An Easy In-Depth Guide To Playing The Drum Set - Beginning Lesson Pt 2, w/Play Along Beat Videos | Ben Schlatter | Skillshare

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An Easy In-Depth Guide To Playing The Drum Set - Beginning Lesson Pt 2, w/Play Along Beat Videos

teacher avatar Ben Schlatter, Rhythm Is Everywhere

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Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Lessons in This Class

32 Lessons (2h 23m)
    • 1. Intro

      0:42
    • 2. Drum Rolls Open

      7:06
    • 3. Drum Rolls Closed

      7:35
    • 4. Dividing A Beat (part 2)

      5:28
    • 5. Accents

      4:15
    • 6. Flams Drags Roughs

      7:57
    • 7. Coordination Exercise

      3:24
    • 8. Drum Beat 5

      3:17
    • 9. Drum Beat 6

      4:02
    • 10. Drum Beat 7

      3:50
    • 11. Drum Beat 8

      4:21
    • 12. Practice Tips

      5:58
    • 13. Slow to Fast Drum Beat 5 Fill 2

      5:41
    • 14. Slow to Fast Drum Beat 6 Fill 4

      5:39
    • 15. Slow to Fast Drum Beat 7 Fill 3

      5:40
    • 16. Slow to Fast Drum Beat 8 Fill 3

      7:24
    • 17. Play Along Beat 5A 115 BPM

      3:44
    • 18. Play Along Beat 5A 115 BPM no drums

      3:44
    • 19. Play Along Beat 5B 245BPM

      3:52
    • 20. Play Along Beat 5B 245BPM no drums

      3:52
    • 21. Play Along Beat 6A 95 BPM

      3:54
    • 22. Play Along Beat 6A 95 BPM no drums

      3:20
    • 23. Play Along Beat 6B 185 BPM

      5:33
    • 24. Play Along Beat 6B 185 BPM no drums

      5:33
    • 25. Play Along Beat 7A 45 BPM

      4:26
    • 26. Play Along Beat 7A 45 BPM no drums

      4:26
    • 27. Play Along Beat 7B 125 BPM

      3:08
    • 28. Play Along Beat 7B 125 BPM no drums

      3:08
    • 29. Play Along Beat 8A 165 BPM

      3:00
    • 30. Play Along Beat 8A 165 BPM no drums

      3:00
    • 31. Play Along Beat 8B 225 BPM

      3:12
    • 32. Play Along Beat 8B 225 BPM no drums

      3:12
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About This Class

Continue learning the basic elements of playing beats on the drum set with this second part of the Beginning Drum Lesson.  This builds on the first part (linked below), and in this class we'll learn:

   - Fundamental parts of the drumming language (rudiments) - rolls, flams, drags, and roughs

   - Create accents effortlessly

   - Improve your sense of a steady beat

   - Coordination exercise to improve your awareness and independence of your arms and legs

No experience is necessary, but experienced players may still find some helpful tips. You'll need drum sticks, and a drum set or set of drum set pads.  

Check out my other Skillshare classes:

An Easy In-Depth Guide to Playing the Drum Set - Beginning Lesson Pt 1/ Play Along Videos

Quick Start Guide to Drumming : How To Play Drum Set For Absolute Beginners w/Play Along Videos

How To Setup A Drum Set : Drums, Stands, Hardware, and Drum Tuning

or sneak a peek at my website www.BeatsWithBen.com

Meet Your Teacher

Teacher Profile Image

Ben Schlatter

Rhythm Is Everywhere

Teacher

Hello, I'm Ben Schlatter, a professional musician who lives and works in the Metro Detroit area. I play drum set, steel drum, piano, and vibraphone in a wide variety of groups and situations. That's one part of playing music I really love; constantly being put in touch with different people in different places.  After playing and teaching for over 20 years, I've developed ways to guide anyone on their journey to becoming a better musician.  

When not involved in something musical, I enjoy cooking with my wife, traveling, cats, talking with friends and family, biking, nature, history, science, and learning in general.

