Advanced Course in Adobe Illustrator | Tim Wilson | Skillshare

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Advanced Course in Adobe Illustrator

teacher avatar Tim Wilson, Adobe Certified Instructor and Expert

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Lessons in This Class

58 Lessons (3h 49m)
    • 1. Advanced Course in Adobe Illustrator - Overview

      0:39
    • 2. Patterns & Live Tools

      1:07
    • 3. Creating Patterns

      4:02
    • 4. Editing Your Pattern

      2:59
    • 5. Creating a Pattern from Scratch

      2:37
    • 6. Creating a Leaf Pattern

      6:53
    • 7. Transforming Patterns

      2:46
    • 8. Live Paint Tool Overview

      3:53
    • 9. Live Paint Tool With Lines

      3:49
    • 10. Image Trace

      6:15
    • 11. Business Card Project: Trace

      7:12
    • 12. Business Card Project: Color

      2:56
    • 13. Adventure Infographic Project: Color Choice

      2:49
    • 14. Adventure Infographic Project: Polar Grid

      3:44
    • 15. Adventure Infographic Project: Live Paint

      4:28
    • 16. Adventure Infographic Project: Live Trace

      3:50
    • 17. Adventure Infographic Project: Legend

      4:51
    • 18. Adventure Infographic Project: Save PDF

      2:31
    • 19. Symbols

      1:01
    • 20. Repeat Symbols

      6:51
    • 21. Using the Spray Can with Symbols

      1:21
    • 22. Brushes

      0:56
    • 23. Brush Types

      3:14
    • 24. Scatter Brush

      13:53
    • 25. Pattern Brush

      2:52
    • 26. Pattern Brush Options

      3:21
    • 27. Art Brush and Color

      4:54
    • 28. Art Brush - Scale Options

      2:15
    • 29. Calligraphic Brushes

      2:01
    • 30. Bristle Brushes

      1:47
    • 31. Car Logo Project: Create Logo

      8:23
    • 32. Car Logo Project: Apply Brush

      9:02
    • 33. Rasterization

      4:13
    • 34. Effects vs Non-Effects

      5:34
    • 35. 3D

      1:10
    • 36. Introducing the 3D Effect

      4:49
    • 37. Add Text, Graphics & Photoshop to Shapes

      7:05
    • 38. Revolve a Shape in 3D

      4:34
    • 39. Multiple Shapes in 3D

      1:10
    • 40. Perspective in 3D

      2:29
    • 41. 3D Sphere Project: Create Your Sphere

      6:52
    • 42. 3D Sphere Project: Adding Shadows

      6:24
    • 43. 3D Sphere Project: Adding Reflection

      11:24
    • 44. 3D Sphere Project: Gradient Background

      4:26
    • 45. 3D Sphere Project: Using Flares

      1:28
    • 46. 3D Sphere Project: Adding Text

      0:25
    • 47. Guides and Perspective Grid

      0:55
    • 48. Making Perspective Grids

      7:26
    • 49. Perspective Grid Point Difference

      3:12
    • 50. Moving the Vanishing Points

      2:06
    • 51. Drawing in Perspective on the Grid

      2:41
    • 52. Moving Non-Grid Items to Grid

      0:51
    • 53. Copy in Perspective

      2:33
    • 54. Playing Card Project: Build the Card

      7:16
    • 55. Playing Card Project: Creating Multiple Copies

      4:25
    • 56. Saving for Print, PDF & EPS

      5:24
    • 57. What You Get in a Printer's File

      0:29
    • 58. Thank you!

      0:24
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About This Class

Hi - I'm Tim

I'm an Adobe Certified Instructor and Adobe Certified Expert and designer working in and around London.

This is an advanced level course in Adobe Illustrator with tutorials and step-by-step projects, for those who have a very good knowledge, or for those who have done the intermediate courseYou do not have to be able to draw to complete this Illustrator course. (See here for the beginner's course). 

Together we will look at a specific set of tools and techniques. Then I will give you some projects to complete to reinforce your knowledge. 

All the content can be adapted for both print or web.

You will learn the advanced aspects of Illustrator and solidify your knowledge by creating 3D projects for infographics and general use as well as using and creating brushes and more advanced work. You'll also learn about the Perspective Grids and Symbols.

All you need is a Mac or PC and a copy of Adobe Illustrator Desktop.

At the end of this course you will have good understanding of the advanced aspects of Illustrator and will be able to create complex, exciting and eye-catching graphics. 

The exercise file comes from the Royalty Free website Unsplash.com with thanks to the following photographer: Colton Sturgeon (silhouette).

List of marks used: Adobe Illustrator logo and Adobe Illustrator name are registered trademarks or trademarks of Adobe in the United States and / or other counties.

