an oval. Then move again forward in time and click "F7". Now you have to decide if you're going to accelerate or decelerate or maintain speed. We can't anymore accelerate because this is the distance. If we're going to accelerate, meaning double that, it's going to go over. We want to stop right here. I think what we can do is we can maintain speed. To maintain speed, let's just copy this distance, so it would be around here. We could use the guide. Don't make it too big that it's outside your guide or too small. Just make it that it fits your guide and make it into an oval shape like that. Now I'm going to move forward in time and then I'm going to click "F7". Now let's start to decelerate. I remember in the previous lessons, I have taught you that when you're going to decelerate, that you're going to divide the distance between this one and this one into half. But we have a problem with that because sometimes we don't really end up in the place where we want to be. Sometimes we end up right here, but that's not really an option here because we have a design to follow, for example. What you can do is you can still use the half method, but not on the previous frame, we're going to do that on the frame after. This is where we want to end up. So instead of dividing the distance between this frame and this frame into half that distance is what we're going to add, what we're going to do is we're going to divide the distance between this and this and the half of that is here, and that's where we would add the next frame. Then I'm going to click "K" fill this, move again forward in time, and then click "F7". Now let's try to slowly change the shape of this oval to something more of our final form, this specific shape. The in-between of that would be somewhere here. I'm already going to slowly add that shape as you can see, then I'm going to click "K". I'm going to go back to my brush tool. Again, move forward in time, and then click "F7", and then try and get the in-between of this frame and the one in the final image. It would be somewhere around something like that. I think we could still move forward, click "F7" and then again, try to get the in-between. I think for this one we can just trace it, so if the onion skin is a bit distracting, you can turn it off, so you can just trace this. Then click okay and fill and then we have finished morphing in one part. Let's have a look with our animation. It's going to have that look. Now we have finished that, let's do the same for the other parts. Now let's hide the path guide one and let's show the path guide two. Now, what we're going to do is we're going to create the blob of this petal behind it. First let's turn back to 100 percent opacity, our reference layer. I'm going to right-click click Properties and change the opacity to 100 percent because we need the color of this petal, this one, we need that color. Is that white? I think that's white. I'm going to click I and click this. I think this is just white. Because if I'm going to change the opacity to 50 percent, there's not much contrast between the white color and the background now. It's hard to animate if there's just minimal contrast. What we can do is I'm going to turn back the opacity again to 100 percent and I'm going to click the Eyedropper tool for the background. Let's create a new layer and then let's create the background. To do a background, just click this rectangle tool right here. This, click that and it can go over the canvas like that. Then bring this one below the reference so we could still see the reference. Then let's rename this to background or BG. I'm going to lock this and then let's start animating. Before we forget, let's create a new layer. This would be for petal dash 2. This one is for the petal below it. The petal-1 should be on the top layer. The petal-2 should be below it. I need to use the eyedropper tool to get the color of the petal below, which I think is just white but just to be sure, I'm going to click I and then click this. Now we have that. Now, if this is a bit distracting, you could always turn on the outline mode and then click lock so we don't accidentally draw into that. Let's do this for the second petal. I'm going to click and go back here and just with the first path guide, we need to do that taper thing that we did with the path guide-1. It should be here, it should be that. Since we can't see the one below it, just estimate where or how big that petal below it. It's going to be like that. Now let's start. I'm going to lock this and go to our petal-2 and now let's do the animation. This is the oval. I'm going to already fill that in. I forgot, let's skip the first frame. It should be blank. We want to start from nothing morphing to something. I'm just going to click hold and drag this to frame 3. We're going to skip the frame 2 because we're animating on two so we're skipping a frame. This is frame 3. Now skip a frame, then click F7. Now I'm going to turn back the onion skin. It would be somewhere, I think I estimate it here. Then move again forward in time, click F7. Now we are going to double the distance. If you can't see, for example here you can't see the onion skin, it's very light. What you can do is hold this onion skin right here and click advanced settings. Then for starting opacity, I'm going to increase the starting opacity to 190 percent. Or maybe the starting opacity, I'm just going to lower this a bit, but increase the decrease by. You can play around with the settings to whatever is more comfortable for you. I'm good with that. Now I could see clearly the onion Skin. Now, I'm going to accelerate, so I'm going to double this distance. It would be somewhere here. Again, move forward in time, click F7, accelerate, double the distance, it would be somewhere here. I think that's too much. I think it's going to be here. Try to make it again into an oval shape. Move again forward in time, click F7. I think we could still accelerate further. Double that it would be somewhere here. Move again forward in time. For this one, I don't think we could accelerate, but I think we could start slowing down. Again, this is a different technique. When decelerating, let's not anymore base it on the previous frame, but on the frame after so that we would land at the specific spot that we want. It would be around here. The half of that is here. Then move forward again in time, click F7. Now let's slowly morph this into this shape. This shape is more of a heart-shape, let's do that. It's harder to see because it's white. For the reference, I'm going to right-click click Properties. That's because it's 100, let's bring this to 50 percent. Better. But still it's hard to differentiate the two, so let's bring the opacity down. I'm going to right-click and click Properties and maybe make this to 20 percent. I think it's just too much, maybe 30 percent. Yeah. This is good. I can still see the back petal, but also see our current frame. Let's go back to the petal-2 layer. It's going to morph into that heart shape. Move again forward in time. Right now, my onion skin is a bit dark so I'm going to hold this and click advanced settings and adjust my starting capacity. Yeah, I think that's good. That's going to be here. It's really hard to see so I think I'm going to bring back the opacity again to 100. It's going to be like that and we're almost done. For the next frame, I think we could just simply trace this. I'm going to hide the onion skin and just trace this and it's going to be that. For the one at the bottom, it doesn't need to be super accurate with the Illustrator file because anyway, that's going to be covered with petal-1. I'm going to turn on petal-1 again and let's have a look. We have two animation. We could even have this into a delay. For petal-2, I'm going to select all of this and then hold click and drag this a bit forward there so that the animation would start at this specific point, that there's going to be a delay. You can't see it that much. I'm going to hide the reference layer. Because it's white, it's harder to see. But as you can see, the delay is making the animation better. Now let's turn on again the reference layer and now let's do a different part. We finished the path guide 2, let's go to path guide 3, so this is for the leaf. I'm just going to create a new layer here and rename this to leaf-1. This would be leaf-1. We also need the haulers. I'm going to click the i2. I'm going to click I and then click this so I could get the color of that. Then I'm going to click "Properties" and lower the opacity to 50 percent. Before we forget, let's unlock path guide 3 and then let's do the taper for this. It's going to be something like that. Also for the bottom part, since the bottom part is covered by the path, it doesn't need to be super accurate. You can just estimate this to where it's endpoint. I think it's going to be something like that. I'm going to lock this and now we can start our animating. I'm going to go to frame 3 and click "F7" and now let's start. This would