 

 

See full profile

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Transcripts

1. Intro: Hi, my name's bench. Later, welcome to the beginning of drum lesson part 2. In this lesson, we'll learn more vocabulary and technique to help build a solid drumming foundation. Will learn about drum accents, drum rolls, more ways to divide a beat. Vlans drags, roughs, and 400 beats to play with the filters we know from beginning drum lesson part one, we'll look at ways to break those beats down and make them easier to play. We'll also go over some more tips on practicing and how to stay motivated. The project for this class has you playing drums in a faint. I have included tracks both with and without drums so that you can listen along and learn the beat and then test your skills by filling in the drum roll and make the band group. Let's play. 2. Drum Rolls Open: When we play a drum, we're all there are two types of drum rolls. We can play a closed role where we tried to get as many bounces out of each stick as possible when we throw it down. And then an open role where we have a measured amount of strokes, either single or a double stroke roll, where we have two times on each stick. Open roles are commonly organized into how many strokes are in the role. And the most common roles are odd numbered rolls, 5, 7, 9, 11, 13, and 15 stroke roles. When we're practicing these, we'll start with our right hand. But then after playing the role once, we'll start with a left-hand the next time, play all these open roles while counting. So if we start with the five stroke roll, we can count it One and two. Ready and go E and O, one at the end. At the end, good to be at 34 E. And next we will hear the seven stroke roll, ready and go. We end 0, 1 and 2, and 3 and 4 and 0, 1 and 2 and 3 and 4. And next we'll hear the nine stroke roll. Ready and go. E and B and 23, E and one, E and D, E and three, E and 12, and the E and O and 23 E. And next we'll hear the 11 stroke roll. Ready and go E and 123123. And I want you to be three E and one unit. And through week and next we'll hear the routine stroke roll. Ready and go. We go on and and and 4123412 and good and eat. And 0, 1, and 2, and 3 and 4. And lastly we have the 15 stroke roll. Ready and go. We end 1234123412341234. And next we'll do those same open roles, but with double strokes. When we're practicing these, we'll start with our right hand. But then after playing the role once, we'll start with a left-hand, the next time I'll start with the five stroke roll. Ready and go. We don't want the hand to meet and greet. And for b and 0, 1 and 2 will be. Then the next the seven stroke roll. Ready and go E and O on the end of the tube. And 3 and 4 and 0, 1, p and d and 34. Next we have the NIH stroke roll. Ready and go E and O, 1231 and the green and the three, and the 231 at the end. In the end the three 0s. And next we have the 11 stroke roll. Ready and go. We Yan DO one vn, good to eat and the look and feel and to eat panda 123812 E and three E. And next we have the 13 stroke roll, ready and go E and one E and the new VM 3 and 4, the N TO one end to the end, 341 T and N would be and 341 two million three Vn of War II. And, and lastly we have the 15 stroke roll, ready and go E and 123412340 or a through E and 34123. And practice those roles at whatever speed you can do it steadily. Notice what's B that is on a metronome and then slowly speed it up as it becomes comfortable. Remember, slow practice makes progress. 3. Drum Rolls Closed: when we play a drum we're all there are two types of drum rolls we can play a closed role where we tried to get as many bounces out a beach stick as possible when we throw it down and then an open role where we have a measured amount of strokes either single or a double structural where we have two times on each stake when we play a closed rule we want to start by just letting the stig dropped in bouts at the very end of that you see that there are a lot of small bounces they create a little buzzing sound so by pushing in just a little bit we can recreate all those small balances that happen at the end of just dropping our stick and we want to get as many bounces as possible sometimes if we drag our stick we can create a few extra bounces and the trick then is to start one stick and right before that one stops bouncing start the other this might not sound like a buzz role at that slow speed but you're really developing the feel for all those small balances notice about pushing in too much it'll start bouncing and if I don't push it enough I'll get the same effect as the first thing we did just dropping the stake it will have a small balances at the end but we won't have a