Meet Your Teacher

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Tim Wilson

Adobe Certified Instructor and Expert

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Transcripts

1. Advanced Course in Adobe Illustrator - Overview: Welcome to the advanced part of this Illustrator course. If you haven't seen the other two parts, go and have look for them. There's an absolute beginners and there's an intermediate part as well. Now, when you go through this course, if you're already a user of Illustrator and you hadn't seen the other courses, feel free to just jump back to look at subjects if you're not sure of them. These the type of things that we're going to be covering on this course. You can see you get, have some amazing work for your portfolio when you finished. Let's get going. 2. Patterns & Live Tools: Illustrator has got an amazing feature and it's called the Live tools. Now the lactose come either as a live trace or as Live Paint. And we're going to be looking at both of those in this section. And they both are absolutely amazing. Really when it comes to coloring up things. I use the live paint all the time. So we're going to be using the live trace to trace a photograph and we're gonna make a little business card like this. And then we're going to go into the Live Paint Tool and take our live trace. But then we're going to use the live paint to make, once again, an infographic branches as we go along, this is not just about making infographics. You can use it for illustrations. You can use it for anything where you need to fill an area I use for my own personal illustrations quite a lot. So I'll take a cartoon like this and I can very, very quickly fill the areas with color and color it up. 3. Creating Patterns: Let's have a look at how to create patterns. Patterns are surprisingly easy to do in Illustrator and you can create some really beautiful stuff. What I'm going to do is I'm going to just start off with a very simple pattern. I'm going to take a little ellipse just like that. Now hold down the Shift key so I can get a perfect circle. I'm going to go to my fill color and I'll give it a color. Let's go with a really bright magenta. Now to make a pattern, all you need to do is to take that and put it into your swatches. So if the fill is open, you can just drag it and drop it in. Now, this is the problem because when I drag and drop it in, it's closed there already. So sometimes you'll find that does automatically close. But of course you can get your swatches by going to the Window menu and going down and finding swatches, they are near the bottom there. And remember this is the same thing as what you see in there. So all I have to do then is to click and drag it in here. So if you can't do it into that one, just do it in here. Now that I've done that, I'm going to get rid of the little ellipse. So we'll delete that pressing the Delete or the backspace button. And that's it. I've now got a pattern. You see if I were to make a shape in here. And it honestly doesn't matter what colors in the shape. When I click on that, it will fill it with that pattern. Now, if you find that it's not filling it, just check that you are on the fill and not on stroke. It's an easy mistake to make when you put in patterns. So let's take this one step further. I'm going to get rid of that pressing Backspace or Delete on the keyboard. And I'm going to make a slightly more complex shape. Let's do a little flower. I'm going to start off with a star shape. Now, this is a little bit of a problem because when I've drawn it, automatically put in my existing pattern from there. So I will just choose a flat color thing about Illustrator patterns is that it's not very easy to do a pattern in a pattern if you do a pattern in your artwork and you drag it into your swatches, we'll just weren't go in there. It won't work. There are ways around that, but just by dragging, it doesn't work. So the next thing I'm going to do is round off some of these little points on the star to make more of a flower shape. So I'm going to go along to my pen tool. I'm going to use the anchor point tool, which will allow me to just click and drag to make a little interesting. Flower. Nothing special, just a funny little shape like that. And once again, I'm going to go in here. Let's put another shape in the middle. Have dead, give that a different color. And maybe something else in the middle of that as well, just a small little ellipse in here, and we'll make that one the blue writer. So now I want to save that as a pattern. I might make it smaller to start off with. You'll notice I just clicked and dragged of the whole thing. Grab the corner, hold down the Shift key to constrain the proportions to make it the size that I want. You can change the size of your pattern after you've made it. That's not a problem. We'll get into that. Let me just drag and drop that into my swatches. There it is. Over there. So I can delete this and we'll go in and apply that to another shape. So once again, I've made sure I'm on the Fill, not on the stroke. And I click over there and there is my, my pattern. Have a go with that. And then we'll take it on to the next level where we can actually offset some of these little shapes and make some changes. 4. Editing Your Pattern: Now I've got my pattern up. And what I want to do is to change these flowers because they are a little bit robotic for want of a better word. The easiest way to do that is to go to the Swatches, double-click on the swatch. And this opens up a new area. You can see we're actually inside the little gray line across the top shows me that I'm in the new pattern swatch 2 over here. And I've got a few options. I can save a copy. So if I, if I don't want to change my original, I can save a copy and say done to update the original or I can cancel. I want to make any changes. And a little window over here appears as well, original panel, and this is the pattern options panel. Now, if you don't see this, you can also get it by going to the Window menu and choosing patent options from down there. But it automatically comes up when you double-click your pattern. So the first thing that we can do over here is with this little button right at the top. If I click on the pattern tile tool, you can see the line around the outside now goes blue. And if I pull that line further out, I can force the patent to go further away from the original. Seeing here is just a preview of how your pattern will look. It's not your original artwork. So I can pull this in and in fact, I can take it so close together that the patent actually overlaps itself. And if the patent overlaps itself, if you go down to the overlap, you can choose whether you want it to overlap left or right, or up and down. So you just choose the one that you want. Of course, if your patent is not overlapping, then it really doesn't matter which one of those you choose. Pull that out a little bit like that. The second thing that we can do in here is where it says tile type. At the moment it's set up to be a grid. But I could choose to have brick by row. And you can see how offsets the rows, and you can choose how much you want to offset to be. So I could go with maybe just a quarter offset like that. Let's take that back to half. Then we've got things like brick by columns. We get the columns to do it. And then we've got these two hexes where they both move at the same time. You'll see over here we've got this little heck shape now, we can still use this patent tile till to change that and drag it around. Like so. Once you feel happy with the way your patent is looking, just go up to the top and choose a done or make a copy of it if you want to keep the original. So click on Done, and there we go. There's my new pattern done. 5. Creating a Pattern from Scratch: Let's have a look at another way of creating a pattern. You don't have to drag it into the swatches panel. What you can do is you can go long to the Object menu. And if we go down here, we can actually go down to pattern. And we can say Make. Now what this does, this little window pops up. It says a new patents been added to the swatches panel. So what it's doing is it's making a, a pattern in there. But there's just nothing in the patent, so it's like a blank pattern. So we can actually now draw our pattern directly in here. I'm going to take the elliptical tool and I'm just going to draw an ellipse. Here's this little blue box that we had before. Remember, we were using it to change the size. So if I just click and drag an ellipse as I'm dragging and drawing it, you can see how my patent is being created. Rectangle and take a bit further, I'm going to overlap it to make an interesting pattern like that. And at anytime when you go into a path, you can always use any of these tools here that you'd normally use to work within your pattern. So here, I can move the pattern around if I wish. I could change the color. So I'm going to go to my stroke and I'm going to change it to a different color in there. And maybe I'll go into the stroke weight and just experiment with a thicker or thinner line. Let's go with a really thin, delicate line in there. Whatever you do once you finished, you just click done exactly like the last pattern and there's your new patent in there. So let me go and apply it to a shape. Now, I'm just going to switch on or click on the fill. Click on my pattern, and there it is. But at anytime doesn't matter which you have created, I can double-click on the pattern, go in and make any changes. So in here, Let's go along to the tile tool. And I could choose to maybe make those further apart or closer together. That's quite interesting. That one I like that I'm going to click on, Done. Now, don't forget, this is exactly the same as your solid colors, your gradients. If you want to save this to use in other documents, you can go along up to the top right-hand corner. And you say Save Swatch Library as AI to save it as an individual. The swatches as an individual library. Try them out. 6. Creating a Leaf Pattern: So let's have a look at taking this pattern on to the next level. I'm going to make some leaves. And I want a few different colored leaves, but I'm just gonna make one and then color it up a bit. I'll start off by doing something fairly simple, like a little ellipse. I'm going to use my white arrow, which is the Direct Selection tool, to select the top and try and make this into more of a interesting leaf shape. We'll just put out some of these handles around here. Maybe I've got a bit too far on on that. Maybe this handle here can be pulled out. There's nothing right or wrong here. Just have been a fiddle until you get something which kind of resembles a leaf and it's up to use what looks like a leaf and what doesn't because there's so many different shapes. So I'm going to select that. And I'm going to go down here and give it a color, and let's make that a green. And I'll get rid of my stroke while I'm there as well. Now, I also want to show some veins on this leaf. So I'm going to use the pencil tool. And with a pencil tool, I'll start off with quite a thin stroke over here. I don't want a fill on this, so I'll get rid of the fill and just looking at a stroke. And in fact, I've choose white I think for my stroke color. So let me just drag in something which is going to be by so. And I then want a vein coming off of it. Now if I click here to do the vein, you see it just redraws that shape. Let's undo that. So what you might need to do is to deselect that shape first. And the fast way to do that is to hold down. Now it depends if you're on a Mac hold down command, and that'll give you the little arrow. If you're on a PC hold down control and that gives you the error. So I can do that and click at de-selected, and I can go off to my next little shape over here. Now this one is not touching that one, so that's fine. I don't need to de-select the first one. Same over here to another one out there. And a last little one. There are I think there's a gap in here. I'm going to change the size on some of these as well, but always want to make them look a little bit more interesting. So what I'll do is I'm going to get from the window menu, the Stroke panel up. Now the Stroke panel, this is all in alphabetical order, is down near the bottom. And in here, I can change the size. By the way, if you don't see all of these options that I'm showing, just double-click on the word stroke a few times until it shows everything. So I'm going to select the middle vein and I can increase the size. Decrease the size. I can round the corners off if I wanted something less hard. But I'm going to go down to the bottom towards his profile. And I'm going to use a different profile in job. So we've got a profile which goes from thin to thick to thin. And, and that, that grid looks quite nice. You can do these ones as well. So I'll select this one and hold down the Shift key to select that. Shift, select that, shift, select that and shift select that one. Let's try the same thing over there. Make it a little bit thicker. Great, I liked the look of that. So I'm going to select all of these items and I'm going to scale them down a little bit before I make my pattern. Now, this is where things can go a little bit funny. You see, if I scale this, I'm holding down the Shift key and I scale it down. Look at that. My veins on the leaf don't scale, they remain the same size. And that's because in the transform option up here, you show some more options. There isn't option here to make sure that you scaling the stroke and the effects. So now when I'm scaling this, you can see the veins are scaling the same amount. So I'll just scale it down a little bit like so. I'm going to select it and I'm going to drag and drop it into my swatches over there. So that's my first part of the pattern done. Let me double-click on that leaf. Double-click in there. That looks a bit dull at the moment. I'm going to go over to my pattern tile tool, pull it out to get myself some more space. And I'm going to select with the direct selection tool, select that leaf, hold down the Alt key and make a copy. But this one here, I'm going to click on the leaf and I'm going to change the color so it's more of an autumn color. Are now didn't change. But you can see it's got the orange stroke because I was on the stroke, not on the fill. Easy mistake to make. Let's make sure I'm on the stroke and give it more of an autumn type of color. And I can even go to the edge if I select all of those again, I'll go to edge over here and rotate it around a little bit as well. Let's do another one. Hold down the Alt key, move that one over. Maybe I'll scale this one down a little bit as well. Pointing to the right position. Over there. Click on just the leaf. Make sure I'm on stroke this time. And it's go with more of a brown color for, for that. Now, same as before. It's still very repetitive or robotics, I'm going to go to my tile. I'll choose Hex by column. You can see how I've now got an interesting overlap. And lastly, I'll just take the patent tile tool and pull this out to have a look at how it looks like that, that looks rather nice. But let's check and see what it looks like if there's a lot of overlaps on it. I don't like that. I'm going to go with this pattern in here. Remember you can always make new shapes in here as well if you wanted to, I could take the pencil tool. I'm going to go and get some green. And all I'm going to do to just click and drag to make some little shapes in there just to green fill in there. So I can just get some interesting shapes coming in habitat. Or you can use some standard shapes in here as well. It's heavier, sort of almost like a berry type of shape. Make that one green as well. I'm happy with that. So all I have to do now is click on done. And I can then go and fill, not the stroke. The fill with my new pattern. Give it a go. 7. Transforming Patterns: So I've got my new pattern here. And what I'd like to do is I'd like to scale the shape. So if I use the selection tool at the top and I click and drag. In my case, you can see it's scaling both the pattern and the shape that it's in. But sometimes you might find that you scale your shape and the pattern doesn't scale. And sometimes you might want to scale the pattern without scaling the shape. So first of all, let's have a look over here at this transform option. Click on those three dots. And you can see it says of scale, strokes and effects in there. So if I switch that off, does that make any difference to this at all? No, it's still scales the middle. But what about if I went to the scaling tool itself? Remember the scaling tool that we looked at earlier in the course? If I double-click on the scaling tool. Now I've got Scale Strokes and Effects. I've got skill. Corn is the same thing that you get there, but I've also got Transform Objects and transform patterns. So if I chose 50 percent in here, and I'll switch on Preview, you can see it scales the whole thing down to 50 percent. But if I switched off Transform Patterns, now, when I scale it, it's scales, just the shape. If I were to switch transform objects off the transform patterns on this time, it will transform just the pattern. So do be aware of this scaling option in here. Are you transform the object or are you transforming the pattern? Now it's exactly the same with rotation. So if I double-click on the rotate tool in here, I can choose to rotate the entire object and the pattern. Just rotate this around. You can see or get that vector 0 again. I could just rotate the object and leave the pattern by itself. Or I could rotate just the patent and not the object. So let's do that one. So there we go. Click Okay, and I'm now rotated just the pattern. So be aware of those because it's very frustrating if you're trying to move a patent or rotate a pattern and it doesn't move or it doesn't scale. Well, it doesn't rotate. 8. Live Paint Tool Overview: Now one of my all time favorite tools in Illustrator is the live paint tool. And before I show you a live pen tool, let me show you the problem so you can see how the Live Paint Tool fixes this. If I've got some shapes and I'm just going to do a little ellipse. Let me make a copy of that shape as well. So hold down the Alt key maker. A copy will change the color of that one. And maybe I'll have a third one here as well. And once again, I'm going to change the color of that will make that one blue. Now, I've got these three shapes here, but what about if I wanted to change of these overlapping areas? You can see where they overlap. Maybe I want to change this little area here. Maybe I want to change that color. Maybe I just want to change the stroke on there. It's very, very difficult to do. Now you can do it by using the Pathfinder. So you can go down to the Pathfinder. Let's go and find that the Pathfinder and the P over them. And with the Pathfinder, I can now go along and I could actually break that up into its all original parts I've just chosen dividing in there. And now each one of these parts is separate at the moment though, it's still grouped together. So I'd have to go to Object and ungroup it there. And now each one of those is an individual piece. And if I wanted to, I could then change the color on one of those areas. So that's not too bad. Unless of course, I realized that I wanted to move this around and then I'm stuck. I have to undo everything and redo the whole thing again. So that's where the live paint tool comes in. I'm going to select all of these objects. I'm going to go to the Object menu, and I'm going to choose Live Paint and make. Now what happens is we get these at all. They look like little stars inside squares around the outside. And when you select an object which has been made into a live paint object, you will see it appears to be grouped together. So how is this any different from normal grouping? Well, the great thing here is if I go along and I find my Live Paint Tool. Now in here, Let's have a look at some of these tools. I'm going to go across to the shape builder tool. And I'm going to find the live paint bucket. Now. The live paint bucket then allows me to go and choose any color that I like. And when I move over this, you can see it's highlighting the areas that I could paint. So I could change the color of that to orange. And maybe I'll go along here and let's have a green, change that bit too, green. And let's change the middle to something else. I'll change that to a pattern. So how is this different to doing it manually? Well, the idea now is that if I need to move these around individually, all I have to do is to double-click. Now I'm inside my Live Paint object, you can see over here. So now I can actually click on this shape and I can move it around and you can see where these overlaps are. It still keeps the colors, correct? When I'm done, I've got it just right in there. What I can do is just double-click to come out to the live paint area. Try that out, but try it with just 23 shapes. Very simple like this. And then we'll take it on to the next level because believe me, this is just the start of 9. Live Paint Tool With Lines: So what else can we do with the live paint tool? Well, let me just take some normal lines to just a line like that. And I'll give it a stroke over here. And let's have another one over there, maybe another one here. This one here. A few different lines. Maybe take a little shape like a, like an ellipse like this, and that I could go in and maybe do use the pen tool. Another shape is true there. Now, if I wanted to try and fill some of these shapes in here, it would be exceptionally difficult. But live paint tool comes in again. So let's go to Object. I'm going to, oops. So let's go to Object. And I'm going to go and select Live Paint. So why is it grayed out? That's because I've de-selected, just make sure it's selected first object, Live Paint. And make. Because now it's a live paint object. I can use my live paint bucket and I can just go in there and paint anything. So let me get my fills over here and I'll just use a red and I can then just fill any of these shapes that I like. But what about the strokes? Can I change the strokes? Absolutely. What I'm going to do is I'm going to double-click on the live paint bucket. And you can see it allows me to either paint the fills, all the strokes or both. I like to have it on either one or the other just makes, makes my life easier. Let's click. Okay, so I'll go and change my stroke to one. Let's go with blue. I'm going to make it a lot thicker. And you see now how can just go in and change the individual lines. To affect the strokes? They don't have to go all the way around the object either. Even on the circle. I can just change part of that stroke. If you want to select areas and delete them. Well, there is a Live Paint Selection tool in here as well that's underneath the live paint bucket. If you double-click that once again, you can choose to select fills all Select strokes. And in here I can go in now and I can select this particular stroke. I'll just use Backspace or Delete on the keyboard to remove it. Same over here. Let's just remove that area in there. You can still use some of your standard tool. So if I went back to my selection tool and I selected this whole live paint object, I could go into my strokes and change them all at the same time and say maybe none for the stroke which we just give me that little area there. If you want to break these into their component parts. If you go to the Object menu, you can choose Expand, and you can then expand them into their individual parts. You usually have to go to Object and Ungroup them as well. And if it doesn't ungroup at once, sometimes it needs to be done a few times until ungroup is grayed out. Those are all now individual pieces back. So try that out and then we'll have a project where we'll use this to do some really cool stuff. 