be our oval-shape. Click "K" and fill the color. Skip a frame to to F7. I'm going to turn on the onion skin and here you decide where is the next frame. This is what I have decided to move forward again in time and now let's accelerate. Let's double the distance. It would be somewhere around here. Move again, forward in time of seven. Again, double the distance. I think we could still accelerate. I think now it would be somewhere around here and then move forward in time click F7. I think this is too soon to decelerate, so I think we could maintain speed. It would be somewhere here. Now I'm slowly going to change the shape to more like a leaf. Move forward in time, click "F7". Now we could decelerate. Find the half of this and this. It would be somewhere around here. Move again forward in time. Click "F7" and again, find the half of this until we come to a full stop. Move again forward in time, click "F7" and find the half of that. I think this would be our last frame. The last frame would be exactly that. Let's just trace this and let's have a look. It's going to have that animation. You can make a delay of this to have some sort of domino effect. I'm going to click and drag this and move this a little back. The first one that would animate is petal-1 and then followed by petal-2 and then leaf-1. It's going to have this effect so that they won't start at the same time, making the animation more dynamic. Now let's move our way to leaf-2. Let's hide path guide 3 and let's turn on path guide 4. Before we even start, let's do the tapering of this. I'm going to unlock this and let's create the taper. I'm going to have this and then for the bottom part, again, it's covered by the patch. It doesn't have to be super accurate, but I'm just going to estimate that do somewhere there. Now that is good. I'm going to click "Lock" and then let's create a new layer and then rename this to leaf-2. The color is so the same, so I'm going to start here at frame 3, click "F7" and then let's now create our oval. Let's lock our leaf-1 and petal-1 and maybe turn on the outline mode so that it's not distracting so just focus on the leaf-2. For a second frame, it's going to be here. We're going forward in time, click "F7". We are going to accelerate double the distance to something here. I think that's a bit too much Something here. Again, move forward in time click "F7", we will accelerate, double the distance, so it would be somewhere here. Make sure you consume the whole guide. It's not too big and not too small. It's going to go over your guide, but it's not also going to be too small like this. Move again forward in time. I think this is our final destination and you still have enough space. But if we're going to accelerate, we're going to go over already. Let's just maintain speed. Let's just copy the distance. It would be somewhere here. I could already start the shape to this shape that it's more closer to the leaf shape. I think something like that and move forward in time. Now we could decelerate. The deceleration would be here, the half and now I'm going to slowly make this into a leaf shape. We do this. We keep on decelerating until we come out of full stop. Now it's almost to this last frame. I'm going to click F7. This one would be the last frame. So the last frame is the actual illustration. I'm going to turn on the onion skin so that I could just simply trace this. We have now this animation and let's turn off the outline mode for the rest of the layers and have a look at our animation. Now for the leaf-2, that's select appears, let's select the layers, drag it, and let's have this start after leaf-1. As you can see in this timeline, at frame 3, petal-1 would start at frame 5, petal-2 would start at fame 7, leaf-1 would start, and at frame 9, the leaf-2 would start. They have a domino effect. For the last one, before we proceed through the next step is the path guide 5, this. I'm going to unlock this and make sure you select this layer and let's create the taper. It's going to have this effect. Then let's create a new layer and we need the color. I think it's white, but just in case, let's turn this back on to 100 percent and click "I" and then bring this back again to 50 percent. At least we already got the color. Let's start with frame 3, click "F7" and now let's do the animation. Let me rename this to pot, and then let's have a look. Let's hide our reference layer and let's also hide this path guide 5 and let's have a look. Remember we have hidden the leaf-2 and leaf-1, so let's review them. This is the main parts of our animation. This is what you're going to do. You're going to do this first and once you're done, you can proceed with the next video. 12. Entrance: Add Main Blob: Now that we have finished the morph in, now let's do the main blob. Let's start again with the first animation and that was petal-1. Let's unlock this and we're going to start the main blob. Then the guide of our petal-1 is path guide 1, so I'm going to reveal that or unhide that. I'm going to click this icon, so we have that. I'm going to set my onion skin for the frames after it's going to be here. I'm not going to show the frames after, only the frames before it. I'm going to traverse the timeline and look for opportunities on where we could add the main blob, and I'm going to change the color again. I'm going to click "I" and then select this so we could go back to make sure that we got the right color correctly. I'm going to hide the other layers because it's a bit distracting for me to see them. I just want to focus on one thing at a time. I'm going to hide them and let's just focus our attention on petal-1. Again, just a recap, if the space is just too small, for example here, I'm not ever going to add the trail, only when there's a significant distance. For example this, there's a significant distance here, so let's add that main blob and it's going to have this shape, that liquid form. We could also just keep them within the guide, we have the taper in the guide, and that would be very helpful. Now for this, we can just have this into a straight manner like that or we could just fill this up. It's like it's turning, but don't make it over your guide, just try to make it within your guide. Then I'm going to use Fill and it's going to have that effect, and I'm going to move forward in time. This one too, this one would have that. Again, just a recap for doing the main blob, don't make it that it's going to be over like that, just right after the previous frame, just after that. It can go a bit over, that's okay, but don't make it that it's going to be this long. It should be just about here. If you're over by a bit, that's just okay. Think of it like your boundary, this is the boundary. You don't go over that. If you go over a bit, that's okay. Let's do that. It's okay to go over a bit because if we're just going to strictly stick to this, it's going to have that robotic feel. It's going to be very sharp, and we want this to be like a liquid, and a liquid has that unpredictability to it. If it goes over by a little bit, then that's fine. We're going to move again forward. For this, I'm just going to add a little bit. I can't use the paint bucket tool because somewhere, there's an opening maybe here. I'm going to close the opening and then click "K" again, so now it works. This one, I think we could still going to add this, and I think that's already okay. Now let's have a look. It's going to have that feel, and I'm going to hide our guide and let's see. Let's have a look. It's going to be like that. So far, looking good. Now, we have finished the petal-1. I'm going to hide that. Let's focus our attention to petal-2. In what order you made the animation, I think it's best to go in that direction with what do you want to do first. Petal-2 was the second one we need, so let's go for petal-2. The guide for petal-2 is this path guide 2. Now that I have think about it, I think it would have been better to actually name the guide. We could change this to path guide for petal-1, and the path guide 2 would be path guide for petal-2. I think it would have been better if we have done this from the start so that it would be easier. Let's just rename them as we go. Now, this is for petal-2 and let's unlock petal-2. Now let's start. This is the starting animation and it's white. I'm going to click "I" and then pick this color. It's white, so I'm going to go back to my brush tool, click "B", and move again forward in time. That's the distance, too small, it's not significant. This one is significant, so we could add the main blob and then move forward in time. Then this one, lets add the main blob. You can try to make your trail to be a shape at the end. For this one, we can have it straight like that, but let's not do that. Let's use our guide, and our guide tells us that we follow this path so let's do that. Then once you have created that, click "K" and then it's going to have that effect and then move forward again. Let's draw the main blob. For here, let's