consistent sound remember we just want all those small balances that happened at the end of that again we don't want the sound to stop so as soon as one stick is about to stop we'll start the other and will stay nice and relaxed as we do this as that becomes comfortable you can start to move your hands faster but again stay nice and relaxed don't tighten up or start to push in more as you speed your hands up sometimes taking the bottom fingers off of the stick can help the stick bounce I'm still trying to get as many bounces out of each tick as possible even though I'm moving my hands faster but remember tried to make the stick do the work and even though we're moving our hands faster we shouldn't have it looked like this by doing that I'm tightening up and losing the relaxed comfortable playing that's going to allow me to play my best again I want to make each sick do the work and keep my hands as relaxed as possible only moving them as fast as I need to make a consistent sound you'll have to experiment with different amounts of pressure to see what works when we start a buzz role try to make sure that both sticks hit the drum at the same time that way we have a nice full sound right from the beginning if we start with just one stick it's a little bit thinner right at the beginning it's a small difference but you want to try to make it full right from the get-go instead of we have just to practice the closed role will add it to our six sticking is that we learned in the beginning drum less than Part 1 singles doubles parentals and the three inversions of those paradox One two ready go one and two and three and four and one two three and four and one and two and three and four and one two and three and four and one and two and three and four and one and two and both one and two and and one and two three and four and one two and three and both work to do and vote two and three and four and one two three four one two three and four and one and two and three and four and one and two and three and four and two and three and four and one two and three and four and one two three and four and one two and three and four and one and two and three and four and one and two and three and four and one and two and three and four and two and three and four and one and two and three and four two and three and four and one two and three and four one and two three and four and one and two and three and four 4. Dividing A Beat (part 2): In the beginner drum less than Part 1, we looked at different ways that we can divide a beat. Now we're going to add to that. Now that we know closed roles, we can hold out notes on the drugs. Usually the sound goes away quite quickly and we can't really sustain. But now that we know how to roll, we can sustain notes. So we're going to add whole notes. Or in other words, holding a note for four beats and half notes, or in other words, holding a note for two beats. We're also going to add a rhythm called a quarter note triplet. In the beginner of dramas and part Lab 1, we learned about eighth note triplets, whereas we divide a b into three, like this. With a quarter note triplet, we're going to play every other count. So instead of playing one law lead to leaf 3 la li for la li, we'll play one law, lead to lovely 3 law leaf for loudly. I'll demonstrate by counting eighth note triplets and playing quarter note triplets will lead to the three la li go. So now we'll play our steady beat divisions. Playing whole notes, half notes, quarter notes, quarter note triplets, eighth notes, eighth note triplets, and finally 16th notes. And we'll do each one for four measures. I have my metronome set to 40, and I recommend wearing earplugs, so it's much easier to hear the metronome unless you have a speaker system you can Blair through and other people in the house, you're not going to annoy. So with a metronome set to 40, we're going to play each steady B division for four measures or four count to four. So here we go. One, two, ready? Go to three. 