10. Image Trace: Now the other live tool that we have is called the Image Trace Tool. And this allows us to trace bitmap images. Bitmap images are images which are made out of pixels, and we can then convert them into vectors. Now it tends to work better for simple logos and the like, but you can't do it to a photograph as well. I find that the text doesn't work so well with this tool. So what I'm going to do is I'm going to bring in a picture and then to go to File. And I'm going to place, if you want to try this on your own, you'll find that these pictures are in your exercise folder. So the one I'm going to go and find first of all is a portrait. And we find this portrait. I'm going to place that portrait in there. Now, I want to convert that portrait from pixels into vector. Let's have a quick look at this portrait. You can see it's made up of pixels in there. If I zoom in. Now with that picture selected, you can either go to your quick actions down here and choose Image trace, or you can go to the Object menu and go down to image trace and make in there. Now, when I've done the Image Trace takes a moment, you can see it just converts it purely into black and white vectors. Now of course, if I go along to the image trace options over here, there are a number of presets that I could use. So I could choose one of these presets, like for example, six colors or 16 colors. Takes a little while. And if you're doing this on a very large bitmap image, it takes even longer still. And you can see now this is all made up of vectors. Now the reason is tools, a live tool is because I can keep going and keep changing this all the time. I could choose any of the other options in there. Or I can go cross to the little button here, which opens up the image trace panel. Now, we've got things in here that you can change that change in number of colors in there. Or you can go across to the top and choose from some of these settings. I'm going to click on high color for this. And once again, it's going to redo the image and make it vector B. That doesn't look bad from a distance. But you'll see when I zoom in, it is definitely vector as opposed to pixels. But this is kind of quite cool for certain things like just purely black and white images in hand with this pure black and white, we've even got a threshold slider, so I could choose to have more black, more white. Now in this particular instance, this looks actually really good. If I push this across a bit. Over there, we've just got the eyes and the nose and the forehead coming through. It's quite a threatening type of picture. Let's have a look at a more simple image now. So I'm going to go along to once again File and place. And I'm going to find another image in here. Once again, this is in your folder and this one is a silhouette. It's a fairly simple shape. So I'm going to click and drag to bring it in. And same again, I'll go to object. Down to Live Paint. Whoops, not live paint. I'll go to Object, Image, Trace and make. Now, because this is quite a large file, it's saying it might take a little while to do it. I'm going to click Okay, it just means it takes longer for it to work with. And you can see we've got a very nice, clean silhouette now there's still some black at the top over there. If I click on the settings in here, I can still go and change these settings and I can get more of the black or more of the white coming through. You can see I can keep going into that white disappears completely. Now, does that give me a nice result around the person here? Let's try it. Over there. There we go. We've got some hair coming through India. Unfortunate this large area is coming across at the top. But this really doesn't matter. Because what we can do now is we can go in and expand this live objects. So by expanding it, it's making this live object into vector shapes. And you can see now if I hover over these kind of highlight a little bit. If I go to the Object menu, they are all grouped and I can just ungroup them by using object and ungroup. And this means now I can actually click on those bits and I can delete them. So there's a white bit around her and move it off the edge. You'll see that we've got that white section over there. And there's a funny little black put in there as well that might need to go in and remove. So you can just click on, on these bits. Remember, this is just a vector shape. So if I click it now, I've got my colors and I could change it. I could fit it with an entirely different color. I could fit it with a pattern if I wanted. Like so. Oh, that looks awful, really, really bad. And remember this is vector so I can always re-scale the entire shape. Do try that out, try it on some different pictures as well. Tried on some logos. Try it on silhouettes, but do be careful of doing it with on something that's got text on it because I find that it changes the text. You don't get really nice crisp text. You tend to get some funny bends on it, but it depends on the, on the text and how and how big it is. Have a go with that. 11. Business Card Project: Trace: We're going to make a business card now. And we're going to be using the Live Trace tool to make the logo that's going to go on the side. So what I'm going to do is start a business card by going to create new winger file and new that way. And I'm going to go across to print. Now. The first thing is to find out what size the business card will be. I can't see anything in here that says business card, but that doesn't matter. The quickest way to do it is to just Google it. And I'm going to do a business card which is going to be 85 millimeters, 85 millimeters in width, and a height of 50, 55, I think we'll be good. So 55 over there. Now, don't always take that as red because this different business cards, different printers have slightly different sizes. This is just an average size. The color mode is going to be CMYK, which is perfect, and the raster effect. So any pixels that we're using in there's going to be high, That's going to be 300. But I do want to put a bleed around the edges, three millimeter bleed around the edge so that we can have the ink going right to the edge. And when the guillotine Cassidy doesn't leave any funny MCS or any white areas. So I'm going to click on Create. And here is my business card. You can see the red line around the outside is going to be the bleed. So anything which is going to go to the edge needs to go right to the edge of that bleed. So I'm going to bring in a picture that I want to auto trace to make into my logo. So I'm going to go to File and we're going to be using place once again. And if you are doing exactly the same one that I'm doing, you find adventure to trace his little JPEG picture in the exercise training folder. Now, I'm going to click on place, and I'm going to just place it by clicking and dragging. Size doesn't matter here. What we want to do is trace it and then we can change the size later. So once I've got that, I'm going to go across to my properties. In the Properties I'm going to choose down the bottom image trace. Now remember, if you can't see it here, as long as your pictures active, you can go to the Object menu. You can also go down to image trace and make in the x exactly the same thing. So once I have traced this, you can see it looks a little bit. Yeah, but Ruffin and ready bit too, too smooth. I'm going to go over to my image trace, trace options. You can depend on the picture that you use. Try other image traces in here. I'm just, I just want to use the black and white. But I'm going to click the little Open Image Trace panel over here. Now the first thing I can do is I can actually change the threshold. So I can get this to recognize more of the black pixels or more of the white pixels. If I drag this left and right, you can see there we go over there. So I want to get rid of all that black and leave it like so. Then I'm also going to click in the advanced settings in here because we've got a number of different things. So down here, I've got things like paths, corners and noise. And depending what you do with these, you can actually get them to recognize more or less detail. Can see if I take that over to the parts over 2. Hi, I'm getting more detail on the person you can almost make out their shoe shapes over there and the movement on their genes. It's entirely up to you as to how stylized you want this image to be. You can try and change in the corners and see if that helps you look as well. And you've also got something in here called noise. If I take the noise, write down or get a lot more detail, if I increase the noise or get a much smoother image. But there's no right or wrong here. You really just need to actually change it until you get what you want. The last thing I'm going to do here is to say ignore the whites. And that way it won't make this white area and that white area there into a shape which I've then got to delete. It will just keep the other color. I'm done with that. But I now want to make this into an editable vector. So I'm going to go across to the image trace. And below that there's a button called Expand. Once again, you can find the same thing in the object menu. Click Expand, and it's broken it up now into a vector shape. And the white has become transparent. If I just move it out, you can see that we've only got the black in there. At this stage. I can then go to my fill color and I can fill that color, any color that I like. Then I'm going to go with that sort of greeny blue color. I can also scale it because it is vector so I can sketch it any size that I like. And what I'm thinking of doing here is having this little logo right in the corner over there and the rest of the business card being this blue color. So I've got him in the corner there. You'll notice I've taken this right way up to the bleed edge. But what about this extra bit? I want to fill this with the same blue. Well, because this is vector, I can use my direct selection tool. And I can just select all these points here. And I can then pull them out. So I can just move that all the way across to that side there. And I can do the same with the bottom, so I can select all the Boston points. I can then just pull that line down to the bottom, once again to the bleed itself. Would have a bit of a go with a picture, try those settings in there, see if you can get the area filled like I've done. Once. You feel happy with that before we put in the details it out, I'm just going to go to the File menu and choose Save as, and I'm saving it as an illustrator AI file. Let's call this adventure. Oh, let's call this adventure. And I'm saving it as an AI file. And we'll just, okay, it's using the latest version of Illustrator. 12. Business Card Project: Color: So let's bring in some text. I'm going to click on the Background and go to the Object menu and choose to lock it. So I'm locking the selection so that I can't move it by mistake. Right bit of text. This is the really easy part over here. I'm going to choose white as my color. And I'll put in a bit of text that the client wants at the bottom. So this is going to be beyond venture. And let's select that. Oh, I should have made that white in there. Choose a typeface. Now, we really need to find some sort of adventure kind of typeface. And we can spend quite a long time going through. But just be careful on your typeface choice. I'm just going to do very, very simple typeface in there. Now of course, I can use my black arrow tool, the selection tool. I can just scale this up to fit the size or whatever size I want it to be honest, there's no right or wrong here. So then this area here could be used for the name and the contact details as well. I'm just going to click and drag with my type tool over here because UPS, Let's try that again. Type tool, click and drag. And this is just filled with Lorem Ipsum text. So until I get details for my client, I would just leave it like that. So once you've got your details in here, the next stage is after saving it, of course, just do your normal safe is to save it out for printing. And we do that by going to File Save As we're saving this footprint as a PDF file. So it's going to be Adobe PDF. I'm going to click on Save in there. And then in here, I'm going to keep preserve illustrator editing capabilities on, in case I've made a mistake in there, I can just call the printer and ask them to open up in Illustrator and make some changes. I'm going to go over here to marks and bleeds. And I'm going to use the document bleed settings and I'm going to switch on old printers marks. So let's click on Save PDF. I've updated my details in Illustrator and saved out the PDF again with my details on it. And there it is, it's finished. This is what you'll be sending to the printer. 13. Adventure Infographic Project: Color Choice: So let's do an infographic and I'm going to be doing an infographic footprint. I'm going to click on Create New. And because this is going to be footprint, I'm going to go to my print preset. I'm just going to choose A4 and I'm going to make this one landscape. We'll put in a three millimeter bleed. And I'm going to make sure that's on CMYK and the raster effect is going to be high. Let's click on Create now. So the first I want to do is to choose the colors I'm going to be working with. Now. I've been given a color by client or by it's my brand color, something like that. And I know the color setting. So I'm going to go to the Window menu. I'm going to go down and I'm going to find the swatches panel. It's right near the bottom of there. Let's try that again. Swatches. And I'm going to click the New Swatch button down the bottom. And then in here I can then just type straight in. The CMYK. Values are percentages. So mine is 76 for 450, whose interesting teal type of color. Now I don't want to add this color to my library. You can add it to your library there. And I'm not going to leave global switched on. If you have global switched on, it means that if you change your color swatches, it will update that color wherever it's been used throughout your document. I'm going to leave that off for the moment. Let's click. Okay, so here is my new color over there. But then I need to find some other colors that will work with that color. So to do that, I'm going to go to the Window menu, down to my color guide. There it is over there. And if you click on the color, you can then go to this drop-down menu and you can choose any color set or any harmony as they're called. From this color says, I kind of like this compound to color set. So if I then go to the bottom, there's a button at the bottom which says Save Color Group to swatch panel. I click that. And now that's been saved as little folder for this particular document. Colors all ready to go. Have a go, get a color scheme going that you're going to be using, and then go on to the next lesson after this. 14. Adventure Infographic Project: Polar Grid: Now we've got the colors up. Let's put in a background and I just want to gray background because I think it'll shut those colors really well. So I'm going to take a shape, just a rectangle. And I'm going to drag my rectangle all way across my document right up to the edge of my bleed. And I'll make that bank a gray. I think I'm going to go with a medium, medium gray in there. We can always change that later. But because I'm going to be working on top of that now, I'm also going to go to the Object menu down to Locke and Locke that selection so I can't touch it by mistake. Now for the infographic, this is going to be a circular graph style for graphic. I'm going to go along to the line segment tool over there. If you click and hold on that, you'll find that there are a number of different tools in there, but one of them is called a polar grid. So if I choose the polar grid, I can then click and drag to make this grid out here. Now if you hold down your shift key, you get a perfect circle. So I do want some sort of grid like that. But what I want is more of the wealth, both more of the lines that go from the middle outwards as well as the circular lines. So I'm going to get rid of that. We can change it the number of lines by using the polar grid, but instead of clicking and dragging, we just click once. And this will allow us to change the number of concentric dividers as well as the radial dividers. So the concentric dividers, the circular dividers, I think I'm going to try and nine in there. And the radial dividers, I want to have six. All I do now is click OK. And you can see it's made me my circular graph. It's not really a graph, it's just a, a radial shape. If you use your selection tool, you can then move it around. If it's not big enough, you can scale it up and down. But the thing about this is that it is actually 1 grouped together shape. So if I want to start editing it, and I'd like these lines to be white and I want to remove some of them, change them a bit. What I can do is I can go to the Object menu and Ungroup. Now, just before I do that, let me show this to you in the layers panel. So if I click down there, you can see that this is a group up there. If I click to show it to you, you can see that group is made up of two groups, one for the radial line and one for the concentric lines. And if you click inside them, you can get eventually to the original lines. So if I go to Object and Ungroup it, ungroup the radial lines from the concentric lines. If I go to Object and Ungroup, again, it ungrouped everything. So every single part of this is separated. So I'm going to take these outer ones and I'm going to delete that outer one. And I'm also going to delete some of these inner ones over here as well. And I think that's looking about right now. All of these are separate items, so you can move them around if you need. You can rotate them, you can do anything you want. They are just separate lines. Once again, gets up to this stage and then we'll go on to the next lesson. And next part of that. 15. Adventure Infographic Project: Live Paint: Let's start filling in some details in here. There are six areas in here, and I've got six parts that I need to put in. So this beyond adventure in for graphics to show how many people have registered for the camp. Upsell raft, climb, kayaking, and forest areas of the business. I don't like this in black a contrary see it? So I'm going to select all of these lines and I'm going to go along to my properties. Or if you've still got your swatches open, you can use that. Click on stroke and change the stroke to white to be a bit easier for me to see exactly what I'm doing. Now, I want to start filling in some of these areas of this infographic. And to do that, I'm going to make this shape. I've just selected the whole thing. We're going to make this shape into a live paint object. So object down to Live Paint and choose Make. Now what I can do is I can go across to my tools and I'm going to go into my live paint bucket tool with the shape builder tool if you can't find it, live paint bucket. And I can then start to fill in these areas here. Now, I'm going to double-click on my live paint bucket to make sure that I'm painting fills and not the strokes. You can do one or the other or both. I'm just going to do fills for now. And then I can start to fill in the details. So I'll start off with this color here as my fill color. And this area here, I think I could to my details, needs to have four of those filled. I am going to leave this one free. I'm not going to fill out that little area there onto the next color. The next color had all five of those. Obviously, this depends on what the client is giving you, what details you need to put in. Let's go over to the next color. I think we've got 12 of those ones to go on with the next color in here. And this one's going to be that. And then we'll go to the orange, fill that in there. And the last one here. Let's have those ones. So I filled them out. But what about all these lines? If I wanted to remove these lines here so it just looked a bit better. Well, I can go along to my Live Paint Selection Tool. Now once again, if I double-click on the Live Paint Selection, I can either select fills or I can select strokes. I'm just going to select strokes. And this means I can now click on the Stroke and delete. Over here. You can see I can just very quickly click a stroke and delete. Now. I'm going to just go round here and delete these ones. And you can see because I've deleted those, if I try and delete part of this, it deletes the whole line up to there. Let's undo that again. So if I leave the circular line there to start off with, then I can just delete these little segments. And in fact, I can drag across them to select them all at the same time. And then it's quite easy for me to get rid of these ones in here. When you start to work with this, if you find that you are deleting the wrong area, well, just undo it and try again. So I'm, I'm happy with that. But I think with these ones here, I'd like to like to say, let's select all of those ones and delete those. And I'll do the same here. So I'm just going to be left with a nice solid color. In these items. You can always change the stroke color as well if you feel that it's not working for you to have a bit of a go with that, with your colors, try it out. And then we put a logo in the middle and the legend down the side. 16. Adventure Infographic Project: Live Trace: What I would like to do here before I start to move this around is to change the width of the stroke. I can just select an item, go into my stroke, and adjust the width in here. Let's go for something a little bit more delicate and thin. You can change it to anything you like. I'm also going to size it up. So I'm just holding down the Shift key to size that right off. Like so. Now I want to look at logo in the middle. So I'm going to do that by tracing. And the process here that I'm tracing is the same process that I used for the beyond the venture business card. In fact, you could even go into your boy beyond adventure business card and just copy the logo from there into here. But I'm going to do it again just in case you haven't done the business card yet. So I'm going to go to File and Place. I'm going to place the image that I want to use. Once again, size doesn't matter because we can always resize it. Later on. I'm going to go down to image trace, click Image trace over here. And we can choose from any of these settings. I'm going to go with silhouette. Now, if I click on this little button here, what I can then do is I can go to my threshold back and change my threshold to get more of the black coming through. You can see it has got rid of the white and that's because Ignore White is switched on. If I switched that off to bring the white through. Once again, I'll just change the settings in here, but I'm going to change the past, get a bit more detail on that little climber. I'm happy with that. So I'll click Expand. And then I can change the color, the fill color through to white. Now, this is going to go right in the middle over there. So I want to remove some of this area around here. Now. We can do that in a number of ways. But the way that I'm going to choose now is I'm going to use an ellipse. I'm going to make an elliptical shape. Now making that shape well, slightly bigger than the center of that. Instead, I'm going to place that on top of my logo. Now. I'm going to just flip it around so I can see that I'm getting in the right place. So I think he's going to kind of go over there. And then I'm going to select both the logo, the one shape at the bottom and the top shape. And in my Pathfinder, we've then got a number of different options and I'm going to go with the intersect. So what this will do is it will delete everything. It will just leave the intersected area, which is where those two shapes overlap. So I'm going to move this across into the right position and then go to the Object menu and send that to the back. So object arrange and send to the back. So it's behind the shape now because by sending it to the back, we've sent below the gray object. We can either go to the Object menu and say bring forward and that'll bring it one object food. Or I'm going to go to my layers. There it is, right at the back there. I'm going to just pull it above that shape. In that. Let's select both of those and go to object and group to group them together. That can now be moved around and they'll all move as one. 17. Adventure Infographic Project: Legend: So let's do a little legend down the side and we're going to do this manually. I'm going to take a little rectangle over here and draw a small rectangle. No problem with size to whatever size you like. And you can do either as perfect squares or as rectangles, whatever fits in with your design, you can even do circles if, if you thought it fitted with the design a lot better. And then I want six of those, one for each color that I've got around here. So I'm going to hold down the Alt key and drag a copy. And then we can use our either Control D or Command D to make six of those. So I've got all my colors, then it's just a matter of applying fill color. Just go through my colors very quickly here. I'm actually thinking the great I've chosen for that background is probably a little bit too light. I think some of these colors will actually show up a lot better if I lightened it up. Now remember it is locked. So if I go over to my layers, I can just unlock it. I'm going to select it by clicking the circle in the layers panel. You can click on here to select it. Or you can just select it with the circle. It's exactly the same thing. And I'm gonna go with a slightly darker gray. I think this is showing up a bit bit better. I'll just lock it again so I can carry on working. And I've got a slight white line around the outside of these to kind of reflect the white lines in there. I'm going to move this up just a little bit, right? So now we've got our text to come in as well. So same thing, I'm going to click ones to put in my text. So over here, we've got camp. And I'll set up the typeface, the size of the fonts, the color in here before I do the rest of them. So same again, goes to the Properties. Choose the typeface that you want to work with. Let's just go with something really simple for now, like Arial. We can always change this later on. And I'm going to go with white. And they make it just a little bit bigger. Now once I've got my first bit of type, correct, all I need to do is to hold down the Alt key and make a copy by dragging it down onto there. So I think that's roughly in the middle. And then I can use Control D or Command D to repeat that. All the way down. Now, you can see over here it's not quite lined up to the middle, that one aligned to the middle of the shape. This one's not quite lined up to the middle. So if I move this one to the middle here today, just make sure that's perfectly in the middle. In fact, I'm even going to move this down a little bit. Let's align this. So I'm going to go to the Window menu, Find the alignment panel. You can also click on the three dots at the bottom over there, but mine just disappears off the bottom of my screen. So let's go to a line here and then I can distribute. And I can either distribute vertically or horizontally. Let's click on distribute vertically first. And you'll see it distributes them, it puts them all onto one place. So what's going on over there? Well, if I went over here to the Align two, I'm gonna make sure mine says aligned to selection over there. And we can then distribute them evenly. With that. If you align to the key object, then it's taking whichever was the key object, probably the last 10 we can lining everything to that. If you aligned to your artboard. I'll do this quickly. You'll see the line, everything on the on the artboard. I'm going to undo that over there. So good alignment panel up and choose distribute, but make sure you know what you're actually aligning two and align to selection for this is probably going to be the best. The rest of this is going to be pretty straightforward. I'm going to put some text down the bottom here. So once again click. I'm going to resize that. So it's nice and big. I'm going to go in and put in all the various camping, forests, kayaking areas in there. And I'll do that. And while you try out this section. 