add that liquid edge. Maybe here we could still add a little bit of that liquid edge. I can't fill that end because of the opened path here, so let's close that. Click "K" again so now it works. Here I don't think I need to add that liquid edge. It's going to have this effect. Now let's turn on the petal-1 and petal-2 and let's have a look at our animation. It's going to be like that. This is going to be so much more interesting once we would do the liquid trails, which we'll do in the next video. Now that it is done, let's do the same for the rest. Now let's go to leaf-1. For this, I'm going to unlock this and then I'm going to click "I" to get the color. Then the path of that is I think this path guide 3. I'm just going to rename this to path guide leaf-1 so we would know exactly what guide is that for. Somehow my color turned back again to red, that's fine. I'm just going to eyedropper tool this. I'm going to click "I" and I'm back again to my color. Let's focus our attention on the leaf. This one could have the main blob. I always interchange those two. Again, let's apply the guide. The guide has this curve, so let's try and draw that in. It's going to have that effect. It's going to look something like that, and then move forward again, have the liquid edge right here because if I don't add this liquid edge, it's going to abrupt the turn to sharp or this round shape. We want to slowly morph that in. That's why I'm adding a little bit of that liquid edge until it fully morphs into the shape of the leaf. I think that's good, we don't need the liquid edge anymore. Let's have a look. Now let's lock this, that's already good. Maybe I'm going to turn on the outline mode for leaf-1, petal-1, and petal-2. Now let's do leaf-2, and I'm going to unlock this. The guide for that is this four, I guess. Yeah, that's right. I'm going to hide path guide leaf-1. For path guide 4, let's rename this to path guide leaf-2. Now let's go back again here and let's just focus our attention to that. This one would leave the main blob, it's going to have a main blob. This one is going to have that main blob and this one too. It's going to be something like that. This one would have that liquid edge. I'm still going to add that liquid edge until it slowly morphs into this round shape here, and we're good. Now let's do the path. I'm going to lock this and turn on the outline mode. Let's reveal the pot layer and unlock this. Then I'm going to click "I" and pick the color and go back to our brush. Let's hide the path guide leaf-2 and turn on path guide 5. Let's rename this. This is the path guide for the pot, and so let's have a look. Let's start from the first drawing and then let's traverse along in the timeline. This one mood have that main blob and this one too, again, let's follow our path. It's going to have that round shape, then move forward in time and add the main blob. Then here, the liquid edge, it's going to slowly morph into our final shape, and then there we go. Now let's have a look. Now let's hide our guide and then let's remove the outline mode for the rest of the frames, and let's have a look at our animation. It's going to be like that. This is what you're going to do. You're going to add the main blob and once you are done, you can proceed to the next video. 13. Entrance: Add Liquid Trails: Next what we're going to do is we're going to add the liquid trails. Let's start with the liquid trails of petal 1. What we're going to do is I'm also going to unhide the bath guide for petal 1. This is the path guide for petal 1. Now let's traverse our timeline then look for opportunities on where we could add those liquid trails. The other layers are distracting, so let's hide them for now and just unhide them later. We could just focus on this and let's unlock the petal 1 so we could see the onion skin. Let's eyedropper tool. Let's eyedrop the color. I'm going to click "I" and click this. Then let's look for places where we could add the liquid trails. It's still the same process as we did with the bowl. We're going to add multiple instances of the liquid trails. This one, some would leave a liquid trail so let's do that first. I'm going to create a new layer and click this specific frame and click "F7", so we would start there, and I'm going to rename this to petal 1 liquid trail. Then I think this would just be one liquid trail like that. Now let's make this disappear. I'm going to move forward in time click "F7", and let's lock petal 1 for now and just unlock it later so that we could just focus on that specific animation. Now it's going to move forward then use the path. Again, we're going to make this disappear. Make it smaller. The movement is still moving forward and it's making it smaller and smaller as it moves forward. This one would disappear in the next frame because it would have evaporated already. Let's have a look. It's going to be like that. Then where else? Let's create a new layer. We're done with this. I'm going to lock this one and let's unlock that other one and look for other opportunities you could add the liquid trail. Already you have done this. You can see the onion skin and we already have blob so that means we're already done with that. Let's move to the next. This one for this onion skin, we don't have a liquid trail for that, so we're going to add that in. We have a new layer like the specific frame so the drawing would start here, click "F7", and then double-click the layer and rename this petal-1-liquid trail. This one's going to be interesting because it's big. The onion skin is big. It's going to be interesting. Again, remember the farther away it is to the main blob, the smaller the trail is. For the first, here it's going to have that big, it's going to be big. It's going to be big. As we move along here, as we go farther, it's going to get smaller and smaller and still going to use the path. We have this curve, I'm going to use that curve. It's going to have that effect. The further away it is, the smaller those trail would be, it's going to be something like that. I'm going to escape and fill this. We have some opening here that's why it's not workings. Let's just close the path and it's going to have something like that. Again, you can have this both ways. You can have these multiple blobs or I think I'm going to change this and just make this one really long. I think that would be interesting. Have the secondary blob have this form. It's going to be something like that. I think the previous one I did was just too much. It's a bit complicated so let's just do this, just one trail and maybe add liquid trials here and also here. Or have this in a curve too, that it's like it's following the path. I think that's good. Right now let's focus our attention to this specific set, this 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5. Let's focus on that and make that disappear. Let's lock petal 1 and just focus our attention to this specific liquid trail. Let's move forward in time, skip a frame then click "F7". I don't know what happened. Let's undo that, should just be here. Click "F7". Now let's just focus our attention to making all of these disappear. All of them are going to move forward so you can follow the guide, the guide is having in that direction so they would move in that direction too. This one would move a bit forward and as they move forward, they're going to get smaller and smaller. This one's going to go smaller and smaller. Again, move forward in time, click "F7". These are going to be smaller, follow the path guide. This one is going to be smaller and this one too, and this one, and also this. Again forward in time, click "F7", this one. Now let's do this until we have made every of this liquid trail disappear. I think that's good. Let's have a look. Yeah, that's looking really good. Now that's again, unlock the petal 1, and let's have a look where else you could add the liquid shadows. This one would have a liquid trail so let's add another layer here. In this specific frame, click "F7" and rename this to petal-1-liquid trail. Then add those liquid trails. Now let's focus our attention in making this new liquid trail that we just added to disappear. Let's lock petal 1 and focus our attention on that. Let's lock the other layers and just focus on the newly created layer and let's make this disappear. Let's have a look. Now let's unlock petal 1 and let's have a look if we could still add some liquid trail. I think we could have this last one. But for the rest, this here, it's too small, we can just skip that. But this one would be the last set of liquid trail. Let's add a new layer and click F7. Let's rename this to petal-1-liquid trail, and let's do what we did for the other layers. Let's lock this and let's create the liquid trail, and let's lock the petal 1 too. We need first to draw before we lock that. This would be our liquid trails. Maybe add that here too. Then now we could lock this petal 1 and then move forward in time, click F7, and just focus on this newly created instance of