123412341011. More. Poll. One law lead to la, la, la, la la la, la, la, la, la, la, la, la, la. La. The 4123412341234, the 12341234123412341234, again, 123412341, layer two, layer three. Leave for like lead or law. The two, the three, the four and the other one to the end of any given atom death or any DO 123412341234 to one. 5. Accents: And the beginner drum less than part one, we learned about how to throw a stick and bounce it. Next, we're going to learn about how to access or make one of those strokes louder than the others. This is very useful in not only making drum beats groove, but also adding a little bit of variety and nuance to a plane. If you have a 100 drummers play the same beat, likely play it a little bit different from each other, making certain parts louder than others. We call accents. And in drumming to create an accent as we're starting with our six hi, all we have to do is lift up our wrist as if it's attached to a string. And then drop it and let the stake just follow along, sort of tracing the path and creating this whipping motion as the risk drops. Just like with normal strokes, we want to let the stig bounce up on its own and not lifted up at all. Notice my elbow is also moving a bit. Now you try with me. Try this with each hand slowly as you first starting this, and as you feel comfortable in that whipping motion, you can start to go faster. To practice accents will play a steady stream of single strokes and count them as 16th notes like one 0s and two E and 34 E. And at first we'll only accent the numbers 1234. Then we'll shift to accenting the Aedes of each of those number 1, E and two, E and three, E and four E. And then we'll switch to the end. Back on the hand is bandwidth. And then lastly we'll switch to the of each number 412. And like this, ready and go E one, the two, the 3412, ie a or b and 0, 1 and 2 E AND and OR. And though one, we add the very deep hip or knee at 1234123412341. One, notice I'm still bouncing every stroke and letting it come back up to the point at that started only raising the accident stroke. Try that exercise at a starting speed of 65 or 75 beats per minute and speed it up from there as it becomes comfortable. 6. Flams Drags Roughs: The next piece of drumming, vocabulary and rudiment that we're going to learn. Our flames, drags and roughs. And I like to think of these as fat notes are wide nose. When you really want to add weight to something, you can add these extra notes before the note you wanna play. If we have OneNote before the No, it's called a flam note that plays just before our main note, we call the grace note. And whatever hand plays, the grace note will start very low to the drum head, no more than an inch off of it. And the other stick will start at our normal playing height. And then it will throw them down with a stick that's closer hitting first, creating again a kind of sound. And then we'll set up so that the other hands do get a chance to play the flam. As you're switching hands. You have to choke the bounce of the steak that started Hi, so that it stays low for the next side. This goes against the main let, one of the main lessons that I try to teach in that you want to let the stick bounce, but in certain instances, you'll have to stop that bounce before rises back up to where it started from. Again, start the grace note low, the main No high. And then take as much time as you need in-between to reset on the other side. If this is difficult, try to make a very big separation between the grace note and the main note like this. And as that becomes comfortable, try to squeeze them closer together so that instead of hearing two distinct notes, you hear that fat note. And as with all things and drumming, as that becomes comfortable, you can speed it up. To practice flames play them very slow and add one beat of rest in between your right flam and you left clamp. It would sound like this. 12. Ready? Go. 1, 2 4, 1, 2, 3, 4, 1, 2. For one to four. Next, we'll talk about drags, which are the same as flames, except instead of one grace note, we have two grace notes, and it sounds like this. And just like flames to start these out, make them very wide and spread apart. And take as much time as you need in between to set up for the next drag. And we'll practice that like we did with flames with one b of rest in between each side. Like 12. Ready? Go. 1, 2 3 4, 1, 2, 3 4, 1, 2, 4, 2, 4. And as it becomes easier and comfortable, you can speed it up. One, two, ready? Go. 234123412341234 or 2412341234124123422412341245241234123. Today people want to go on to, go on to take on to what degree is 0, 1, 0, 1 2 3 0 1, 0, 1, 0, 0, 1, 0, 1 2, 3 4 123412412341234123412341234123412341234. With a rough, we have three grace notes and they're played a single strokes rather than on one stick as the drags are. So we'll have right, left, right, left, or left, right, left, right as are sticking pattern for a rough, the grace notes are still not as loud as the main know. And again, you have to anticipate them. So the main node is on the beat 12. Ready? Go, 1234123412341234 to four. 23412341234. Just like we did the flames and drag so we can spread out those roughs in order to practice them. And then as they get comfortable but can squeeze them back together. So if we spread them out, it would sound like this. Drawn two. Ready? Go. 1, 2, 3, 4, 1, 2 4, 1, 2, 3, 41234. With any flam, drag or rough, you want to make the main note on the beat so that the grace notes or just slightly before it don't make, don't start the grace notes on the beat, rather anticipate them before that made no practice at whatever speed you can do with steadily. Notice what's B that is on a metronome and then slowly speed it up as it becomes comfortable. Remember, slow practice makes progress. 