Adobe Premiere Pro CC 2021: Intermediate Video Editing | Brad Newton | Skillshare

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Adobe Premiere Pro CC 2021: Intermediate Video Editing

teacher avatar Brad Newton, Fitness & Travel Adventure Vlogger

Watch this class and thousands more

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Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Lessons in This Class

34 Lessons (6h 15m)
    • 1. Getting Started- What You Will Learn

      1:29
    • 2. Getting Started- Creating A New Project

      8:16
    • 3. Getting Started- Creating Sequences and Versioning

      9:15
    • 4. Getting Started- Organising Your Project (Folder Structure, Workspace Layout, Colour Coding)

      13:51
    • 5. Getting Started- Keyboard Shortcuts for Fast Editing

      19:38
    • 6. The Timeline- Comprehensive Timeline Functions (Part 1 of 3)

      14:44
    • 7. The Timeline- Comprehensive Timeline Functions (Part 2 of 3)

      18:17
    • 8. The Timeline- Comprehensive Timeline Functions (Part 3 of 3)

      10:52
    • 9. The Timeline- Working with Timeline Render Bars (Green, Yellow, Red)

      8:27
    • 10. The Timeline- Working with Nested Sequences

      8:49
    • 11. Workflow- The Pancake Editing Technique

      7:42
    • 12. Workflow- How to Edit Faster with Proxy Files

      6:30
    • 13. Motion Graphics- Create Awesome Photo Slideshows

      14:32
    • 14. Motion Graphics- Working with Professional Templates (Awesome Photo Slideshows)

      19:51
    • 15. Motion Graphics- How I Use Motion Array to Make Awesome Videos

      10:17
    • 16. Motion Graphics- Importing, Organising, and Editing MOGRTS

      11:22
    • 17. Music & SFX- Professional Royalty-Free Music & SFX for Production

      12:53
    • 18. Music & SFX- Mixing Background Music with Dialogue (Two Methods)

      13:35
    • 19. Music & SFX- How to Synchronise Audio and Video (Two Methods)

      9:31
    • 20. Music & SFX- Working with Automated Sequences

      17:57
    • 21. Effects- Working with Effect Presets

      7:18
    • 22. Effects- Stabilise Shaky Footage with Warp Stabiliser

      10:26
    • 23. Specialty- Multi Camera Editing Fundamentals

      11:24
    • 24. Specialty- Speech-to-Text Auto Transcription & Captioning

      8:54
    • 25. Specialty- How to Use Automatic Mask Tracking

      12:00
    • 26. Specialty- How to Put Video Inside Text

      4:55
    • 27. Specialty- Video Inside Text (Animated)

      3:51
    • 28. Specialty- How to Use Blending Modes

      11:04
    • 29. Specialty- Create Epic Ink Transitions

      8:36
    • 30. Exporting- Exporting Transparent Video (with Alpha Channel)

      6:09
    • 31. Exporting- The Best Export Settings for YouTube

      14:09
    • 32. Exporting- Bulk Sequence Exporting with Media Encoder

      7:03
    • 33. Workflow Breakdown- Editing Workflow Breakdown #1 - AKA Thailand Highlight Reel

      28:49
    • 34. Conclusion- The End of a Chapter

      2:48
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About This Class

* UPDATED 22ND SEPTEMBER 2021 - INCLUDES LATEST SOFTWARE UPDATES *

Welcome to the Intermediate editing course for Adobe Premiere Pro CC! In this course, you'll be learning how to become a more efficient editor by refining your editing technique and workflow.

This course is focused on improving efficiency, editing speed, and exploring more advanced editing techniques.

If you are a beginner, I suggest looking at my Premiere Pro Beginner Course to help you create the foundations necessary before starting this course.

Class Objectives

Below are some of the lessons you'll learn:

  • Project and Sequence Management

  • Project Organisation (Folder Structure, Workspace Layout, etc)
  • Keyboard Shortcuts for Fast Editing Workflows

  • Pancake Editing Technique

  • Automatic Mask Tracking

  • Working with Proxy Files
  • Multi Camera Editing Fundamentals

  • Speech-to-Text Auto Transcription & Captioning
  • Working with Automated Sequences

  • Working with Nested Sequences

  • How to Use Blending Modes

What makes me qualified to teach you?

I'm a self-taught video editor and full time vlogger that started off like you!

In 2016, I had zero video editing experience, no laptop, no students and no YouTube channel. Fast forward to April 2021, I have;

  • 650+ videos on my vlogging YouTube channel

  • Almost 12,000 YouTube subscribers with over 7.44 million minutes watched

  • 275,000+ students in my online video courses

  • Over 5,000 reviews

Trust me, as I review my stats it sounds crazy to me too! I never expected in a million years to be in my current position with these achievements. I started with nothing. If I can do it, I am confident that you can do it too.

What Makes This Course Different?

My ambition with this course is to take 5 years of my video editing knowledge and experience, and put it in an easy-to-follow course so you can learn in 1 week what has taken the last 5 years to learn.

I'll see you inside the course!

Meet Your Teacher

Teacher Profile Image

Brad Newton

Fitness & Travel Adventure Vlogger

Teacher

Hey Everyone! Brad here.

I create fitness video courses to help you get into shape and travel vlogs to inspire your next travel adventure.

I have also won multiple fitness model/ bodybuilding competitions under a drug-tested steroid-free Federation. I’ve also helped thousands of people get into shape with my digital fitness courses.

I am also passionate about flying planes, drones, cinematography, and visual storytelling.

You can watch my fitness and adventure vlogs on YouTube: www.youtube.com/bradnewton

Have an awesome day and see you inside one of my courses.

Regards,

Brad

 