liquid trails. Have them move forward and make them disappear. Again, try to not have them disappear at the same time. Like for example this, I'm not going to draw that. Think of it like it should have a domino effect in how they would disappear. Let's have a look. Let's turn off our guide and let's see. It's going to have that effect. Now let's do the same for the other elements. Let's do the petal 2 first. I'm going to unhide it and for the rest, I'm just going to turn on the outline mode. We could just hide them if it's too distracting, and then focus our attention on the task at hand which is petal 2. It's white, so I'm going to click I on my keyboard and pick the color, and I'm going to create a new layer. Let's have a look where we could add those liquid trails. This one, it's a bit too small. You can if you want to, but it's not really required. But this one is already big enough. I think this would warrant one liquid trail. Now, let's start with this. We forgot to click F7. As you can see now, it starts from the first frame. We don't want that so I'm going to click Undo and then click the specific frame because we want to start here and then click F7. Let's rename this to petal-2-liquid trail. Now, this would be our blob. Let's focus on this specific liquid trail. Let's lock petal 2 for now and just unlock it later. Move forward and click F7, and we need the guide. Let's find that guide that should be path guide petal-2 right here. Perfect. Now, let's animate. Remember to make it smaller and smaller. Don't make the next frame to be the same size because it's going to take a long time to make it disappear if you do so. Just make sure or have it in your mind that the next frame of your liquid trail should be smaller, it should be smaller and smaller than the previous frame. That way, it would eventually disappear. Now we're good with that. Let's lock this and create a new layer and traverse our timeline. Since we don't have an onion skin, let's unlock petal 2. This one is big. It's going to leave a big trail so let's go here, click F7. This one is going to have a long trail, something like that and it's going to be smaller and smaller. You don't really have to consume everything. This one would be good. As long as there's a trail, that would suffice. We have currently 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 liquid trails that were going to make disappear. Let's lock petal 2. We could just focus on this and let's rename this to petal-2-liquid trail. Then let's make this disappear. Move forward and make it smaller and smaller. Have this trail follow along our path, the guide. If seeing two drawings is a bit distracting, you could always adjust your onion skin to only show the previous one. Let's have a look so far. It's going to look like that. Now, let's move on. Let's create a new layer and traverse our timeline. We need to unlock petal 2 because that's where we're going to base the liquid trail. This one, we still haven't done it, so we need to add liquid trails to that. Click the specific frame. The drawing would start here, then click F7. The things that I'm going to do next are more of a repetition already. I'm just going to time-lapse this. You could still see my process, but it's going to be a speed up version. We're done with petal-2. Let's hide our path guide and let's have a look. Let's unhide petal-1 and its liquid trails and let's turn off the outline mode and let's have a look. It's going to look like this. Now let's do the same for the other parts. We're done. Let's turn off our path guide and zoom this out. Let's have a look. That's our animation. Once you're done with this, once you've finished the liquid trails for all of the elements or the parts, then you can proceed with the next video. 14. Entrance: Animate In The Details: So next, what we are going to do is to animate in the details. First let's go to our first frame to Frame 1, and let's have a look at our reference. I'm going to unhide our reference layer. Here, we only have three details here, the stem and the two details for each of the leaf. What we're going to do when we animate this is, it's going to have that right on effect. It's like when you're drawing, and if you don't get that, I'm just going to show you and you'll get what I mean. First, let's create a new layer, or I think we should pick the color first. I'm going to right-click our reference layer, click "Properties", and then set the opacity to 100 percent, then click "Okay", so now we're at 100 percent. The stem and the leaf details are the same color, I think. That's the look. Eye drop to the stem and that's the color, let's have a look at our leaf. It's slightly different color, I think, or it's just because of the image. But I think technically they're the same color. You could confirm that by opening your Illustrator file and have a look at the exact color code. If you want to change the exact or choose a color with the exact color code, what you can do is click this and click this icon, and it's going to open this panel. You input here the actual code. But I think for my purposes of demonstrating, we don't really need an accurate colors. I'm just going to stick with this, for both the stem and the leaf details. Then next is I'm going to set this back again to 50 percent, and now we could start. I'm going to create a new layer and this would be our stem. I'm just going to rename this to stem, and it should be below the petal, so that's good. What I meant right the write on is, first I'm going to increase the size of my brush because it's too thin, see. I need it to be the same way as the illustration, so I'm clicking the right bracket on my keyboard to increase the brush size. I think that's about it. This is what I meant about the the write on. We start with like a small drawing and then slowly it's going to finish the whole illustration. Frame 1 would be blank because we want to animate from nothing to something. Skip a frame and then go to Frame 3, and then I'm going to click "F7", and then this is going to be our starting frame. I think we could lower the opacity even further for our brush so that we could see our drawing. Because currently it's too light and it's hard to see so I'm going to right-click "Properties" and then maybe set this to 25. I think that would be good. Then let's move forward and then add a blank frame. Click "F7", and let's turn on the onion skin. We can also apply the acceleration and deceleration concept of this. Our next frame, it would be this big, we added that length, and then I'm going to move forward in time and then click "F7". Then I'm going to adjust the onion skin so that it would show two drawings. Currently I can't see much here, let's adjust our onion skin. Let's hold click and then click the "Advanced Settings", so we have this. We need to see both drawings so I'm just adjusting this. I think that decrease by, we could lessen the decrease by, and I think that's good. We could already see both drawings. This is the addition, this is the added. We could also accelerate, using the acceleration concept we could multiply this. We're going to add this much now. It's going to be this big, and we're going to move forward in time and click "F7". You can maintain the speed or you could start to decelerate. Now I'm going to start to decelerate, it's going to be only by this much and slowly it's going to finish the whole drawing. I'm going to move forward in time, click "F7" and let me just undo this and make sure that this is really accurate. This would be our final frame. Let's have a look with our animation. It's going to be like that. Let's do the same for the leaf. First we need to find the leaf layers, for example, Leaf 1 here. We need to create a layer above Leaf 1 because that is its detail. This is Leaf 1, so let's create a new layer. Let's rename this to leaf-1-detail. So this one would be the detail. Again, I'm going to skip a frame and Frame 1 should be empty, skip a frame so we're starting with Frame 3, click "F7" and we're starting there. Now let's zoom this in and let's see. We can't use this brush size because it's too thick. Let's decrease our brush size and that's the shortcut to decrease the brush size, is the left bracket on your keyboard. I think this is the right size. I'm going to start here, it's going to be something like that, and then move forward in time, click "F7". Then the next frame would be like this, move forward in time, click "F7". Now we could accelerate, so double the added length. I'm going to double the added length, so it's going to be something like that, move forward in time, click "F7", and then you could still accelerate further, double. This is the added length. If we're going to accelerate, we're going to double this. It's going to be one and two, so it's going to be that long. It's going to be like this. Then move forward in time, click "F7". Now we could start to decelerate, divide that into two, so it's going to be like this. The rate at this is growing is dividing into two. If this is