18. Adventure Infographic Project: Save PDF: So there we have it. I've added some text in here, a little bit of text about the infographic. I've put in some more details of editor title at the bottom and just a little bit more text along the top. Now, the first thing that we should be doing as we're going along is actually saving. So I'm just going to do it now. I'm going to choose Save As and save it as an AI file. Click Okay, and then we can choose how are we going to save it out for the various media. If I go to File and Save As like everything else, I could choose to save this out as a PDF for print. I'm going to click on Save. However this time, instead of actually saving it with the marks and bleeds for the printers, I'm going to switch them all off because I want to save this as a PDF, but I want to email it out to various people and they're not going to be printing it using commercial printing. So having done that, also want to make the file as small as possible. So I will switch off, preserve illustrator editing capabilities to keep the file size down. Once again, the people I'm sending it to don't need to edit this. I've got a fully editable AI file for that. Let's click on Save PDF. And this just warns you that you won't be able to edit it in Illustrator properly. Click Okay, and that's done as a PDF. The last thing I can do is I could go to File and Export because I also want to upload this for social media. So I could say Export As, and just save this out as a JPEG file. Once again, we'll go in here to JPEG. Click on Export, and I've now got the JPEG file. I'm going to make the JPEG RGB though rather than CMYK. And we'll click, Okay, have a bit of a go with this and try saving it out in various ways, whether it is for print or for screen or whatever, you use. The most. 19. Symbols: Very often in Illustrator, you will have created a graphic, whether it's a logo or whether it's something more complex. And you want to reuse it a number of times in your document. So what we can do is we can use something called symbols. Now souls of great because we can take something as a symbol, put it on our page. And then later if we need to update that symbol, we only have to update one and all the instances where we've used that symbol will automatically be updated as well. We can also use a tool from the toolbar to spray symbols around. And that's what we're going to do in our project. We're going to make a symbol of a leaf. And we're going to be able to spray that leaf all over the tree. And then we'll be able to change those instances at the same time. 20. Repeat Symbols: I've got a piece of artwork in on this artwork, we've got a number of little icons. And these could be icons and logos, but they're these little people with headsets on. And because I've got a number of these items here, I made them by just copying them are held down the Alt key. And I clicked and dragged to make a copy and then put it in the right Position. Same with these ones here. Hold down the Alt key, drag to make a copy. Now, there's nothing wrong with working like that at all. However, once you've done some work, what you might find is that when you're looking at your items, you think, you know what, they're not quite the right color or maybe I've made a bit of a mistake on them and I want to just do some changes. Now this will be a bit of a pain for me because what I've got it then do is to delete all of these, correct the color and then copy them into the right position again. Now this is where symbols come in. To find your symbols. You go to the Window menu, go down near the bottom until you find symbols. And this gives you a little panel which looks something like that. They give you some default symbols and there's some in the symbols library, then not terribly exciting. The best thing to do with symbols is to make your own. So what happens if I make a symbol? Well, first of all, if I were to go in here and I'm just going to delete all of these. I've locked everything else apart from my little icons. So I'm going to delete all of those. So I'm just left with a one of them in there. And I'm going to take this icon, I'm going to drag and drop it into my symbols panel. When you do that, you find the symbols options come up. We'd give it a name if we like, so we can find it later on if we're looking in list view, I'll call this a headset. And then you can choose from a movie clip or graphic. Now, the only time you'd really choose from between movie clip and graphic as if you're doing something for Adobe. Well, it's now called animated, used to be called Flash. And you, well, if you're doing flash, why animates? You'll know the difference between a movie clip and a symbol. If you're doing for Illustrator, well, it really doesn't matter. To be honest. Let's go in here and just click. Okay. So now I've got this as a symbol. If I deleted this, that's gone. Here is my little symbol icon. So if I want to use it now, I can actually take that symbol and I can just drag it onto my picture. Once again, you can probably see the shortcomings here when I'm dragging the sin rather than hold down the Alt key to make a copy. They still blue, but hang on. We will fix them shortly. So I can place all of my symbols along the graph over there. And I want some bigger one. So I'm going to make a bigger one and I'm going to scale it up because you can scale symbols, rotate them, flip them just like you can a normal item. In fact, you can even copy them so I can hold down the Alt key on Mac and drag a copy over like that. I can hold down the Alt key and drag another copy over like that. As opposed to just going in and pulling them out from the symbols. Why is this any different from just making a copy? Well, it's because all of these items here have got a parent and this is the parent in the Symbols panel. So if I were to change the parent, all of these instances of that parent who change as well have looked at what I mean. If I double-click on the NAB, zoomed right in well, I'm sorry, I'm bad to zoom right into that. And you can see I'm now inside the symbol up the top here on the left it says headset. And here's my headset. So what I'm going to do is I'm going to select it and I'm going to change the color. Let's try a red. Not entirely sure that it will work with that picture, but we'll find out maybe an orange. Now to come out of it. I'm going to go up to the top to this little arrow here and it says exit symbol editing mode. And I click on that. And when we zoom out, you'll see that all of those symbols with they've been scaled or not, have all been adjusted. So I'm looking to make all of these white. So I'm going to double-click in there, select all of them over here and choose white as my fill color. I click Off, which you can't see it in there, but it is still there. And then come out of that, they all update to white. What about if I needed to make another change to it? Well, it's exactly the same. I'm going to double-click to go in. Now I can't really see what I'm doing. I can zoom in, but it's white on a white background. So let's have a look at this in outline mode. There we go. I can see it now that's a bit better. So I'm going to use my white arrow tool. This is the direct selection tool. And I'm going to select some of these and just make a bit of a change to them. I'm going to pull that bottom section up like that. Once again, I will go back to the original and have look and see what they look like. And it changes all of them. If you don't like them, we'll use Control or Command Z to undo what you've done. And we can just come back out again over here. We can do other things to these as well. I can select them either individually or as a whole group. And select all of these ones here. And we can go to the opacity and we can change the transparency or opacity of those little items. And we do have a bit of a go with that. Just drag and drop an object into the Symbols panel it makes into symbol. And then you can then pull them out, making copies of them. And anything you do to the symbol will affect wherever it's been used, all of the instances in your artwork. Great for icons, grateful logos, especially if a client changes their mind and gives you a different logo and the jobs done and you've used it a number of times in your artwork. Have a go. 21. Using the Spray Can with Symbols: So how else can we use the symbols? Well, we can also use them with a spray can die. No, That does sound a bit odd. But bear with me. I'm going to select this little logo that I've created here can screen flame. And I'm going to drag and drop it into my symbols panel. Let's give this a name. Green flame. And once again, I will click Okay. So if I want to spray the green flame around so I get a whole effected the bottom. All I have to do is to go along to the spray can In the tools over here. And it's called the symbol sprayer. I choose the one that I want to work on. And I can then just spray flames around into the image like so. Now we're going to be looking at this in the next little mini-project. And we can't be creating a tree with money in it, a monetary, and we're going to be using the symbol sprayer to get all sorts of money on our tree, but have a go with the symbol sprayer. And then during the project we'll look at all of the options within this area. 22. Brushes: In this section, we're going to cover the various brushes in Illustrator. Now, even if you can't draw or paint, don't worry about it at all. Brushes, although they can be used for free hand drawing, can also be applied to strokes. So you can, for example, trace a picture as we did before with that guitar. But in maybe you want more of a hand-drawn look to it. So you could apply a brush to the outside into exact, you've painted it all, done it in ink or whatever you'd like. Once again, we're going to have a project on here. And we're going to be looking at creating things like roads and railway tracks or anything you like rarely. But we'll, we'll do a road and we'll make that road by creating a brush. 23. Brush Types: So one of the things that you can do with your strokes is to apply a brush to them. Now, illustrator does give you a number of different brushes. And if I go along to the Window menu, first of all, you'll see you've got the brushes panel. And this is where you can create your own brushes and place them in here. Or you can also go down, either get to this by going to Window menu right to the bottom, to the libraries. Or you can click on the little library here, bottom left-hand side, because the brushes library and in here will cause a number of different brushes. So for example, what arrow brushes, his artistic brushes, whole different set of brushes in each of these menus. So how do you apply brush? Well, first of all, you have a stroke. So I'm going to go along to the Pencil tool now you can use a shape. You can use the pen, you can use anything that's got a stroke on it. And I'm going to just draw my shape in there. So I've just got a black stroke there. And to apply one of these existing brushes, you just click. And it applies that brush. You can still go along to the appearance panel lacking increase the stroke or decrease the stroke. So this one at the top here, this is a calligraphic brush. And then we've got some other different types of brushes and we'll be looking at all of these ones in the next lesson. So you can see I can click on some of them. Once again, I will increase the size. You can see that's a bristle brush over there. We've got pattern brushes in here. And if I increase the size, you'll be able to see what that one looks like. And of course it's worth having a bit of a plan going along to the libraries. So I'm, and to go down to the bottom over here, click on that down and choose one of these brushes. I think I'll start with the artistic. And I kind of quite like this of watercolor brush that we have in here. And you can see these are a library of watercolor brushes. So I can click on any of them to just adjust the shape than Amman. Once again, I can change the stroke and I can even go along and I can change the stroke color on some of these brushes, same as before. I'll be telling you how you can do this on your custom brushes as well. So do spend a little bit of time having a play with some of these, going to the libraries, checking out the different types of brushes that they've got. Let's go to this grunge brush vector pack. This is quite an interesting one with various different grungy shapes over there. And if they come out too large, just change the size in the Stroke panel. Remember you can still edit your shapes. I can go along here and change my shape with a brush applied to it. Try those out and once you've had a bit of a go and understand what's actually in Illustrators brushes. We will get into the next lesson and we'll make some of our own custom brushes as well, which honestly are lot more useful. 24. Scatter Brush: So let's have a look at making our own brushes. Now, I've got my brushes panel up. Remember this is my brushes panel that's in the Window menu under brushes there. And if you're making a brush, you make them in this panel. Don't try and make them in any of the ones from the library because it won't allow you to drag them to that as we are going to be doing. So, there's two ways to create a brush. You can either make the brush in here and then drag it into the brushes panel. Or you can click on the new brushes button at the bottom. And it depends on what you're doing as to which one of those two methods you will choose. So let me start off by creating a little brush here. And we're going to start off by looking at one of my favorite ones, which is the scatter brush. Now, the scatter brush works by scattering objects around. Let's start off with a simple shape. I'm going to take a rectangle, make my little rectangle. I'll fill it with color. Just that looks a little bit interesting. And I'm going to use my selection tool, the black arrow tool at the top, and just drag this and drop it into the brushes panel. You can see when you drag it across into there, if you hold down the middle dot, it won't allow you to drop it in there, but if you drag it anywhere else, it will latch drop it into your brushes panel. Now, you can then choose the type of brush that you want to work within these five different brushes. I'm going to start off with the scatter brush. You click, Okay, and then this window pops up. Now, this window can looks a little bit scary when you first see it, but we'll be going through all the settings. It really is nice and easy. But you can name it if you like. So I'll just Command SQ for square. I never make my changes in here. Certainly not with the scatter brush. I'm just going to click, Okay? And there's my brush in there. I can get rid of this one. Let's delete that. And here's my brush. Now you can view your brushes either in this mode or if you click in the corner, you can go down and you can see them by ListView. And there you can see my SQ brush in there. Let's go back to thumbnail view. So if I want to use the brush now, all I do is take a tool and make a stroke. So I've got a black stroke there and I can click on that brush. Now you can see straight away what it does. It takes that shape and just scatters it. It's called a scatter brush along the path. But we've got a lot of options for this brush. Firstly, what I'm going to do is I'm going to double-click the brush in here. So I've made sure I've applied it to something. And that something is active. I'm going to double-click on my brush in here, and that opens up these settings again. Now the reason I've done it this way round is because if preview is switched on, when I make changes in here, I can see exactly what it's going to do to a path. It's just a bit easier than trying to blindfolded. So first of all, we've got the size and I can change the size of those items. Pretty much like I could do with a stroke as well. So I can change the size, I can change the spacing. So are there going to be closer together worth again to be further apart? You just drag that to whatever you want it to be. You can change the scattering so I can scatter them and I can move them. I'm on one side of the line. On the other side of the line, I was going to say below or above. But to be honest, it's not always above or below, just depends on how your line is. And last I can change the rotation so I can move those back and rotate them all around. Like so. Let's just click. Okay. And then a little window that says, do you want to apply it to your stroke or do you want to leave that stroke as it was? I'm going to apply it to that stroke. Now of course, whenever I make a new shape and apply that brush, it will apply those settings to the new stroke. And of course I can still go in and change stroke weight on here. Let's do another one. So this time what I want to do is I want to make some bubbles are making an underwater scene. And I want a few bubbles in there. Well, I'm going to go along to my ellipse and I'm going to draw the ellipse to make the bubble. Now I don't want a stroke on that, so I'll get rid of my stroke. But on the fill I want to have something rounded which is a bubble shape. So if I go along to my fill and I fill it with a gradient. And maybe for the gradient, I even go to my Gradient Options and I change it to a elliptical gradient. And then of course we can use the gradient tool to offset that gradient slightly. So it looks kind of more like lack of bubble. Now I'm going to close these down here because this is where the problem starts. The great, I've got this little bubble that I want to use. And I drag it and drop it into the, drops it into the brushes and our choose scatter brush. When I click Okay, this little thing up here pops up and it says the selected artwork contains an element, cannot be used in a scatter brush. Unfortunately, you can't use gradients in scatter brushes. So how do we get around that problem? Well, quite easy, actually. I'm going to fill this just with a blue color. I'm going to make a copy of the shape. So I'll use my elliptical tool. I will draw another little ellipse inside there. I'm going to fill that ellipse with white. And I'm going to select both of them. And this time I'm going to use something we looked at earlier in the course, which was creating gradients using blends. I'll go to Object, Blend and Make. And that kind of makes a great infamy. Now of course, if you do this and you discover that Sony's of two steps, your gradient just going to blend options as we did before and change it so that it's smooth. It looks like a gradient. It's pretty much is a gradient. But now if I drag the sin click, Okay, you can see that I've now got a gradient in there. Let's just click OK on there. So I want my bubbles to be coming up from the bottom here. So I'm going to go along. I'll use, well the pencil tool again to make the path for the bubbles. I can click on the bubbles in there. That doesn't really look like bubbles yet. But I'm going to double-click. I'm going to go in here and I'm going to change the size. Now the thing about bubbles is the not always all the same size. And if I change this, it will change all the bubbles together. So we've got some more options in here because at the moment that says the size is fixed. If you click on fixed and choose random. Now that you find that you've got two sliders here. So this one allows me to go all, let's have a minimum size of that. And this one here allows me to do a maximum size so I can have a combination of bigger and smaller bubbles. Now I can do the same with the spacing as well. So rather than spacing things evenly, I can have random spacing. So some will be further apart and some will be closer together to give them a slightly more realistic look. Scattering, same again, a bit of random scattering. So I can scatter some of them on one side of the line and some of them on the other side of the line, like so. But they all do look a little bit large, but I'll fix that shortly. The rotation, well, I don't want to change the rotation on here. I'm going to leave it exactly as it is because the light is hitting those bubbles from the top-left and it'll be the same for all the bubbles. Let's click Okay, applied to the stroke. And I can now go in and change my stroke width to make those bubbles a whole lot smaller. So at anytime if I need some bubbles now, I can go along, get my pencil tool, and just draw a path for some bubbles. Click on the bubbles, and I might need to go in and adjust the stroke weight on that as well. You can even do it to existing shapes, so I will get rid of those. Let's have a little ellipse here and make an elliptical shape. I'm going to fill that or stroke that with bubbles. And over here I'm gonna go and change them. So I have really tiny bubbles all way around the outside of my ellipse. There's one more option that I'd like to show you in here. And this option is when you want to put things along a path, but you want to get them to follow the path. So I'm going to make a very quick little icon here. I'm going to make a car. And this will just remind you also of things that we've done before. Because I'm going to be using this little tool over here called the shape builder tool. So let me go and fill this car with a color. Let's just make it read. As I said, this is going to be very quick. I'm going to have a second shape over here. Move that shape, shape up there That's looking more like a spaceship, isn't it? Let's select them both. And I will use this shape builder tool over here, hold down the Alt key and subtract those two bits. And this is the body of the car. It's going to be kind of a bubble car. So I have something on the top there. Select both of those. And once again, use this to unite them together. So if I click on all of them to unite them. And so it's kinda like a sports bubble car. We will take another shape over here. Pop that on top of those. Select both of those and use the shape builder tool with the alt key to subtract those two bits in there. Now of course, we need some wheels on this as well. So let's use the elliptical tool to cut some wheels out. Or we'll arches, one there and one there will select all of those. Hold down the Alt key with the shape builder tool and drag over both of them like so. And finally, just the wheels. So let's go and get the elliptical tool. And just make two little wheels in here. So you can see there are three different shapes in this brush that I'm making here. And in fact, there's going to be two colors as well. I'm going to make my wheels a very dark blue. Let's make it a bit smaller to start off with. Now you can make any shape you like with this one too, to be honest, I've just done a car because it's an interesting shape. I'm going to drag that and drop that into the brushes panel. Choose Scatter, Brush and click. Okay. And in here I'm going to just okay this again. Now I've got a little road. Well, I'm going to have a little road and unused my pen tool for this one. And I want a lot of those cars running along the top of that road. I think I would just go down here and stop. Ever that do. So there is my my road or my hill. Let's make it a hill. We make it green. And I'm going to go and apply the car to that shape. Now you can see the car is actually, they're all running in the same direction. Let's double-click on the car. I'm going to go to my size first of all and maybe reduce them so they're a bit smaller and slightly further apart, so spacing. And that's good. Now the rotation will change the rotation on all of those cars, so they all go in the same direction. But that's because the rotation is relative to the page. If I make the rotation relative to the path. Now you can see they're all follow the direction of the path. And all I have to do now is to go to my scattering and I can move them above the line or below the line. We can just angle them around as well if they're not quite at the right angle. Just like that. Click, okay? And remember you can still always change the stroke width on those as well. Have some fun, make your own scatter brushes and see what you can do. 25. Pattern Brush: Let's have a look at some of the other brushes now. And I want to go into the pattern brush. So in order for me to show you the pattern brush, what I'm going to do is I'm going to make a scatter brush first so that you can see the difference between a patent and a scatter. I'm going to take a little rectangle over here and draw a rectangular shape. And I'm not going to make a copy of that. So I'm going to have two of these shapes in there, and let's have two moles. I'm selecting them, hold down the Alt key or the time. So I've got four shapes in here and I'm going to give them some different colors in here. So this is kind of a checkered effect really. And I think I will get rid of all of the stroke from those at the same time. Now, let me take that, make it a little bit smaller and I'm going to drag and drop it in. So all four of those, they're selected, I'm going to drag and drop them in. And let's do them initially as a scatter brush. So I'll click OK. Click OK again. And I'm going to move those out the side. So I'm going to use them again shortly. And let me make a little ellipse over there. And with this ellipse, I'm going to use that scatter brush now you can see it's not looking very good at moment. If I double-click and go in here and say the rotation is going to be relative to the path like we did with the car. Now you can see it's following the path around. If I click okay, the problem is it doesn't look very good because what it does, it retains the integrity of each of these little shapes. And if you put squares together like that on a circle, you're going to get gaps in the top and it's going to overlap at the bottom. That's just the way things are. But let's have a look at what happens if we make that into a pattern brush. I'll move that one over. And I'm going to select this, drag and drop it in. And I'm going to choose pattern brushes, the one at the bottom. So pattern brush in there, click OK. And once again in here I'm going to click Okay. But just before I do that, you'll see that this is slightly different to the other one. So I'll just make a copy of this shape here. And I'm going to apply my pattern brush to that and look at that. That's absolutely smooth now. So the thing is that each of these has now been distorted to fit the shape. And that's the big difference between the pattern brush and the scatter brush. The scatter brush keeps the integrity of each shape. The pattern brush distorts the object so that they work as a smooth shape together. 