See full profile

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Transcripts

1. Getting Started- What You Will Learn: Hi everyone and welcome to my intermediate Premiere Pro course. The course designed to help you level up your video editing ability. My name is Brad and I'm a fitness and adventure of lockup for over 5.5 years, I've produced over 1000 travel and adventure videos using Premier Pro with over 19 publications on Amazon Prime. A little bit. All. That's just about the land. Protect the second stage of the lab, the intermediate course is focused on improving efficiency, editing speed, and exploring more advanced editing techniques and workflows. If you have a good foundation of the editing fundamentals of Premiere Pro, this course is perfect for you. By the end of this course, you'll learn project and sequence management, project organization, keyboard shortcuts for fast editing workflows. The pancake editing technique, mask tracking, multi-camera editing fundamentals and much more. So come and join me in the course and let's take your video editing journey to another level. 2. Getting Started- Creating A New Project: I'll be showing you how to set up your project and create a new sequence and do some backups with your projects inside of Premiere Pro in the very first video for the series. And given that it's an intermediate course, I'm going to assume that you've got previous experience and knowledge with Premier Pro. So I'm gonna move fairly quickly through this series. Feel free to pause the videos or slow them down, or even speed them up if you need to. So I've got permanent open here with the splash screen. The very first thing you'll see when you open up the software, you will have a number of options over here, New Project and open project, and here is recent projects. So you can either click on erasing project or you can go to Open Project. Otherwise, you can click on New Project to set up a brand new project. So we'll do that in this example, and we'll just call this one creating a new project, for example. And then here under location is where we tell Premiere Pro to store the project file itself. So not necessarily where the media is located. Some people actually prefer to store the project and the media, or the videos and audio that they're working with in two separate locations. You might have your project file stored on your computer. And you'll media might be stored on an external hard drive or an as backup system or redundancy system, or vice versa. So this is completely up to you. If you have a computer or laptop and it crashes, you don't want to lose both your project and your media. So that's why some people prefer to store the project in one location and the media somewhere else. So for now, I'm just going to store the project inside of this location here, which is the default location for Premiere Pro. And then I'm going to go down further. So we've got three tabs here, general Scratch Disks and ingest settings. Now, I will talk more about Scratch Disks and ingest settings later on in the course when we talk about proxies and things of that nature. But for now we're going to just start with a general tab. Now with the General tab here, we have an important setting, I believe, ice to build computers when I was a teenager and having a very powerful graphics card was important to me when I used to play computer games. And so this is super important, especially when you're working with video. And I'm playing back for K for h and things of that nature is to ensure that your renderer is set to GPU acceleration or cuda. So if you have a powerful graphics card in your laptop or your computer and it's set to software only. You really do need to change that to GPU acceleration, cuda. It's going to dramatically speed up your rendering times and your playback speeds. Inside of Premiere Pro, you may have a situation where this is grayed out or not enabled. Maybe you need to download the lightest graphics card drivers for your graphics card to then re-enabled this option. So if you've got GPU acceleration as an option, make sure you select it and we'll move down further. So we have video and audio display format. So timecode and audio samples by default is the standard. So just leave those two options as is. And then we move down to Captures. We have capture format dv. So this is if we're recording from a DV or HDTV device via a firewire cable. We can connect that directly into our computer. And we can record from those devices directly into Premier Pro. And then we have color management, which we can leave for now. We'll just click on, Okay, and we have a brand new project set up. So I talk about all of the panel layouts and things of that nature in the beginner course, I'm not going to go there again. But essentially real quick, we've got here the source monitor box over here in the top-left, the program monitor box here at the timeline box here, and the project panel down here. So down here is where we will typically import our media. It says import media to start, or we can use our media browser to import media if you choose. I don't use the media browser all the time. I mostly use the project panel to import media. So before we actually start importing our media and creating a new sequence, I want to show you a couple of things. First, this is important. So if we go to Edit, get onto preferences and we'll go to Media down here. I'll just show you a setting which is really important. If we see here default media scaling, it's typically set to none, right? I like to set this to scale, to frame size. What that means is that if you're working with different resolution media like you might have for k, AK, maybe some red for each 10 ADP. And you've got different resolutions of video content. And you're importing that into the same sequence. That must be set to four k, then it's much easier to set this automatically that way Premiere Pro will automatically scale all of the different resolutions of your videos to one particular video resolution that's set by the sequence. That won't make a lot of sense in this video. But I guarantee you, as you move through the course, you will come across and we'll, I'll show you situations when. You might have a sequence size which is set to four, okay? And then you import a whole lot of 1080 pay for age. And then as you drag that footage into a timeline that's set to four K, then you're going to have to scale up that 1080, pay 4000 by hand. Do we doing it manually? Whereas if you do this in the software until Premiere Pro to do it automatically, you will save a whole lot of time. So make sure that's selected scale to frame size. And the next thing I suggest you change is if you go into auto save right here, and I've just recently, recent or my preferences inside Premiere Pro to make these videos to see what the defaults look like. But you'll see here under autosave, it's by default 15 minutes. I typically like to set this to around five or six minutes myself. I talk about those reasons more so in another video. But I typically like to keep the auto save time really, really short because if you, if the software crashes and it will, and you've probably experienced this yourself. I get this at least a few times a week where Premiere Pro will crash, then you only lose a couple of minutes of work. What I do in addition to the six minutes is I also use Control S or Command S on the keyboard to do an auto save as well. So I'll only ever lose a couple of minutes of work when Premier Pro crashes. Next one here is maximum Project versions. I usually leave it at 20, which is the default. Some people like to use 50 and 60 versions. It just means that if you, if your project file becomes corrupted, you can always go back to a previous version of the project. And another option I like to tick here is saved backup project to Creative Cloud. And what that means is that with the Creative Cloud account, it automatically backs this project up to the Cloud, the Adobe Cloud. So I'll give you an example. This is what mine looks like here. And so this is my Adobe Creative Cloud account and everything goes inside of Premiere Pro folder. So all of the projects that I work on get backed up into here. Now, I actually don't use it. I actually have my own backup that I use, which I talk about in another video, which is my natural phonology system, which is like my own private cloud that I've spent thousands of dollars on. Which if you get more experienced and more advanced with editing and you're working with clients and you're making a lot of content that really does become an important investment. Otherwise, you can just use the Adobe Creative Cloud for the time being. And this is a great way to backup your projects in case your computer crashes or your hard drive crashes. And you've always got that backup here on the Cloud. So there we have it. That's how we set up a brand new project. I know it seems really straightforward, but even if you are a beginner watching the Intermediate Series, I'm just covering off all basis. In the next video we'll be talking about setting up a brand new sequence and the different ways that you can create sequences and doing backups of those sequences, which is really important. I'll see you in the next video tutorial. 3. Getting Started- Creating Sequences and Versioning: I'll be showing you how to set up a brand new sequence inside of your projects in Premier Pro. In the previous video, I showed you how to separate brand new project and get that all ready to go. In this video, I'll show you different ways of creating a brand new sequence. And some of the ways I like to go about creating a brand new sequence. So the first way that you can create a brand new sequence is go to File New and then go to Sequence. Click on that. And you'll see here this box will pop up with all of these different presets that you can select. So these are great if you have a very specific camera that you're working with. For example, you're working with red footage or you're working with AVC HD, which is what I did back Back in the day with my handy cam or you're working with RE cameras. This is the way you would go to select a preset to create a sequence. And then you just go down here, give you a sequence, a name click OK, and you're off and running. However, for me personally, I like to create my sequences from the clips themselves. So I'll show you what I mean. And this is going to happen to you if it hasn't already, where you might be shooting most of your videos at one frame size like 1920 by 1080. But then you might have one or two clips which are shutter fork. And you want to work with that footage as well. Working with footage of different resolutions inside of the same sequence. So this is what I do. I go through my clips, and so I've got a couple of clips here. Just quickly changed that to thumbnail views. I can have a look at a kind of a quick preview of my clips here. And then I can switch over to List View. And then this tells me all of the information about each of these clips. The frame rate, which is all 50 frames per second. And then I can just scroll across and have a look at the resolution. And I can see that it is 1920 by 1080 square pixels 1. The audios 48 thousand hertz all the way down. So if I scroll down, all of these clips have been shot at 1920 by 1080. So in my head, I'm thinking I need to create a sequence that is 1920 by 1080. Because as we've seen so far, all of the clips have been shot at 1920 by 1080. So then I go and have a look at my drone clip, for example, right, for k. And you'll see here this is a thumbnail view of the drone clip. We go to List View and we can see it's shot at a different frame rate, 25 frames. And if we move across, we can see that it is 3840 by 2160 square pixels 1. There's no audio. So this clip has been shot at forecasting. So I don't want to create a sequence using this clip because this clip is not representative of all of the video dimensions that I've created in this project. So I go back to this bin here and I'm, I just switched the thumbnail view and all I do, There's two options, three options. Actually, I can take one of these clips that I want to create a sequence from. I click and either drag it over here to the timeline window. And that automatically create a sequence that's based on the parameters of that clip. That clip is most representative of the footage that I've shot, the frame size that I've shot. And then if I go over to sequence settings, you can see here that Premiere Pro has created this sequence based around the perimeters of that clip. So we can see a time-based 50 frames a second, 1920 by 1080 square pixels, 1.0709. We've got 48 thousand hertz for our sample rate, for our audio. So that's the beauty of just letting Premiere Pro create the sequence for you, but just telling Premiere Pro what clip you wanted to use so that it can create that sequence for you. Alternatively, you can take the clip that you want to create the sequence from, and you can click and drag it down here to this little icon, where the little, the little icon, the little mouse would change to a plus sign. And then it'll also credit sequence for you. And the sequence name automatically is the name of the clip itself. So this here is the sequence file inside your project. And you'll see here that the little icon there's like a little stack of bricks, like a little Tetris set of bricks. That's just sequence file itself. So all we need to do is click and give this a name. We'll call it sequence example Enter. And you'll see that that reflects up here. So this is our sequence. And what I like to do is I like to pull out the sequences because they see that these are the actual clips. I like to pull out the sequences by going Control X or Command X. And then just moving them into a different area of the project panel. And then going Control V or Command V. And then our credits separate been here. So it says here new bin. And I call this sequences, and I put all of my sequences into a separate bin, right, to keep them separate from everything else. So it gives you sequence it a name as well, just to keep organized. But essentially we have created two sequences here. Another way that you can create a sequence is going to one of your clips, right-clicking on it, and then going over to where it says New Sequence From Clip. And that's the same thing. It'll create a brand new sequence using that clip. And you'll see that SQL to pop up here in the little menu. And it will pop down here in the Project panel. And again, you can just give this a name. We'll call it sequence example to, right. And then you can do the same thing. Take the sequence, drop it down here to the new item option, another sequence. And so what you can do, and this is what I usually do, is I have one big project file. And inside of that project file, I can have up to 20 to 30 different sequences height. So that might seem like a lot, but it just saves having one project, one sequence. I just have one project would like 15, 20, 30 different sequences. And I can just click and move between the sequences if I'm working on multiple projects at the same time, right? So I just have one project file, multiple sequences, and I can just click and move around between the sequences. I can also click and move the sequences around here on the top menu. So I can just kinda changed the order there. Sometimes you might accidentally close the sequence down to my just click on the little cross sign. You might think you've deleted it, which is what I thought back in the Bayeux years ago. I thought I deleted my sequence by hitting the cross sign. No, you just close the sequence. You just have to go back in and reopen it by clicking, finding it in the project panel down here. And also what I like to do is I like to set versioning to my sequences. So what does that mean? That means that if I am working on a major project and I want to try something new in terms of editing. Or I want to move something around that involves a lot of changes. I will actually actually duplicate the sequence and create a separate version so that if I stuffed it up, I can just go back to the previous version of the sequence to just say, for example, I've got this sequence here. I've got just a singular clip here on the timeline. And just say there's a quite a busy project. I have all these clips everywhere and I want to make all these changes, but I might want to go back, I might make a mistake and I might wanna go back to before these changes were made. All I do is I go right-click and then I find duplicate over here. And I can duplicate the sequence. So I might call this example one, version one. And then I continue to make my changes. And then I might make another copy once I've made those changes by going duplicate. And I'm, I call this version to. Another practical reason why you do this is because you might have a client where they want you to make some changes to the project and then you send it off to them. But then the client comes back and says, Do you know no, I don't like what you've changed. I like what you did before. And if you haven't done this, then you've got to rebuild what that project look like before. Whereas if you have versions, you can easily jump between the previous versions if your client wants an earlier piece or an earlier revision for your project. So that's another reason why you should create versions for your sequences. So that is all you really need to know when it comes to setting up a sequence for your projects and Premiere Pro. If you have any other questions, please let me know as semi email, I'll be more than happy to help you out and I'll see you in the next tutorial. 4. Getting Started- Organising Your Project (Folder Structure, Workspace Layout, Colour Coding): Before you start editing your projects inside Premiere Pro, It's really important, I believe, to organize your content, your music, your video files, your sound effects, and all of that into folders. First, I'll show you my simple folder structure, and then I'll show you how I import all of this into a fresh project inside of Premier Pro. And then I'll show you things such as how I organize my Workspace Layout and a few other things that will help you when it comes to organizing your projects. It's up to you what you want to take from this lecture or this video. Everyone has a slightly different approach in a slightly different way of organizing depending on the type of project your filming or creating. But this is from the perspective of video blogging, which is what I've been doing for 55 and a half years now. And let's get started. So first and foremost, what I, before I even start editing or before I even open up Premiere Pro, I take all of my footage, are tackle all of my content, and I create separate folders. So I organize my folders based on projects. So if I've gone to Europe, so got Europe adventure vlogs, season one, season two. I've got fitness street, season one, season two, I got my in my 2018 of South Africa 2019. And so that's an easy way for me to organize my content. If I need to reference it very quickly, I can just go straight to Europe or Australia, Cambodia, and so on and so forth. And then inside of these folders, I'll show you, for example, fitness treat Season 2. I've got folders for various things such as sound effects. So all of my sound effects will go into one folder, and then all of my sequence files will go into another folder here. And I'll just give you a really good piece of advice whenever you are creating or working on a project inside Premiere Pro, it's really important to periodically save that project as another version. So every, every couple of days, every day owed to save that project again as another version because sometimes not always. And this has happened to me. Sometimes the sequence becomes corrupted for some reason. Sometimes Premiere Pro crashes and the sequence gets corrupted and there's no way you can recover that sequence. And so I've lost a lot of work because I, I lost a sequence and I couldn't recover it. And I back in the day I didn't use to save different versions of my sequences. This is a really handy way of going back to a previous version of your work in case you lose a sequence. So just keep that one in mind. That's a handy little tip. I wish I learned that when I first started and then phone assets. So all of my any footage that I've taken from my mobile phone goes into this folder here, and then I've got other for everything else, I've got background music goes into another folder here. So this is all my background music. And then I've got Instagram stories. Sometimes I use Instagram stories in my videos. That goes in there. And then the daily vlog goes into this folder. And then for me personally, because I was shooting a daily video on fitness straight, I organize my footage according to the day. So I've got here date stamp 041119, so forth and November 2019, season two, episode 19, episode 20, episode 21 and so forth. And so it just helps me. I have a shortlist and I have a little directory where I take notes according to what happened on each of these days in each of these episodes. And then if I go into one of these folders, for example, episode one, I've got here, I've organized my footage according to where that footage has come from. So this footage in this folder has come from my big camera, the EOS m5. And then all of the images go into the images folder. And then all of my GoPro videos shot on this day go inside of this folder. So this is a very basic, simple structure that I use for this type of project when it comes to organizing my footage for my daily videos. The next aspect of your editing organization inside of Premiere Pro is the workspace panel layout. What you're looking at now is what they call the pancake editing technique. And so essentially it's called pancake because we have two sequences that looked like a pancake stacked one on top of the other. But in a future video in this course, I explain how to set this pancake editing method up for yourself. So I'm not going to talk about that right now, but I'm going to show you a couple of things that's going to help you organize your workspace a lot more effectively. So this is my preferred workspace. What I'm working with bigger projects. But typically you're probably looking at a workspace similar to this right now. So I've just restructured my workspace. You've got your timeline down here. You've got the program monitor box here, the source panel here. And you've got your project panel down here, and your toolboxes here. So typically this is fine. There's nothing wrong with this layout. I sometimes use this layout if I'm working with a very quick project, that might be a couple minutes long. Okay, there's nothing wrong with this layout. But what I suggest you do is actually close out a lot of these tabs that you're not going to use. And so typically what I like to do is the audio clip mixer. I click here and the little hamburger menu, and then click on Close Panel. The metadata. Click here, Close Panel. I like to close the panels that are not actually using just to keep everything running smoothly and a lot more efficiently in terms of media browser. Now you can import footage using the media browser, but personally, I never use it or very rarely use it. And therefore I close it, so close the library's panel, I close the info panel, I close the effects panel, I leave it the markers panel are usually close it. I don't often use it unless I'm using a lot of markers. Close history. Sometimes I use it both times. I don't I close it. Typically I have two panels down here. I have the project panel and the effects panel next to it, the toolbox, I leave it there. And then I've got the source panel over here and Effect Controls. I leave that there as well. Now what you can do once you have a certain layout that you're happy with, then you can save that layout by going to Window. Workspaces, go down to save as new workspace. And then you can give this workspace a name. There might be multiple people that are using your laptop or your Premiere Pro, and you want to maybe use different workspaces. Maybe someone in the family uses your software, uses your laptop, and they have a different workspace. So you can have two different workspaces and you can just change between the two. It's up to you. This is an example and you can save the workspace so that you don't have to keep changing it every time you open up a new project, you can just go Window workspaces and click on this as an example. For me, I've got my layout here. And if I click on that, it brings us back to what we started with this tutorial. So I've got my little pancake layout here and you get the idea. Another point I wanna make about organizing inside Premiere Pro is the use of color-coding. So I'm looking at a very old project here. And you'll notice here that there are certain clips that are color-coded, different colors. And the reason for this is because you might have certain clips that are related to each other. They have a certain theme. And so you might want to color code them just to help you kind of visually organize your clips on your timeline. And so for example, if I scroll through this timeline here, I've got clips that are color-coded blue, and then I've got magenta that I've got yellow. So this tells me very quickly that these clips represent a certain type of theme in my video. And so how do you do this? Select the clips that are related to each other and that you want to color code as a singular group. And then right-click and then go to where it says label. And then just pick a color that you want to use. So maybe brown or yellow, and that will change all of those clips into that color. And also, another way I like to stay organized inside of my timeline is by using these little comment markers here. So what I'll do sometimes, not always. If I need to quickly identify what's going on within a certain part of my day inside my project. Then I'll just go up here to one of the markers. I'll double-click on that. And I'll type in, say, for example, having breakfast, right? I can give the comment marker or color. Just call it orange click. Okay? And then what I'll do is I'll stretch out this comment marker. Essentially by looking at the top of my timeline, I can see that this magenta part of my, of my project is relating to me having breakfast. And so it's just a quick and easy visual way of labeling different parts of your timeline if you have quite a busy timeline. So that's another little tip that I like to use on a regular basis. And the last point I want to make when it comes to editing experience and the overall editing workflow efficiency inside of Premiere Pro is the hardware that you're using to edit your projects with. Now this becomes extremely important from a time management perspective if you're an intermediate editor or above in your editing for clients or your editing as a full-time blogger or Summon creating content every day, then this is going to save you so much time if you're using the right hardware. And this is definitely worth the investment in my opinion. So for example, when I'm editing and I'm working with my active projects, I'm editing with the internal SSD of my laptop, my laptop that I'm currently recording on now. And then I edit my videos with Contains a solid-state drive similar to this photo Western Digital SSD. And so by using the internal SSD to edit my active projects, my editing performance is going to be dramatically increased. Versus if I were to edit directly, often external hard drive, which I used to do when I first started my editing journey, I was traveling a lot. I was editing on the road. And I, I really was kinda making the most of what I had. And I was editing directly off my external hard drive. So I had an external hard drive kinda similar to this here. A Western Digital and, uh, also used a couple of Seagate external hard drives. And I still use external hard drives now. But you should definitely not edit your working projects off an external hard drive. Especially if your projects are really big and more than like 20 minutes. Or even if you're working with a lot of for k 42 or eight K4 h. Then Editing off an external hard drive with four K and aka 45 is going to be a terrible experience. You really do need to consider an SSD setup. And then typically once I've finished with a particular project, then I offload that project onto both an external hard drive. And my master backup goes on to a Naz sociology backup system. So that's what I'm showing you right now. So this lives in my living room and I essentially I turn it on and it's got four bays, we've got four hard drives. And this is my ultimate back-up solution. And this is something that you should definitely consider down the track, especially if you plan on taking this editing thing very seriously and you're working with clients. Because what can happen is that this, these external hard drives, they're fine if you're doing it for yourself. But if you've got people that are relying on you and they're paying you to edit their projects. And one of these hard drives fails, then you've lost a lot of work and that might be a problem. So this has happened to me. I've had two of these external hard drives fail. One of my mates actually, it's going through the process of getting his external hard drive recovered. It does cost a lot of money to recover footage from a hard drive if it fails and there's no guarantee that the hard-drive recovery specialists can actually recover everything off the drive. So, okay, when you're first starting edit, your editing journey to use external hard drives as your ultimate back-up. However, you really do need to consider a system like this. And I'm not promoting this, I'm not sponsored by phonology, but this is the system that I use. I have at the moment I use this analogy DS9 18 plus it's a four bay Naz redundancy system. Yes, it does cost a lot of money, but this is something that you really do need to keep in mind if you plan on taking this seriously. And that's pretty much all I have to give an offer you for this tutorial. I hope it was helpful and insightful. If you have any questions, let me know and I'll see you in the next tutorial. 