7. Coordination Exercise: This practice tool is a coordination exercise that'll do a few things. It'll start to develop the control over each limb. It'll also start to develop the independence between all of your limbs. And also it helps us practice a very important concept in music, the idea of on the beat and off the beat. We're going to play all four of our limbs together on the beat. And then one by one, we're going to take each limb and put it on the ends or on the offbeat. As with many things, will start this slow and as it becomes more comfortable, we can speed it up. I've got my metronome set to 65 beats per minute. We'll do each of these for two measures of peace or to counter for. First, we'll play it all four limbs together. 12, ready and go. 12341234. And then we'll take one lamb and put it on the end. We'll start with our right-hand 12 and ready to go and 12341234. And next we'll put our left-hand I'm ands are on the offbeats. One and two. Ready? Go. And 12341234. And next we'll put our right foot on the offbeats. One and two. Ready? Egg DO and 12341 and then 34 band. And next we'll put our left foot on the offbeats. One, two, ready? Go, 1234123. And whatever limbs are playing together, make sure they're playing exactly at the same time. And they're not playing right before or after one another causing a flam. We want to make it a very exact point in time and try to make sure that all the instruments are hitting that exact point together. Repeat these as many times as you need to to make them comfortable. And then when they each feel comfortable and see if you can move from one to the next without stopping like this. 12, ready? Go. 123121, 2341234, ban 12341234123 or 123412341341234123. And 8. Drum Beat 5: Next we're going to learn four or more drumbeat. It's that'll allow you to play along with countless amounts of songs. The first B I like to call a, we will write UB. And it sounds like this. 12, ready and row three and add 12311. Now you try with me. One, two, ready and go. 1234123123123. As we learned in the beginner drum lesson part 1, there are two ways that we can break this down. One way is that we can play just two limbs at a time. So we'll start with our hi-hat in bass drum. One, two, ready? Go. 1, 2, 3, and 4. 1 and 2, 3412341234. Next we'll play our bass drum and snare drum. One, two, ready? Go, 123123134123. And next we'll play our hi-hat snare drum, 12 and ready and go. And add 12341234123. And the second way we can break down this drumbeat is by taking away the steady beat and just focusing on which limbs are lining up on which counts. And it would sound like this. Ready? Go. 1234. One. 9. Drum Beat 6: Next we have a beat that sounds a lot like the we will rock you beat. But the bass drums, instead of being on one and are on and 1234, like this, 12. Ready go. 12313412313. And and now you try with me, One, two, ready? Go. 1 a and 31313123. And to break that down to limbs at a time, we'll start with our high hat and base drone. One, two, ready and play, and 12341234123412341. Next, we'll do the bass drum and snare drum, 12 and ready and go. And 12341341234134. And next we have the hi-hat snare drum, One and two, ready? Play and what? And and 31313131. And the second way we can break it down again is to take away the steady beat and just focus on which drums or which instruments are playing on which counts. 12, ready go, and 123412341. Another way that might make this easier, we also talked about in the beginning of drum lesson part 1 is to add eighth notes on the hi-hat so that we'll hear every count that every one of the other instruments could play out. It would sound like this. 123 and go 12341231234. One 10. Drum Beat 7: The next B is going to be something that we haven't ever done before. And we're going to use the triplet grouping or three notes on one beat on our hi-hat, instead of a quarter note or an eighth note grouping. So our high hat is going to sound like one loudly to the three. The four and Seven would sound like this. One. The two the three the 41234123123412341. I'll try it with me. 123412341234123. The fourth one, the the very loudly, or if we break that down to just two instruments at a time. First we'll do the bass drum and the high hat. 1, 2, 3, 4, 1, 2, 3 41234. Next we'll play the bass drum and the snare drum. 1, 2, 3, 4. The very loudly, or the one, the two lead the board. And last we'll do the high hat and the snare drum. 123. Go the three. The one, the two, the three. The second way we can break it down, take away the steady beat and focus on which instruments are playing on which counts. One law lead to three la li go, 123412. Three. 