a bit distracting for you, the other layers, because they could be seen in the onion skin, you can turn it off or hide this. Let me just start by locking them so that they don't show on my onion skin. I think this is already good. The other layers isn't that much distracting, so just keep it as this. It's going to be this. This one is going to continue, move forward in time and click "F7". Now this is blocking my view, so I think we should really just hide this. I think that would be leaf, I guess, and this blob, where's that? I think that would be Leaf 2, let's hide Leaf 2. Now going back to Leaf 1 detail and let's continue drawing this. This is done for this layer. Now let's do the same for Leaf 2. I'm going to go to Leaf 2 and create a new layer and rename this to leaf-2-detail, and we're going to have the same animation. Let's move forward in time, skip a frame, so go directly to Frame 3, click "F7". Now we're going to start here. Move forward in time, click "F7, and it's going to be like that. Let's accelerate the growth and maintain the growth, and now let's start to slow down until we finish drawing this. We are done. Now, let's unhide the Leaf 2 and Leaf 1, and let's have a look. Let's zoom out. Let's hide our reference layer, and let's have a look at our animation. The timing is a bit weird, because the details start to animate even before the main shape is in that position. So what we can do is, we can delay the details that they would start animating once the main blob has finished going into place. For example, let's go to Leaf 1, now we have our leaf detail. I'm going to select this, so drag up to that point, then hold click, and I'm going to drag it here. Basically what this is telling is that, leaf-1-detail would start animating once Leaf 1 has finished going into place, right here. Now let's do the same for Leaf 2. Select and drag this, and I'm going to click hold and drag it back to the point where Leaf 2 has finished animating. Let's do the same for the stem. We would want that when the petal has finished going into place, I'm going to select the stem animation, hold click and drag it back. Let's have a look at our animation. We have finished the entrance animation of this. Next thing that you're going to do is create the animation in of the details, and once you are done, you can proceed with the next video. 15. Exit: Morph Out: Now what we're going to do is we're going to morph this out. We're going to do the morph out. The first thing that we need to do is create that taper in our path guide, just like what we did with the morph in. Let's have a look with our first path guide, which is for the petal right here. We need to see the full petal like that, and I'm going to unlock this layer and let's create our path guide and let's do the taper. I'm going to do the taper. It's going to be in that direction. I think let me reduce the brush size. I think of it smaller like that, this would work. Let's create the taper and also for this one, so it's going to have that. Before we proceed with the animation, let's just do the taper for all of the path guide before we start with the animation. Let's go to the petal-2 guide so it's going to be the white at the back. Let's go to that layer, this layer, and let's create the taper for this. The estimation of this is going to be here, so let's just create that taper. Let me do that again and make the path more smooth. I think that was good. Let's proceed with the leaf guide, from here, so make sure you're on the layer when you draw. Now this is going to be the taper for that leaf and now for the leaf-2. I'm going to unlock this and let's create that taper. Then the last one which is the path and I'm going to unlock this so I could draw, and make sure you are on that layer and let's create the taper and we're done. We're done with the taper so I'm going to hide this and reveal the path guide for petal-1, so here. I just want to expand this window and there is something that I want to explain to you, which is about the timing of our animation. Take a look at this, this is what we have done. It's a lot, I know, but here you could see that for example, for this petal-2, this frame is exposed until the 4-second mark. Meaning it doesn't disappear, it stays on the screen. You could see here the main elements, the stem, petal-2, they stay on screen, petal-1, leaf-1 detail. The liquid trails, as you can see here, they disappear at some point. With just this, you could already tell that the animation would end here. This is the last frame where the animation would end. When we do the morph out, we don't want to start immediately after the entrance animation is finished. We want to have a little bit of pause because we want the viewer to appreciate the illustration, so let's leave a breathing room, breathing time for the viewer to appreciate the illustration before we do the exit animation. With that said, let's start the exit animation at the 3-second mark right here. This is where we would start morphing out doing the exit animation. I do believe that from three seconds to four seconds, this amount of frames would be lacking to completely do the exit animation because we're still going to do the liquid trails and et cetera, but we'll just add a few. Let's just add the necessary frames as we need them. You could always click F5. I could always click this and F5, if we lack a bit of frames. For now, let's just stick with our 4-second mark and we'll start the exit animation here at this specific point, at 3-second mark. Now, let me drag this down. I need to drag down the window so that it's like that and let's go to this. Let's start with petal-1 and I'm going to use the eyedropper tool, click Eye and then click the petal color. I'm going to go back to my brush tool, which is B. Now, currently as you can see here, everything is blue. Don't click F7 because you're going to create a blank frame. Let me just try it so you could see. If I'm going to click F7, see that's what it's going to do. It's going to create lots of blank key frame. We don't want that, so I'm going to undo this. If everything is selected, just select one frame. Just select one frame, and then let's click F7. Let's turn on our onion skin, and this is what's going to be the animation. It's now going to be the opposite of a morph in. A morph out, we will be animating something into nothing. We're going to animate this to disappear, and we're still going to apply the acceleration, maintaining speed and deceleration concept. Currently, this one is at the full stop. The next frame, it's completely up to you where you would put it. But since we are going to apply the acceleration concept, don't make it too far away like here. It should be close to somewhere here, and remember that our base model for our morph is an oval. Let's slowly morph from a petal shape to an oval. The next frame would still have that petal shape, but it's going to be more loose because slowly, we're going to make it into an oval until it disappears. I'm just going to color this, press K and then click here. Then I'm going to go back to the skip a frame, then click F7. Now I'm going to extend my onion skin so I could see two drawings. Right we would accelerate. Let's double the space. Now it's going to be somewhere here. Now I'm just going to make it a little bit like be the petal shape, but more of an oval now, and then skip a frame, click F7. Now let's accelerate further, so it's going to be here, and now, I'm going to make this into an oval shape. I think it's too much. I think let's push it back a bit. It's going to be like that, and then move forward in time, click F7. Now let's decelerate. It's going to be somewhere here. It's going to have that shape, and then move forward in time. I'm going to click F7 and then it's going to be something like this. We're going to follow the taper so that it's going to slowly disappear, going to be at that zero-point right here. Let's follow this, follow your guide. Move forward again in time, click F7 and it's going to be here. Move forward in time, click F7, and then I'm just going to make it into a dot. Move forward in time and I'm going to click F7, and then it disappears at that point. Let's take a look at our morph out. It's going to look like that, morph in and then let's have a look at this morph in. Then pause a little bit, then morph out. We have finished for petal-1, now let's do the same for petal-2. I'm just going to hide this so we could focus our attention on petal-2, and currently our guide is for petal-1, so I'm going to hide that and unhide the guide for petal-2 and that's fine. The petal-2 there. For the delay, remember we have created the delay in our morph in. Let's just do that later. For now, let's just start the morph out animation at the 3-second mark for all of the layers and let's just adjust them later. Click this specific frame and then click F7 and before that, let me undo it. Let's eyedrop the colors. I'm going to click Eye and let's eyedrop the color. Now I got that white color and