26. Pattern Brush Options: So let's have a look at some more of the settings in this particular brush. Now, the thing is that if I put this same brush. 27. Art Brush and Color: Let's look at the next brush. For this brush, I'm going to just take it if a shape like this, It's going to be in a elliptical shape. And I'm going to fill it with black. So let's have a black fill over their stroke. I'm just going to remove the stroke so we can say none over there. And I think I'd like a few more copies of that inside this. So I'm going to go along to the scaling tool, double-click the scale tool. And in here I'm going to put in 70 percent, which happened to be there already. So I'm going to click copy and this one to make a dark gray. I'm going to do it again. Double-click on the scaling tool. Scale, this one down 70%, make it a copy, and once again, make that lighter still in there. And let's have one more. So once again, double-click on the scaling tool, make that 170% of the last one. And this one, I'm going to make white. I'm going to take this in and make this into my brush. So I'm going to drag it in. And this is going to be an art brush. So what the art brush does, it takes any shape you've made and it drags it along the shape or along the line, shall I say? Let's have a look. Click. Okay, I'll use the pencil tool and just draw along line like that. So it's going to take this shape. I don't need to keep it up. I can get rid of it. When I click on here, it just drags along the line. I can still go into my stroke panel and I can change the width of that line should I wish, Let's make that really quiet, quite thin. I'm going to get rid of this now. There was a reason that I did it using black and shades of gray. So I'm going to select the line. And if I go along to my stroke, you'll see doesn't matter what color I choose, it always goes from black to white. If I want to change the color of a brush, now, it doesn't, it's not necessarily just this brush, but any brush. Make them black and white. You can then double-click on your brush. And all the brushes have got a little setting here which says colorization. Now, I'm going to go in here because I find the two important ones are tense. And then tints and shades is if I choose tints and click Okay. And applied to the stroke, it's taken the blue that I've got for my stroke color. And you can even see it there or there. And it's made the black blue. So the black is then changed to blue. And the other colors are shades and tints of that blue going through to white. So white remains pure white. If I use the next one down instead, tints and shades. Now, the blacks will remain black. 50 percent gray will be that blue. And lighter colors will be light whites to remains white. So black remains black, white remains white. Gray or middle gray is the color and you have darker and lighter shades of that. The last one is an odd one. Over here. It's called the hue shift. And to show you, I'm going to show you a little helpful hint that they put in here. So there is a little light bulb which says tips when you hover over it. And this shows you how the colors work. So as I've just shown, if you have a stroke of red and that was your brush. If you use tints, you will see the black goes to that red. And then the rest of those are tense all the way through to pure white. If you have tints and shades, black remains black and mid gray or midtones will remain red and the rest to go out to white. If you use hue shift, you pick a color that you want to be that red there, and everything else shifts along the color spectrum. So around the color wheel. So if I chosen green of them clicked on that part of the shape, that would be green, same with purple over there. Honestly, I don't find it that useful. If I want something to be a specific color, I'll make it that color rather than just letting the colors change along the color spectrum. Once again, try that out. We'll have a look at some of these in the next lesson. 28. Art Brush - Scale Options: I've made a little wavy shape here with the triangle on one side, the square on the other. And what I'd like to do is I'd like to apply that to this line over here using the brushes. So I'm going to select it. I'm going to drag and drop it into my brushes panel. I will choose Art Brush, click, Okay. And I'll click Okay again. So let's see what happens when I apply it. What if I do that? And click? You can see the first thing that's happening here is that the whole line is being stretched along that shape, which is fine. That's maybe what I wanted. But so is the little arrow at the end being stretched, and this is being stretched as well. So let's see what we can do if I double-click to open this up. First of all, we've got some options here, so there's the directions. I could change the direction so I could get it to go the other way if I wanted to. The thing is with this, sometimes the preview works perfectly and sometimes it doesn't. If I click okay, even though the previous not working, you'll see it'll just change it. It's going in the opposite direction. Just going to undo that. So you can change things so you can get them to go left, right, or up and down if you wished. That would be a bit strange that one ready, I'll leave it back on the default. Now over here it says scale proportionately. And how my previous now working. So you can see it's scaled it up proportionately with that shape. Once again, we've got proportional or, and this is what I'm interested in, stretch between guides. So if I move this guide into there and this guide into here, it will only stretch this middle bit. It won't stretch these n bits. So when I click Okay, you'll see that the ends will be as they were and just the middle section gets stretched. It's useful for things that have got ends that you don't want to stretch out. As always, try it out. 29. Calligraphic Brushes: Let's have a look at the calligraphic brushes now. Now for this one, I'm going to make the shape first. And then I'm going to go along to the calligraphic brushes in here. As you can see, if I click on them, you get a different calligraphic brush. But I'm actually going to make my own. So I'm going to click on the new brushes button down the bottom there. Make a calligraphic brush, click OK. And then in here, I'll do exactly as I did before. Click Okay, there is my brush. Now the, the basics for a calligraphic brushes that it comes out as round. So double-click it. And I can then go in with previous switched on and change things like the roundness sockets of kind of squash it down a bit like that, will change the size so it's easier for you to see and you see how I can make that round or more flat. You can also change the angle in there. Now you can actually do this manually. You can drag it around. And it's possible to pull that out as well. I'm going to leave that in. When I'm happy with that, I can click Okay and applied to the stroke. Now, there are some other options in there as well. For example, it says fixed or random. So I can have random variations in the angle, random variations and the roundness and size. Now, with all these randomness is, you'll see we've got some other options as well. Really depends on your setup. If you've got, for example, a graphics tablet like a wagon, and you find that you can actually start to use some of these options to change the angle or the roundness based on the tilt of your pen or on a stylus wheel. If you've got something that supports this, I haven't got anything attached to this machine, so I've only got the random option in there. But if you do have, give them a go. 30. Bristle Brushes: So the last brush is going to be the bristle brushes. So I'm going to click on the new brush button there. Go to bristle brush and click Okay. That's okay, that again. So here is my my bristle brushes in them. And I've got two of them, got something called cat's tongue, which is the default. And I'm going to double-click on this new bristle brush that I've made. And then there's just lots and lots of settings for you to experiment with. First of all, you can change the shape of the brush and what things like fans and flat points. And they're really trying to replicate as much as you can with a vector, real life paint brushes. Let's go with this round fan. And then down here I can then go and change the look of the fans. I could change the size, increase that a little bit. In. Then if I switch on Preview, you'll see it on my on my line. I can change the bristle length, the Bristol density, thickness, paint capacity, and stiffness. And you can do that for any of these different types of brushes in there. We can go in and just adjust. Once you're happy with it, click Okay. Like the other brushes. You can then go in and change your stroke color on the brush. And if you want to make any changes to it, once again, back to your brushes and just double-click to make any changes that you need in here. This brush really does give a lot of artwork and interesting hand-drawn effect, even though it is just vector. Have a bit of a go with that one. 31. Car Logo Project: Create Logo: So in this project, we're going to build a little logo for a children's game, and it's going to be about cars. So we're going to make a little road and we're gonna use brushes to make the road and brushes for the cars around the outside. But let's start off with the first part, which is making the road. Now to make the road, I'm going to start off by going to the Window menu and finding my brushes. And in the brushes, I'm going to build two sections for the road. The one section is going to be the dotted line, sorry, The dotted line that goes down the middle of the road. And the second bit will be the yellow lines which go along the edge of the road. And they get to be two separate brushes. So let me make the brushes. First year I'm going to go to the line segment tool. And I'm going to click and drag to make a little line. Now this is going to be the double yellow line that goes around the edge of the road. You'll see what happens once admitted into a brush. So I'm going to make it yellow. I'll go to the Stroke, find yellow for the stroke and maybe increase the width just a little bit. See, very difficult to see with that yellow on the, on the white. Now if you have a problem like this, what you can do is you can just move it onto the gray area. And by art would have looked at properly. I'll do that now finished building overhears that you can see what I'm doing. Now I'm going to make a copy of this lines or hold down the Alt key and drag a copy like that. So that's the double yellow line. I'm going to select both of those. Hold down the Alt key again and make another copy. Now while I'm copying these, I don't want this to move over to the side. I want to make sure it runs perfectly parallel. So I also hold down the Shift key. There's my road there. And, and then I'm going to have another one which is going to be the dotted line to go along the middle. So this is my first road. I'm going to take first part of it. I'm going to take that drag and drop it into my brushes over there. And this is going to be a pattern brush. We'll click OK and make them into a pattern brush. And okay, that. Now let's do the dotted line down the middle. So why am I doing these as separate brushes? Well, first of all, it means that I can then actually adjust the width of the dots in the middle separately to the width of the yellow lines on the outside of the brush. I'm going to go into my line tool again and make a little line like so. And this is going to run down the middle of the road. And if I make that white, like a white line down the middle of the road over there. I'm going to drag this once again into my brushes. Choose Pattern, Brush, click. Okay, and Okay again, right, so let's have a look now at applying this to align. I'm going to just for the moment so that you can see what it's doing. Use the pencil tool and just draw a stroke down there. And then I add that one to it and you can see how we have the line going down the outside there. Or if I add this one, all I have is a white line going down the middle. So we can still adjust these separately. Now in order to stack multiple brushes on top of each other. I'm going to go to the Window menu. I'm going to find the appearance panel. And in the appearance panel in here. At the moment, I've got the one stroke, whatever that stroke might be, whether it's the line, whether it's the double yellows or maybe anything else. I'm going to start with this one here. Instead of it being a brush, I'm just going to go in and make it a nice solid line. So how do we get rid of a brush from a line? Well, you can do it in the brushes panel by just going down to the bottom here and clicking Remove brushstroke, and that goes back to standard stroke. So let's try this out. On this stroke. I'm going to go and get some gray for the color of the, of the road. And I'm going to increase the stroke width to make it pretty thick. It's getting there slowly, slowly, slowly, probably faster if I just went straight in over here and tried AT in there. Might not be thick enough, but table we'll find out shortly. Now I'm going to add a second stroke in the appearance panel, which is going to be the double yellow line. So down the bottom, I click on this, it'll add new stroke button. And then this top one here and make sure that is selected. I can then add my second stroke, which is the brush. And as you can see, the bottom stroke is not wide enough. So if I go back to this bottom stroke over here, I can then go and increase the stroke width until it covers the top brush. That's working for me. Okay, so let's have the dotted line down the middle. So once again, I'm going to add a stroke. This one's going to be the white line down the middle, but you can see it's just one white line. I would like this one to actually be a dotted line. Now what we do is if we double-click on the brush over there, I can then go into my spacing and I can add some space between those shapes. So within the spacing, I'm just going to add in 50 percent in there and you can see immediately how it's given me some dots in there. Now, this means that I can change this at anytime. I could say, well, let's have a 100 in there to move them further apart, or 200 to go even further still. I think I'm going to settle for a 150 on there. Now the great thing about doing brushes this way with multiple brushes, we'll apply that to the stroke on or using the appearance panel is at each of those brushes are separate strokes. So I can go into this brushstroke here, which is the white dotted line. And I can adjust the stroke width on just that brush. Let's just take this down to maybe narrow one, like so. I can then also separately go to as you've seen, the Stroke panel here. And I can increase the gray or decrease the gray. And I can also change the color of that gray separately. So I'll click over there. No wrong one. Click on this one, and then go into my stroke. And let's experiment with a lighter gray and see how that, how that works. And so finally, I want to keep all this appearance panel so I can apply it to other shapes. So I'm going to go to the Window menu and we're going to go down. We're going to find the graphic styles panel. Here it is over there. And then I just use the black arrow tool, which is the selection tool, and drag what I've applied this appearance to onto my graphic style. There it is, all ready to go. If I get rid of this, this means that I can now go across to the shape. Now we're going to have this going around a circle. So I'll draw an elliptical shape in there. Apply the graphic style and you can see I've got my road running around in a circle. Try that out, class and variations on the way. This is great for all types of, of different effects, not just roads. It's also good for maps and railway lines and all sorts of things. But do try that out and then come back for the second part of this project where we're going to do some cars and put some cars going round on the road as well. 32. Car Logo Project: Apply Brush: Let's have a bit of a look at how we can make a car. Well, I'm going to use techniques that we looked at earlier in this course. I'm going to be using this little tool over here called the shape builder tool quite a lot. So I'm going to start off with an ellipse, and I'm going to draw a little ellipse. This is the body of the car that I am creating your credit of any size and scale it up or scale down as you need. And then I'm going to have a second one over here. So I'm holding down the Alt key to make a copy, which I'll make slightly bigger. Now I'm going to use the second ellipse to cut off from the first one. So that'll do nicely, looks more like a spaceship. And I'm going to select both of them. And I'm going to cut one from the other. Now, I can use this little tool here, which is the shape builder tool. Or I could use my Pathfinder over there as well. I'm using the shape builder tool and hold down the Alt key, cut. This is the body of the car and that's the underside of the car. I didn't wanted to straight a straight cut. I wanted a slight bend on it. So onto the next area here I'm going to take a rectangle. And with my rectangle, this is going to be the top of the car here. I'm going to use the direct selection tool to select that point and just pull it into round off the back of the car. And then I'm going to select this point here and move it across. This will be the front windscreen. We can then take that move it down onto here. It's got a long trunk out at the back. So loved ones in the front runner. Compute out the back. I'm going to select both of them. And then once again, I will use this little tool to just drag over them to unite them together. Now, the wheels in here we keep in this quite simple. Remember we thinking in terms of a logo for a small child. So I'm keeping just as a rough car shape. I'm going to take my ellipse. I'm going to draw two ellipses. I'm using these to cut out where the wheels will go. So we'll move that up to there. Hold down the Alt key, and make another copy, select all three items, and then use this little tool with the alt key to subtract one from the other, like that. So it's Alt key and subtract. And then lastly, all I've got to do is to ellipses for my wheels. So let's have a little ellipse over here. And this ellipse, I'm going to give it a stroke. So we'll have a black stroke on there and make that stroke a whole lot larger. So why overcome for black stroke with a black wheel will because actually I'm going to go to the fill and change the fill color to something else. And let me choose a whitish gray for, for silver will give the car color as well. And we'll make that red in there. So I'm going to place that wheel there, hold down the Alt key and make a copy of that one to go there. So my car is pretty much done. I'm going to select the car and I'm going to put it into my brushes now and I'm going to do a scatter brush. So Window menu, going down to brushes. I'm going to drag it in. I think I'll make it a bit smaller before I do that. So I'm just taking it down a little bit in there. You don't have to, but it just helps a bit. Drag-and-drop it in. This is going to be a scatter brush and I'll click Okay. Okay, once again. So now I want to get the cart that's running around the outside here. So I'm going to go over to the window menu, find my appearance panel again. So if you can't see it, you need to bring it up. Click on the circle. Over here. We're going to add another stroke on the top. So another stroke here. And this stroke, we're going to find the car. You can see the car goes around the outside, a line like that. It's not looking so great. So I could double-click on the car and go in and set the rotation is relative to the path. And then I could change the size of the car and I could change the spacing so it may be closer together or slightly further apart. Doing it this way will ensure that that car is exactly as I drew it in the first place. But sometimes you might want to do things slightly differently, especially if you're working for kids work. If I drag and drop it into here and did it as a pattern brush and click. Okay. Now you can see that it's already right up close. We'll click Okay. So let's do the same thing again here we'll click on the car. I'll go to my brush. I will choose my pattern brush this time. And now you can see the cars automatically just go around the outside. And because it's on a a bend, the curve will actually bend itself slightly to the shape that I've got in there. Now of course, unfortunately, what's happening is the cause of two close together. So we double-click on the brush and up the top of this brush, there is a spacing option in here. So I can change my spacing. And exactly as we did with the dots on the road. And I'm going to put in a 100 between them and the cars are now nicely spaced out. Like so. What about if I wanted to change the size of the cars? Well, once again, as long as I'm on the appearance panel, I can go to my stroke and that can change the size of that particular stroke. You can see we've got now more, more cars on their assets, more space on that. All I've got to do now is to go and add a bit of text in the middle. So this could be something that's been given to us by a client. Or I can just go in here and use my type tool, one click. So for cars or the zed there. And I'm going to make it loops. Try that again. And I'm going to make it a little bit larger. So into my type tool, click a few times. And over here in my sizes, and it goes up to 72, but I can keep going to make that a whole lot bigger in there. There's just one thing that I would like to do to this type. As you can see, I've, I've chosen Ariel black in here. And you've got the C and the a, which are kind of close together, but there is a bit of a gap between the two of them. Whereas the R and the zed is almost touching in there. And I'd like a little bit more space between the legged that are in the base of the Z in there. So what I'm going to do is use my type tool. Click between the two. Go to my character panel. And we've got something in here called kerning. So if I were to increase the kerning, you can see it'll just move those two characters slightly further apart. That's probably a bit much. Let's try 25 in there. And then even here, if I'm thinking between the C and the a, I can click between those two. An academic put a negative kerning in there to move them closer together. If I felt that it helped it to look better. Lastly, because of the way that I've done this type, I'll just use the click and type in method. I can always grab the corner and pull it out. Don't forget if you used a different kind of type, you'd go to the Type menu and you can change between point type and area type in there. And finally, in the Type tool is the Touch Type Tool option in here. So I can actually click on individual characters. If I think it would look more interesting. And maybe just scale up those characters, even move them down a little bit like that as well. I don't like that. I'm going to undo it and just use my type straight in, like so, and maybe scale it down just a little bit to the middle. And we go, There's my child's car logo. All done. Try it out. Use different shapes in there. And with your brushes. If you find that one brush doesn't do what you want, try it in a different way, and it might give you the result that you're after. 33. Rasterization: Let's have a look at the effects menu now. Right at the top, we've got the effects. And you can see it's divided into two sections, the illustrator effects and the Photoshop effects. So before we start having looked at just a few of these effects are not going to go through every single one because that's a cause and it's self. But what I'd like to do to show you the difference between these two main sets. I'm going to take a shape now, just a simple little ellipse like this. And I'll get rid of the stroke and change the fill color. Just got a simple little red shape like that. Now, if I go to my Effects and I go to the illustrator effects, the illustrator effects work as a vaccine. So when I go down to an effect and let's go down here to distort and Transform pucker and bloat. And this effect will affect the vector directly. So I can just drag that slider to make that bloat or pull it out that way to make it Packer. Once, once I've done that and I click Okay, the effect is applied to the vector. So if I change the vector shape, the effect, the effect will automatically change as well. And it's all vector base at all instant. And you can zoom right in. I just go right in that corner over there. And you can see it's all absolutely smooth. It's totally vector. Remember, vector allows full scaling. So what about if I used when the Photoshop effects? Well, the thing is that Photoshop works with pixels. So what's going to happen is it's going to change the shape temporarily into pixels. And this is a process called rasterization, where you change from vector into pixels. So let me do the same thing again, a little circle like that. And I'm going to once again go to Effect and to the Photoshop Effects. And let's use one of these blurbs here. Now, put on a Gaussian blur. Yeah, I've got a bit of a blur there. Maybe it's a bit much you can see if I keep going too much, you can actually see the edges there. Will just pull it back a little bit over there and click Okay. So if I used my selection tool and I decide to change the shape, I can quite happily do that. When I change the shape, what Illustrator is doing is it's converting it from pixels back to vector and pixels again. So here at the moment it is rasterize the shape. This is all pixels. If I were to cut that corner and click and drag, it's now changed into the vector and then rerun it, arises it again. If we zoom right in, I'll just use the little zoom tool to zoom right into aside. There we go in far enough. You can actually see those pixels that make up that effect. We've got a fairly large now. So is there a way to to change the resolution that the so is there a way to change the resolution that this rust rises to? Well, yes. If you go to Effect, you can say the document raster effects settings. And in here I can change that resolution. Well, to anything I like or I can go from screen to high. Remember though, if your resolution is too high in here, when it comes to moving things in, changing them. It might take a little while to update. You can see I've gone to high resolution here, are pull this down and wait for a second, and there we go. It updates. Whereas using the illustrator effect, it will be instantaneous because it is a vector. 