5. Getting Started- Keyboard Shortcuts for Fast Editing: Before we get into the meat of the course, I want to talk about the importance of keyboard shortcuts when you're editing inside of Premiere Pro, especially when you're getting to intermediate level editing, because the expectation is that you're not a beginner anymore. It's okay if you're a beginner and you're editing a couple of videos for yourself, for your own YouTube channel or for your own family. But when you're getting into intermediate level editing, There's more of a pressure and expectation to deliver projects on time and to be more efficient with your editing workflow. And that does come down to things such as, Have you selected shortcuts or shortcut keys that are located under your left hand, for example. And it may not seem like a big difference, but I mean, if you can save a couple of seconds here or a couple of seconds, there are a few mouse clicks here or there. Just by remapping some of the keyboard shortcuts so that they're closer to your left hand so you don't have to lift your hand or, you know, lift your right hand off the mouse or your left hand off the keyboard and move it to the other side of the keyboard. If you can remap it so that you can just leave your hands mostly in the same position. You can save a few seconds here and there. And that really does add up if you're working on projects that are multiple hours long. And if you multiply that over, you know, how many projects you're doing in a year. And I was making a daily video, you know, every day for 14 months when I first started my editing journey and I learned very quickly how to make this efficient. So I'm going to share with you a couple of shortcuts that I like to use for my editing workflow. I might make another video as a follow-up to this one because I'm not gonna go through every single one, but I'll give you a couple of shortcuts to consider, and also shortcuts to consider remapping in the keyboard settings of Premier Pro. So for example, I've got a couple of clips here on my timeline. I'm just going to mess around with these clips here. And I'm going to go over to Edit and down to keyboard shortcuts. Click on that. And this is where we're going to make a few adjustments to the, how the keys are mapped out. So the first thing I want to look at changing is zoom in and zoom out. So if we just type in Zoom, you will see here it says zoom in and zoom out. We have shortcut a and S. So that's what I currently have at the moment. So a and S just means that they're right next to each other. The little finger and the next finger across. I don't have to lift up my left hand. If I want to zoom in and zoom out on my timeline, I can just hit a or S. If you want to change this, then you can just double click on it or click on it once, and then just press the a key and that will then fill that with a click on this. So changes blue, press S, and that will update that as well. So if I click okay, and if I hit a and S, I am zooming out with S and zooming in with a. Alright, so this is a brilliant shortcut. In my opinion. I don't have to lift up my left hand. And if you're working with really big projects where there could be two or three hours long. I've worked with projects that are over two hours long. Then it saves me having to use this little, this little, this little bar down here where I have to move my mouse around and move it left to right. If I want to zoom in and zoom out, this is really, really inefficient. Whereas I can just quickly, with the keys a and S, I can zoom in, zoom out just like that. So keep that in mind. Okay, the next one I have on my list is clear, which I'm going to call delete. So I'll show what I mean. So if I go into Edit, Keyboard Shortcuts and then type in clear, type in clear. And then down here I have d remapped my keyboard. So CLIA is D for delete, right? So just click there, make sure that turns blue precent d. So now we have a S and D from left to right. Zoom in, zoom out, and then delete. If I press OK, what's going to happen by zoom out, by pressing the S. If I click here and then I press D, then it will just delete that clip, as opposed to moving my right hand off the mouse and pressing the Delete key on the keyboard. So even that doesn't seem like a lot, but moving my right hand off the mouse over to the Delete key is about 1 second of wasted time, right? So as opposed to just, you know, pressing D on the keyboard and then just delete. So that's another good one. So the next one is ripple delete. So we type in ripple and it will come up here, ripple delete. I've got it mapped out under my index finger, f. So click there, press F, and then click, Okay. And watch what happens when you ripple delete. So when he ripple delete, that it will actually delete the clip, but it will also fill the gap as well. If I just click on a clip and press the d key on the keyboard, remember we've just changed it. It deletes the clip that we've selected, but it also leaves this annoying gap here. It is going to cost you a few extra seconds by the drag all these clips and moving them across. Or right-clicking in the gap and clicking ripple delete. So there's just a few extra mouse clicks that you don't have to do. And as I said, if you can save a few mouse clicks here and there, that's all going to add up and saving possibly 5, 10, 20 minutes of time at when it comes to the end of your projects. So I'll just undo that. And I'll click here and then I'll press F for ripple delete. So not only have I deleted that clip, but it's also removed that empty void as well. So ripple delete is one of my favorite ones. The next one is step back and step forward. So this is where we can move frame-by-frame. So it's either going to be the left and right arrows, which is by default, that's what Premiere Pro has set it as. So if I want to move my playhead one or two frames to the left, I just press the left arrow or one or two frames to the right, I just press the right arrow, but that means I've got to move my right hands off my mouse and use the left and right arrow. It's not efficient, whereas I can remap it so that the, in my case, the queue and the w keys on my left and right, or my step back and step forward. So let's go Edit back into keyboard shortcuts. And we're going to type in step, okay, over here. So we've got to step back one frame, step forward, one frame, and I've got it mapped to Q and left. So at the moment, this, this function here is mapped to two shortcuts, Q and left, the left arrow and step forward. One frame is mapped to the W key and also to the right arrow. Okay, so I would suggest adding in these two shortcuts as well that can save you a lot of time if you want to step back and step forward. And another one of my favorite shortcuts is the track select tool. So this comes in handy when you're working with bigger projects. And this is one of my older projects that I did. And I've got a lot of clips here on the timeline is not that much of it. It's not really a big project, but it's, I want to show you this because it gives you an example of if you want to move a bunch of clips down the timeline because you want to put in another clip here somewhere. Then as opposed to just zooming out, selecting all these clips, moving them to the ride, dropping in some clips here, moving them back again, right? That's really inefficient. There's a tool called the track select tool. And so there's two ways of accessing it. You can go over here, do toolbox, right? And click here where it says Track, Select Forward Tool. Click on that. And then you can move. Say what happens, the Yossi, you notice the cursor changes to two arrows pointing to the right. If I just click there, wherever my cursor is, clicking everything to the right of that. All of the clips to the right-hand side will be highlighted automatically. And then I can just click and drag them all like that at once. Really, really cool technique. If I undo that, what I've actually done it for, hit the V key on the keyboard. Another one of my favorites. We'll go back to the selection tool and actually re-map it to Z on my keyboard. Then if I press zed, I also get the track selection tool as well. Saves me having to move my mouse over here or down over here, because sometimes I'll usually have the toolbox, the toolbox down here. It just saves me moving my mouse over to the toolbox and clicking or even clicking and holding and finding it in here as well. I can just press the Z key on the keyboard. So I go into Edit, go into keyboard shortcuts, and I'm going to type in track select tool. So the track select forward tool, and I've mapped it to Z on the keyboard. So I don't have to lift my left hand off the keyboard. That's the whole point of doing this. And if I want to go back to my selection tool, I press the V key on the keyboard, right, as opposed to just clicking up here. And it just allows me to pick and move clips around on the timeline by selecting the selection tool. Another one of my favorite little shortcut is the ability to swap clips. Now, what does that mean? Just say, for example, I've got three clips on my timeline here. What I used to do years ago was if I wanted to swap these two clips around, I would pick this one up, drag it over here, get this one, drag it here. Good. This one here, drag it back there. Okay, done. We've now swapped those two clips around. Too many clicks, too much missing or Hound. A faster, more efficient way that's going to save you time is if you literally just hold down the ALT and the control key, watch what happens to my cursor. Hold down the Alt key or the Option key if you're on a Mac. And then I'm going to hold down the Control key at the same time or the Command key. Watch my cursor's, it's changed. So now I have a little arrow, a little blue arrow pointing to the left. Now watch what happens. I'm going to take this clip and I'm going to move it this way. And I'm going to drop it right there. There we go. So I've now swapped these two clips around. Just by quite simply holding down the Alt key and the control key. So Alt Control, or once again on a Mac it's going to be Option command. And then I'm going to take this clip for example, or maybe even the one on the NT. I'm gonna take this one and I want to move it to the very front. It's now going to move the other two clips down the timeline. Watch this. There we go. So that's how easy it is to swap clips around on your timeline, which is super handy if you have big projects like this, right? And you need to swap these two clips around. And this is kind of weird because if you try and move this over here, it's like water. Where do I put this? No, you just quite easily Alt, Control. Pick up this clip, move it. You'll see these little tiny arrows, right? See those little tiny look like teeth. So I want to drop it there and there we go. I've just swapped these two flips around. And before I forget another one of my two favorite shortcuts which you'll be using on a very regular basis is the undo redo shortcuts. So where if you make a mistake, I usually press Control Z to undo or Command Z on a Mac. And then if I want to go forward as in, if I want to redo that it's Control Shift Z to redo. Control Shift Z to redo again. Or to undo, It's going to be Control Z, control Z, control Z, control said Control Z or Command Z at commands at. So if you go up to Edit here, you'll see undo and redo. It's Control Z or Control Shift zed, or it's going to be Command zed, Command Shift Z on a Mac. So they'll be, you'll be using those ones on a very regular basis. I can guarantee you. Another one of my favorite shortcuts is the ability to duplicate clips. So what I used to do, I would, if I wanted to duplicate a clip on the timeline, just say for example, I wanted to take a copy of this clip. I would then highlighted, I'd go Control C, right? Which it works exactly the same as most other applications. Control C, Control V, or Command C, Command V. And then just move the play head and go Control V to paste. Another way, it's faster. I'll just delete that. Is take the clip, hold down the Alt key, hold the Alt key down, and then take the clip and drop it. We've just duplicated it. So you don't even need to go Control C, Control V to paste it, you just take the clip, hold down the Alt key. And while you're holding down the Alt key, just drag the clip away and you've now duplicated it. Another one of my favorite shortcuts that I like to use every now and again. And that is especially true when I've got multiple layers. I might have 6, 7, 8, 9, 10 video track layers, and I want to cut through everything at the same time as I haven't actually talked about this yet, but we have the razor tool over in the toolbox here. So if you press the razor tool or shortcut C on the keyboard. So I do recommend you to stick to the shortcut. See, it's much, much faster. And if I want to just cut, if I just have a singular clip on one V1 or A1, and I just want to cut it. It's very easy to do. But what happens if I have multiple clips now I'm just going to simulate this, for example, because this will happen to you when you're working on multiple projects. So I just duplicated this hour just to simulate this. Now if I want to cut all of these video clips at the same time, right? I just want to put a slice straight through there. Now, I used to do this years ago. As you go cut, cut, cut, cut, cut. I've got too many mouse clicks, too much of a voice to time. Alright, undo, undo, undo, Control, zed, zed, zed, right? Much, much faster way is to hold down the Shift key. And then by holding down the Shift key, did you notice what happened? A line has been drawn straight through my timeline and if I hold down the Shift key again, there we go. And if I now cut it, it now cut all of them at the same time. If I hold down the Shift key again, it now cuts them all at the same time. So this is a fantastic shortcut. If you want to cut multiple clips on multiple tracks layers all at the same time without wasting any time. One to keep in mind. Okay, Another one I need to tell you about is the saving project shortcut, which is Control S on the keyboard. So if you go Control S, it will save the project for you as it's done now. And a little asterix thing here will disappear. So whenever you make a change, right? So I'm just gonna do a little cut here. The little asterix will appear up here at the top. That means that there are unsaved changes. So it's just something to keep in mind if you go Control S to save the project. That little asterix will disappear. It means that everything is being saved in the project. Why am I telling you this? Because when you get really fast at editing at intermediate or advanced levels in 15 minutes, I can get a lot of work done. I can get a huge amount of work completed. And in 15 minutes if I lose my project because Premier Pro crashes, which happens a lot unfortunately, or it's late at night and something happens with my project. Then I've lost 15 minutes of work. Now this is what used to happen. What I've done, and I'm going to share this with you, is if I go to Edit, go down to Preferences, and then go to Auto Save here. Now it's happy option here where it says automatically save every by default is 15 minutes. Okay? I think 15 minutes is too long. Especially when you're at a level of intermediate editing in your editing very fast, very efficiently. If you lose 15 minutes of work because Premier Pro crashes, then for me that's a lot of work. So I usually dropped that down to about five minutes, six minutes, right? And then on top of that, if I've done a fairly complex edit within that six minutes, I'll go Control S very quickly, right? So Control S bang, done. So that's something to keep in mind. And I'm only telling you this from my experience because I've worked on projects. Most of my projects I work on at night 234 or five o'clock in the morning. And sometimes the software crashes at three o'clock in the morning. And I've almost cried because I haven't saved the last 10 minutes, 15 minutes of work. So Control S we a friend. So I would suggest start using it. And a couple other ones that I will mention very quickly and I'll finish off the video that's relating to the toolbox here. So the toolbox, which I should just sit. So the toolbox is back down here because I like the toolbox down here. I'll talk about Workspace Layout in another video. This particular layout is not the most efficient for me personally, but I'm just letting it go for now because we'll talk about that later. But we have the toolbox here. So we have a couple of little shortcuts that you get to know very quickly. The selection tool, right? That's one you'll be using in every project that shortcut V on the keyboard. It just allows you to pick things up and move them around, right? So the, the next one we have is what are still use the razor tool we've talked about, which is shortcuts C on the keyboard, that's the cut and allows you to raise the things, cut things. And then you'll be toggling between C and V. Two then select and move clips around or trim them and that kind of stuff. What else? We have the Pen tool, which is shortcut P on the keyboard. So this is if you want to create masks and things like that, which we won't talk about in this video. But it just allows you to create a mask. And then you can do really cool stuff with that, which we'll talk about later. We also have that tool I never use the hand tool just allows you to kinda pantry your timeline. To be honest with you, I think I've ever used this like three or four times. I think it's a little bit redundant in my opinion. I use the scroll wheel on my mouse if I need to move left and right through my timeline, I don't use that at all, but you can, if you want, write the options there. Now that you'll be using is the Type Tool or the text tool. So it's shortcut T on the keyboard. If you press T, then the cursor will change, and that will allow you to type syntax. You just type anything in here. This is an example. I might mention a few other ones in a future video. So that's all I can think about for now. If you have any questions, certainly let me know. Otherwise, I'll see you in the next tutorial. 6. The Timeline- Comprehensive Timeline Functions (Part 1 of 3): As an intermediate editor, it becomes vitally important to be efficient with your workflow. And being efficient means that you know all of the functions, all the tools off the software. And so I'll be spending a little bit of time in this video explaining all the various tools and functions of the timeline panel inside Premiere Pro. This might be a two part video series in itself. I'm not sure yet we'll see how we go. But it's really important to know everything that's inside the timeline. You are going to be spending so much time in this window. You really do need to know the ins and outs and I'm gonna do my best to explain it quite clearly, but I'm going to move very quickly as well to save as much time, feel free to pause the video, rewind, slow, slow the video down if you need to. If I do move too quickly for you, right? So the first thing I'm going to show you on a jump straight into it. The first thing I'm going to show you is the tool that key, the little squiggly line that's above the Tab key on your keyboard. Now, you'll notice here firstly that there's a blue box around the timeline window, right? So I currently have this set as the active panel. If I press the Tilde key, which is below the escape key and above the Tab key, it's going to expand that out. So this is really handy if you're working with a big project that has, you know, it's quite a long project and it has a lot of video and audio tracks. And you need a whole screen to see the whole sequence. So this is where I use the tilde key to. It just blows it up on the screen. I can see everything all at once. If I press the Tilde key again, it shrinks it down back into the corner again. If I click and highlight the project panel, you'll see that blue box there. The project panel is the active Panel. Press the Tilde key, it expands this out so I can see all of my clips in here. If I have a lot of clips, press the Tilde key again, back up to here. Press the Tilde key to make it expand as nothing in there. And back over here to this sequence panel. And there we go. So that's one to keep in mind. You will be using the tilde key little squiggly line. Okay, so let's get some of the basics out of the way first. I know that you probably know all this stuff is, but we'll go through it very quickly. So we have video track layer 1, 2, and 3. So V1, V2, V3, video track layer 1, 2, 3, and audio track layer 123. Okay? Now we can add tracks quite simply right-click Add Track, or we can take a clip and then drag it up into the next track. And Premier Pro will automatically create additional tracks for us. Now we can attract to the audio track side. So right-click, Add Track, right-click Add Track. And again, attract to the video side or we can delete, right-click, Delete track, delete track. So that's quite simply how you add and delete tracks inside Premiere Pro. Now I think I mentioned before, if you take this horizontal line and drag it down, it's going to shift it so that if you're working with a lot more video track layers, That's going to give you a lot more Canvas space to work with video track layers. If you're working with more audio track layers because you're working with a lot of sound design, then you can drag that horizontal line up and you can work with all your sound design down here with all the different audio track layers down there. So I'll put it back in the center there. And I'll hit the Tilde key to zoom out. And I'll show you a couple of things. So with the play head, if I hit the down and up arrow, the play hits going to jump to the next edit point. So if I hit the down arrow, again, the play head's going to jump to the next cut or the next edit point on the clip, on the timeline. So it's a very fast and efficient way to move between different cuts on the timeline just by using the up and down arrows as such. If I hold down the Shift key and press home, then it's going to take that play head back to the beginning of the sequence. Then I hit the down key, right? And then I'll show you something else. Now, if we hit the right arrow, it's going to shift the play head forward by singular frames. So now if you have a look over here, this is the position of the playhead, this timer here. So this exact position, if I move the play head here. You'll see here the exact position of this timeline of this play head right now in this position is 0000 hours, 04 minutes, 58 seconds, and 46 frames. That's the exact position of the playhead. Now, watch what happens if I move the play head by pressing the right arrow? Watch what happens to this number here? The frames 47, frames 4849, and then 00. Now why that's happened is because if I go to sequence settings, the time base of this sequence is 50 frames per second. So that means whenever it gets to 49, and then when it goes to 50, it's going to roll over to the next second. So if I hit the left arrow, which is what I'm doing now, I'm now pushing the play head to the left by singular frames. So 44, 45 frames, 46 frames, seven, forty eight, forty nine. Remember to 50 frame per second time base. Then it moves over to the next second, 59 seconds. So now we're at position 0 frames 59 seconds, four minutes, and 0 hours. So that's how you read this timer. This is the play head position timer. Okay, so moving left and right with your arrows will move the play head by singular frames. Very good. One to keep in mind if you're trying to make very precise cuts. In your editing, there's something else which might be a little bit obvious, but I'll show you anyway if I take a clip here and I just put some B-roll here for example. Now the way that this works is that we have layers, right? So we have video track layer 1, 2, and 3. I'll grab another one just to demonstrate this. So I'm going a little bit of B-roll here, and I dropped that on top. So it will have two, we have three video clips on three layers. Now the play head is only going to show you the video clip that's on the highest layer, video track layer 3, right? So right now it's only showing you this one, these other two here, invisible. I like to think of it like the eye in the sky. So like sheets of paper stacked on top of each other. So if I move this one out of the way, now the play had shown you this clip here. If I move this one the other way, it's showing you this one over here. If I use the eyeball over here, I can make this track invisible, right? So now that tracks and visible. This one here is invisible. Now the eye in the sky is looking straight through this clip. It's almost like an invisible layer straight through onto this clip here. If I make that track invisible. Now, the eye in the sky is looking straight through and seeing this one here. Now, if I'm using audio, now the audio is different, right? So if I take audio and taking soundbites here, and I drop it onto the timeline as such. Zoom in and I just duplicate this out like this. Now what's going to happen if I play this back? Premiere Pro will actually play both of these at the same time, right? So it's not going to just play this one and forget about this one. Both of these will play back at the same time. So this is where it's different to the video track layers. So I thought I'll just make that distinction or just delete all of