click again. If you see here, it's selected. So if I click F7, that's going to create blank key frames for all of them and that's not what you want. We just want one specific frame. I'm going to click that layer and then click F7. Now let's morph this out, so it's going to have this. Now click K to color that. Move forward in time, click F7. Now let's accelerate, let's double the distance, it's now going to be here. A heart shape it's much easier to morph into an oval. Again, move forward in time, click F7. It's now going to be here and now I'm going to make this into an oval shape. Move forward in time, click F7. I think we could still accelerate this. Now it's going to be here. Move forward in time, click F7. Now let's decelerate. Make sure you lock the path guide because we don't want to accidentally color the path guide. Let's click Lock. Let's go back to our petal-2. Where it is that pedal-2 layer? Here, and then going to feel that. Move forward in time and then click F7. It's going to be here. Now it's smaller. Move forward in time, click F7. It's going to be here. Move forward in time, click F7. Now it's just a dot. Move forward in time, and then click F7, then it's gone, it disappeared. Now let's have a look at our animation. Now let's have a look with the petal-1 revealed. I'm going to unhide petal-1 and let's have a look. It's going to have that animation. Now, let's go to our leaf. I'm just going to lock petal-1 and I'm going to lock petal-2. Let's go to our leaf 1. Let's start with leaf 1 and go to the three-second mark. I'm going to unlock this and use the eyedropper tool, select the layer to get the color, and then click the specific frame exactly on the three-second mark and click F7. Let's reveal the path guide for the leaf. That's the path guide for the leaf. Let's hide the path guide for the petal. Let's lock the path guide leaf-1 so that we don't accidentally draw on it. Currently, I have here selected on leaf-1 layer. Let's start. This would be our next frame. It's going to be close on the previous frame and then move forward in time and then click F7. Now it's going to accelerate. It's going to be here. Notice now I'm slowly morphing this into an oval. The other leaf, this leaf-2, is a bit distracting for me because I can't see anymore where I'm drawing. I'm going to hide this. I have hidden it. I'm also going to hide the leaf-2-detail so I could just focus on this specific drawing. Now let's move forward in time, click F7. Now let's accelerate. Let's double the distance. It's going to be here, now it's going to have that oval shape. Move forward in time, click F7. Let's just maintain speed. It's going to be here. Now let's decelerate. Move forward in time, click F7. Let's decelerate. Move forward in time, click F7. Decelerate, and then it's a dot, and then I'm going to click F7. Now it has disappeared. Now let's have a look. Looking good. Now let's do the same for leaf-2. Let's find leaf-2. Let's unhide this and let's hide that guide and let's reveal the guide for leaf-2. Go to the three-second mark and find the leaf-2 layer here. Click that specific frame that marks this three-second mark, then click F7. I'm just going to lock leaf-1 because it's showing in my onion skin and it's a bit distracting for me. Maybe let's just hide this so we could just focus on leaf-2. Now I'm at leaf-2. Currently, it's locked. Remember, you can't draw when the layer is locked, so let's unlock that. I'm going to click B for Brush tool. Now let's animate. It's going to be here. It's going to be near the previous frame. Then move forward in time. Skip a frame, click F7. Now let's accelerate and slowly morph this into an oval. Move forward in time, click F7, accelerate. Let's double the distance. It's going to be here. I think next frame, now click F7, I think we could still accelerate. Now it's going to be here or I think here. Move forward in time, click F7. Now we can decelerate or I think the deceleration should be around here. Move forward in time, click F7. Remember, you need to skip a frame, just a reminder. Now decelerate. Move again forward in time, click F7, decelerate. Move for in time, click F7, decelerate. Then it disappeared. Now let's have a look. Looking good. Now for the last one, the pot, so we need to hide the leaf-2-guide and let's unhide the path guide for the pot, and then let's just lock this so we could be sure that you don't draw on it. Go to the three-second mark. This is the pot, and currently it's locked. Let's unlock this and click F7. It's not at the three-second mark so I'm going to move one more frame right here and click F7. Let me undo that. We forgot to click the eyedropper tool so click I and I'm going to pick the color, go back to B, click that specific frame then click F7. Now let's do this. This would be our next frame. Remember, we're going to slowly morph this into an oval. Move again forward in time, click F7. Now let's accelerate and make this more into an oval shape. Move forward in time, click F7, accelerate again. It's now going to be here. Now it's an oval. Move again forward in time, click F7. We could just maintain speed. Move forward in time, click F7. Now we can decelerate, so it's going to be here. Move forward in time, click F7, decelerate. Move forward in time, F7, decelerate. As you can see, as we're decelerating, the distance is getting tighter and tighter. Move forward in time, click F7, until we make the object disappeared. Now move forward in time, then click F7. Now it has disappeared and let's have a look. It's going to look like that. Let's unhide the leaf-2-detail. Let's unhide the main elements that we have hidden just a while ago. I think that's it. Now let's have a look. That's going to be the animation, the morph out. The main elements have morphed out. This is what you're going to do next. Once you are done, you can proceed to the next video. 16. Exit: Add Main Blob: Now, that we have finished the morph out, the next step that we're going to do is add the main blob. Before that, let's have a look at our current file and the number of layers is a lot. It's hard already to locate. What we can do is we can add folders to this and put the liquid trails to the folder so that it would lessen the number of layers. To add a folder, first, let's click this petal to liquid trail, for example. Then I'm going to click this folder icon right here, and what I'm going to do is I'm going to select all of the "Petal-2-liquid trail." I'm going to click this and I'm going to hold the "Shift" key and click this. I've selected all of them. Then I'm going to hold, click and drag towards the folder. Then now it's on that folder. You could click this arrow button to collapse the layers, it's going to be like that. I'm just going to rename this folder, double-click this, and let's just rename this to petal-2-liquid trail folder so we would know what that folder is for. Now let's do that for the other liquid trails. Because with the liquid trails, it's going to be a lot of layers, so we need to add the liquid trail for the morph out later on. It's really going to be a lot of layers. Let's do some little bit of layer organization. I'm going to click the folder icon right here and click this and hold "Shift" and just select the liquid trail. Don't select the petal one, just the liquid trails. Drag, hold, click, drag this to this folder. Let's collapse it, double-click this, and this is petal-1-liquid trail folder. If you want to have a look at your layers, you can click this to expand, click it again to collapse. Now it's more organized, it's much better, it's easier now to locate. Remember that we don't want everything to animate at the same time. You want to have that domino effect. Let me just adjust this. What we want is that first, the petal-1 animation would start, and then let's drag this petal-2, and move this back two times. It's going to start here, and then here, this is where it would start for the leaf-1. It's going to be that and move it back a bit. If you can look at this, you will see that petal-1 would start moving out, and then with just two frames, petal-2 would now start moving out. Then after that, leaf-1. For leaf-2 it would start after leaf-1 so it's going to be here. That's where leaf-1 would start, and then let's move this back a bit. For the pot, the pot would be the last one to move. The order of this actually depends on you. You can make this animate later, so I'm going to drag this here, or you could animate this just by delaying a little bit. I think I would be good with that, and let's have a look. I think I'm already happy with the animation or the timing of this. Remember what I told you that we lack a bit of frames for all of these because we're still going to animate the liquid trails later on? Let's just add that now. Let's just add one second. At five-second mark here, I'm just going to select all of these and I'm going to click "F5." It's going to be exposed up to that point. For the rest of this, for this detail, I'm going to click "F5" here. I'm