34. Effects vs Non-Effects: So why might we want to use an effect? Well, one of the main reasons is that you can get rid of an effect. It is fully adjustable. Let's have a little bit of a look. You see in the effects. We've got various effects in here. And what you're gonna notice it is that some of these effects are replications of things you can do from possibly the Object menu or some of the other menus. Let me show you what I mean. I'm going to take this little shape that I've created and make a copy of it. Now, this one here, what I'm going to do is I'm going to rotate the shape around to make it an interesting shape. So this is something we did earlier on in this course. I can either go along to my rotation and I can double-click my Rotate tool to get interpretation. I can put in 20 degrees in there, and I can choose Copy. And I can copy that around using my Control Command D to repeat it. And then do that. Or I can go to the Object menu. I can go to transform and I can choose rotate in here. And once again, that takes me into the same area, put in 20 degrees and I can repeat that, we'll way round, so let's just copy that around like so. Now I could do exactly the same thing as an effect. I can take this, I can go to Effect. I can go down to distort and transform. And under transform. In here we've got an option to rotate. I'll put in 20 degrees in there. Now what it does do is it asks me how many copies I want. So I want to have eight copies in this. That'll go all way around and I'll click Okay. Now as you can see, these two look exactly the same. So where's the difference? Well, the main difference is that each one of these objects is a separate entity, whereas in here we only have one original. So firstly, if I want to get rid of the effect, I can go over here to the transform in the properties panel under Appearance, I can just click on the pin and that will remove any appearance that I've got. Secondly, if I want to go and adjust that appearance, I can click back on the word transform in there. And in here I can say, well, actually I want to have ten degrees in there. And 16. Whoops, Good of 18 of those. So I can always adjust the transformation or any of the effects by clicking on there. Well, what else can I do if I go to this original shape? If I were to change the shape, you can see how it will adjust the look of the effect on there. As kinda cool, Ready? What else can I, can I do with this? Well, I can also save it to apply to other shapes. If you go to the Window menu. And what we're going to do is we're going to look at the graphic styles. We looked at this earlier on where we took an appearance and we dropped it in there. I can drop an effect in there as well. So and get rid of that. This means I can take any shape that I like or any object that I like. And very quickly apply that appearance. And even take something like a line that I've drawn and very quickly apply that appearance to it. And anytime I can go into the transform and make changes to it. But what about if you did want to just change one of those will, in that case, you need to go to the Object menu and we expand the appearance of that object and that breaks it down into its component parts. You'll find it is grouped together and you do need to go to the Object menu and ungroup it sometimes, several times, basically until ungroup gets grayed out. And now each of those is an individual shape is if you done it the traditional way, have a go with a few of those in it is quite a number of effects in here. We will be covering 3D shortly, but do check out some of these options. For example the distort and transform, this some interesting ones in there. I was using transform to get the rotation over there. And this different path options, there's a pathfinder and this does a flexible version of what we were doing before, where we were using the Pathfinder from the window menu. Rasterization takes your shape and converted into pixels. Got some stylize options there, drop shadows, feathers, SVG filters and warping effects as well. To try to remember those you can always go back to at anytime and they are all vector. Once again, you could do the same thing in here. You can always go back to an effect that you've applied in from the Photoshop effects. But remember, they are pixelated and you do need to be aware of your raster effects settings. Have fun with them, try them out. 35. 3D: 3d. Now, this can be a huge area if you've ever looked at 3D programs. But the great thing is 3D and illustrate is actually quite simple. It's just done as an effect. So what we're going to be doing is we are going to be creating some shapes and then applying a 3D effect to them. Now, you can then go into your 3D effect and you can change all sorts of things. There are different types of effects, as you'll see, I'll show you the various types from extruding things to being able to spin them around to make things like bottles. And then for the project, what we're going to do is we're going to make some spheres. And once we've made these spheres, we're going to then make them look as if they glass. As you can see, the result is pretty impressive when you think that those are done in Illustrator, and they're just vector shapes. And the great thing is because they are effects. We can then change the size of them. We can manipulate them. And the whole 3D thing will update itself straight into now. 36. Introducing the 3D Effect: Now, illustrators got some really cool 3D effects. And remember these are effects. So you can apply them and then you can remove them at any point or you can go back and adjust them as well. I'm going to use this square of this rectangle that I've made. If I click on it, you can see I just use the rectangular tool and a little rectangle. Now by the mid brown, I'm going to go to Effect and 3D. Now. In the 3D option, we have Extrude and Bevel. We have revolve and we have rotate. I'm going to start at the top with Extrude and Bevel. I'll click on that. And you can see immediately it gives us the sense of 3D on that object. So by moving it and rotating it slightly in sort of see a 3D view of the item going to go down and start here with the extrude depth. And this allows me to just change the depth of that object. And you can see down here because I've got Preview switched on, I'm going to be seeing what I'm doing live. Now next to extrude depth, you can then choose whether you want caps on the end or whether you wanted to be clear in the middle. Now, once you've done that, if you just click Okay, you then applied a 3D Extrude and Bevel effect. And like everything else, you can get rid of it. You can also change the shape. So if I were to go the corners and just pull the menu can suck and rounded and the effect will automatically update. At the moment, I've just got to fill in there. If I went to my stroke, I could put a stroke on there. And I could change the width of the stroke as well. If I went to the fill, I could remove the fill if I wanted to. And that would just leave the stroke around the outside. And then put that fill back on there again. And I'm going to go to my stroke and just remove the stroke. And I can even go back here again and just take it back to a rectangle. Of course, you can also take your points and you can move your points around so I can adjust it like so. Now if I want to go back and adjust the shape a bit more and go back to my 3D, Extrude and Bevel. Don't go Effect 3D and back to it that way. Go down to the appearance panel and just click the 3D Extrude and Bevel effect, which has been applied to that shape. And that opens up your settings once again. Now this it'll set over here, allows me to read the object around within 3D space. So I can go onto the object and you can see as I move onto it, it kind of shows me little bits which are highlighted. Firstly, if I'm not on the object on the background, I can click and I'm rotating the object around. So and you can see this still one is moving in the, if I do that, I could do exactly the same thing where I can do it from within this box area as well. I can also go in here and I can click on these lines. And if I do that, exactly rotate the object around. On that axis over there. These axes have got different names as the x, y, and z axes. But for the moment, just move onto the shape and you can click and drag. Of course, you can just click anywhere in the shape and move it around. But that's a little bit more hidden miss. Trying to get things absolutely spot on. And I click, Okay, remember this is just an effect. So you can save it and you can put it into the graphic styles if you wish to apply to other things so I can drag and drop it straight in there. It's in my graphic style now. So if I have a different shaped me do a little star over here. I can quickly apply that graphic style to that shape. This is great for maps when you want to do small buildings and just little squares for buildings or 3D shapes for buildings, you can just create one, quit the style and then applied very, very quickly. Have a bit of a play with that. Try it out, see how you get on. And then on the next lesson, we'll come back. We'll take this a little bit further. 37. Add Text, Graphics & Photoshop to Shapes: Let's look at some more settings for the extrude. Once again, I'm going to take a very simple shape and I'll go with the rectangle again. Click and drag. I still got the same color. And I'm going to go up to Effect 3D and Extrude and Bevel. So in here, I'm going to increase the extrude depth. And we're gonna move this out a little bit. So if we go down a little bit here, you'll see this more options along the bottom. If I click where it says More Options, I can then even change the lighting so I can move the lighting around and I'd get it to maybe light from the back or the front. Whatever works for the illustration that you're trying to do. Now, we've got another option right down the bottom which says Map Art. Now, map heart allows you to put graphics onto the various sides. So I'm going to prepare my graphics to go in there. I'm just going to cancel this for now. So to get the graphics, what we do is we go along to the Window menu. We find over here how symbols panel, It's near the bottom under Ss. And the symbols of the items that we can place on the side of the box. So I want a few things on my box. I want to have some text. I want to have a photograph. And well, just a simple little shape. So I'm going to do a little star over here. So I'm going to have a star which is going to go onto the box in there. I'll give it a different color. And I think because it's going to go into that box, I'm gonna make it white. So I will drag and drop that white item into there now just so that you can see it a bit easier because white on white, it doesn't really work. I'm going to put a black stroke around the outside. So it move that into my symbols. I'm not even going to bother to name it. I will just click. Okay, there it is, There's my style. Now. Next one. And I want some text. So it's put in some text over here. So I'm going to click once and just do the word box. And not very creative. But nonetheless, I'm going to increase the size. And I might actually even going use the selection tool to just scale that word up a little bit and drop it straight in there. Same again. Click Okay. And it's in. Now, what about a photograph? Well, I'm going to go to file and place to place a photograph into my document. I'll just use this one up here, the adventure to trace. I'm going to click on Place and click and drag that him. Now, the first thing that you notice is that this image has got a cross through the middle. And that means that it's linked to an external file. So if I use the selection tool and I click and drag that into my symbols panel. Click, Okay. You see it just says it can't add a linked image. Now we can bring in a photograph, but what we have to do is to make sure that it's imbedded into the document and not linked. Now you can do that either when you actually bring the image in and you using place switching off the little link option in and just make sure it's LinkedIn that will embed it. Or if you've brought it in and it is linked, well, just go along to the properties down here and click Embed. You see the cross disappears from the middle. And now I can drag that picture in quite happily. And it's now got a pixel image inside the symbols. Okay, so applying this to our shape, we don't even need that up anymore. I'm gonna move it over. So I've got some room here to show you. And if I go along to Effect 3D, Extrude and Bevel. And then I'm going to increase the extrusion depth. While we're in here. You can also change the bevel if you wish, so you can have contact with slightly adjusted corners, beveled corners or when wonderful corners. To be honest, I'm keeping mind with none at the moment. And then lead to click Map Art. And map art takes me into a new window. And you can just about see this little red line around the front plane of my shape. And I can then choose in here which plane I want to work in. That's the backplane there. The right-hand side plane, the bottom, the left. So that's now on the left plane. There were, of course we've got the top as well. Let me go back to the front. So I want to work on the front plane. And up here it says symbols. So I can go into my symbols. And down the bottom, I can then choose my box text. It's a bit small on there, so I can go in here and just scale it right up. If I need. Let me go on to the next one, so I'll go over here to the left-hand side. I want to put the star on there. So same again going here, choose my star, and I'm going to just scale it up a little bit until it fits. Once again, the last one over here onto the top, and that'll be the photograph pops in there. If you wanted to be at a different angle where you can just grab the corner and you can rotate it around if it's not quite correct. So I could just do that to move it around to the right angle that I like. And it's not quite in the right place at the moment. And I'm going to grab a corner, place that corner there and put this one over there so it'll cover the whole of the top. When I'm happy with that. As always, click Okay, and Okay, again, Let's de-select that and there's our shape. We can still do all the usual things and go and change things and move them around. But be careful if you've got artwork and you then start to add other bits in here like these planes, you might end up losing your artwork. And we go, it's back again. Try that out. And in the next lesson, we'll then start to look at another kind of 3D. 38. Revolve a Shape in 3D: So let's look at the next type of 3D effect. Going to go down and just find a shape for the moment. And I'll use an ellipse over here. Let's give it a different color this time. So what I'm going to do is I'm going to go to the Effect menu down to 3D, and I'm going to go to revolve. What revolt does is it takes to shape and spins it or laid sit around one of the points. Now, same again over here we've got some more options this time it's an angle so you can actually cut things out like Sir. You can also, oops, let's make sure it's full. You can also offset it in different amounts. So I can increase the offset to get more of a larger ring. It's just shorten that a bit and I will just rotate them around. So we've got something along that line there. Let's try and make this a little bit more interesting. I'm going to cancel that and I'm going to remove that shaped their this time. What I'm going to do is I'm going to use the pen tool. And I'm going to create a little vase or a bottle shape. So I'm going to and click over here and I'm just clicking and dragging. If you prefer to use any other tool, feel free to do that. You could use the pencil tool for this. You could use any of the tools to be honest, as long as you can make it a bit of a line, like so. And all I want from that line is to do half of the bottle. So 1.5 of the bottle like that, which is all flat. Now the important thing is go back to the black arrow, the selection tool, just de-selected and reselect to get. Always like to do that just to make sure that I've got exactly everything selected. Let's make it green as it's going to be. A bottle will go with the bright green. So same again, Effect 3D and revolve. And straight away you can see it just takes hadn't laid to the, revolves it into a bottle shape. Now, you might find that you've actually drawn yours the opposite way around. And in that case, you can change from the left edge to the right edge. So if it ends up looking something like that, just change it from left to right. Like the other. 3d. We can also go into map art, but you'll see that your surfaces look slightly different, but I can still apply artwork to that. I'm going to put that yellows white star on, then I'm going to pull it round. So it's kind of in the front of the bottle. Will just make sure that shades as well. So a bit of artwork shading on there, you find it's too dark, leave artwork shading switched off. Once I'm happy with that, I'll click Okay. Now remember this is an effect, 3D revolve effect, which has been applied to this line here. So if my line wasn't quite correct, I can use my white arrow, the direct selection tool, and I can select any of these points and I'm going to select that point. Then I'm just going to pull it in to adjust the top of the bottle in there. Likewise, I can go over here and I can grab this point here and I can pull it out in there to change the shape of that bottle. Do be careful when you're doing this because it's very easy to mess the 3D up and you get some really weird results. There we go. It's gone a bit weird where you can sort of see the middle line coming through in the, if that was right in the middle there, it might not be quite so, so bad. And also remember that your artwork might just disappear at some point. But it's a great way of modeling things where you can just put on a 3D effect and then go and play with the shapes and till you get the exact look, the draft. I'm going to take these two here and just move them out. So you get more of an interesting traditional bottle. Don't forget, of course, you can always click on your shape and you can go and change your colors. If I want that to be a dark brown bottle, I can choose dark brown in there. Have fun with that one. 39. Multiple Shapes in 3D: I've got three individual shapes over here. If I select all of them at the same time, I can go to Effect 3D and revolve. And when I revolve them, you'll see they're all revolving as independent shapes. This was the last one I drew, so it's the one that's right at the top, whereas those two are behind it. That's why it looks so very, very strange. So if I were to rotate them like so, you can see they're all being treated as individuals and they all go all over the place. So what about if I want to treat that as one shape, say three stripes on that. Well, it's really simple. You just select them all. Go to the Object menu, down to group and group them together. And now when you apply your effect, it will see that as one shape Effect, 3D revolve. And you're seeing it as one shape in there. And I can move that around and put it at any angle that I like. Let's click Okay and deselect it. 40. Perspective in 3D: Let's have a look at the last of these 3D effects, and that's the one at the bottom which is rotate. Now rotate works on flat objects. So just rotate the object around as if it was a flat object or disk. So if I take this particular circle and I go to Effect 3D and rotate, I can then use this to rotate it around. As if it was a flat, flat disc. There is no depth to that item. One of the things I can do however, is I can change the perspective on an item. So if I change the perspective, you see it's sort of almost pulling that shape towards me. We do that again. This time. I'm going to use a number of circles and I'll give them some different colors. So let's start there. Another one there. And let's have a few more, like so. And we'll just change the color on these quickly. Let's have some different colors popping up here. Green on that. Some bright blue here, pink. And we need one more color after that. Let's go with yellow. Now, remember as before, if I select them all and went to Effect, 3D and rotate, they will all be treated as independent items. So I can change them all. They're all independent. If I apply the perspective, it's applying the perspective to each one of those on its own. So I'm going to do exactly what I did in the last tutorial. I'm going to go to object and group them all together. So now illustrator sees this as one object, Effect, 3D and rotate. I'm going to rotate them all together, like so. And then if I go to the perspective, when I change the perspective, it will look at them as if they were one object. So the pink one in the front and the blue one gets larger and the other ones gets smaller in the background. I'll click Okay. And de-selected. And it's done. 41. 3D Sphere Project: Create Your Sphere: So let's have a look at creating some spheres. And we're going to do that using the first of all effects. And we're going to be using revolve in there. Now, the problem with the sphere, obviously, is it, if you just create a little ellipse like this? And well, let's give it a different color so that it'll be easy to see in here and make it green with a yellow surround. And I go along to Effect down to 3D and revolve. It will revolve it. But what it does is it pulls it out and makes it basically into a doughnut shape. So we really don't want that. We want a really nice rounded sphere. So I'm going to cancel this. And let's go and get rid of this and start once again. So to make a sphere, we need half of a circle. I'll get an ellipse. I'm going to draw my ellipse in. I'm holding down the Shift key so I get a perfect circle. I think I'll do this one without a stroke, so let's have no stroke on there, and I'll just give it some color in here. Let's take a blue. I want to have this and there's various ways of doing this and cutting objects in half. I'm going to use a nice simple way. And that's going to be to use a rectangle, put a rectangle over half of my shape. You can see how nicely snaps onto the middle. Select both parts. And then I can either use the Pathfinder to subtract the front from the back, or I could go along to the shape builder tool, hold down the Alt key and drag over both of them. I'll just use the Pathfinder to subtract the front object from the back object. That gives me this really nice half of a circle. So now I can go to Effect 3D and revolve. And you can see it revolves it into a perfect sphere. Now you might find yours looks a funny shape. And that could be because it's actually offset from the wrong side. If I change that to offset from the right, you'll see it'll offset from the other side. In there. I'm going to keep mine on the left. So I've now got my shape in there. But what I'd like to do is to put a little bit of artwork on it. And I'm thinking in terms of billiard balls, something within maybe a number in there. So to do that, I'll just okay. This. I'm going to take some artwork and put it into the we can find them. I'm going to put it into my symbols panel. So let's find the symbols. Over here. I will make the artwork. And I'm just going to use a little circle like this. I'm gonna make my circle. I think I'll do it white or maybe just slightly off-white. And I'll put a number in there as well. So I'm going to go along to my type tool and just click. I'll do a number 8. And we're going to make that a lot larger. So it's pull that right out, make it quite big and pop it on there. Now I take both of those and I dropped them back into the Symbols panel. Now when you get to this stage, once again, don't worry about anything here. Just click Okay, and we can get rid of that now. So to put the number onto the sphere, we need to go back to the sphere. Now, if I click on the sphere, you'll see that I can then get in the Appearance palette here to the effect that I used on it. I'll click the 3D revolve effect that takes me back into there again. You might find that you need to switch on preview if you're not seeing what it's doing, I'm going to click Map artwork. And in the symbols at the top here, I'm going to choose my number eight. It's on the wrong side, but that's not a problem. I can just move it across in here until I get it into the right position. But you can see the lighting is coming down onto my sphere from this top right-hand side. But the number eight is just flat art. So I'm going to switch on shade artwork. And that will then shade any artwork that you put in there as well. And it looks like it's a lot more accurate. We'll click OK, OK again. And there is my first of the blood pools because what I want to do is to have some more, the shapes may be different colors. So I'm going to hold down the Alt key and make a copy of this one. Now this one's going to be a bit bigger, so I'm going to scale it up. But look what happens when I start to scale this. Hold down the Shift key. And you can see how the artwork remains the same size. Now, there is an option that that fixes that for you. If you go along to the properties, make sure you're in transform. If you can't see it, click on these three dots. And that will then show you an option where you can scale stroke and effects. So with that switched on this time, when I scale this, it will scale the artwork, which is the whole effect as well. All of now going to do is to change the color of that one. It's make that orange. Hold down the Alt key, like my next one. Over here. Let's bring that forward a little bit. Over here. I'm going to scale that up. And once again, I can then change that. So just one scan, make sure that scale, artwork and effects is switched on. And I'll change the color on that. Let's go with more of a brighter color. Well, the pink we'll, we'll do anyway, get up to that stage there. So remember, make your, your ellipse first cut in half. Maybe do your artwork, put it into the Symbols panel, go into the effects down to 3D and revolve. Remember if you need to go back in there again, don't go to effects a second time. Get to the effect by clicking it in the appearance panel. And then you can make copies of this. And if you want to scale them with your artwork, as well as the effect, make sure that in the transform option, you click on the little scale. Artwork was Scale Strokes and Effects. If I say, have a go with that and then come for the next stage where we're gonna put some shadows under these objects. 