that. Okay, something else I'll show you is track heights. Now this is very handy as well. So over here we have a various track heights. Now if I double-click with my mouse, sort of in this area here, it will expand out these tracks, right? So double-click here. I like to do is I like to see the thumbnails of my clips on the timeline, just like that. Double-click again, that will just shrink it down. But what I like to also do is hold down the Alt key or the Option key. If you're on a Mac, use the scroll wheel on the mouse. This is one of my favorite ones. This way I can just kind of control the track height with more precision just by using the Alt key or the Option key, hold it down, use the scroll wheel on the mouse, right? A few other tricks that not many people know actually is if you take the Shift key, hold the Shift key down and hit the plus sign, it's going to expand all of those track simultaneously, the tilde key. So shift and minus will shrink all track simultaneously. And shift and plus will expand all of them simultaneously. Now, don't use the plus and minus keys on the keypad. They're not going to work, so shift doesn't work. I'm just pressing them now. But the shift, the minus and the plus key above the letters, they're going to work. So shift and minus, shift and plus. If you just want to expand out the video track layers, you can just use the Control Minus key. So hold down the Control or the Command key and hit the Minus key or hold down Control hit the plus key. And that will just expand out the video track layers like that. The Alt key or the Option key will just expand the audio track layers. Or you can just use these little nodes over here. And you can expand out just like that by pulling these nodes down or pushing it up like that, right? So there's many different ways you can skin this, but it's up to you. I'm just showing you all the possible ways. So Shift Minus or shrink them all down. And tilde key again. And what else is there? Also another one that I like is zooming in and zooming out. So zooming in, zooming out on the timeline, There's two ways of doing this. You can either use the nodes down here, which I never really use, right? So if you just click on the node here, just pull it out to the right, that will zoom out. This was Zoom in, right, but I actually like to use the alt key and the scroll wheel on the mouse. So hold down the Alt or the Option key. If you're on a Mac, use the scroll wheel. And if you, if you let go the Alt key and just use the scroll wheel, you can actually pan across the timeline, or you can use this as well, right? So hold down the Alt key, use the scroll wheel zoomed out and hold down the Alt key used to Zoom will to zoom in. All right, so that's how you zoom in and zoom out. And there's something else that some people do. I've noticed and I've seen this on a couple of YouTube videos, is that when you get really engrossed in a project and you're working away and you may be working into the early hours of the morning, which is what I used to do when I first started my whole editing journey. Is your forget about this, is you'll be editing away, but you don't realize that there's a clip kinda hiding all the way down the end of your timeline like this, right? I'm just going to demonstrate this. And you have no idea that this clip is tucked away here I am. Right? So if we go back over here and you're working away and you're like, I'm ready to export this. So then you go and export it File, Export Media. And you go, great, this is looking good. Don't actually notice that there's all this black, all these black frames. And then there's a clip at the very end there. And I've seen this for a couple of YouTube videos over the years where it's like an hour and 40 minutes or something like that. But the video itself as any like 15 minutes long, but there was like an hour of black frames. And the very last clip was some random clip of this guy. He obviously didn't pick it up. But it's one thing to keep in mind that when you're, before you go to export your project, right, is just to make sure that there's no stray clips hanging around at the end of your, of your timeline. So the backslash, if I press Backslash, the timeline is going to shrink and zoom to show you all the clips on the timeline, right? So the backslash key, very handy. If I delete this clip like that and then hit the Backslash again. Now the timeline will zoom according to all the clips that are on the timeline, right? So the backslash key is going to be your friend. Okay, so now I'm going to show you some of these little tools up here. So the first I'm going to show you is this one which is insert an override sequences as ness or individual clips. So this one here, I'll show how that works. It's better to show you because it will make more sense. I'm going to create a new sequence, and I'm just going to dump a whole lot of clips into this new sequence. I'm not going to think too much about it. It's going to drop heaps of clips. But what I'm going to take these ones, these ones we'll do, drop them all in here, delete this one. Cool. So now I am creating a new sequence. This is called examples sequence. Alright, so I'm going to take this, so for a moving very quickly, I'm going to paste it out here somewhere. Cool. All right, so we have two sequences. Open this one up. So I've got two sequences sitting up here like this. And just say for example, I'm back in my normal sequence here. And I'm going to leave this one selected as blue. And this sequence here, example sequence. I can actually drag that sequence inside of this sequence of here. By doing this, I click and drag it over. Now watch what happens dragging as a nested sequence. I took more about nested sequences in another video. But what that means is that it's a sequence within a sequence. So if I let that go, I now have a nested sequence by which if I double-click on this, it's going to take me to all the clips inside of this sequence. So don't worry, I'll talk more about nested sequences and why you should use them in another video. But I'm just demonstrating to you what happens when you leave this selected. Okay? So by leaving this selected, it means that any clips or any sequences that I dragged into this sequence right here, it's going to treat it as a nested sequence. Now, if I delete this and then turn that off, watch what happens now, I take the same example sequence and instead of dragging it in as a nested sequence, It's going to drag all the individual clips in instead, right? So this is super handy when you're working with projects and I'll go into more detail in another video where you don't want to drag the nest in, you want to drag in the individual clips. But I'll talk more about this in the nested sequence tutorial. That's the only reason why you would turn this on and off. All right, so we're going to be moving on to part two of this little series. I'll see you in Part 2. 7. The Timeline- Comprehensive Timeline Functions (Part 2 of 3): The next one along here is snap in timeline. So this is super handy when you're looking for precision, when it comes to joining your clips together on the timeline. So what that means is that it's like a little magnet, right? So if I push this away and I want to push these together, watch what happens when one clip gets close to the other. So that black line that's appearing there. What Premiere Pro is saying is that it believes that I want to push this clip up against that clip. And so draws a black line where it's going to put those two clips together. So they pretty much but right up against each other, right? So it's called snapping into timeline. This is super handy if I'm working with a lot of clips on a very busy timeline, if I turn this off, watch what happens. There is no snapping on. There are now need to look at this very closely to see if I'm pretty close there. Now, if I look at this and go, That looks like it's I think that's it. I think that's right against the next clip. Now it isn't. I'll zoom all the way in. I have some black frames here. So that's why it's important to leave that on, in my opinion, because Premiere Pro is going to snap for you. So if I'm zoomed all the way out, right, I can't tell if there's any blacks. Any black frames DO NOT. But what's this? Now it snaps and I don't have to worry about there being any black frames. All right, so you get the idea. So that's why you should leave that one selected. The next one is Linked Selection. Now Linked Selection just means that when I am clicking on a clip, it will tell me what audio or what video tracks are related to each other. So as you'll see here, when I click on the video here, it tells me that this audio track is connected with this video track. And if I click on this audio track, it tells me that this video clip here is connected to this audio track. So these are all linked together, right? But I may not want that to be the case. I might want to de-select it. So if I hit that and I'll turn that off, now, I can click on each of these video and audio tracks independently and I can delete them if I want to, just like that. So now I've independently switched off the video and audio that were once connected together, and I can go through and just delete what I want. Whereas if I do all of that and turn that back on again, and I start deleting. It's going to delete both the audio and the video track together, and I may not want that. So that's why this, there's reasons why you want to turn this on and off. Most of the time you just leave it on. But there will be times where you will need to disconnect the audio and the video, right? But that's good to know. The next one is the marker button. Now, there's definitely a lot more to know about markers, and I do talk about this in another video. But what that means is that you can just click here or press M on the keyboard, and that drops a marker. If you double-click on this, you can configure your mark with different colors, put in some comments and creates chapter and segmentation markers, flash cues, or go into more detail in another video. But you can click and press this here, which is the addMarker button, or press M on the keyboard. Or if you click on the clip and you press M is also going to create a clip marker. You'll notice the little markers down here, Matt, but you have to make sure the clip is selected. So M, if you don't select the clip and you only select the sequence, and then you press M, It's going to put that mark on the top of the sequence. So this difference is clipped markers and then this sequence markets, right? So here is your sequence Marker. All right, and you just click on that, and that will create a sequence marker. Okay, so if we go inside this wrench icon, we have a several other options here we have Show Video Thumbnails Show Video Keyframes, Show Video Names. So that's talking about these thumbnails here, right? So you'll see thumbnails here at the beginning of the clips. I like to leave them turned on because I like to see kinda what the clips are all about. I can see here that I'm in the car here with my girlfriend were in a helicopter here. And then she's in the helicopter there. So I'm looking at the thumbnails and I know very quickly what's going on in the video where they're having to move my playhead along just like that. So you make all of those changes inside the wrench icon. If I turn that off, you see, it looks kind of, you know, you don't really know what's inside those clips. So I like to leave that turned on show video thumbnails. And then we got show audio wave form, show audio keyframes. I'll leave that turned on because I like to see the waveform of the audio Show Clip markers. I'll leave that turned on, show duplicate frame markers. Now, I like to leave this turned on or turned off just before. But what that means is that if I have to demonstrate this with some footage, so just say for example, I'm using this B-roll here, right? So notice what happened there. So there's a blue line underneath this clip here. Now watch what happens. If I take the same piece of B-roll and I move it somewhere else. Now that's telling me that this, these particular clips, these particular frames have been used somewhere else in the project. That's what this is telling me. There had been duplicated somewhere else. So if you're working with big projects and you're using a lot of B roll. This is a great way to tell you that you've already used your B-roll somewhere else in your project. And it might be worthwhile considering using different B-roll. Now watch what happens if we've got this clip here on the timeline. There's no color bar underneath it. Now watch what happens if I drag the same clip in. Okay, So that's when it tells me that I've now duplicated the same frames in a different clip. Now watch what happens if I shorten one of these clips down? Watch what happens? So now, this color has now shrunk. Now it's telling me that only this portion of this clip has been duplicated in another clip, which is this one here, right? However, this part of the clip has not been duplicated anywhere else. But watch what happens when I when I pull this out again, see that that's being pushed across. So this is a brilliant way. I usually turn this on what I'm working with really big projects where I have a lot of B-roll and I can see straight away that that clips been used somewhere else. Now if I take this one, a different color will be used. This one here maybe. Okay, so I'll just override that. And then I take the same one. Okay, COC a different colors now being used. So I believe Premiere Pro users like ten different colors right before it starts using the same colors again. So we are blue here, we've got red here, or magenta there. So you get the idea. Okay, So what else do we have here? So My turn that off showed duplicate frame markers are the next one I like is show through Edit Cut. This is a really good one. I'll show you what I mean by this. So I'm going to drag, I'm actually going to delete everything here. And I'm going to throw everything back on the timeline again, just how it was. Okay, go back over here. So show through edits are really interesting. If I go and get my razor tool and cut. Okay, watch what happens for look closely. There's two little arrows that are facing each other. That's telling me that there's a through edit. And what that means is that the frame, the last frame of this clip and the next frame on this clip here are adjacent to each other, right there through edit. So this last frame of this cut and the next frame, or the first frame on this cut, right next to each other, they're adjacent. If I hit and cut through age of if I'm Mike, all these cuts here. You'll see that by looking at this at a first glimpse, it's showing me that all of these clips are correctly related to each other. They're sequentially related to each other. Now, if I don't have this turned on, show through edits. If I look at this, it looks like these are all unrelated clips, right? It looks like it that they could be unrelated. But if I turn this on, if I turn on show through edit, I can see straight away that I've made a stupid cut, rawhide. This is a stupid cut. I can see straight away just by seeing that these two little arrows are facing each other through edits. And these are unnecessary edits. So you can actually undo all of that. Right? So that's how you use show through edits are usually lead that turned on only when I'm working with big projects. And what else do we have show effects badges. So these little effects badges there, right? Fx there, we can turn them on and off. They actually change color as well whenever you are adding effects. So for example, if I go and add, I don't know, Lumetri color for example, I'll show you what I mean. Just say we using monochrome faded and I dropped that watch. What happens to the color badge, the effects batch, it changes to a purple color, right? And it changes to other colors like green, things like that if you're using combination of effects. But that just tells me right now, because that's gray. That affects badges gray. It means that there's no effects added whatsoever. It's a clean It's a clean slate, so to speak. And if we go back in here, so I'd like to leave that turned on show effects badges that we have. Minimize all tracks, Save Preset, so we don't need to worry about that. And that's pretty much all there is there. Let's see what else there is. Okay, so something else you really need to know is source patching over here. So if I run my mouse over it, we have V1 and A1 right here on Rama mouse over it again. So you can see source patching for inserts and overwrites. And then over here we have toggle for track targeting for this track. So there is a difference between these two. I'll show you what source patching means. First, source patching is really just telling Premiere Pro. Whenever you're using the source monitor box and you're using Insert and Overwrite editing, what they call three-point editing. So if I take my play head here and I have V1, A1 selected, and I take an in and out point as such. And I either use insert or overwrite to drop that into the timeline. Watch what happens if I just do an insert, for example, It's going to insert from the position of the playhead straight onto wherever I've got V1 and A1 activated as my source patching. Okay, So just say I want to take all of my three-point edits from my source monitor box into my timeline, onto V2 and a2. I then click where it's source patching here. This is the source patching column. And I've got V1 here and a1 selected here. And then I've got my play head setup here, which means that whatever I've selected here, and I click, Insert or overwrite, it's going to drop it straight on top of V2 and a2. Watch this. Now because I've got insert selected, it's going to cut that clip and I might not want that. So there is a difference between these two, which I'll explain in another video. I actually have talked about this in the beginner course, but if I select Overwrite, it's just going to leave these tracks alone, right? And so you'll see that it automatically drops whatever I've selected here according to source patching, which is V1, A1, right? And it's going to drop the clip that I've selected on V2 track, V2 audio track a two. All right, if I changed source patching to the next track up V3 and A3. Watch what happens now. Okay, so that's what source patching is. Source patching is related related to the source monitor box. So thank source patching, source monitor box, source patching source monitor box. And one more thing I want to mention before I forget. And this is a common question that are usually receive. And that is people asking, why is it they can't import video or audio when they're trying to use, insert or override from the source monitor box straight into the timeline. And that's because it's relating to source patching being disabled. So at the moment, we've got here, source patching is turn off a V1 A1. So we're telling Premiere Pro, as I've mentioned before, that whenever we insert or overwrite from inside the source monitor box that it's going to be directed to V1 and A1. However, some people by accident because they click around that it realize what they're doing. They might accidentally turn off source patching for V1. And they only leave A1 turned on. And I didn't even know they've done this because they're not really sure what this even means. And then they go over here into the Reddit. They select an in point and an out point. And they can see the video very clearly inside the source monitor box. But then when they go to hit insert, it only drags in the audio only. And then like what's going on here? Where's the video, this video up here, but there's no video being dragged down here, just the audio. And that's because they've got source patching for video turned off. You gotta tell Premiere Pro where you want the video and the audio to go and what tracks. So in this case, I don't have source patching turned on for any of the video track layers. If I turn on source patching for video on V4, then Premiere Pro. If I just delete this and try again, It's going to throw the video onto V4 and the audio onto A1. So as you can see. So, and the same thing with audio, common mistake is that people will not realize what they're doing and they'll click of source patching for audio. And I'll just leave source patching for video turned on. And they've selected here in an app point as such, and the live and go into severe click here, right, so we got video and audio. So I can see the audio waveform of this clip, and I can see the video over here just by clicking between these two icons here. So this clearly audio in this clip. However, I've got my in and out points selected, and I've got my timer ready to rock and roll. And then I hit Insert and overrides and only the video drags across. And you're like What's going on here and then you try override because you think maybe if I hit the wrong button, but the same thing happens in like What's going on. This is crazy. There's no audio. But then you go here, this clearly audio over here. Again, the same reason because you don't have source patching for audio turned on. So just make sure when you're using the source monitor box and you're using insert an override that you have source patching turned on for video and audio at the same time. If you have both of them turned off, then nothing's going to drag it across. All right, so this is can be very frustrating and this is a common question that I usually receive. So that's why I'm spending a couple minutes on it. So make sure you've got source patching audio and video turned on for any one of the tracks that you want to drop your edits onto the timeline if you're using Track Targeting, it's different again. So I'm going to bring my source patching back to V1 A1. Okay, so now I'm going to talk about track targeting. So track targeting these two or this column here, right? So I'm going to, what am I gonna do? I'm going to cut to some chopping away. And I'm going to demonstrate something. I'm going to copy this clip by going Control C on the keyboard or just Command C. And I want to paste that clip up here right in the timeline. Now, if I hit paste Control V, it's going to paste it back onto V1, A1. I don't want that. I want to paste up on to say V3, A3. Now how do I do that? Well, that's where I set my track targeting. Now the reason why it pasted it on V1, A1. I'll do it again is because of track targeting. Premiere Pro is targeting my paste on V1, A1 because that's what I've got selected here. Watch what happens if I select V3 and A3, but I have to de-select all of the other ones. So now I've tracked targeted V3, E3. Watch what happens, control V. It automatically targets V3, A3. If I undo that, watch, what happens if I've selected all of these tracks as being tracked targeted? It's going to default to the very first track first. So it takes precedence to V1, V1, V2, V3, A3. It starts from the center and then it moves out. So if I de-select these two, the next track target, the priority is V2, A2. If I hit paste, It's going to now paste on the 2 a2. So you're going to make sure that if you want to paste on V3, you have to de-select all the other ones so that now V3, E3 is a priority. So that's where you would use. That's a main reason why you would use Track Targeting is to copy and paste. So remember, there is a difference between source patching and track targeting these two columns here. Okay, let's move into part three of this little series talking about timeline functions. This is definitely much longer than what I thought would be Part 3. Here we come. 8. The Timeline- Comprehensive Timeline Functions (Part 3 of 3): Okay, I'll show you a couple of other things. So we have the padlock here, so this is called quite obvious. It really just locks down a layer. So it means that I can't do anything with it. I can't get my eraser tool, I can't cut into it. So this is super handy when you're working with a background track, some background music or got some music here actually. And so just say for example, I want to add some music. Oops, I don't want to cut it. And I want to just kind of leave my background music there like this. And I don't want to touch it or by accident, I just get my padlock and bang. I lock it down. Right. So there's no way I can't move it around. I can't delete it. I can't chop into it. So this is a perfect method of just locking down a layer and just leaving it locked. But just make sure be careful that if you locked in a layer, you can make mistakes by like deleting some video tracks or video clips that are essentially linked to that audio track. And as you can see there, it's telling me that they're both out of sync now. So just be careful that when you're locking down tracks, because you might be locking on tracks that are linked to video clips or audio clips on an unlocked track. So that's the padlock there. What else do we have? We have mute and solo tracks. So if I want to, for example, mu to track and play it back, and I just want to hear the track here. I'll just get back whatever done. So just if I just want to play again. Okay, so just muted this track here. Now, if I've got multiple audio tracks, for example, on this like over here, maybe I'll use a different track like this. There we go. Might just make this a different color, just demonstrate. Okay, great. So now I've got three audio tracks here I am. So what happens if I just want to hear what's going on on this track here, okay, well, I just hit the Solo button and that will solo this track. So you're only hearing audio track layer three. Some people actually go mute, mute, and they just do it that way. I mean, that just takes a little bit more clicking. You can't do it that way. But that's why we've got the solo option there, because we can just solve any one of these tracks. Alright, That's the solo option. We have the mute option we've talked about. And now we have the voice-over record option. Now, I'll show this one's pretty cool. So to say, for example, you want to record a voiceover, and I'm only going to go through this pretty quickly, is you have a little microphone here. If you right-click and go to voice-over record settings, you'll see all of the settings for your voice over. So the source is going to be the microphone. I'm using a Yeti X to make this tutorial. It's a fantastic microphone. If you like the quality of this audio in this tutorial, then get a Yeti microphone doesn't cost that much money to get the Yeti X. And I've decided I want to use the ATX to record a voiceover inside Premiere Pro. And over here I've got pre-rolls. So if you want, so a little bit of time before the audio starts recording, I usually set three seconds with pre-roll. I don't bother setting a post role. And then I've pretty much set up my audio for voice-over. If we go to Edit and then go to Preferences, go to audio. One more thing I'd like to check is under Audio, if we go to mute input during Timeline recording, make sure that this is selected. If you don't select this, it means that you're going to hear yourself talking as you're doing the voiceover. And trust me, it is so distracting. You've got a you've got a muted. In my experience, I can't hear myself talking while I'm talking. It's just a very annoying echo. Click. Okay? And then all you gotta do is press the voice-over record button on whatever track that you want to start recording on. So you have your visuals here, right? You have the video playing at the same time, or just find it where we go, for example. So you're playing this back on a mute, this rise, your helicopters taking off here. And you might be looking at this guy. I want to do a voice-over. So a play head sit up here. And we're gonna put the voiceover on audio track layer two. We're going to press