also going to click "F5" here. For stem, and for the reference and BG, background, I'm going to select this and I'm going to click "F5." They're going to be exposed up to that point. For the rest of this, for example, petal -2, you don't need anymore to F5 this here to extend it because this is already empty, it's blank and it's pointless to make it up to this time because anyway it's already empty. You don't need to F5 this up to that point. I think we could already start with adding the main blobs. Let's start first with petal-1 here. Let's turn on the path guide for petal-1 there. We are at petal-1. Let's unlock this layer and let's begin. I'm going to pick the color, I'll move forward in time. This one doesn't warrant a main blob so let's proceed. Move forward. This one, the space is already big enough so we can add that liquid look. I'm going to move again forward in time. This one, if we are not going to add this, it's going to be abrupt so we need to add this liquid trail here. For this one, I think we could just add a little bit of that here too and then here. Then now it has disappeared. Now let's have a look at our animation, so it's going to look like that. Now let's go to petal-2. I'm going to lock this and let's go to petal-2, or maybe just hide this. Let's go to petal-2, and I'm going to pick the color. Go back to brush to be. Because the space is a bit big, now let's add the main blob here. This one, there's a very big space. Let me just undo that because I may have done that wrong. Because our guide is still for petal-1, so I'm going to hide this and let's reveal the guide for petal-2. Now let's go back. Petal-2 is here, this is where we should be drawing. I'm going to draw that, that liquid edge and fill that in. For this one, that's going to have the main blob, and this one too, and this one, and this one, and this one. It's just the same concept as what we did with the morph in. We started with the morph in and then we added the main blobs, it's just the same process. We're good with that. Now let's go to our leaf. From here on out, it's basically just a repetition of steps applied to the different parts. I'm just going to time-lapse this. Let's have a look at our animation. That's what you are going to do next. Once you are done, you can proceed with the next video. 17. Exit: Add Liquid Trails: Next what we're going to do is we're going to add liquid trails to our animation. Lets see. Do this again one by one just like what we did with the entrance liquid trails. Let's start first with petal. Lets take a look at that petal 1 let's locate the petal 1. This is petal 1. We need to turn on the petal 1 guide. It's this. Let's turn on the onion skin. Currently our petal 1 is locked. Let's unlock our petal 1. Let's lock petal 2 because we could see it in our onion skin. I'm going to lock petal 2 and just focus our attention in petal 1. Now let's traverse the timeline and see where we could add liquid trails. We could add the liquid trails once it begins this shape because here it's very much like still the flower. You'll start the liquid trail once it has this liquid blob already. This would be our first. This onion skin, see that? We need to add liquid trails to that. I'm going to create a new layer. Click here, click "F7" and I'm going to pick the color, click "I" and then click this. I'm going to go back to my brush tool. Then let's add the liquid trail. It's very much the same process as what we did before. Skip a frame, click '' F7. '' Now I'm going to lock petal 1 because I'm just going to focus on making this specific instance of liquid trails to disappear. Now we are done with this set. I'm just going to rename this to petal-1-liquid trail. Then I'm going to create another layer. Now I'm going to lock this. Now let's traverse through our timeline and see where else we can add the liquid trail. I'm going to unlock petal 1 because we need the onion skin. This one is already done. This one doesn't have any liquid trails. We need to do that. Let's click this current frame in the timeline and then click '' F7. '' Now let's add our liquid trail and we're going to follow the motion path of our guide. It's going to have this effect. It's going to have this a bit of a curve. Then let's lock petal 1. It won't show in the onion skin. Now the only thing that would show on the onion skin is this new instance that we have created, this liquid trail. I'm going to click '' F7. '' Now we're going to focus on making these disappear. Then we're done with that. Let's rename this to petal-1-liquid trail. Let's lock this and unlocked petal 1. Let's again traverse the timeline and look where else we could add. This one already has that liquid trail but this one, it's still empty. I'm going to click '' F7 '' in this specific time. It's just a small shape now so maybe just 1 liquid trail would do. Let's lock petal 1 it's good if we just focus on that, move forward in time click '' F7. '' Then let's focus on making this disappear. Then let's rename this to petal-1-liquid trail. Let's lock this. Let's have a look at our animation so far. Let's have a look without the petal guide. I'm going to hide that and let's have a look. It's going to look like that. Looking good. Now we have finished the liquid trails for petal 1 and so that it's organized, let's select all of the petal 1 liquid trail, the newly added ones. Again to do that, I'm going to click to this and hold my Shift key and go to click the 3rd. It's going to select all of it. Then click '' Hold '' and drag it to this folder. You can see that there's this black line. But once it goes like it indents forward meaning that's going to go inside the folder. Then I release then now they are all inside the folder so I could expand this and now the animation is there or collapse it so now it's more organized. We have finished the liquid trail for petal 1. Now let's do the same for the liquid trails of petal 2. Now let's turn on the petal 2 guide. This is the petal 2 guide and make sure it's locked. Currently it's locked, that's good. Now let's go to our petal 2. Let's unlock this so that it would show on the onion skin. Maybe let's just hide petal 1 because it's blocking our view. I'm going to hide petal 1. Now let's go back to petal 2, let's create a new layer. This would be our liquid trail. Now, let's look for opportunities where we could add the liquid trail. I remember we need to look at the previous frame not the after. The green one, that's the after frame. The blue one is the frame before. So that it's not too confusing, you could adjust your onion skin so that it won't show the after frames. It's only for this specific task that it would benefit you to only have the previous frame. This one, it doesn't have that liquid trails yet. I'm going to click this frame, click '' F7. '' I'm going to pick the color. I'm going to add the liquid trails. Then let's make this disappear. Now let's rename this to petal-2-liquid trail. Now let's create a new layer and now let's traverse again the timeline and see where else you could add. Now, the liquid trails of petal 1 is blocking our view. Let's just hide everything. We need to expand the petal 1 liquid trail folder and hide the liquid trails. Then I'm going to collapse it again. Then let's go back to this layer then let's add liquid trails to this. The first one would be long and the next one would be a bit smaller and then smaller. Same with here. Farther away this to the mean blob, the smaller it gets. Now let's focus our attention on making this disappear. Now let's rename this to petal-2-liquid trail. Now let's again traverse the timeline and see where else you could add our liquid trail. I think we just needed one more and we're good with petal 2. I'm going to create a new layer, click "F7" and then just for this last one, there's going to be like one trail here. I think one trail would be enough. Let's focus our attention on making this new trail to disappear. Let's rename this to petal-2-liquid trail. Since we're already done with this, let's select all of petal 2, and let's drag this to the petal-2-liquid trail folder. Now it's inside the folder. Let's have a look at our animation so far. That's our animation so far. Now let's go to our leaf. I'm going to hide our petal-2-guide, path guide, and let's turn on the path guide for the leaf. I'm just going to click the "Lock" button. So just to be sure that we don't accidentally draw on it. Now let's go to our leaf. Before that, I'm just going to collapse the folder. That's good. Let's go to our leaf 1. I'm going to unlock it so it would show on the onion skin. Let's start. First I'm going to pick the color. Let's add liquid trials to this. I'm going to create a new layer. Let's hide the details first because it's a bit distracting or obscuring our view. I'm going to hide the leaf 1 detail and I think that's the stem. Let's hide that too and leaf 2 detail. Let's hide that leaf 2 detail. Now we're here. Let's cover the timeline and look for opportunities where we could add liquid trail. Here, this is the first time it became a liquid effect. So that's bound to have some liquid trail. So I'm going to click this specific time in the timeline and then click "F7", and then let's add our liquid trail. Let's add one more blob or one more liquid trail here. Let's focus our attention on making that disappear. Basically, this is the same process as the previous elements. There's not much new information that I'm going to say. I'm just going to time-lapse this. Basically, we're just going to do the same for leaf 1 then leaf 2, then for the pot. So I'm just going to speed this up. I think we're done here. Let's hide our guide and let's have a look at our animation. Let's review everything. Let's expand the folders and unhide all the layers that we have hidden. I'm just checking the folders if you still have hidden layers. Let's include all of them, including the stem. I think that's everything. Let's have a look. That's what we have done so far. We're almost done. This is what you're going to do. You're going to add liquid trails, and once you are done, you can proceed to the next video. 