42. 3D Sphere Project: Adding Shadows: So let's make some shadows for these now. And there are a number of ways of making shadows. One way which you can make a very simple shadow is you can go along to an ellipse. And if I put a solid color on this ellipse, like a black in there, I can then go up to the Effects. I can go down to Blur and I can put some blur onto that shape. And you can see I can blurred a little bit like that. If you blow too far, you start to see the edge around the, but a little bit of blur would be fine. Click Okay, and that gives me a very simple little shadow which I could then go and place underneath the shape. I'm just going to send it to the back by going to object arrange and send to back, and we get something like that. I'd like to go a little bit more accurate than that. But before I do, something might be thinking, well, what about a drop shadow effect? Well, let's have a look at the drop shadow effect. If I go to Effect, I go down to Stylize and there is a drop shadow in there. You can see what the drop shadow effect does, is it puts the shadow around the entire shape. So it just won't look accurate at all. The type of shadows that I like to do is actually with the Blend tool. I'm going to go along and I'm going to get an ellipse, and I'm going to draw a large ellipse like this, and I'm going to make that ellipse black. I always like to make my shadows black if it's a solid object, because I can always change the opacity. I, I never start with gray, always with black. So let's start off with that one there. And I'm going to make a copy of that or hold down the Alt key to make a copy and make this one a lot smaller. So this is going to be a smaller version. That shape. Now because the light is coming from the top left-hand corner, I actually want more shadow over on the left-hand side. So I'll move the center bit over here to the, to the top or to the right-hand side of my shadow. Now, I'm going to take the big circle over here, just a big one and I'm going to change the opacity on that to 0. So we've got two shapes here. They've both got black as the color, but one is a 100 percent capacity. And the second one, the bigger one is 0. If I select both of those and go to Object, Blend and Make. Well, we don't get much of a shadow because what it's done is it's taken a smooth color, so it's gone from there to semi-transparent to black. But if you go back to Object blend and your Blend Options and change from smooth color into Specified Steps. You can put in as many steps in here as you like. I'm just going to put in 200 and click Okay. And you see now we get this really nice, smooth from Black through transparent and it is transparent, it's not white. You see if I were to move it on top of that shape, you can see through it. Now the reason I do it out to transfer it rather than white is because if I wanted to change my background color, well, if I come to white, it would just look very, very strange. So if I've got a shape where shadow like this, once again, you can see it still doesn't look that accurate. So I'm just going to go along here to my Let's try that again. So I'm going to go along to my opacity and just reduce the opacity as well as change it from the top to the bottom target from object, arrange and send to the back. It's starting to look better now, but it's still not quite right. You see when you have a shape, a solid shape like this, this January or very dark area right underneath the object. Not big like that, but really, really quite dark. So I can make another copy of this one. Make this one smaller. There's no right or wrong with size here. Just do what you think. And we'll make this one less transparent. So I've got this one here. And I've got this one, which is going to be right underneath my shaped for the original darkness. And then the bigger one, I can maybe make a little bit less solid. So we get this really nice shadow effect coming through. Now of course we want the same for, for that one next moment it looks like it's floating. So I can select both of those, hold down the old key, maybe reduce the size of these two and move them across under that one. And if I see the last bowl, they do the same to that. In fact, our move it across to here. And let's put that one more in the distance and do the same thing again. Select both of those, hold down the old key, popped under there, but maybe make it a little bit smaller still as well. I'm using the arrow keys to just move this around. It's on my keyboard to get it exactly where I needed. So do have a bit of a go with that. If things look like they are floating, just move them closer to the background or to the bottom of this shadow. And try to shadows in there, use the blend tool to do it. So biggest circle and a smaller circle, both of them black to start off with. Take the biggest circle, take the opacity down to 0, select them both, and it's Object Blend and Make, and then change your blend steps to get a smooth blend between them. Try it out. 43. 3D Sphere Project: Adding Reflection: Now that's great for solid shapes like billiard balls or snicker, snicker balls. But what about if we wanted something a bit more glassy or semi-transparent? Well, let's try this out. What I'm going to do is rather than make a new document, I'm just going to make a new art board. So I will zoom out a bit and that's remember command minus or Control minus depending on your Mac or PC. I'm going to move this up. So I'm holding down spacebar to move that up. And I will go along to my Artboard tool. I only want to copy the art board, not the artwork. So our switch off, move artwork with artboard and hold down the Alt key to make a copy of the art board. I can now go over to my new art board. And now I'm, rather than recreating one of these shapes again from scratch, I'm just going to pinch one that I've got up here. So let me select that with the shadow. Hold down the Alt key and drag it down. Let's see what we can do with this one now. Well, the first thing is because this is going to be transparent. I'm going to get rid of the 8 on here. So to do that, I click on the 3D shape. I go to 3D, revolve in the appearance panel. And I can then go into my map art work. I can just delete for clear the artwork from that. We'll click Okay on that. And okay again. So why can't we just change the opacity of the object to make it semi-transparent. Well, you can, but it doesn't really work very well. It kind of gives you just a very light sphere and maybe you can see the background shape through there. What we really need is something which is transparent and maybe shows off a little bit of reflection on here. So it looks almost like a glass ball. If the light is going to come through our shape, it will put a bit of a shadow over here, but the shadow won't be black and dark like this. The shadow will actually be a color the same color as your shapes. The first thing I'm going to do, just move that out the way. I'm going to select my shapes down here. And I'm going to change the fill color to a blue. And you can see now we almost get a blue glow in there. Unfortunately, not dark enough. So I will go into my blue here. I'm going to double-click it and I'm going to dark in that blue down. Now I'm working in RGB. And to darken things down, I find if I'm in RGB mode, the fastest way to do that is to go to where it says RGB. Choose HSB, that stands for hue saturation and brightness. And in here I can then just choose to darken that down quite a lot. Click, okay. And if we've chosen that color, you can see now we've got more of an interesting glow. This one here, I could choose a much brighter color as well. Unfortunately, because I've changed the blue in here, I should have made a copy. I'll just do another copy of that. And we'll have the brighter blue back once again. So something like that. Click, Okay, so this one here is the bright blue and I've got the dark blue in there. And that's going to give me an interesting sort of effect where the light is almost coming through my shape and just casting a very small shadow, but it's going to be the blue shadow in there. Okay, so what about the shape itself? Let's have a look at what we can do to make a bit of a reflection on here to give it a glossy feel. Now, there's no right or wrong with reflections at all. Probably the best thing to do is to find something which is glass and it's got a reflection and then try and copy those reflections onto your shape. Now if you do a Google search, you'll find a plenty of items with reflections in them. And I've done that over here. I've just gone to Google, had a look to find a glass sphere, and I'll just bring it in, drag it into my document of then you can see the same thing in here. So this has got a lot of shapes in there which are reflections of the surrounding scene. So that's what we're going to try and replicate. Let's start off with this large shape over here. So I will use my Pen tool to do this. And I'm just going to draw the shape into our start over here. Click and drag, click and drag to get another curve in there. Maybe down to here, back around to there, and down to the starting point in there. Remember, if this doesn't work for you, you can use the pencil tool if you like. You can move your handles around. You can get the shape exactly as you wanted. Looking closely at this reflection, you'll notice that it goes from, well, it's not white, it's actually orange through to a darker orange. This a bit of a gradient going on there. And we could do exactly the same thing on our shape. So I will select my shape. And I'm going to go to the Window menu, find the gradient panel. And I'm just going to apply a simple gradient to start off with. So you can either choose from here or you can click on, on here to see your gradients. I'm going to pick a black to white one. So what I'd like is to have this going from white to white. I'll double-click on that side there, and that allows me to choose white to white. That's not much of a gradient going from white to white. But if I were to pick one of these sides and change the opacity. Now it'll go from white to transparent. And then of course I can use my gradient tool and just drag this to any angle that I like. So I'm trying to roughly replicate what we've got over here. You can still click on your shape. If you find that that's too bright. In there, go to the opacity and take your pasty down a bit so we get something which looks more like that, that's closer to that shape there. Now have a look at the shapes that they've got. They've got another shape over here. There's one that goes right way around the underneath as another shape in the, just pick the ones that you want to or you think would look quite good on your shape. And remember, you can move them around if they're not in the right position. So I'm going to do another one at the bottom. So I'll start over here and just click and drag to make another shape going right the way around the bottom. Over here. Remember, don't worry about getting it perfect. You can always fix it. Later on. I'll just take that out like that. And it doesn't have to be absolutely exact. I can move it around into the right position there. I can use my white selection tool, which is the Direct Selection tool, the move, any of these points around until I get the effect that we're after. And because it's a gradient, I can choose the different types of gradients. I can go center gradient, I can inverse the gradient. And I can use the gradient tool and just click and drag to put the gradient where I wanted to go. Now that's showing up with a very nasty line down there. I'll just click on that point and maybe adjust those handles a little bit. Maybe like so. And let's take this one and make this a bit narrower. I'm really just looking at something which you almost get a reflection from the ground and will take down the opacity of that. The problem with doing these type of shapes is when you are looking at them so closely, they don't look three-dimensional anymore. So once I've done a few little shapes in there, I tend to take a quick tea break and then come back and add some more shapes in to get the shape looks much better that way. Let's add a few more in here. Let's go to this one here, little shape down there. And back to that point there. Once again, I'm going to do a gradient on there. I'll do a linear gradient from the edge, maybe. And I will change the opacity on that. Let's have one last one on this side here of the white gradients. So same again, down to here. Take it down to there, and come back to that point. I'll leave that one as is. You'll notice there's a darker area down here. We can do the same thing. So I could just draw a, another semicircle over there. And maybe this one, I will fill with black or use a black gradient. I'm going to choose the black gradient there, make sure both sides are black. But one side is going to be more transparent than the other side. And of course I'll just take down the opacity on that and that'll give me the darker area at the bottom. Let's select all of those items over their group them together, so object and down to Group. And then we'll move them across on top of the little shadow glow area. Get rid of that one over there. And there we go. We've got something which looks a lot more glass-like. Then the hard-edged objects that we had over here, Let's zoom out a bit so you can see both of them at the same time. So have a bit of a go with both types of these and try out a few more versions of this because you can do it in different colors. Remember, once you've created one, if I hold down the Alt key and make a copy of that, as long as I can select that semicircle and I will undo the group over here. So I'm going to just ungroup it. So I can just select that semicircle there. I can change the color of that to anything I like. And the glass effect will still work on there. Same with this one over here. I can select these, move that over and then have a pink shadow underneath it. Have fun with the 3D stuff, and just enjoy it. 44. 3D Sphere Project: Gradient Background: So now we've got our 3D glass balls. I'd like to put a very subtle background behind this. I'm going to make a shape here. And on that shape I'm going to put a subtle gradient. So I'm going to go into my fill. Just choose any old gradient. Click the gradient options button. Now in the Gradient Options button, what I can do is I can change this gradient and I wanted to go from white to a very light gray. So we'll have three of these little stops in there. This one is going to be y two, almost white. This one here, I'm going to double-click. It is also going to be white or almost white. And the middle one, which I'm going to double-click is going to be more of a gray colors. You can just about see gray in there. But rather than going across, I wanted to go up and down. So our change the angle in here, 45, sorry, to 90 degrees. Now, I can move that around and you can see this middle is slightly more gray. If you wanted to even more gray, just double-click and choose a darker gray in there. So once I've got to this stage here and I'm thinking, well, that's probably about right, that'll be in the background there. It's going from white to gray through to white again at the top. Let's close this down and I'm going to go to object, arrange and send that to the back. And you can see now we've got this sort of slightly darker background in there. If you find it's too dark, feel free to just change it in the lightened up. You can go back to the gradient and lighten up that gray as well. The next thing though, is I want these to be reflected on a very hot surface here. So I'm going to select just the 3D balls themselves. I'm going to de-select the backgrounds and hold down the Shift key and clicking on that background. So I've just got those selected. Hold down the Alt key to drag a copy. And then we can actually just put a copy of itself like that. I'm going to move it into the right position now. It's not accurate, but it'll be accurate enough. Now, mine are not quite in the correct row, so I might find that I'm going to have to select them individually, de-select the background, and move them into the right position over there. Same with this one here. So long as that group together, you should be able to do this without any trouble at all. That one's not grouped together. So let's just make sure that I select all of that. De-select the outside and just move that up a little bit to the correct position. And then all of these can be changed in the opacity. So I'll go in and just adjust the opacity to lighten them up. So we get just a hint of a reflection on there. Depending on how shiny you want that surface to be, you can adjust the opacity in here. But what might be just very, very subtle doesn't think that you can do in here is you could also go into the effects. You could go down to stylize, sorry. You could go down to blur. And you could apply a little bit of Gaussian blur on them. Not too much, but just enough to take off that harsh edge in there. And you find that will sort of soften. The effects are rather than a harder edge, the hardest surface you're on, you're gonna slightly less harsh surface. You can see these ones worked perfectly. That one, I didn't manage to select those items. So I just undo that over there and maybe make sure that I select those when I do it. I'd like mine to be on a quite a harsh surface in there. And depending on the angle that you're looking at, you can adjust the length of these. So once again, I could select all those shapes over here and just squash them in a bit more. Which means that my viewpoint is further down. Once can enjoy them. They're so useful in all types of circumstances and they look very, very impressive. 45. 3D Sphere Project: Using Flares: Now here's a little bonus tip when you are working with shiny shapes with its glass or anything that you want to shine. I'm going to go over to the shapes here and I'm going to choose the Flatow. All I do is go to the most shiny part. Click and drag out a little flair like that. And it's de-select that. And you'll see we've got this three subtle little shine in there. If I move it out. That's what we've actually putting in there, that little shine in there. So I can just place it wherever I wanted. Now you can change it to different sizes as well. You can move it around based on what you want. So this one here, let's go with a slightly bigger This time. And you can see I get more of a shine on that. If I want a hard, very hard, hard edge like glass, try and keep your flares really small. In a small flare will just give you a very, very harsh edge to your shape. And it looks like there's almost a sun hitting that directly. You can put these not just on the shiny parts, but if you've got, for example, a glass, glass, as in a tumbler glass, you could use this on the edge. So when you put it right on the edge, it gives you that effect of light hitting a corner. In this case, because they're round and me to keep it where I think the light hits it the most. 46. 3D Sphere Project: Adding Text: So we can use these spheres for all sorts of things. But what I've done is I've made them into an infographic and a little bit of white text on top of them change the size to represent the values that the infographic might, might represent. And a bit of text in gray at the bottom, so the color doesn't take away from the colors of an infographic. So many uses for them. 47. Guides and Perspective Grid: Now, when you first start looking at Grids and Guides, it sounds a bit dry. And there are important parts of Illustrator. So we're going to have a look at how to apply grids and guides and things like smart guides, what are they, how to work with them. After that though, we're going to go into something called the perspective grid. And this allows you to draw things in perspective. And of course, we've got a project, so we're going to be using the project or the perspective grid, shall I say not the project. To make this really quite interesting stack of cards. Once again, you'd have two cards. You can do whatever you like with it, but it will give you a good understanding of how the whole perspective grid actually works. 