11. Drum Beat 8: Beat a is sort of a variation from B7 and it's a type of be called the shuffle. Chances are, you've heard of shuffle at some point in your life. It would sound like this. 1, 2, 3, 4, 1, 2, 3 4, 1 la la, la, la, la, la, la, la, la, the phone. 1, 2, 3. Notice the high hat. Instead of playing every triplet count, just plays the first, third part of the triplet and each be 1, 2, 3, 4. Lean. Now try it with me. One, lead, 2341234, The 34123123. So if we break it down to just two instruments at a time, the base and the high hat would sound like this. 123123412341. The two, the three, the four, la li, 1, 2, 3, 4. And if we play the bass drum and snare drum, it would sound like this. 12, ready? Go. 1. The lead very loudly. For law only one. The only three la li for me. The a la, la, la, la, la. And if we play the high hat and the snare drum, it would sound like this. 12, ready, go. 1234123412341234. Second way we can break it down by taking away the steady beat. What sound like this? One? The two, the three, the 41, la, la, la, la, la. La. The three. The one. 12. Practice Tips: Whenever you sit down to play the drums, try to make sure you're as relaxed as possible. Our body functions the best when it's relaxed, especially when a song gets intense or you get really excited, it's easy to let your heart rate start pumping and it's going to affect your plan. One of the most important things that you'll hear me say again and again as we're playing drums, is to stay relaxed. Your body functions the best when it's relaxed and you have the best control over a steady beat. Andrew motions when you're relaxed. Part of this is breathing and it might sound kinda weird, but a lot of drummer is right before they're about to get to a hard part, they'll stop breathing for a moment, but try to make it so that you can keep breathing even through the hard parts. It's going to take a little bit of practice it. So try to notice how your breathing as you approach difficult parts when you're playing. Another part of staying relaxed is making sure you're drinking enough fluids and I mean water by that. Another part of staying relaxed is to make sure you're hydrated, drink plenty of water as you play. I've heard many stories of musicians playing on a stage, maybe outside or in a hot venue. And the sweat and they're playing through and at some point their muscles cramp up because they've dehydrated enough and the body is no longer functioning as it should. Another part of staying relaxed is to be prepared. The best performance has come from when you know what you're gonna do. Even if that includes improvisation, you should know where you're going to improvise and you should have a good idea how to come into that improvisation and come back into the song. If you're not prepared to play, chances are you're going to be nervous and your heart rate will already be racing before you play a single note. Sure, we want to be excited, but we still want to be in control of our body and do not have excitement or fatigue effect. Our plane. Signal behind the drums every day is probably the hardest part. Oftentimes when you get started, you get excited about something and it helps to motivate you to keep practicing. But sometimes that motivation can be hard to find to help with the motivation, think about your goals. Playing drum set. Do you just want to play and rock out in your basement? Do you want to record the ROM covers and post them on YouTube? Do you want to have fun with some friends and a garage? Do you want to just play a few gigs with some friends? Or do you want to make this your living? Either way, focusing on what your goals are and remembering the steps needed to get there could help motivate you to sit down and put the work in any way you look at it. Playing the drums is going to be a little bit of work, but there can be a big reward from that work that you put in. As I've said before, music is something that should be shared. And part of what motivates me to play is imagining getting in front of a crowd and sharing the hard work that I've done, whether it be by myself or with a group of other musicians, that reward of being in front of people and seeing their reaction to what you play and how it makes them feel is one of the best things about music. You can really, really change someone's day with the music