on this, and it's got a little countdown here, 1 second. So right now we're playing back a demonstrating a voice-over recording. My girlfriends learning how to fly a helicopter, and she's having the time of her life. And I'm just doing this as a demonstration. And this is a really cool voiceover. And then I press Enter and then it will dump that on to cancel. It will dump it onto audio track layer two if I play this back. So right now we're playing back a, demonstrating a voice-over recording. My girlfriend's learning how to fly a helicopter and she's having the time of her life and I'm just doing this as a demonstration. There you go. So now I've got a little sound bite of a voice-over recording which I can move around, whatever I can move it to different tracks. So that's how easy it is to do a voiceover recording in Premiere Pro. And we'll just delete that one. What else is there? So I've showed you that the solo, the track and toggle sink, lock. Okay, So this is important. Now, if I zoom out a little bit and I get my razor tool and cut, and I'll move this up another, okay, I'm going to demonstrate this to you and bring this shrink this a little bit. Okay, so I'm sitting up multiple tracks here. Now, if I take this clip and delete it, and then right-click ripple, delete. Watch what happens to all of these clips on all of the other tracks. Not just on the track that I do the ripple delete on, but watch what happens to all of these other tracks. And also notice that I've got toggle sink, lock turned on for all of these tracks. Pay attention. Right-click ripple, delete it. Now ripple deletes not just the track that I've done the ripple delete on. It's actually rippled, deleted all of the tracks as well because sink lock is turned on. Now watch what happens if I turn sync lock off on these other tracks. Now do the same thing. Watch what happens. Now all of these have stayed in the same spot and it's only rippled deleted on this track here. Okay, so just undo that. So if I, if I turn Sync log on and off on various tracks, essentially what that means is that it's going to move those video clips along the timeline while leaving all the other ones behind. So now that I've just turned that one on, sync lock on, and I do another ripple delete, or just put that back on the timeline. So it's all nice and flush ripple delete. Now it's only moved this video clip and this video clip along because sink lock is turned on. So there might be a situation where you're working with quite a big project and you have 15 or 20 video track layers and 15 or 20 audio track layers. And you don't want everything to shuffle across. When you do a ripple delete, you only just want one or two tracks to shuffle across, not everything shuffling across at once. So that's where it's super handy. Turns the lock off and just have the lock turned on for one particular track. So the reason why you'll notice here, we have little flags here, right? So this is telling me that this video clip and this audio track are linked together. And you'll see that because I've clicked on it that both now been highlighted and they're out of sync. So there's a little time badge that tells me how much throughout a sync by which is two minutes and 27 seconds and 39 frames. So as I pull them back in that time or will get less and less and less. So that just tells me how much at a sink the video and audio track layer is. So that's something to keep in mind. Okay, so we can actually add keyframes to our audio track here. So we're taking our play head and a little keyframe thing will show up. If you don't see that, you just go right-click, go to customize. And you can actually add additional icons or functions to your timeline riots. So you'll see here where it says keyframe, add, remove keyframe. You can just click and drag that over onto the audio track layer and that's going to add that for you, right? So this is a little button editor for the Timeline panel. So I've already got it there. So with the time, with the play head here, as such, I can then add keyframes. So watch what happens when I click Add keyframe, it drops a little keyframe there. I can add another keyframe and another keyframe like this. And I could do the same thing for the video track. I can do the same thing for the video track layer as well. So click on the clip, add a keyframe at another one. Now, I don't actually do it this way myself. I used to, but I don't anymore. I use the pen tool. So if you go to the toolbox, click on the Pen tool and you can actually just click directly on the rubber band to create keyframes. And then you can just kind of adjust the volume this way by just moving the keyframes around. This is how I do it now by just using the pen tool, dropping keyframes, by clicking on the rubber band and it just kind of adjusting this way. Now, if I do the same thing in the video track layer, it's going to adjust the opacity, right? So you'll notice here, if I drag this keyframe down to 0, I'll just mute this. The capacity will now slowly drop off on this clip. Just like that. Right? So that's how you adjust the opacity by using keyframes for go to effect controls. You see all those keyframes had been dropped in here under opacity, right there. Now I can delete all these key frames by selecting the more pressing Delete, right? So that's how you use keyframes inside of the timeline panel in Premiere Pro. And that is it We have definitely covered a lot here. I will definitely make this a two-part series of or haven't already, if you have any questions here about the timeline panel or how to use some of the features or functions or you want to further explanation, feel free to let me know. I'll make a follow-up video. Otherwise, I hope this was helpful and insightful. Please use this as a reference video in case you forget something later on, you need to come back to it. You can re-watch this video. Otherwise, I'll see you in the next video tutorial. 9. The Timeline- Working with Timeline Render Bars (Green, Yellow, Red): So we're going to be looking at green, yellow, and red timeline render bars, insider, Premier Pro. These, it'll render bars that you're seeing here on the top of the sequence. I'm going to explain to you what that means and how to work with them as an intermediate editor. And so it's important to understand what they mean and how to work around them. When you're working with big projects where you have a lot of clips in the timeline and you're working with a lot of effects, a lot of adjustment layers and things like that. You will definitely need to know what these mean. So I'm going to spend a few minutes explaining it to you. In this example, I'm just going to use three simple clips on the timeline just to keep the explanation simple. And then you'll see how the supplies when you work with bigger projects, with more clips and more video and audio layers. So the first clip we have is green. The second clip we have has a yellow bar on top of it and the red clip, and the next clip has a red bar. So if we move the clip along, you'll see that the red bar chases that clip. So what this essentially means is that Premiere Pro is saying that if we want to play back this clip in real time, right, by hitting the play button and watching it. Then there's a pretty good chance, in fact, almost a 100 percent chance that it's going to playback smoothly because it's green. What that means is that it's been rendered out. It's been rendered out so that you can watch the frames in the program monitor box in real time. However, a yellow indicates there's a good chance that it may struggle a little bit, but not always, but there's a good chance it might struggle to play back that clip in real time. And if I hit the play button here, if we have a look at it, I'm also recording my screen for the tutorial. It's still running pretty good. It's quite smooth, right? Because I've just bought a new laptop maybe a month ago. And so it also helps having a fast laptop. But if I were to run this same clip on my old laptop, it would definitely struggle a lot more. So there's no guarantee that yellow means that your laptop or computer is going to struggle to play this back in real time. It just means that there's a good chance. And if we look at the last clip here, which is red, we'll premiere Pro is pretty much saying there's a good, good chance that your lab tuple computer's going to struggle to play this clip back in real time. So if I play this back, and right now, it's jumping a lot. It's not running too good. And so I don't need to play these clips back to know if the clip is going to playback smoothly or not. That's what these bars mean. These are render bars that sit above your clips. And it just tells you with some degree of probability of how your clip is going to play back in real-time. I'll also show you something else real quick. If you go to the Wrench icon here, click on that, and then go down to where it says Show dropped frame indicator. If we click on that, a little light will appear. A little sort of an indication will appear over here, which says here 0 frames dropped during playback, right? And so watch what happens if I play back the first clip which has a green render bar, and I play this back. Premiere Pro will show me how many frames have been dropped. So we've got 15 frames have been dropped so far. So it looks like it's running quite smoothly, but still we've lost about 15 frames playing back a clip that has a green render bomb. If I go over two and you can reset the frame counter by hitting Stop and hitting play again, and that will reset that back to 0. So if I show you this experiment on the yellow bar, if I hit Play, all right, we've lost five frames, are ready. And I'm going to move my mouse over and back over it again. So 55, pretty good so far. So we've only lost five frames. Okay, but as I said, yellow just means that there's a good chance that it will play back slowly in real time. But Premiere Pro will do its best to play back in real-time any of the clips that have a yellow bar above them. So we already lost five frames. So at the moment, this clip has performed better than this one, right? And I haven't added any effects or anything else to these clips. If we go to the red one, watch what happens to the frame, drop count playback. It starts off with green and then watch it change. We've lost 10 frames. 31 frames have been dropped. 8131 frames 158, 196. I used to play a lot of computer games as a kid. And so frame rate was something which I obsessed about anyway. So we've lost a lot of frames, 417 frames. Okay, so what do we do about this? Now, if you're working with a lot of effects, if you get this clip here, for example. And I put on an effect like unsharp mask. Or if I want to remove these black bars here, right? To say go to Effect Controls, go to Scale. Watch what happens when I increase the scale to close out these black bars, watch, watch this. It changes red. So automatically if I play this back, it's going to run really slow because Premier Pro is telling me it's going to run really slow. Liberal the frames I'm dropping now. So what do I do about this? Well, I want to perhaps render this out. So let me show you if you go and select the clip here on the timeline that you want to render out. Sequence. You get all these options here, render effects into out. So if I only want to render the effects that I've added to this clip that ALL select this option. If I go down to rent a selection, then it'll render only what I've selected on the timeline. Okay, so that's all rendered out. So just as easy as that. But watch what happens if I add another effect. It changes red again. So you get the idea now if I remove this effect by going Unsharp Mask and deleting it, it automatically goes back to green. So what's actually happening when you render out clips on your timeline is you're actually creating video previews, right? So you're essentially getting Premier Pro to render out your project in a lower quality version in what they call video previews, so that you can watch your clips as a preview in real time if that makes sense. If we go to sequence settings, you will see here video previews. So whatever you've selected here, whenever you're rendering stuff on your timeline, it's going to render according to what you've selected here. So my video previews are going to be iframe mpeg. And at this dimension 1920 by 2013. But I leave it as is. I don't touch these settings. You can adjust if you wish to AVI or QuickTime, but I usually leave it as iframe and then click Okay, right. Sometimes I have problems with my render files and not very often, but this has happened to me. And if it happens to you, and I'm sure you'll come across it. This is what you do. Sometimes I can render out a project. I can render out clips on my timeline. The becomes a green bar, right, which tells me that it's rendered, but then it still plays back really Sloan. I don't know why, but I, every time I go to sequence and then click on delete render files, it deletes all the render files. So you'll notice that it's gone back to red. And then our regenerate those rendered files by clicking here. I cannot think I render it into out. If I've selected in and out points on my timeline, I can just render this section out if I want. Right? Is that a rendering the entire timeline. So sequence render into out. And then whenever I re-render that previews, it then works. So if ever you struggle with rendered files, if it shows up as green and it's not playing back smoothly, you might have to delete those render files and regenerate video previews. I hope that makes sense and I hope that's clarified what the timeline render bars all about. If you have any questions, let me know and I'll see you in the next video tutorial. 10. The Timeline- Working with Nested Sequences: When working with really big projects inside of Premiere Pro, it becomes vitally important to understand and use nested sequences. Now, nesting your sequences means that you can keep your projects organized, your sequences organized, and help improve your workflow. In fact, you can save so much time in your workflow, especially when you're working with larger projects, when you start using nested sequences. Now, I'm going to show you two different ways of using nested sequences in your own projects in this tutorial. Now, I've got four clips here in front of you in one sequence he called example Nested Sequence. Now, what does it mean to nest a sequence? Quite simply, it just means that we're selecting multiple clips on our timeline. And we're going to nest whatever clips that we decide to select here. In this case, we're going to select all four of these clips. And we're going to tell Premiere Pro to treat these four clips as one clip. So I'll show you what I mean. So we select the clips that we want to nest. We have four of those on our timeline. We right-click and we go over to nest, we click on that, and then we give our nest and name. So I might just call it ness to one, for example, enter. And what we've done now is we've told Premier Pro to put all of those clips into this nest, which is actually another sequence. So now we have a sequence inside of a sequence called example nested sequence. So this is our main sequence, and now this here is our nested sequence, which is, you'll notice the color there's green. If we double-click on this nested sequence, sequence, we have these four individual clips here. So we're now telling Premiere Pro to treat those four clips as one singular clip that we can now move around on our timeline. This is a really great way of organizing your footage on your timeline. As I said, when you start working with major projects, this becomes vitally important. Of course, if you've only got four clips, you don't need to nest these clips, right? You can just use an adjustment layer and you can apply all of the effects and everything inside the adjustment layer. But for organizational purposes, when you get to bigger projects, nesting becomes essential. And I'm going to show you towards the end of this tutorial, a real life project where things do get very, very busy if you don't use nested sequences. So if we go inside our nested sequence here, we can actually move these clips around like this, change the order of them like this. We might even turn this one off, go to disable, shorten this down. And what we do is we go back to our main sequence. You'll see the nested sequence here opens up as a sequence at the top here, we go back to our main sequence sequence and then play this back. And all of the changes that we've made to those individual clips had been reflected against our main sequence. So that's one main reason to use nested sequences is to keep everything organized. The second reason is that if we want to apply multiple effects to all of these clips here, then we can just apply them directly to the nest itself. So we're now inside the main sequence. We have our nested sequence here. And we go over to Effect Controls. And I'll give you an example. Just say for example, I want to change the scale of the nest, make it bigger. I want to rotate all of the clips inside the nest. I want to reduce the opacity of the nest Eclipse, right? So I've now applied these effects directly to the nest itself. If I play this back, you'll see that that's been applied to all of the clips inside the nest. So there we have it. Now, if I go inside the nest itself to the individual clips, those changes have not been made. So I've essentially just applied the effects directly to the nest without actually having to apply those changes or those effects to the each individual clip. So imagine having to apply the scale to each individual clip. So make this bigger, rotate this one, reduce the opacity. Okay, next clip. I might just enable this one here, right? Increase the scale, rotation opacity. So you get the idea, this becomes a very slow arduous process. If I were to go through to each individual clip and modify the scale and the rotation, as opposed to just jumping into the nested sequence, clicking on it and making all the changes directly to the nested sequence. Okay, so now we'll just go through and I'll undo all of those changes there. Now, I do the same thing with color grading. I can go to click on the nest itself and I can grade, I can do color correction on the entire nest. I can overexpose it by heaps, just completely ruin it. Just to demonstrate here, go and do some color grading. And I might. Over the top there and just make it really, really ugly. But as you can see, I've apply that directly to the nest itself, right? As you can see, it's applied directly to the nest. But if I go inside the nest, the clips have not been changed. This is amazing. So they are two different ways that you can use nested sequences in your projects to number one, keep your clips organized and tell Premiere Pro to treat all of your clips as one singular clip. And secondly, you can apply all of your effects and your color grading and color correction to the nest without touching the individual clips themselves. So let me give you an actual project where nesting becomes super important. And it's only when you see a real life project that's quite big that you'll start to appreciate why it's important to use nesting. So here I have a project, quite an old project here. Now this is quite a big project. If you have a look, we have 28 video track layers here. And if we look at this on your screen now, all of these green items here in the timeline are all nested sequences. Now, if I play this back, just, I'll show you the first couple of seconds. Now, if I play this back really slowly, we have a logo, we have My name, we have my image, we have some glitches. We have some transitions, more transitions, more glitches, more transitions. So this is quite complex. But if you have a look at the timeline, it looks very neat. I mean, you can't see anywhere on this timeline where all those glitches are. You can't see those transitions on this timeline. Now, if I wasn't using nested sequences, this would be a very complex looking timeline. It would be very difficult to navigate around this timeline. However, if I want to go and change, if I want to look at the glitching of this part of the project, where it's glitching around the logo, I can just jump straight into this particular nest here, total pre-comps 0, 1. This is a nested sequence. If I double-click on this, then I can see all of the individual glitch maps that I've used here for that part of the project. I can go into Tidal and I can change my logo right here. I'll zoom out so you can see. And by, as you can see here, we have the nested sequence here, which just contains my logo. If I close that, then this nested sequence only contains those glitches. So I can go through and I can manipulate these glitches if I want. Just like that. All right. So I can go through I can make them bigger, I can make them smaller. But then I can close this nested sequence. And as you can see, that's the nested sequence. This nested sequence contains all of the glitches for that logo. And the same thing as if I continue scrubbing forward. We have some more titles here. So this is another sequence that's being nested. So if I double-click on this, I have more glitch maps that I can change, right? So imagine putting all of these individual clips onto the main sequence timeline and doing that for the entire project. Can you imagine how messy this would be? Our hope you can appreciate why it's important to use nested sequences from an organizational perspective. So that's an example of where you can use nesting in larger projects to keep your workflow quite neat and tidy and fast, and keeping everything organized on your timeline. So if you have any questions, let me know. I hope this was helpful. Otherwise, I'll see you in the next tutorial. 11. Workflow- The Pancake Editing Technique: So I'll be showing you the pancake editing technique inside of Premiere Pro, which is exactly what you're seeing on your screen right now, where we have two sequences stacked on top of each other. That's why they call it a pancake editing technique. And this is a brilliant editing technique. If you have filmed a lot of footage and you want an easy way of scrubbing through that footage and being able to just pick what you want and then drag it onto another timeline. And this timeline might be a rough cut or it might be your final cut. It's up to you. You can have one sequence for all of your B-roll clips and one sequence for all of your original raw clips. It's completely up to you how you label these two sequences. But it's just really, really easy to sort through a whole lot of footage. So I encourage you to give this editing style a try. And I'm going to show you how to set this up in this tutorial. So the first thing I'm gonna do is I'm just going to close out and remove the sequences. And I'm going to recreate these sequences from the very beginning. And so we're now working together off the same screen. So essentially I've got all of my GoPro clips here imported into my project panel. And I'm just going to create my very first sequence, a right-click, go to New Sequence From Clip. And for now, I'm just going to delete that clip there. I'm going to give this sequence, sequence a name. I'm going to call it fitness street because this was episode 6 and I'm going to call it R4. Okay, so this sequence is going to contain all of these clips. And I'm going to select them all. And I'm going to de-select that. And I'm going to drag them all over into the timeline as such. So we have all about Clips, They're dragged into our timeline. I'm now going to create a second sequence and I'm just going to use any of these clips because they're all shot at the same frame rate. Right-click new sequence from clip. And I'm going to give this sequence the name of fitness Street, episode 6, and I'm going to call it final, as in this is going to be my final sequence that I end up exporting, right? So as I said, you can call this B roll clips. You can call it whatever you want. It's completely up to you. But now we have two sequences here. Now this is not the pancake technique right now we have to pull one of these sequences off and stack it. And when you do that by just clicking and dragging one of them down to the bottom where it's blue. And then just releasing the mouse. And now we have two sequences stacked on top of each other. So this is the very beginning of our pancake editing style. We have all of our roll clips here, and then we have our final sequence down here. I'll just delete that clip there, and I'll just re size the sequences here. Okay, so all you really need to do is use your play head here. I'm just going to mute this audio tracks. You don't hear that through the recording. And all you need to do is really just scrub through with your play head there and just pick what you want. Click and then drag it down into the other sequence. And it's just that simple. You just go through here. Is that like what you want and then drag it down here. Now just another one. Another thing to point out. If you don't want the clips to drag down with the audio clip as well, then you can just click over here where it says Linked Selection. If you unselect that or de-select that, then it will de-select the audio from the video track. So you just click and drag the on the video only, or you may just want to click and drag them the audio only. So now we've essentially separated the video from the audio by clicking Linked Selection. So for now, I'm just going to re-select that. I'm going to delete these here. Another thing you can do as well for the pancake editing technique to help you sort out your footage in the raw sequence is you can actually label these clips. So for example, if these clips here were some particular story or some particular theme of your shot, then you can select the relevant clips, right-click, click on label and then give them a color, and then just continue on. And that just helps you quickly and easily identify on your raw sequence what exactly is going on with the story. So I can very easily see that all these are blue. These are relating to one particular theme. All of these are magenta, which are related to something else. So that's another little thing that I use. I'm using the pancake editing technique. And one more thing is you can actually select in and out points inside this sequence here. And then with the in and out points selected, you can drop that into the final sequence down here. So what does that mean is essentially opening up the sequence in the source monitor box. And I'll show you what I mean by that. So we're going to go back into our project panel here, look for these sequence, which is fitness Street episode six, R4, which is this one here. And I'm going to right-click and then I'm going to look forward. It says open in source monitor. So I'm gonna click on that. And then I'm going to go to this wrench icon here. And then I'm going to select Open sequence in timeline, the pancake will fall apart. And so you might see this happening on your screen right now. All you need to do is just click and then drag down one of those sequences down to the bottom. And that will restore your pancake like this. So you should be seeing exactly what I'm seeing on my screen right now. So at the very top we have our raw sequence. And it says source monitor here. And then our playhead changes into a red color. So that means that this source, this sequence here is tied up with this source monitor box over here. So as I scrub through this footage here, I can see this footage being displayed over here in the source monitor box. And then down here, I have this play head here showing me the footage in the program window over there. So all you need to do is using your play head. Just like we learned in the beginner course. And I talked about this in the beginning course, is you can just set the adjustments here so you can see all of these. Now if you can't see any of these icons here, some of them have disappeared. Then they might be inside these two arrows here. Or you might need to just adjust the panels like that. Very easy to do. So you just take your play head here or you take the play head over here and you set an endpoint. You move the playhead across, set an out point, and then you can, where it says insert or override, you can actually click on that and that will drop it straight into the second sequence here, right? Or we can undo that. We can move this play head to the end using the down key on the keyboard. And this is a selection here that we've selected from our raw sequence. We can then use override. And that will drop it straight into that sequence there. So this is a little bit of an extension of the pancake editing technique that not a lot of people talk about. But this is super handy, especially if you want to use in and out points and use three-point editing with the pancake editing technique. So I hope this was helpful. If you have any questions, please let me know and I'll see you in the next tutorial. 