48. Making Perspective Grids: So let's start by having a look at how to work with the guides and grids. Now you can get your guides and grids by going on to the View menu. And you'll find that right at the bottom, there's some options for grids, and if you keep going further down, there's some guides as well or vice versa. But it's much easier to actually work with the properties panel over here. So if you've clicked on your art board rather than on a piece of artwork, you'll find that some of the options here will be to do with rulers and Grids and Guides. Now, looking along the top here we've got rulers and grids. First of all, if I click this little button here, it switches on the ruler so you can see the routers along the top in there. And if I then want a guide, I just click inside the ruler and drag downwards to place a guide into my document. So I'm just going to do that again, click and drag to bring in the guides. Now, like mine, if you can't see yours and I'm dragging them in and dragging them in. What you have to do is to go down to the guides and switch them on. There. There are totally invisible otherwise. So click inside your ruler and drag them in and drop them into the right position. Now of course, you can still go into them and you can move them around if you need. I'll just click back onto my art board again. If you wish to lock them, there's a lock there to stop you from moving them by mistake. If you want to remove them, unlock them, click on the one that you want to remove and press Delete or Backspace, I'll just drag across those and I can delete them very easily like so. Now there is another type of guide that we have over here. And if I hover over it, you'll see it's some, it's a smart guide. So what is a smart guide? Will, when you've got a shape and it's just gets a little object like this. And you start to move your shapes around. I'll click and drag this. You can see when it gets added work, it's moving parallel. A little red line appears. That's a smart guide for move up to here. It will show me when I get to 90 degrees of that original shape. If you've got multiple shapes over here and you start to drag them, it shows in this case, with a little red line at the bottom that directly just touching exactly where they are, perfectly intersecting each other. If I keep going over here, once again, you'll see when I get to the edge over there, these things just pop up. And it says that it's, the middle is now intersecting the edge of the other one. If I go right on top of that one, you can see I'm intersecting those two middle points. If I want to put on the top, I just make sure it's intersecting over. They're really useful to have. But if you find them annoying because they flash on and off, you can just switch them off in there. And now, when I move this around you and see any of those little smart guides, I'm going to leave mine switched on because I much prefer them. The other thing that we can do in under rulers and grids is you can click on a grid. So you can see a grid in the background. Now, the grid itself can be changed if you find that the size is not as you'd like it are the colors not as you'd like it. If you click on the preferences down here. You can then go into Grids and Guides. And under the grid you can change the color of the grid. Let's give this a different color for now, Robin gray, I'm going to go green in there. And instead of lines, you can have dots and you can have the grid every, well, have many pixels points you want it to be. I'm going to click Okay, and you'll see my grid will now change to green while you're in there, in the preferences and once again in the guides and grids, you can also change the color of the guides, and you can change them from dots into lines. There are some preset colors that you can work from here as well. I'll click Okay, so now when I drag in one of my guides, you'll see that all now, pink. Lastly, if you want to move the zero-point because by default it's the top left-hand corner for your rulers. All you do is you click on the area between the two, is that little area there and drag and that way you can move it wherever you want. I'm going to go and place it in the middle of my document. So you can see now 0 there and 0 here going up and down. But you can put it wherever you like. I'm going to drag it to the top right-hand corner. So now I've got the 0 there and 0 over there. There is a last option in here, and I'm just going to switch off my grid because it's really annoying and I'm going to hide my guides as well. This acetal option here is to show a transparent grid. So if you're used to working in Photoshop or you're doing something you want to see trends. See, click on that and it'll show you which bits the transparent. I find this is really useful if I've got objects and I want to very quickly see if I filled them or if they are empty objects in there. Because when you're working like this, you can't always tell when something is filled with white or whether it is actually just transparent. But using this, I can quickly switched on and switched off and see where I've got white in my document. Now, when it comes to moving objects around, we can get the points to snap. So over here, the first one I've got is the Snap to Point is on. So if I'm moving something over another point, it will snap to it. I can also snap to the grid. Once again with a very fine grid like I had up there, it makes life a bit difficult. And if you're working on a document which is going to be changed into pixels. So you're doing something maybe for the web, something like that, rather than keeping it as vectors. You can also snap to pixels. So if you've got a particular pixel size document, you can get things to snap to it. Now, the reason I mentioned that is because sometimes that can be a bit annoying. Finally, these close together, like so. And I've got snap to pixels switched on. When I'm trying to get this to exactly the right place you can see as I'm moving it, it's sort of it's jumping in large increments and it might not snap exactly where I wanted to go. But that's because it's snapping to pixels. If I switch that off and now move it, I can move it a much finer increments, not get it exactly where I wanted in there. Even if I'm using the arrows on the keyboard. Do be aware of these items and switch them on and off as you need them. 49. Perspective Grid Point Difference: So with the perspective grid, the first way that most people come across it is by mistake. Because if you've got the Advanced Toolbar up like this and you click through most tools where you can just click on them. And it really doesn't make any difference. If you click on the Perspective Grid tool, you get a perspective grid in here. Now, this is okay, except you need to know how to get rid of it because if you don't you can't ignore it. If I just change it all out. I don't know how to get rid of Tao. I'll just work anyway. When you go in and start to try and draw. And if I start to try and draw a rectangle, you can see it goes in, into perspective. So the first thing for the Perspective Grid is how to remove it. Well, there's two ways to do it. One way is if you go to the Perspective Grid tool, you can click on the little x on the widget, which will just get rid of it. And that's the quickest way to do it. The other way to do it is to actually go to the View menu. Go all the way down until you see the perspective grid. And then in here you can choose to hide the grid. Now, let's have a little bit of a look at the different grids that we have because there are three types of perspective grid, we have the 1.2 and the three-point perspective. So what does this all mean? Well, when we go to the one-point perspective, I've got little example here. What happens is that all of the lines go into 1. So for example, if you were doing a street and you've got some buildings go down the side is the road over there. Everything looks to the one-point in the distance and that's known as your vanishing point. So here it is. There's my vanishing point there on my horizon. So what is a two-point? Well, 2 is if you're looking at the side of a building, the building vanishes that way and that way, this way and this way. So it vanishes into the vanishing point on that side of the building, and it vanishes into the vanishing point on that side of the building. This once again is your horizon line. So three points. Three points is imagine if we've gone up above the building. So we're looking down on the building here, there's the green roof Building. And over here we've got a vanishing point up there, which these lines, or go towards that line there, that line there and that line there. We've got a vanishing point here. So that one, that one and that one go towards that point there. And for perspective, because we're looking down all of these lines here, that one, this one and this one go to this last vanishing point in there. So we've got 123 types of perspective or grids. 50. Moving the Vanishing Points: So the first thing that we need to know about when we've got a grid is how to move it around because there's so many little points on here and you can't just click on it to move it around. So if you go along to these lines here, that's your horizon line there. And you've got this kind of foreground line. If you click on the bottom left-hand corner, this will allow you to move your grid around the page and you can place it wherever you want. The second thing that we have here is the horizon line. So I can go to the horizon line and I can move my horizon up or down. So if I move my horizon down like this, I'm looking up at the building or whatever it is that I'm creating. Once again, if I move my horizon up, then my viewpoint has gone upwards and I'm looking more down on that shape. But even now I'm looking down on it. It's not like 3 perspective where we've also got perspective on the building as well as just it's coming towards us. We got two vanishing points in there. Now, the last thing over here that I'm going to do with this 2 vanishing lines are to move the vanishing points themselves. If I pull them in closer together, we then get a more extreme grid. So it's kind of like you've come closer to the building. And the perspective is a bit more extreme, where if you move your vanishing points further away. It's as if you've moved a back further away from the building. And the perspective is less extremes not changing the size of the building. It's just changing how the perspective works. If you are into photography or photography, you will understand this as this would be the equivalent of more of a telephoto lens, whereas this would be the equivalent of a wide angle. Whoops, I made a bit of mistake on that one, but that would be the equivalent of a wide angle lens like that. 51. Drawing in Perspective on the Grid: So let's start drawing in perspective. I'm going to click on my grid to bring it up. And what I want to do now is to go over to my tools, rectangles, rounded rectangles, ellipses, whatever you like. I'm going to use the rectangle tool. Now you can see this little widget at the top here has got the blue left grid active. And this means now that the perspective on this left-hand side is active. So if I were to click and draw a shape, it will draw it on the left-hand side. Let's give that some color so that it's easier for you to see. If I clicked on the right-hand side. So I've gone to the right-hand side now, once again with the same tool. And I click in and draw, drew the shape. It's looking at that perspective. It's got nothing to do with where I'm drawing. If I started here and clicked, you can see it's still within that same perspective area. It's to do with which of these grid parts you're actually on. Let's get rid of this one. And if I want to then work on the top of the bottom perspective, I'll click on this little one here. And then if I'm in the top area, I can draw based on the top. I'm in the bottom area. It's drawing based on the bottom there. So we've got those two grids there. Now, what about if I want to move these around? Well, you can't go to the Move tool because if you do, it doesn't actually keep your perspective going. Let's get rid of that. And this one here. So how do we move it? Well, you use the Perspective Selection tool. And that way I can select something on this perspective and I can move it around on its perspective. You can see it jumped to that perspective there. If I click on the right, it's jumped to the right grid, sorry, the left grid. And now it's moving around on the left grid as well. So using this Perspective Selection tool, you can then move your objects around. But what about if I want to draw while still having the grid up? But I don't want to work within the grid itself. Well, there's another option here. If you click on this little ring just on the outside of that cube, goes blue. Now if I'm drawing, it's not taking the perspective into account at all. 52. Moving Non-Grid Items to Grid: So can you draw something and then put it into perspective? Absolutely. I've drawn these three little shapes over here, and we can even do this with texts. So I'll put in a little bit of text over here as well. I'm gonna make my text a little bit larger and then pop it in with that shape. So how did we get into perspective? Well, we go along to the Perspective Selection Tool. Just choose the grid that we want to work on. Select the item we want to move and drag it. And there we go. We've just dragged it straight into perspective acts. So. 53. Copy in Perspective: What about copying things in perspective? Well, it works exactly the same way as normal copy. If I took a rectangle like that. And I'm just going to hold down the Shift key to make a perfect square. Let's give it a different color. And then I'm going to use my Perspective Selection Tool. Because obviously I want to move it in perspective. Start to drag and hold down the Alt key to make a copy of that. Down to there. Let go. Now if I use either Control D or Command D, depending on your Mac or PC, I can repeat that again and repeats again and repeats it in perspective. I'm going to select all of those. Once again, I'm still on my Perspective Selection Tool. Hold down the old key and make copies of those. And then once again Control or Command and D to repeat those, like so. And it doesn't have to be done with a rectangle either. You can use an ellipse. So let me take an ellipse. I'm going to click on this right grid. Up here. I'm going to choose a different color. And blue for, for this one. I'm going to draw an ellipse in perspective on the right grid. So once again, I'm just looking at that grid there. About three. Hi, I go to my Perspective Selection Tool. Hold down the Alt key, make a copy of that down to there. And then I can use Command or Control D twice mole. Same again, select them all, hold down the Alt key to move copies across just one square root of time, like so. And Command D to keep going into the distance. Now, if I'm finished with that, nothing, that's great. I want to get rid of my perspective grid. I just go to the Perspective tool and click on the little plus. And those objects or as if you'd made them from scratch in that particular shape, you can do whatever you want with that. I'm going to group them together and rotate them around to make an interesting shape like so. And we can just treat them exactly the same as we would any Illustrator shape. Try it out, and then have a go with the project at the end. 54. Playing Card Project: Build the Card: In this project, we're going to build a stack of cards. And we're going to do it by using our perspective grid. And we're going to be using the z axes. So let's build the card first. So the first part of building the card, and I'm gonna show you some new techniques in there as well. And after that, we'll go into actually creating the stack of cards. What I'm going to do is to start off by making the card using a rectangle. Now just click and drag to create a rough playing card type of shape. Not like the corners to be slightly rounded. So I'll use the selection tool to just click and drag in a little bit like that. Now, I'd like to have the inside of the card a slightly different color and I'd like a light area around the outside. So what I want to do is I want to create a second shape inside this one. Now I'm going to show you the incorrect way of doing this first of all, so that you can understand why I'm doing things the way I'm doing them. You see, if I want a copy of this. And I went along to the scaling tool because I want a copy that's scaled down. Double-click the scaling tool and say, well, let's scale this down to 90 percent. And I click on Copy. It makes a copy for me, but you can see it's gone 90 percent on both horizontal and vertical. So that means that we've got bigger sides over here then that we have on the side. So that's a bit of a problem. You can't change your horizontal and vertical independently with this. But unfortunately, if you do that, you've then got to try and work out exactly how much you need from horizontally or vertical percentages. So instead, what I'm going to do is I'm going to use a feature which is really useful. And it's in the objects menu. You go down to path. And over here we're going to use something called Offset Path. So what offset path does is it allows us to offset the path with a copy. And you can change, would choose how many pixels or points or millimeters you want. Now, if it comes in with say for example, ten over day, which is usually the default. That means it'll be 10, in this case, pixels larger than the original. But if you want to make it smaller than the original, you just put an a minus in front and you can put in any size you like. I think I'm going to go with minus 11 in there and I'll just switch off and on again. That's absolutely perfect. When I click Okay, what it's done is it's made two shapes. I've got the outer shape and the inner shape. If we look at the layers in here, you see I've got my two rectangles, that one there and that one there, that totally independent. Now, this means that I can then go to my inner one and I'm going to give it a slightly different color. I'm going to get rid of the stroke. So no stroke on there. And the fill color is going to be slightly, slight gray. Now, I'd like this to be the ace of hearts, so I'm going to make a heart shape. And we're going to use some of the techniques that we looked at earlier. So I'm going to go along and you can draw a heart shape. Have you like really? You could use the pen tool to create it. You could use the pencil tool to draw it. And there's so many different ways of working. You could even use a rectangle. Take a square like that, it to 45 degrees. And then we can go into these corners over here and make them rounded. So I could just add another point to them into the middle there and then start to move those out as well. You can see how it's starting to now get rounded shape and we'll just make those round up. I click on Convert. I can do the same with the other side over there. Pull that out and it's not looking too much like a hot at the moment. But I could take this one here. Once again, pull that out, round of that. Pull this one down and you can see where we're going with a heart shape. It would take a little bit of messing around with to be, to be fair. I like working by creating half the shape. So what I'm going to do is I'm going to use my Pen Tool to just draw half of the heart. So I'm going to go round here. I'll go all way around there, down to the bottom. Like so. Now I want another one on the other side. So I'm going to go to my Reflect tool. Now, the reflect tool, if you're looking for it, is in with the Rotate tool. And I'm just make sure that I've selected this, go to my Reflect tool. I'm going to hold down the Alt key and click on the point I wanted to reflect over. So you can see I can copy that. So I've now got two of them. And if I select them both, we can then use little to cool the join tool and just join them up so that it can be joined there. And this bit here can be joined. That's now one shape. You'll see if I click on it. So it's one shape. I'll just give it a bit more room there. Obviously this is the ace of hearts. So let's give it some red. I'm going to scale it down. They will have a big heart right in the middle over there. And then two small ones. So make a little one up here. So we've got a heart over there. And then hold down the Alt key, make a heart at the bottom. And then maybe just put a great big a on here as well. So capital a, I'm going to make that quite large. That will go right in the middle. And I'm going to make that white. And I've put two more a's AS in there as well. Have a go create something really interesting. They don't have to be hearts, but do try out using the object path and the offset path option to get a smaller object inside a bigger one. It is really useful. Once you've created your card, selected, go to the Object menu and group it together to make life easier. And then onto the next lesson, we'll have a look at making this into a stack of cards. 55. Playing Card Project: Creating Multiple Copies: I'm going to move my card out of the way, so put it up to the side over here. And I'm going to go down until I find the Perspective Grid tool. Now, if you don't see the perspective grid to do make sure that in the Window menu you are on the advanced tools rather than the basic tools. So I'll click on that once and this brings up my perspective. So I want to move my cards into perspective and I want to move them over to this left grid perspective. So I'll use the Perspective Selection Tool. And what I can do then is I can just click and drag and it will automatically drag it into that perspective. Let me just do that again to show you. So I'm on the left perspective. I use the Perspective Selection Tool bottom on there. I just select the cards and just drag straight onto that area. So I've got my icons in perspective. Now, what I'd like to do is to have a whole stack of cards, one behind the other. Now, in order to move objects between the various planes, we use a number system on the keyboard. And if I were to hold down the different numbers, you can see over here it says left good one, right Grid 3, horizontal grid two, and finally, active Grid for. So we've got four different numbers in there. And you can use this with changing over. So because this top right-hand side grid is three, if I held down three on the keyboard and drag my card, it would drag it onto the opposite grid. I went back to hell down to and dragged it. It would come to the top grid. If I held down one and dragged it, it will go back onto this side here. So we've got four possible options, but there is a fifth hidden option that we can use as well. If you hold down five, you'll find that you can then move your object along the z axis. So I can move it standing where it is, but backwards and forwards on its z axis. And that's what I'm going to do. I'm going to move the card all the way back to there. Then I'm going to start bringing it forward. So I'm going to make a copy of the next card will be in front of it. So I start off at the back. Then I hold down the Alt key and move the card. But I want to move it forward still. Some also holding down five on the keyboard. It's a bit of sort of finger gymnastics going on here. So I'm holding down five and the Alt key or Option key to make a copy of this card in front of that one. We keep it really nice and close to that one there. And then let go the mouse. Now, the rest of it is actually really easy because you just use Control or Command and D to do it again. So it will just keep making copies, one in front of the next, all the way along. And we have this whole pile of cards coming up from the back. Or we have to do now is to hide the grid. And I'll do that by clicking on the little X at the top. In there. There we go. We've got a really nice stack of cards. Of course, they are totally independent from the grid now, so I could take my cards. I'm going to group them all again. So make them a little bit smaller because they're a bit on the large side. I can move them across and we can even rotate them if we want them to be going up or coming up with from the bottom. Like so I'm going to leave mine just like that. Don't just try it with cards. Have a go with absolutely any shape you like, and just bring things forward by using ALT and 5 and moving it on its axis. 56. Saving for Print, PDF & EPS: So let's look at saving a document out for print and sending it out to printers. What do they require? Well, the first thing is before you save it to send to the printers, always make sure you do a File, Save As, and save your document as a Illustrator file. There it is Adobe Illustrator in there. And I'm just going to save that out somewhere where I can find it. Now, when it comes to the second little window here, I'm going to make sure that the version is 2020 because that's what I'm working in. But if you're working in an earlier version, you could always choose the version that you want to save out to. Let's just click Okay on that. So what do we need to do for the printers? Will, this particular file is an RGB file and the printers would probably want a CMYK version. So if you go to File and go to your document color mode, you can convert from RGB to CMYK. In there. Did you see how the colors changed? And that's because the colors were very bright. For RGB, you can't get those same really vivid colors in CMYK. As we looked at earlier, the RGB and CMYK, it's just not possible with cyan magenta, yellow and black ink. So I'm ready to send this to the printers. I'm going to get a file. I'm going to go to Save As and I'm going to save it as a PDF file. So in here where it says format and if you're on a PC, this might look slightly different, but you will still find formatting in there. I'm going to click where it says illustrator, AI, and I'm going to choose PDF. So PDF in there, click on Save, and a window opens up here at the top, we have got various presets that we can use. Now if you print it tells you to send them the file as for example, a PDF Z1A. All you've got to do is to choose that preset in there. You don't need to worry about anything here. You can just save your PDF. But if they don't give you any help like that, choose high-quality print. Now the first thing to look at here is preserved illustrator editing capabilities. If you leave that on, like mine is, you'll be able to open the file up in Illustrator and work with it as an Illustrator document later on. Unfortunately though, it does increase the file size. So if you're emailing this around and you really are not interested in the person who you're selling it to. Open up in Illustrator, you can switch that off. The other thing that we're going to look at when it comes to printing is marks and bleeds. So the printer will require some printers marks and they'll usually require a bleed. Now the bleed is this little extra air. You can see this little red line over there. I put that in but I was making a new document. I just had three millimeter bleed in there. So I've just made sure that my artwork goes up to the bleed, not the edge of the document. And that way when it gets cut up with the Guillotine later on, the guillotine doesn't have to be quite as accurate as it would without it. So I'm going to switch that on and say use the documents bleed settings. And in here, I'm just going to switch on all printers marks. You need to know which ones they want, which ones. I don't if they tell you, great, otherwise, just leave them all switched on. Now, we've got a number of other little settings in here that we can go to. One of those is the output color setting. And in here you can choose if you've got a CMYK images, sorry, RGB images in your CMYK document, you can choose to make sure everything gets converted to the final profile. Now once again, the profile will depend on your printers. It will depend on which country you're in as well. Let's click on Save PDF. I'm going to just click OK. This is the preserve illustrator editing capabilities is unchecked. It's just warning you that you were built open up the document and edited normally in Illustrator. That's fine. We've already saved this as an AI file as well. And that's done. Now the last possibility that we have here is if I go to File and Save As if I'm saving this out for somebody who wants a vector file. But they don't have Illustrator. They might have different software that opens up vector files. We can save this as an EPS file in Illustrator EPS, that is for encapsulated postscript. That's what it means. And I can quite happy save it out as an EPS file. Once again, just click Okay when it pops up. And now people who don't have Illustrator but have software that recognize vectors will be able to open the file as well. 57. What You Get in a Printer's File: So here's my open file, the PDF file. And you can see all the printers marks around the edge. So over there we've got these little targets in there is where the guillotine is going to cut it. There's some information in there and there's some color bars on the left and right-hand side. And a graduate of graduation from white to black at the bottom to help the printer with a settings. 58. Thank you!: Well, you've made it to the end of the advanced course. That is absolutely amazing. Don't forget, have a look at how the courses and there was Illustrator on the iPad. And if you've enjoyed this, you would definitely enjoy that. Now go and create some amazing, amazing work. See you soon.