that you play. So use that to motivate you to sit down and do the work. Oftentimes will also watch drummers and other musicians play as a way to get inspired. Seeing what's possible is a big part. Watch other drummers play and let that inspire you, express yourself in similar ways. Oftentimes we'll compare ourselves to the drummers were C. But remember that you're not that person and you haven't had their experiences or their practice regimen. So although you can copy what they do, don't worry if you can't do it exactly like them. You're your own person, and that doesn't mean that you can't play something meaningful and expressive that is going to both fulfill you. Add a listener. I've heard drummers say, Man, that guy, so good. I'm never going to be like that. But try to learn a little something from him and don't compare yourself to him. I've heard drummers look at other drummers and think, Oh man, I'm, they'll never be as good as they are. But try to find one aspect of their playing that you like and make it a part of your own, your own experiences and your own practice will allow you to have your own sound. So embrace what you can do and celebrate it. But keep looking at other drummers for new pieces of vocabulary you can add to your own. It's easy to find other drummers online on Instagram, YouTube, or Facebook. If you just search for drums, drum, drummer, drumming or drummers. Another way I stay motivated is by listening to drummer musician podcasts. Listening about how people learned how to play the drum set and the different experiences they had along the way is very inspiring to me, knowing that everybody has a different story on how they got to be a drummer. To great podcasts that talk about drummers and music in general are the trap set and song exploiter. Both take in-depth looks at either a single musician or maybe a song and how it came to be. And they let you in on the process that drummers and musicians use to write songs or to learn their instrument. You can also get motivated by thinking about the personal growth you're engaging in. Working towards making yourself a more knowledgeable and talented person. Of course, this is not going to be an easy path to become good at the instrument, but it's something that you can do and it's something that people just like you have done for thousands of years. The discipline necessary to learn drums is something that can carry into other aspects of your life as well. You never know what you might learn in music that has other applications in life. I hope you enjoyed this class and found it helpful. Please let me know if you do have any questions about it. I'm always down to talk drums and music in general, the lessons you've learned in this class should be practiced continually until they're comfortable and require very little to no thought to, to execute. Remember that practicing slow and then speeding up as you get comfortable is the quickest way to make progress in music. And until next time, happy practicing and take care. 13. Slow to Fast Drum Beat 5 Fill 2: Right? Okay. Hi. Hi. 14. Slow to Fast Drum Beat 6 Fill 4: Hi. Okay. 15. Slow to Fast Drum Beat 7 Fill 3: Hey, okay. Thanks everybody. Okay. Boc, BOC. Boc. Here we go. Hello. 16. Slow to Fast Drum Beat 8 Fill 3: Oh, wow. Wow. Hello. Okay. Hi again. Good. Hi. Okay. 17. Play Along Beat 5A 115 BPM: Good. In the first place? Yes. So now that we've received so the first question. 18. Play Along Beat 5A 115 BPM no drums: So stay tuned for more. And the other sections. Yes. Good. Hi. 19. Play Along Beat 5B 245BPM: In addition to these systems. Okay. Here. Okay. Okay. 20. Play Along Beat 5B 245BPM no drums: Good. Teach in this lesson instruction sheet. Okay. 21. Play Along Beat 6A 95 BPM : Hello. In this book. Hello. Okay. 22. Play Along Beat 6A 95 BPM no drums: And to do that, if you want to, do, we look up to for the MOOC. 23. Play Along Beat 6B 185 BPM: Okay. Okay. Okay. Hi, the entropy measure. Okay. 24. Play Along Beat 6B 185 BPM no drums: Okay. Okay. Good morning. Okay. Okay. Okay. 25. Play Along Beat 7A 45 BPM: Thank you so much. First things first and what it was and all of that. Let's get started. 26. Play Along Beat 7A 45 BPM no drums: Hello. Hello. Hi. Hey, right. From luck. 27. Play Along Beat 7B 125 BPM: Hey, hi. We now call bye. Bye, bye. Bye. Bye. Hello. 28. Play Along Beat 7B 125 BPM no drums: Hello. Hello. Hello. Hello. 29. Play Along Beat 8A 165 BPM: Hi. All of these. Okay. 30. Play Along Beat 8A 165 BPM no drums: Hello. Fracture of the arm. Before fracture. Today's lecture for Chapter 14. Hello. 31. Play Along Beat 8B 225 BPM: I'm Joe. And with teachers with yeah. 32. Play Along Beat 8B 225 BPM no drums: Okay.