12. Workflow- How to Edit Faster with Proxy Files: You might have shot some clips in 48 K or even some red footage. And you want to work with that high-resolution, high-quality footage inside of Premiere Pro, such as over here on the red.com website, we have some sample, our 3D files for each shot in 8 K. And you want to import that into Premier Pro and work with that high resolution footage. But you find that when you screw up the play head back and forth, that it's really choppy and it's really slow and it's extremely painful to edit. And you think, well, what can I do? You might be running an old laptop or you may not have a very powerful CPU or graphics card or not much memory or RAM. So what can you do? Well, I mean, there are little things you can do such as clicking here on the drop-down menu and reducing the playback resolution to say one-quarter or 1 eighth. But just say you've already done that. You've already selected one-quarter or 1 eighth and you take the playhead new scrub it back and forth, and it's really, really slow. What do you do? So here comes the magic of proxy files. So what is a proxy file? A proxy firewall is essentially telling Premiere Pro to take the original high-quality, high-resolution video clips and creating a lower resolution, lower quality of the same clips. And whilst you're working inside Premiere Pro, you're using those lower quality clips, but they are linked back to the original high-quality clips just before you export the project to the final finished product. So for example, here we have two clips and these are for k clips. Now I've taken the sample clips from Pexels.com and over here. So we have this website here, which is where you can download sample red footage. If you want to follow along with me, you can download some of this sample 8 K forage, or you can go to Pexels.com over here, type in 4k resolution. And a couple of clips here will pop up, which I'm using in this example. So feel free to follow along with me if you want. You can download these clips and import them into Premier Pro and you can follow along with me. So just say you've got some clips here, and we've got these clips here for k. So if I right-click on this and I go to properties, you'll see He Image Size 3840 by 2160, which is four K resolution. Now I want to, I want to create some proxy files with these two clips. And how do I do that? So all I need to do is go over to my project window over here. And I will select down here List View. And I will select these two clips here. And these two clips, I will right-click and go to proxy and then Create proxies. So what I'm telling Premiere Pro to do is I'm telling Premier to create a lower resolution of these two clips so that I can then work with these lower resolution clips instead. So click on Create proxies, and this little box will pop up. So hit the drop-down menu and select Quick Time. And then under Preset, hit the drop-down menu and select center form low resolution proxy. It's what I like to work with personally. And then just ignore it says at ingest preset and down here where it says Destination, make sure it's set to next two original media in a proxy folder. So that should be selected by default. And then click Okay. And then what happens now is Premiere Pro will open up Media Encoder. And it will now encode these two clips at a lower resolution. And so just make sure that you've got Media Encoder installed. Media Encoder 2021 is what I'm using. And Premier Pro will do all the work for you. So this will happen in the background and it shouldn't take too long. So we have two ticks there, so we're good to go. So we can just close out of Media Encoder and we go back into Premier Pro. And then we move our play head and it's still really choppy. And you're like, Well, what's happened to those proxy files we've just created? They're not over here. Like it just looks the same as before. So you need to do a couple of other things. If you go over here to the program monitor box, there is a little plus sign it says button editor. Click on that. And this is where we can add in some buttons. And we have here this icon says Toggle Proxies. So we need to click and drag this over into our toolbar down here. Click Okay. And now we have this option where it says Toggle Proxies. So right now it's turned off, which means that as we scrub our playhead, we are looking at the original four K quality clips here. That's why it's so choppy. But what's this? When I select Toggle Proxies? Now Premiere Pro is playing back super fast because now we're using the proxy files of the original clips, which then allows us to quickly and easily scrub the footage. We can make all of our edits. We can take our razor tool, we can chop things up. We can do all our color grading and color correction and add effects and all that kinda stuff. We're applying all of those changes to the proxy files right now. And then the moment we turn off proxies and go back to the original full K quality. Then we go back to really choppy, really slow, laggy performance. So all you need to do is when you're working with proxies, make sure that it's turned blue. It means that it's turned on. Then make all the changes you need to make to the Eclipse. And then when you're ready to export the clips, you don't need to click on that again. You don't need to turn off proxies before you export. Just leave it turned on. It doesn't really matter, right? To make all the changes you need to make to the proxy files. And then when you're ready to export, watch this. Go to File. Go to Export Media. And down here it says under Video 3840 by 2160. So what Premiere Pro will do is it's going to automatically export out the high resolution version of your finished project. So you don't need to worry about ensuring that that turned off. Premier Pro has a fail-safe solution there. So that's essentially how you use proxy files to speed up your editing process and workflow inside of Premier. 13. Motion Graphics- Create Awesome Photo Slideshows: I'll be showing you how easy it is to create an awesome photo slideshow inside of Premiere Pro. Exactly. What you're seeing right now on your screen is what we're going to be recreating in this tutorial. So feel free to bring your own images and follow along with me in this tutorial and let's get into it. So now I have the project panel here on the left-hand side with the images that I've used in the demonstration here from my previous travel adventures. And the first thing we want to do is we want to create a brand new sequence. Before we do that, this is what we're going to be recreating just to show you this is what you saw in the introduction there, right? And I won't be supplying the background music because that is actually license to myself. So the first thing we'll do is create a brand new sequence. So we just go down here to New Item, click on that, and then look for sequence, click on that. And then under digital SLR, click on that, go to 10 ADP and then go to DSLR 1080 P 30 frames. That's the sequence we are going to be creating. And we'll just give the sequence a name. We'll call this amazing photo slideshow. And Tom. Okay, So we have a brand new sequence here. So the first thing we do is we select all about images in our project panel and we track them over into our timeline. And we zoom into our timeline just like that. And we have a look at them real quick. We scrub along. Now clearly, these photos are not aligned properly. Inside the frame of 10 ADP. We need to set these images so that they're correctly aligned inside our frame. So we write, we, we select all of the images, right-click and then go to Scale to Frame Size. Click on that. And all of these images will be scaled to 10 ADP. If we just scrub along, we should see that all of these images scaled correctly. Now, if you're using images that are of different sizes, you might have a couple of images that might look like this and then got black bars around them. That means you just need to jump into the image by selecting the image, go into Effect Controls and jump into scale, and then just set the scale so that the black bars disappear. Okay? So that's something to keep in mind. We didn't have any black bars. That all looks pretty good to me. And the first thing we're gonna do is we're going to duplicate all of these images. So we select all of these images. We hold down the Alt key or the Option key. Click without mouse, drag all of these images up to the second video track layer. So now we have a second copy of the same images. For now, I'm going to turn off and I'm going to lock this layer. So now this layer is completely invisible. And I'm only looking at the images on the bottom track, that video track layout one. So the first thing we're gonna do is we're going to select the first image. Actually, sorry, we're gonna go to Effects. We're going to type in Guassian blur. That's going to be the first effect that we're going to be using. So Gaussian blur over here, click and drag it over to the first image. Click on the first image, go over to Effect Controls, go down to Gaussian Blur, scroll down. And under blurriness, we're going to set the blurriness to something like 200 or something, call it 200. So it's nice and blurry. And then we've got a little bit of a black shadow around that image. We're going to remove that by clicking Repeat Edge Pixels. You'll notice that it disappears. So there we go. Select Repeat Edge Pixels. And then what we're gonna do is we're going to apply that effect to h of these other images as well. So we're going to click Gaussian blur, go Control C or Command C. For Mac users, select all of the other images, then go Control V or Command V. And that will then paste that same effect. As you'll see he Guassian blur is now on each of these other images. So this is a really fast way of copying and pasting all of your effects across multiple different clips. It just saves you having to drag this Gaussian blur onto each and every clip on the timeline. Okay, so once we've done that, we can now unlock the second layer, make it visible. So now we're looking at the images on video track layer 2, and we click on the first image. There, we go over to Effect Controls, go to scale. And we didn't mean to do that. Just remove that, go to scale and then we're going to drop the scale down to 80 or 85 percent should do the trick. Okay, and then once we said 85 percent, you'll notice that the image has been scaled down there. We then click on the little stopwatch icon here to create a keyframe at drops, a little keyframe there, we move the playhead along a little bit to the left. And then we set another keyframe to something like, I don't know, 75 percent, and then it drops another keyframe here. So we're going to change the behavior of these two keyframes. We're going to select the first keyframe there, right-click on it, set it to ease out, and select the next keyframe there, set it to ease in. So now the keyframes change to an hour glass. We select the first keyframe, we shifted to the left, we select the second one shifted to the right. So now those two keyframes behave across the entire period of the clip from beginning to end and let it save. And then if we play this back, you'll see that we have some motion. So it's not much, but that's the beginning. There we have it. So easing out, easing in. And then all we need to do is click on the first clip, go to motion, Go Control C, or Command C to select the other clips, right, on video track layer two, and then go Control V to paste. And that will paste that same motion effect across the other images on the timeline there. So if I play this back, this is what we have so far. So we have a nice little bit of motion there. And this is the very beginning of our amazing photo slideshow. So the next effect that we're going to add is going to be radial shadow. So radial shadow here. We're going to select this effect and we're going to drag it over to the first image on video track layer two, right? So make sure that you are applying all of these effects to all of the images on the second video track layer, not the first one. So then we click on the first image on video track lead to go to Effect Controls. Scroll down and we'll see radial shadow. We're gonna make a few changes here. So this is where we're essentially creating a border around this image here. So you can set the shadow color to any color you want. But we're going to set sort of a off-white color, right? And then click Okay. And then what we're gonna do is we're gonna make a few more adjustments in here. So we might set the projection distance by dropping down this little arrow here. And we can set the projection distance to maybe around 15 or play with 15 and see what happens. And then we'll move down to re-size layer. Okay, click on re-size layer. And then we'll change the, actually go back and modify the projection distance a little bit. Maybe bring it back to eight or something like that. Maybe closer to five. Like I think five should be good enough. And then we'll move the light source so that the image is more centered inside of our frame that we've just created. So we're just going to shift the light source. So we essentially just trying to center the image inside so that it's relatively centered. And then we'll just bring that down a little bit. Okay, So I'm kind of just playing around here. Okay, that looks good enough. I'm in for a tutorial and moving fairly quickly. I might even changed the shadow color to something a little bit more white. So it stands out a little bit more. See what other colors we could use. I think I liked the off-white that are closer to white. I think that looks pretty good to me. So once i'm, I'm pretty happy with that. So then the next thing we do is we select radio shadow. Once again, we go Control C, and then we select the other images and then go Control V. And we should see that same effect to play out across the other images. So there we have it. The next one we're going to add is the drop shadows. So we're going to add a nice little shadow around our frame. So we go to Effects, we type in drop and we find drop shadow. We click and drag it over to our first image on video track layer 2. Click on that, scroll down. You'll see drop shadow here. And then we're going to make some adjustments in here. So we might look at the softness and the distance. Let's have a look. Okay, so the distance here is set to five. If we just bump that up, you'll notice here that the drop shadow starting to appear. So if I just increase that a little bit more, looks pretty good to me. I might have been just soften that out a little bit more so it's not as harsh of a shadow, just to make it a nice soft shadow. So as you can see, we have a nice soft shadow there. I'm pretty happy with that for the time being, I'll take that effect and select drop shadow Control C or Command C. And then I'll paste that out across the other images on the timeline. So again, we have the order. We have a radio shadow followed by a drop shadow. So it's important to ensure that the order of effects from top to bottom is that we have radio shadow first and then we have drop-shadow second. So I'm pretty happy with that. The next effect that we're going to add, this is the final one or the second last one. We have these slide effects. So we need to give this a little bit of an animation where we are making the images fly in from either left to right, right to left, top to bottom, or bottom to top. So we type in slide and we look for these slide video transition. So under video transitions slide. You can select anyone you wish. But I'm going to use slide for now. And I'm going to click and put that in between these two images here. And also I am going to put that between the images on the first video track layer as well. So I'm going to go Control C. So I've clicked the slide transition here and then control C, move down here, and then go Control V to paste that as well. Okay, So here between these two images, Control V to paste, control V, control V, there. You can make this a default transition by right-clicking and set as a default transition. It just means that you don't have to keep clicking here and go and Control V, control V or Control V. You can just right-click and select set as the default transition. So, and that's it. So if we play this back, what do we have? We have a nice little simple animation from left to right. Now if you want, you can change the behavior of this transition by clicking on the transition going over to Effect Controls. And you can influence what direction this slide occurs from. So we can have from north to south, south, south, the north. By selecting any one of these arrows, we can change the direction of that slide. So if I want it coming from north to south, I select north or south, but I also need to select the second transition for the second or the first video track layer and then go up here and make sure that it's the same. So if I click on play this back, we have a nice north or south transition. And here we have West Asia. We have another west to east. So it's up to you the direction that you want to set the transitions for. And that's pretty much it. And the last effect that we're going to apply is the basic 3D. So if we type in basic, we will look for basic 3D. Click and then drag that over to the first clip, and then click on the first clip on video track layer to go to Effect Controls scroll down and then we're gonna take our play head, move it around here. And then the two effects that we're going to play with inside basic 3D is swivel and tilt. So we're going to set these swivel to three degrees. You can set it to five degrees. That's up to you. Just play around with this. And we'll set this one to minus 3. So tilt and swivel three degrees and minus 3. And then we're going to set two keyframes for both of these. So here and here, we've dropped two keyframes. Move the play head back a little bit, change this to minus 3. So set the swivel minus 3, set the tilt of three. And then we've got two more keyframes here. We're going to change these keyframes behavior to ease out, these two keyframes to ease in. And then we're going to push these keyframes out so that the duration of them take effect over the entire length of the clip itself. And then if we play this back, we have a nice little swivel tilt effect, nice little motion effect. Of course, a little bit off frame, but that's okay. You can kind of play around with this in your own time. You can move this anywhere you want around inside the frame. And That's it. So now we've got that, we have to copy that effect across. So if we click back on the image here, go down, select basic 3D Control C on your keyboard or Command C, select the other images, Control V to paste. And if we play this back, we now have a very simple, but a very awesome photo slideshow. So hope this was helpful if you have any questions, let me know and I'll see you in the next video tutorial. 14. Motion Graphics- Working with Professional Templates (Awesome Photo Slideshows): Now we are going to become isolated and short of it. So again, to be recreating that epic photo slideshow that you saw in the introduction of this tutorial. And so this video is not just a matter of breaking down what you saw and showing you how you can do it yourself. But also a dedication to my girlfriend who at the time of recording this tutorial is stuck overseas due to the pandemic. And I haven't seen her in eight months, so I don't know when I'll see her again. So I thought I'd put this together to kinda help me get through the difficult times. So with that aside, I'm going to give you the value that you've come for, which is I'm going to help break down this little template that you saw in the introduction of this tutorial. So let's get started. I should also mention that this particular template in this course, I cannot supply to you because it is licensed to me from motion array. However, like I did years ago, you can't just go to Google, type in free Premier Pro slideshow template Enter. And I can assure you you will find free templates that you can play around with. And so everything that I'm going to explain to you in this tutorial is essentially applicable to all different types of templates. So you will get value from this video, even if you're not using the exact template that I have on my screen right now. But I'm going to show from the very top the kind of workflow that I follow what I'm using templates in some of my video projects. I don't always use templates, but think of templates like a website, right? So if you're wanting to build a website for your business, you don't just build it from the ground up. You just go and have a look at a bunch of website templates. And then get an idea of the look and feel that you want for your website. And then you just take it to a developer. Or you might even make those adjustments yourself, color scheme and all that kinda stuff, right? And this is no different from a video editing perspective. Motion arrays company, which by the way, I'm not affiliated with a lot sponsored by I'm not paid to make this video from them. I'm just sharing with you some of the tools that I use as a full timer doing this, that you can also do as well. However, if you use motion array, you do pay every month. And I believe I pay 2995 US dollars a month. I know some people are not willing to pay that, which is completely fine. When I first started out my journey, I didn't want to pay anything. I was really saving money. But now that I do this full time becomes a business expense. Every financial year go to the accountant and I told them that I pay license fees to motion array or pay license fees to Envato elements to Epidemic Sound and so on and so forth. So, you know, it's part of, part of the cost of running a business which then allows me for $30 a month to go through motion arrays, entire database of Premiere Pro templates here. So I've used the great moments for k template that you saw in the introduction. And this is really what it looks like. And what's great is that you can take a template like this and have a look at it and go, well, this is kinda like what I want to create for myself. You have a look at it. This is the general look and feel. You might even have a client that brings a template to you and brings all the photos and all of the footage and all of the sound effects to you. And they want you to create it for them. So what I usually do is I looked through the templates here. And if I go down to related Premiere Pro templates that we have all these different types of templates here that you can watch and have a look at and find which one works best for you. And then what I do is I read it. It says here contains 18 media placeholders for editable text layers. A little bit of a spiel. And then it says He had no plugins required, which is important because some of these templates required plug-in, some of them require Adobe After Effects installed. It says here that it's compatible with CC 2018. Now I'm using CC 2020 one. It's still going to work. It just means that when I open up the project, it's going to have to convert the project from a 2018 project file to a 2021 project file. It's a fork project, so the sequence is four K, which is fine. I can downscale this to 1080 if I want. And no plugins. And also as well, when you're playing these back and you hear the music, sometimes the music is not included and you have to download it separately here. So you also download this from motion array, which is what I've done. And then I download this and I get my 18 images that I want to use inside of this project, and I import it into Premiere Pro. So let's jump into Premiere Pro and take a look at this project closely. Okay, So this is the template project and I've just opened it up here. And I've also applied all of my images inside of the placeholders supplied. I've also added the background music and a couple of sound effects in. So this does look quite intimidating at first glimpse. Now, I'm going to take away the intimidation. I'm going to break this project down for you. And so even if you're not working with this exact same template, because as I said, I can't supply it. I'm not allowed to. If you go and get a free one from Google, download it and then just kind of follow along with me this, the principles of very much the same. Of course they're going to be structured differently, but the principles that I'm about to share with you are about the same, okay? So we have our main composition sequence here. So it's called Main Comp or main composition. And over here on the left in our project panel, or just push this over here and make that icon view. So edit comps, render others. This is all supplied from the original template. The photos I've my photos that I've already put into the project here and S effects or sound effects is essentially what I've brought along to the project. So these are my contribution to the project. Everything else was part of the downloaded for motion or right? So let's break this project down and simplified here. So there is a lot going on here, right? But it's a relatively simple, a simple project. But I understand if you're just starting this journey as an intermediate, it does look pretty intimidating. So we have here main sequence called main composition, right? And so if I make this full screen, and by using the tilde key, if you remember from one of the earlier tutorials. So now we have here, we have a lot of video track layers and we have a lot of audio track layers here. So this bar, if we pull it down, because what's going to happen is there's a lot more stuff going on up here. We have 47 video track Laius. And you might be thinking, well, how am I going to get to these video attract layers up here, right? I mean, I've already shrunk these track hot to as minimal, as small as they can be. I can't make them any smaller. This is where you need to pull this down so that you can reveal the rest of those video track layers, right? So we've essentially got 47 video track layers. And we have an adjustment layer there. We have a couple of scratches, right? And we have some light lakes. We have more light lakes here, more light leaks. So essentially what I do when I look at a project like this or a template like this, I like, I like to look at it on a big screen. I'll go to 17 inch monitor right now. And I'd like to get a general overview of what's going on inside the project. What has the developer used to put this template together? So we've got scratches here. And if you're not sure, you can always just turn off layers on and off, or you can right-click on various elements