18. Exit: Animate Out The Details: Now what we're going to do is, we're going to animate out the details. This is what we have done so far, and it would be weird if the details will just stay like that so we need to animate it out. The animate out is the opposite of animate in. If the animate in of the details replicates the way we draw, the animate out would be like erasing the details. I'm just going to show you, for the stem, so let's go to the stem layer, so this is the stem layer. Like with other parts, let's start with the tree seconds mark. Here I'm going to click "F7" and I'm going to undo first, and I'm going to pick the colors, so click "I" and click that, so you have the colors. I'm going to go back to B, and currently our brush size is too small, so I'm going to increase the brush size. It would be around that. Now I think that's the right size. A tree second mark, click "F7" and click the onion skin that's turned on your onion skin. What I meant about the animation out is that the next frame should be smaller in length. I'm going to skip a frame and here click "F7", and it's becoming smaller and smaller in length until it becomes zero, until it becomes nothing. If the other elements are obscuring your vision, we can always hide them, so these are Leaf 1. I'm going to hide the Leaf 1 and lets hide Leaf 2 also. Let's go back to our stem, move forward in time and click "F7". It's going to be smaller and smaller until it becomes nothing, until it disappears. So there it disappears. Now let's do the same for the other details like the leaf 1 detail. Let's start at the tree second mark. Right here, I'm going to click "F7", is this three seconds? No, its here, so I'm going to click "F7". Currently my brush is too thick, so I'm going to click the left bracket on my keyboard to adjust. I think that's still too thick, I think this is the right size. It's going to be like that, it would be smaller in length. Then move forward in time. Skip a frame, click "F7." It's going to get smaller and smaller until the size or the length would be zero. Now let's do the same for leaf 2 detail again, start from the three second mark and I'm going to click up seven. It's going to be smaller in length. It's going to get smaller and smaller until it becomes zero. Let's have a look. Let's turn on the leaf layer, the leaf 2 and leaf 1, but let's bring them back and let's have a look. It's looking good. Now if you want to adjust the priming of this for the animation out of the details you can also do so. For example, our stem. Let's look at the stem, so this stem, if you want the sub a domino effect. That this would, animate it first before the blob would morph out. What you can do is select all of the frames and make sure you include the blank keyframe. I select that, hold, click and maybe push this back by a few frames. The animation of this would start sooner than all of the other frames. Now let's also do the same for our leaf details. For example, this, I'm going to select and make sure you include the blank keyframe. Click and drag. Move this back by a bit. Let's do the same for the leaf to detail. Move this back by a bit and let's have a look. It's looking good. You're done. 19. Exporting Your Animation: Now that we have finished the animation, your class project, the next thing we're going to do is to export it. There are multiple ways on how to export on your animation. The most common one is either the SWF, the GIF, or a video file like an mp4. Let's start first with SWF. The shortcut to export an SWF is Command Enter on a MAC or Control Enter on Windows. Currently, you may see, why is this guide being shown? Didn't we have hidden it here? How the SWF works is even if it's hidden, it will show everything. In order for some of the layers to not show on the export, what you can do is convert them to a guide layer. I'm going to select this and hold Shift. I'm going to set up all my path guide and right-click, then click this "Guide". Now I'm going to export the SWF again. Now, it doesn't have the guide, but we still have this. What is this? This is our reference image. Let's close this. Let's go to our reference image. Here, our ref, this isn't a guide layer, it's just hidden. We need to change this to a guide layer so that it's not going to show on our export. Right-click this and then click "Guide". Now let's do that again. Now we have exported the SWF file. Usually, this is being passed on to After Effects. If you're working in a team and it's a big project and they have to do something and post, you need the SWF for that. Where can you find that? It's just right beside your file right here. Next, what we're going to do is export a GIF. Click "File", click "Export", then export, and you meet the GIF. It's going to open up this window. It's currently processing. I'm going to click "Save" and choose the location where you want to save it. I'm going to save it here. Click "Save". The GIF is already exported. Now, what if you want to export this as a video, as an mp4? Click "File", go to Export and click this "Export Video/Media". Depending on the version of Animate that you're using, if you're using the newer version, you may need to download the Media Encoder. I'm going to click this. It's going to open up this window. These are just okay. Format is H.264, and where do we want to save it? The location, I'm just going to change the location to our class project here. I'll click "Save", and then, I'm going to click "Export". What it does is it will open a different application, which is the Media Encoder. Here I would like to access, I'll click "Okay". Once it's done, you will receive this pop up that it has been successfully created and just click "Okay". All of the files are here. This is our SWF, our GIF, and our mp4. To create the project, go to My Class and scroll down. Here at the Projects and Resources tab, there is this Create Project button, so click that, and then, you'll have this. For the cover image, click "Upload". Don't upload the GIF for the cover image, just upload the JPEG, the design that you have chosen. Click that and I'm going to click "Open". Then, you can resize this. Maybe I'm going to make it a bit bigger, click "Submit". That's my cover. Now for the project title, I'm just going to type here My Test Upload. Now the GIF, this is where we're going to add the GIF. Write any description that you want or anything you want to say to me, any questions that you may have. I'm just going to type here My test description. Then to add more content here, the GIF here, or in the Add More Content section, there's this image. Click that, and then locate the GIF, click "Open". Now, it has finished uploading and then click "Publish", and you're good to go. 20. Final Thoughts: First, I would like to congratulate you for finishing this class. Well done. Don't forget to post your class project here at Skillshare because I would really love to see your animation. The lessons that I've taught here isn't exclusively for plant illustration. You could apply this to any illustration that you want, like let's say a computer illustration or a shoe illustration, or whatever illustration that you have made. The concept still applies. At the very start, you need to analyze your illustration. You need to see how many basic colors that you have, because the number of basic colors is the number of blob animation that you need to animate. If you have some details in your illustration, like some outline work, you could always animate them later, like what we did with your class project. I think that's it. Thank you very much for taking this class. I hope you enjoyed it. I hope you learned something today. If there's a concept that you didn't fully understand, then please write a question in the discussion tab and I will try my best to answer them. Or you could also reach me via Instagram or Facebook. That's all for now. Take care always, and see you next time.