and click on Disable to turn things on and off. And when you do that, you can have a look at the output here and you can see what changes. And this is how I learned, this is how I taught myself. I taught myself how to build these kinds of projects because I was curious on like, what does this do? Just turn this off, I delete things. And if I deleted it and then I'll go back and my jaw now should have done that. So then I go back in and I undo it. This is a lot of experimentation and disabling, moving things around, seeing how things work. But we have scratches, we have light lakes. And then down here we've got all of our text layers here. So we have text 1, 2, 3, and 4. So if we go back over here, it says here that there are 18 media placeholders for editable text layers. So this is where we can go in, double-click on the text, and then we can change the text to whatever we want, right? Using our text tool, we can change that. It's going to open it up in a separate sequence, right? And then we go to the next text layer, double-click on texts to presents. We can change the font, we can change the text. And again, we can close that out once we've finished with it. Text 3 and texts for and then of course we have our media placeholders, right? So this is where you bring your own images and you can import your own images into the media placeholders. Now, before I talk about that, I want to mention that we have our main composition here, right? Which essentially is a tying together all of our nested sequences. Now if I make this full screen again. You'll notice that everything is green, right? Essentially we're dealing with a bunch of nested sequences, right? So with inside of these nested sequences, which I do talk about, if you're not sure what a nest sequences in another video, maybe pause this video, go watch it real quick and then come back. But what that means is that there are sequences within sequences. And that means if I double-click on any one of these nested sequences, it's going to open up another sequence up on the top here, right up on this little shelf. So we have main composition is only sequence open. If I double-click over here, for example, where it says pre media seven, this is a media placeholder. This is another media placeholder. Media placeholder 9, 10, 11, 12. So this is where I'm going to drop all of my images into. We have 16, 17, 18, 19 was 19, or we didn't have 19. There's only 18. Okay, so we got to seven, for example. And we double-click on it. And it's going to open this up as another nest, right? So we have pre media seven is a nested sequence, but this is another nest. So we have a nest within a nest. So that opens it up as media seven. And this is where I changed the image, right? So this image here is what I've brought into the project myself. And then when I finish, I just close off that nest. I close off this nest. And then I'll move to the next nested sequence, pre media eight. I double-click on it when it's ready, Right, brings up another nested sequence. And if you're not sure, I'll just double-click on this and go, Oh, we have what seems to be some kind of a frame or a mask. We close that out. We're not going to touch that. We go into this one. I'll there's another mask, there are another frame there, right? So that's going to be used as part of our image. And if we go into media eight, this is where I drop in another image, right? So that's when they're talking about image placeholders. They're talking about areas of the project where you can add your own images or add your own video clips, right? So if I close all of those out and I have a look at it closely. Now what I'm gonna do is I'm going to show you some of the effects that I've used here. So clearly when I play this back, I will play this back. What you're hearing is the sound effects that have added as well. So I haven't muted those. But I want you to see what's going on. We have some scratches, we have some flares, isolate, we have some very slow and subtle movement of the images there. So what you can do is actually click on one of these nested sequences, go to Effect Controls. And you can see yourself what's going on here, right? So we have position and rotation keyframes set up there. And you can see here what they've done, what the developer has done. And as you move this playhead along, you can see that this layer, pre media seven layer. You can see that this layer is on top of the other two. What are the three layers here? And it kinda just moves by changing position and rotation keyframe as such. And then this one down here is probably this one here actually. Let's check it. Yeah, it is. So if we do the same thing, we see that there's two sets of keyframes, position and rotation keyframes to create the effect that we're seeing with this lay here, right? And then of course we have this nested sequence, which is the image itself where we can go in and change that. And then this layer here is going to be the background image. Now if we've clicked on that there go to Effect Control. Scroll down. You'll see here that they've used a fast blur. And if you turn that off, you'll see what happens with the background there. So all of a sudden that's not blurry anymore. If we turn that back on watch what happens? Right turns the blowback on. So this is literally what I did when I first started my editing journey. I spent hours and hours and hours and hours trying to break down what these authors would do to create the templates. And then I recreate my own templates. And that's how I learned to ride. A candidate spent time looking at how they did things and it inspired me when it came to editing my own projects from the ground up. Okay, So let's move on. So if we just push this bar up and then go hit the Tilde key. Now we have the, we've done the video side. We've looked at the video side of this project. Okay, It's pretty straightforward. Now, let's have a look at the audio side. Now. The audio side is where we have our background music and we have our sound effects. The sound effects were not part of the project. I've just put them in to add a little bit more depth to this video project. Because I will talk about sound effects and the use of sound effects to create more depth to your video projects later on. But I'll play this back with just, I'll just show you what it sounds like, what a project sounds like with just the sound effects. Yeah, How good is that? This is isolated in the wild. Oh, okay, so you get the idea. And so that's essentially just the sound effects and this is the music. So all I've done with the music is I've just downloaded it from motion array and I've just dropped it straight into audio track layer one. Just dropped in two keyframes here because at this point the music gets a little bit louder. Want to keep when I, when I adjust the volume or when I adjust the levels for my music and my sound, I like to keep it around minus 12, minus 6 maximum, right? I'll talk more about this in the beginner course. But what I'm setting the levels for my music and my sound effects, I like to keep everything around minus 12 to minus six. Okay, so the last thing I've done with the sound effects is I've added a constant power, which is almost like a fade for your sound bites or your sound effects. That it just allows the sound effects to come in nice and smoothly and also fade off nice and smoothly, right? So I'll show you what that means and I'll will delete what it sounds like without the constant power. And I'll just delete the constant power there, for example. Alright? Whereas if we have constant power, this is what it sounds like. All right, So nice. Fade in and fade out there with a constant power. So if you actually right-click on the edge of any of your sound effects, Right-click and go, apply default transitions. Constant power is already set as a default transition for audio. And that's pretty much it. So I thought I'd just spend a bit of time to break down a typical template for you feel free to download a template for free off Google and play around with some of the principles I've talked about in this video. I do apologize, I can't supply this template, but I do know that the general philosophy and the general concepts do apply irrespective of the templates that you're taking for free off the internet. Otherwise you have any questions, let me know and I'll see you in the next tutorial. I'm going to play out this little 56 second clip right now. Oh yeah. Bases isolated. We've added. 15. Motion Graphics- How I Use Motion Array to Make Awesome Videos: I've been using motion array.com for a number of years now to help improve the production quality of my videos, insider Premier Pro. So in this video, I'm going to walk you through how I use the platform and what I do with many of the assets from the website to improve the quality of my videos. Now, I should point out real quick that are not paid nor sponsored to make this video. I'm not affiliated with motion array.com. I'm just simply sharing with you one of many tools that I use to improve the quality of my videos inside of Premier Pro. So feel free to follow along with me. Now of course, I pay $30 a month to use motion array. I get unlimited access to all the stuff that I'm about to show you. But I'll show you where you can click free and you can download stuff for free from the motion array.com website without having to pay $30 a month. So let's go and I'm going to show you some stuff off this amazing website. Okay, so if we have a look here under video platform, we've got here adobe Premiere Pro and all of their assets on their website are organized by templates, presets, and motion graphic templates or maggots. So I'm going to show you a couple of the sum of my favorite templates and presets and more guards In this video tutorial. And just to open up your imagination to what's possible with these different things inside of Premier Pro. So I've actually opened up in different tabs, some of my favorite ones from motion array. And so here is one. If, for example, you want to create split-screen effects inside of your project, you can essentially just download this as a preset. So we have Premier Pro presets here. You can download this as a preset and apply this. And within seconds you'll have a split-screen effect for your videos. Now, you can create this manually using keyframes and adjusting position sliders and things like that. But man, it's a lot of work. But if you could just get a preset and drop it straight over your footage, you can just save so much time. So and if we go through, we have defocus camera effect. So this is another preset that you can apply to your photos and your videos. It's got, it's got here eight unique presets that it comes with. I actually applied this one too, some photos and I'll jump into Premiere Pro and show you. So this is the defocus effect. Now, if we go to these two arrows and then go to effects. And then here, Where's his presets? If you right-click, you can actually import presets here, right? So if we go back to Motion Array, when you download the MOOC Premiere Pro preset, download it, you can then just go right-click import and then we just go down and look for it. So we maybe just type into the search. It's faster to type in defocus. And there we go. Defocus camera effect. We have all of our effects here. And then we just drop it literally just drop it straight onto our footage. So these are just some photos that I quickly imported. And that's essentially what defocus looks like. And yeah, it is that easy. Okay, so what else do we have here? We've got 16 millimeter movie effects. So this is a really great pack if you want to create a VHS kind of retro cinematic look to your projects. There's all these different layouts and different formats and yeah, fantastic. You can play around with this. What else do we have? We've got photo animation tools, right? I'm kinda just showing you everything that's possible, right? So you can take your normal boring photos and you can apply this preset to them to animate your photos to make them more interesting. Which is more or less important if you're working with both video and photos in the same project. It's very jarring for someone to watch a video that cut straight to a photo that stationary. So this kinda helps with the flow of your projects if you want to incorporate photos with your video projects. So I really great preset to use. And what else do we have? We've got, this is actually a pretty good pond camera frame transitions. So nice little transition of preset there. Little bit of a stop motion effect that's created. Really, really cool. And again, you can just download them as presets and import them are his. This is another really good one. So if you want to create camera POPs or point of views, this is essentially overlays that you can put over your footage to make it look like your footage was filmed on your phone, right? Just another little creative thing you can add. And if we go to different transitions, so if you want to play with different transitions, this is a great transitions pack that also comes with some background music as well that you can download. Or you can download separate transition sound effects. Really, really cool. What else do we have? Okay, This one here we have different, Let's now talk about LUTS in a different video. I covered this more or less than the beginner course. Lots stand for lookup tables, which are essentially presets from a color grading perspective. So think of it like. Filters on your Instagram photos, right? So you might have a certain preset that you use for your Instagram photos. This is essentially the video equivalent of that. So we have Lookup Tables or lots, which are presets for video footage. And in this case we have DJI, which is a drone. I used to have a drone and I was to shoot with a drone in dialogue. So if you're shooting in dialogue, you can use lots that a four-day log footage. But I took more about this in another video. So it gives you a little preview of what it looks like after shooting. If you're shooting a flat color profile and then you apply some dialogue lots to it. That's what the output looks like. And if we move to the next one, are great. So if you're a YouTuber and you're creating YouTube videos, then you can get these little template packs, which can kinda help bring up the production value of your YouTube videos. So we have here video animations, YouTube titles. So really fantastic if you have a YouTube channel and you want to sort of make those videos more or less applicable to YouTube. Really, really great tidal animations you can apply. We have another one here which is 4 slide shows. Really, really great. It says here 36 placeholder images, editable texts, layers. What else do we have? If you're a restaurant, this is a really good template. If you are wanting to promote a menu or promote your restaurant. If you were to do all this manually, it would just take so much time. It really would ice to do this stuff manually. I still do a lot of stuff manually, but man, if you can get a preset for it, it would save you a whole lot of time. And this is a really great one to this, the word cloud. Really, really cool Instagram stories. So if you want to really juiced up your Instagram stories, you can use these kinds of templates to create Instagram stories that look like this. Now I don't usually myself, I don't do any of this for my own Instagram. I'm pretty raw with my Instagram storytelling. But you can use those templates if you want to use professional looking Instagram stories. We have more slide shows. We have. Okay, so you can get these little animation arrows. So we're moving into the motion graphic template part of Premiere Pro. Nice little arrows you can use. We have Subscribe elements that you can use. What else do we have? These are really good little clocks. If you're doing, if you're teaching like fitness classes or follow along classes. And using a timer or clock is maybe beneficial if you want to help your audience kind of keep pace with what you're up to in the video. You can simply use one of these motion graphic templates to help achieve that kinda storytelling. Our titles are really good if you're doing product demonstrations. And you want to show people various parts of the product on screen. These little call out to pretty cool. You don't have to do these manually. You just get the preset and you hold the template and you just apply it. What else do we have? Our map MapKit. So this is very handy if you're doing travel vlogs, travel videos. And you wanted to kind of help OCW old Mencius storytelling by taking your audience visually from 1 to another point. In your travel videos. Something that I've done before, really, really handy I use to create these manually, actually takes a lot of work. What else do we have? The typewriter effect, very common effect, that gets around in the online space. Now you can do this manually or you can use a preset. It's up to you. And the last one is more clocks to countdown clocks, things like that. So that's motion array. And I've just showed you very quickly all the different things that you can download from motion array. Now of course, if you don't have a membership or you want to do is go to Adobe Premiere Pro and then click on free right here. And in the search results to make sure that's ticked in the search results, you'll be able to download all of this stuff here for free and you can play around with it and all of that in your own time. I hope this was helpful and insightful. Literally the purpose of this video was just to open your eyes to what is possible when you want to improve the production quality and storytelling of your videos, either for yourself or your clients. This is a great place to go to get all different types of assets to help take your video production level to a whole new standard. So if you have any questions, feel free to let me know and I'll be more than happy to help you out. Otherwise, I'll see you in the next video tutorial. 16. Motion Graphics- Importing, Organising, and Editing MOGRTS: In this video tutorial, we're going to be looking at more guards, working with more gods, or also known as motion graphic templates. Inside of Premiere Pro will look at how to import them, how to organize them, and a few other tips and tricks above and beyond what I've covered in the beginner course already. So I'm gonna jump straight into it. We're inside Premiere Pro and motion graphics or Mozart's, a very easy to work with inside of Premiere Pro. If you need to access it inside of Premier Pro. And you should already know where to find this, assuming you're watching this video, you've done the beginner course. Otherwise, just quickly if you click on Graphics up here, it'll open up a central graphics over here. If you still are seeing a central graphics, go to Window and then look for essential graphics right here. Make sure that's selected. And you'll see it pop up over on the right-hand side. So essential graphics. So when we're talking about motion graphics, where essentially adding motion graphics to our projects to really just give them a little bit more interactive, interesting appeal. And you can easily install and organize these motion graphics inside of Premier Pro. And you can get them for free. There's plenty of places online, you can get them for free. So over here, if you go to mix kit dot code and then go to templates and then go to Premiere Pro. You can actually download a bunch of these mug shots here. If you just run your mouse over it, you get a little preview there of the various different types of mug shots that you can download into Premier Pro. So I'll let you play around with this. This is all kind of free stuff you can download. We have here audio visualizer that looks pretty good. So go through mixed kit and if you want, you can just kind of follow this tutorial along by using your own mode guards from this website or somewhere else. But I use motion array and Envato elements to get all of my motion graphics. So firstly, we're going to look at importing motion graphics and how to do that. So with Premiere Pro, if you're looking at just importing one or two motion graphics, then you can use this little icon down here. So make sure you click on Browse and you'll see this little plus sign down here. It says Installed motion graphics template. If you click on that, then you can go and select the motion graphic. So these are dot MOFERT files. Double-click. And that will say yes, I've already installed it. And that will install it into the local folder for Premiere Pro, which is in this case going to be for Mac users. This is going to be the local folder. So if you follow this, all of your motion graphics are going to be installed into this folder here for a Mac, and this folder here for Windows. So this is the path, so the username slash data slash roaming slash Adobe slash common. So your motion graphic templates are going to be stored in these various paths. Now if you're looking at that going, that is confusing. It is confusing. I don't generally recommend this way, but this is something which you can get away with. But the problem is that you can put all your motion graphics into these standard paths. But what happens if you lose your laptop or someone steals your laptop, or you remove Premiere Pro from your computer, then you might lose all of your mug shots, right? So that's why I'm going to show you some really cool tricks at an intermediate level that you should really be applying. And that is organizing your mug shots so that they're located off-site, not on your laptop, but they're located somewhere like the Cloud for example. So I'm going to break this down if we go browse, instead of clicking down here to install more guards. Once you've gone to mix kit dot co or motion array or Envato Elements and downloaded Your Mogul. Then you can upload them to the Cloud. I'll show you. So over here I've got one of my clouds, OneDrive, and I've got all of my mouth guards. For this. Not all my mouth guards. I have several clouds, but on this cloud of God, guards for call-outs, clocks, lower third sidebars, text messages, titles, travel maps. And so I've organized my moguls according to folders. And trust me, when you're working with a lot of more guts, you definitely do need to organize them into folders like this. It's going to make life easier when it comes to finding those moguls when you're working in future projects. And all you need to do inside Premiere Pro is where it says essential graphics over here. If you right-click on these three lines, right-click and then go down to where it says Manage additional folders. If you click on that, this is where you can tell Premiere Pro where to find more guards located on your Cloud. And so as you can see here, I've got several configured locations. And if you look closely, we have OneDrive, OneDrive, OneDrive. So this is all the Cloud, right? So all you need to do once you take your moguls that you've downloaded from Motion Array, put them on the Cloud, organize them by folders, and then click on Add. And then you're going to go to your Cloud. And then you're going to add each of these folders. So for example, I'll do it again. Click on lower thirds, then click on Select folder. I've already done it. So that's why it's giving me an error message. And then you'll get a list here of all of your mouth guards according to folders. So I've got call-outs, clocks, lower thirds, sidebars and so on and so forth. Then you click Okay. And then all you need to do is click on local versus local here, click on that, hit the drop-down, and then all of your mouth guards, according to folders, will be in this drop-down menu here. So then all you need to do is click on All OK and then click on the folder that you want to look into. So I might want to look at lower thirds. So then all my lower thirds are going to pop up in this folder here. I can then click and drag one of them onto the timeline as such, then it's going to complain about some fonts. So you can either go and download these fonts or you can get them to Adobe fonts. That's why it's complaining. So I'm going to click Okay for now. And then I'm just going to play this back, right? So this is one of the lower thirds that I might want to use. Now, the Lower Thirds will run quite slow with Premiere Pro, if these lower thirds were created in After Effects, it's just how it is. It's a really unfortunate side effect of using lower thirds that were generated inside of After Effects. And what can help you play back and render these lower thirds or these motion graphics faster is by dropping the playback resolution here. So drop it from, say, fall down to a quarter and then play this back. It should play back a little bit quicker. So we have one Lower Third there. We might want to go to our text messages, for example. Now you can't just click on the drop-down and go text messages, you can, but a little dash will show up there, right? So I usually just click on All and then it resets all of the options. And then I click on text messages so that it only selects text messages. So that I look at my text messages, mug shots, and I might want to use this. My God, I drag it onto my timeline and then we go. So if I play this back, okay, so we have, well, one of our text message MOG out here. So you get the idea. So that's very simply how you can organize your mug shots. You can also favorite your mug shots as well. So I'll add two. If you, for example, user mode got more frequently and you want a quick reference to it, you can actually click on the little star here that puts a little star next to it. And maybe this one put a star next to that one, a star next to that one, a star next to this one. And then you just click on star up here. And it's going to sort by all of your favorite mug shots. So that's a really cool quick reference tool for accessing your favorite most commonly used moguls. So in terms of organizing your maggots, that is a proper way of doing it when you're getting more experience with editing and you're working with a lot of more guards, you really do need to. In my opinion, have all of your mouth guards on the cloud like this. And you go from say, downloading or your mug shots from mixed kit.com or from motion array. Download them, unzip them, and then you'll upload them as little emoji SRT files. These are called Mogul files. So you'll have all your titles inside a call-outs folder. You'll have all of your lower thirds inside a lower thirds folder. And then you go into Premier Pro and you right-click go, manage additional folders. You said all you'd individual folders for all your different types of mug shots. And then from there you just click on the folder that you want in the drop-down menu. So that's quite simply how you organize your mouth guards. And then the last thing I wanna talk about is modifying and editing your mortgage. So again, if you just select the mode got that you've got on your timeline here, you just go grab this selection tool, click on it over here, go to Edit. And then depending on what the author has allowed you to change, we'll determine what's going to pop up in this edit box here. So we have global controls. So we can change the global position and size of this box. So we can drop, we can move the position to the left or to the right by using the global position handles, we can change the size as such. But if we go to Text, then this is where we can adjust the text, the font, the size, the color, et cetera, et cetera, et cetera, the frame color. We might want to change this to blue, for example, right? So completely up to you. Every mole God has its own properties to change. So it really depends on the bow God itself. What else do we have? I'll show you one more thing will go to call outs. Now, call it a really great if you're doing product reviews and you want to call something out in the shot. Okay, great. So just so we want to customize this call-out, we click on the call that down here. We click on Edit IV here, and we can adjust all of the colors, the text, again, the font, more colors, more position stuff. So this is all very self-explanatory. And I suggest you just play around with this. You know, we have exposition. So we can change the position of the coal out there up, down left, right. So you get the idea. So this is essentially how you import, organize, and edit your mug got inside Premiere Pro. I have moved fairly quickly on this one. I do talk more about mug shots and working with them in the beginner course. Feel free to reference that. Otherwise, if you have any questions, let me know and I'll see you in the next tutorial. 17. Music & SFX- Professional Royalty-Free Music & SFX for Production: So let's take a look at where you can find really amazing professional, royalty-free music and sound effects for your video projects. Now, in the beginner cause I did talk about where you can find high-quality background music for your video projects off of YouTube and various different YouTube channels that offer high-quality background music for YouTube is that you can download, you can use it. You don't have to pay for it. And most of the time you won't get a copyright strike. And I say most of the time because there are times you can and may get a copyright strike. Even if you use that music and you do all the right things. There are situations where you can still get a copyright. Strike. Now, this is not good if you're doing YouTube full-time as a full-time creator or you're creating videos for your clients. That's the last thing you want. So that's why I want to sort of dedicate a video to where you can find high-quality, royalty-free music in your professional level projects. Moving forward now as an intermediate video editor, it is almost essential that you consider one or more of the platforms that I'm about to talk about in this video. Now they do come at a cost. They are not free. You will either pay every month, a licensing fee, or every year, depending on what sort of membership you sign up for. And you might be thinking, well, I don't want to have to pay. The truth is, is that if you want to take this seriously, it becomes a business. And of course, every business has expenses and overheads. Consider this to be an overhead. Now for me, I pay every month to Epidemic Sound, which we'll talk about in just a second. And that is a tax deduction for me. Right. So I'll go to my accountant. I told them that I pay a licensing fee every month to Epidemic Sound. It's part of the cost of doing business. If you're here with me now you're an intermediate editor, then you really do need to consider one of these options that I'm about to talk to you about. So what that essentially means is that irrespective of the platform that you choose to pay a licensing fee to every month or every year to use their music, whether that be Sound Stripe, art list, epidemic sound, music bed or whatever. It just means that you have pure peace of mind as a professional video editor or content producer on YouTube, for example, if you're a full-time YouTuber or you're creating videos for clients. You don't have to worry about copyright strikes ever, right? You don't have to worry about your videos being democratized on YouTube ever. With that little rant over, I'm going to go through a couple of different options for you. Now. I'll show you the first one that I started with years ago. When I started paying for music was Ben sound.com. There are Benson.com is where you pay on a per track basis. So you look for their database of music, you pick what you want, and then you click on Download. It brings up a little license thing here, where essentially you paying €34 per track. Very, very expensive. If you're doing this often. I was spending hundreds and hundreds and hundreds of dollars on tracks back years and years ago before all of these other platforms came along, which we're gonna get to in just a second. So this was just one I thought I'd bring up just out of interest, but yeah, I don't do this one anymore. So and then I jumped onto Sound Stripe. Now Sound Stripe is a great platform. I was a member with Sound Stripe for a couple of years. And they're a great platform for high-quality background music. They add music to their database every week, I believe, I think it's every Friday. They had a couple of 100 additional songs to their database every month. And I'll let you go through this and have a look in your own time, what it's all about. But essentially, you'll have access to the complete array of background music and sound effects. You can actually browse through the library here. You can also play this music. You can search via author or composer. You can play tracks, listen to them, they got their sound effects here, right? That everything is organized by genre. So I'll let you look around with this in your own time. That's go back over here and we'll just see how much they cost now we'll just go over to pricing. So Sound Stripe is a great platform, but as I said, I don't use them anymore because I use Epidemic sound. So here it's for music and sound effects. $12, 25 us a month, right? And this is what it includes. You get 50000 plus sound effects, unlimited sound effects licenses. And there's actually an Adobe Premiere Pro Extension which I have tried. This is actually pretty good. You can search the music and sound effects of sound stroke within side of Premiere Pro without actually having to open up this website here. So the extension is pretty good, I must say, so that you have a look at Sound Stripe in your own time. I don't use them anymore, but I will show you art list. Now. Artless, I have not used, but I'm thinking about giving these guys are try that haven't been around forever, but it looks like a great platform and a great offering, a kind of a very similar look and feel to Epidemic sound. So you've got here, you can search by a mood. You can search by genre or musical instrument. And they've got the waveforms here so you can see what The music looks like via a waveform, you can see whether there are vocals in the tracks. You can also play these back and preview them. And it looks like a great little platform for professional background music for your YouTube videos or for your clients. So you can use this music for commercial use. For your YouTube videos, Facebook, Instagram, Tiktok, Twitter, and wedding videos, podcasts. And it goes on and on and on divorce. I got here a sound effects library. Now as I said that this actually looks very similar to Epidemic Sound. Actually, the layout looks very, very similar. Rise at cinematic impacts, destruction, city noises, tech noises. So if you've got a pricing here, so it's around the same for 1660 a month us, or you can pay every year. This is the question that I've had actually in the beginner course, which was, what happens if I jump on one of these plans with art list or Epidemic Sound and then I decided to cancel it. I don't want it anymore. Does that mean that the music that I've used in all of my videos now become subject to copyright and I'm now going to get copyright strikes, know the license doesn't expire. What that means is that if you cancel your membership with art list or Epidemic sound, it just means that you can't use that music, that you've received a license for any future projects. So it's okay in old projects, you can use the music that you have a license for during the duration of your membership. But if you cancel your membership, you can't use that license anymore. It actually says here, will my license ever expire? Know any assets you use in a project during your active subscription, yours to use forever. Okay. Does my license cover commercial projects? Yes. Right. So I'll let you read all of this. Can I use the music on YouTube? Yes. Right. So this is artless 1660 a month, right? And just have a look at this in your own time. There's another one here, music bed.com. Now, again, never used this service, but take a look at it for yourself. $99 a month. You know, a little bit more expensive than the other two options. But this is another option to have a look at. The one that I'm currently using is Epidemic Sound. And I love this platform. Actually, I was using Sound Stripe and I was using Epidemic sound at the same time for about eight months or something like that. And our decided to cancel my sound strike membership because I couldn't afford to keep both. I couldn't I didn't want to pay for two subscription services. And the reason why I went with Epidemic Sound is because they had a sound effects library, and this is what they got here. So they've got all these sound effects here, right? And at the time, Epidemic Sound struck didn't have sound effects, they just had music. And shortly after I canceled my membership with Sound Stripe and I made her actually matter review video on YouTube saying sounds drops amazing, but they don't have sound effects. And then a few months later they released sound effects. But by then I decided to just stick with Epidemic Sound. So this is a great platform all link up where you can sign up to Epidemic Sound. And as a trial, I'll have a link after this video. And you can just trial it for free. I think it's like a 30 day trial or something like that. And I'll link it up so you can check it out. But this is what I continued to use. Now, I've been using Epidemic Sound for awhile. And what I love about it is that they always add music to their database. And I've actually linked to my YouTube channel, to my, my account. And so based on the music that I've used on my YouTube channel, Epidemic Sound have actually queued up music that I haven't yet used that they believe I might like because it's all part of my YouTube channel. And they think that they are this music micro world with my future projects. So if I scroll down because some categories who are trending music online, creative music, comedy music, cinematic. So I love cinematic, I love travel. If you're making wedding videos, this might be a category to check out between podcast. There's one here as well. Staff picks a pretty good, I usually go for the staff picks new releases. So we go over here to genres. And I like hip hop and pop sometimes. And what else beats? The ones that I like to go into. But as you can see the guts, many different genres. You can click on 1980s rock, reggae, and 20 twenties pop. And if we go to moods, we can sort by an epic, which is one of my favorite ones because I love cinematic video production. So epic is one of my favorite ones that I go into. And albums we looked at sound effects are ready. Actually one feature that I really like the most is the similar features. So if I go to, for example, now trending and I, for example, click on, Okay, so we've got to track it or play this back. All right, cool. So just say I liked that trachoma. That's a really awesome track. But what similar to that? I will go over here to this icon here, and it's a similar, I click on that. It will give me all of the tracks that are similar to this track. I use that all the time. If I'm looking for a very similar track, you'll see here that we have vocals and some of these, which is great. Yeah, look, it's a great platform. I definitely suggest checking it out. Okay, so if we go over to pricing and okay, so we've got different options here, personal commercial enterprise. So commercials, the one that I'm on here, twenty-five dollars a month. And obviously, this is what you get. So 35000 tracks, 90000 sound effects. You know, you've got your first month for free. So there's no harm in trying it. And it goes on and on and on. So fantastic platform, I highly recommend epidemic sound. But in general, whether you go with Epidemic Sound or not, you really do need to go with some kind of subscription model. I really genuinely believe that you just won't have an issue with copyright strikes. You won't have an issue with your clients getting in trouble if you are putting background music to save a little bit of money, right? You'd like are just put into background music that I don't have to pay for and I give it to a client. No, that's not how you do it. You want to you know, this is the time we need to up the ante, be professional and start paying for this. As I said before, it's for me, it's a tax deduction. That's my business and it's part of the cost of running business is a 25 dollar a month license, which in the scheme of things, you'll get your money back very quickly when you're making a lot of videos for clients or your YouTube channel, for example. So I hope this was helpful and insightful. I have gone pretty quickly through this. I will link up either in the resources section or after this video a list of these websites and links and more information. But if you have any questions, feel free to let me know and I'll see you in the next video tutorial. 18. Music & SFX- Mixing Background Music with Dialogue (Two Methods): Good day everyone and welcome back to the next tutorial in this series. As you can tell, the background music is distracting. This is a mistake that I made when I first started my YouTube channel years ago, was that the background audio and music was so loud you get barely hear what I was saying. And it was so distracting that not even myself to this day can watch those videos. One of the biggest mistakes that people make when they're making videos with background music is that the background music volume is too loud and it's too distracting against the message in the dialogue or the monologue of the video. And as per the introduction of this tutorial, you know exactly what I'm talking about. We've all watched videos from somebody or a YouTube channel where the background music is so annoying and you can't even watch past the first 1520 thirty-seconds of the video, even though it's a great video in terms of content and the quality of the message. But unfortunately because of the background music, it just destroys the entire video. I did this when I first started making videos on my channel years ago, which is normal. Most people make this mistake. It's because your ear hasn't been trained to recognize what sounds right? And it comes with experience. But I'll give you some tips and some strategies that will help you on the right path to get on top of this common mistake early on in your editing journey if you haven't already, but I'll give you two different ways of how to properly mix the background music with any kind of dialogue in your videos. Okay, so we have some dialogue here in the timeline that I'm going to play around with and show you how to do this. I'll show you two different methods. So I'll play this back. Good everyone, and welcome back to the next tutorial in this series. Great, so that's what we're going to be working with. We've got that here on my timeline. I'm just going to take some background music, drop it onto the audio track layer 2. And I'm going to play this back. Everyone and welcome back to the next tutorial. Or a clearly that's a problem. So we need to now Mary, our monologue or our dialogue with the background music so they work together. Now, I've placed these two clips on the timeline like this because I'm just pretending that at the very beginning of the project here, I might have some B-roll, I might have some cutaway footage. I might have some kind of montage where I want the background music to be pretty loud, right? And then when I hit the dialogue, I want the music to drop off a little bit in the background for the duration of this dialogue here. And then when I get to the end, I want the music to increase again and get louder. So this whole concept of the background music playing at a normal level, that it drops off and then it increases again, is called ducking. It's where the background music ducks underneath or behind the dialogue of the speaker or speakers. So I'm going to show you how to do that. So first method is the manual method, and then I'll show you the automatic method coming up. So grab my pen tool here. I'm also going to zoom into my timeline. I'm also going to expand these tracks, had a little bit more so I can see the wave form. So you just have to go over here to the empty space. You can either hold down Alt or Option on the keyboard and then just use the scroll wheel on the mouse. That's what I'm doing now. Just hold down Alt or Option. Just expand that out, right? Just make them bigger so you can see the waveform there. And then I'm just going to use my scroll wheel to move across left and right of my timeline. And then all I'm gonna do is just mark a couple of points. So I've got the pen tool here or P on the keyboard. And then I'm just going to mark two points right here. Those two points around where that dialogue is going to start. Then I'm going to come to the end here, zoom into my timeline. And just where that dialogue finishes, I'm going to mark another two points around that distance, right? And then I'm going to come down the other side here. I'm going to click on this. And I'm going to hold down the Alt or the Option key on my keyboard and pull this down, right? If I don't hold down the Alt or Option key on my keyboard, it means that this is going to really fluctuate rapidly. So I want to get a finer decrease, a finer decrease, hold down Alt or Option. And that will just drop down nice and slowly. And i'm, I dropped that down to say minus 20. Now, a good ballpark that I like to use is around somewhere between minus 20 and minus 35. It really depends on what's, what's going on in the background music. I mean, if it's a rock rock and roll track or if the truck has a lot of vocals in it, then I might drop it down to say minus 35, sometimes even minus 40. Because if there's vocals in the background music, then it's actually going to be able to hear those vocals against your dialogue and they'll, they'll become distracting. You really do need to push those down further. In my experience. We're down to minus 40. So essentially what we've done is we've created this kinda like a ditch right here, right? And if I play this back, Good everyone, and welcome back to the next tutorial in this series. As you can tell that it's a good start, but this is something that you need to listen to and get a feel for it. And this is something you know, that there's no hard or fast science to this, right? It's a combination of practice and just kind of playing around with it. Now, in my experience, that's still a little bit too loud. So I've just got my selection tool here or V on the keyboard. I'm going to hold down the Alt key or the Option key. All right, select what they called. This is called the rubber band here, this line here, it's called the rubber band. I'm going to click on the rubber band. I'm going to pull it down further to around say, minus 25. I'm going to go down five decibels further and play this back. Good everyone, and welcome back to the next tutorial in this series, as you can tell, much better. So minus 25 seems like a good setting for this situation. Now if I'm using a different background track, then it may be a different setting. So that's a good start and that's the first method. Now if I use a different audio track, let me show you the difference. Everyone and welcome back to this background track has vocals in it, and I'll show you real quick the difference here. So if I just do the same thing as before, make to the rule keyframes there and drop that down to say, what did we say before? Minus 25, right? So just roughly around minus 25, and I'll play this back. Good everyone, and welcome back to the next tutorial. So as you can see, we're still sit around minus 25, which is exactly what we did with the first track. But Series, as you can tell, that is way too distracting is because the vocals are there. And that's why we need to push this down further, as I said before. So bored, try minus 30 here and see how we go. K minus 30. I've got a feeling. We need to push it down further, but we'll see all the background music is distracting, okay, so as you can see, we're going to push it down. As I said, minus 40 is something around what I usually set my background levels too, if I'm using background music with vocals. So we'll try minus 40. Get everyone and welcome back to the next tutorial in this series, as you can tell, the backward, okay, well, we could just get away with that just, but I would probably push that down to say minus 45 and then go from there. So as you can see, I've just demonstrated the first method and that there is no set level for background music. It depends on the type of background music or using vocals versus non vocals. But this is essentially what they call ducking. And the second method is really just called auto ducking, which is where Premiere Pro will do this process for you automatically. So you don't have to go in and do this for every single clip. And what I mean, every single clip, you might have a situation where you've got multiple soundbites here and you want the music to duck behind each one of these soundbites. And as opposed to just going in with your pen tool and go in click, click, click, click, click, click. This is what I did years ago, right? Because auto ducking was never a feature of Premiere Pro. What I first started Premiere Pro years ago. So I had to go through manually and do this. And literally, this is what you have to do if you've got multiple soundbites. I'm doing this very quickly, right? Because I've been doing this. I used to spend hours doing this that have like dozens and dozens of soundbites. And I'll just go through men. So that's literally what they call ducking. And that's, I've just done it for you manually. But Premiere Pro now makes this process easier. If you've got multiple soundbites that you want the background music to duck. So I'm going to show you how to do that. It's called auto ducking. So I'm going to delete this track. I'm going to bring in my other track and we're going to start over. So delete this one here, bringing this one over. And I'm just going to set that up there. Okay, So the second method is auto ducking. So we get a window and we're going to look for essential sound. So this is called the essential sound panel that's going to pop up over here. And then the first thing we're gonna do is we're going to select all of these soundbite clips here. We need to tell Premiere Pro that all of these soundbite clips on audio track layer one is our dialogue, right? So we tag the sound by clips as dialogue. And then we click on our background music and we tag it as music. All you need to do, There's more detail to this, but I might explain that in another video. And then with our background track selected here, you'll see an option for ducking right here. And it's untyped, right? So I'm gonna ticket. And then we have several options here. Now we can tell Premiere Pro to adjust the sensitivity, how much we want the background music to duck by. So this track here, which is the first track that were used, doesn't have dialogue. And if you remember correctly, it was 25 decibel is right that we've set for the, for the track with the vocals. It was like 40, 45 minus 40, minus 45. So minus 25 is a good amount too dark for this particular track, as we've already seen. And the fate of 800 milliseconds. I'll explain that in just a second. So there's only three settings here, and we tell Premiere Pro to dock the background music here against, right here, against the dialogue clips, which are these clips here. So we've tagged these as dialogue as we've done before. We click on the background track and we tell Premiere Pro to duck the background track against the dialogue clips. And then watch what happens if I select, generate keyframes or zoom in. So you can see this right? Make this bigger because this is where the magic really happens and this will save you a lot of time. So generate keyframes. Premiere Pro will go through and it will automatically dropping these key-frames right here. So you don't have to do it. How easy is that? Right? And then if we want, we can go through and we can make further adjustments if we're not happy with what Premiere Pro has done. But as you can see here, we've got two keyframes set. Now where it says Fade 800 milliseconds is just the amount of time that allows for the music to either drop off or increase, right? So that's 800 millisecond increase their right. So we can adjust these settings here. Call it twelve hundred, thirteen hundred milliseconds. If we hit generate keyframes, it will make those adjustments. Watch this, watch what happens to these keyframes now that we've adjusted the fade? So as you can see, the fade is much, much more pushed. It's pushed out more, right? So we have twelve hundred, thirteen hundred millisecond fade. So any adjustments you make here, you might want to drop the background music to minus 30 instead of minus 25. And then I'll just click on the background music. So minus 30, we've already said that. And then we just hit generate keyframes and then Premiere Pro will go back through and make the follow-up adjustments. As you can see that dropped down a little bit extra a pay this back. Music is too distracting. This is a mistake that I made when I first started my YouTube channel years ago. That's pretty good. This day. Can watch those videos. Get everyone and welcome back to the next tutorial in this series, as you can see, get the idea. So that's essentially how you do auto ducking inside Premiere Pro. If you've got multiple soundbites on your timeline and you want the background music to drop or duck behind each one of those soundbites. So if you have any questions, definitely let me know. I hope this was helpful and I'll see you in the next video tutorial. 19. Music & SFX- How to Synchronise Audio and Video (Two Methods): Okay, So what I've just done now is to synchronize the audio and the visuals inside of Premier Pro. So in this tutorial, I'm going to teach you how to align or synchronize your video with high-quality audio taken by a recording device such as this one right here. So right now, there's audio being recorded for this level here, like here, directly connected to this Sony external recorder. So what I wanna do, I don't want to use the audio that's currently being recorded into the camera that's filming me right now because it's not high-quality. So I want to swap that audio with this audio. So I'm going to teach you how to do that in this tutorial. And what I did before with the clap is to create spikes in the audio wave form. So that when I go into Premier Pro, I can just align the spikes generated from the audio in the camera to the spikes in the recording device. I'll show you inside Premiere Pro. Let's go. Oh, by the way, you can also use your phone to record audio as well. All right, let's jump into Premiere Pro and I'll show you how to do this. So now I'll be showing you how to synchronize audio and video insider Premier Pro, as mentioned, taking the high-quality audio recorded on an external recorder that you saw before, and then synchronizing that with the video shot on my camera. And also the camera was also filming audio using the built-in microphone, which is usually terrible quality. So I've imported both here into Premiere Pro. I'll drag the visual over to the timeline, and I'll just play back what this audio sounds like that was recorded directly into the camera itself inside of Premier Pro. So in this tutorial, I'm going to teach you how to ally or synchronize. So lot of echoed, not really good quality audio. So we're going to replace this audio with the audio taken from the recorder. So I'm going to drag the recorded audio onto audio track layer two and then drop it straight there. Now, if I just hit S for solo, we're going to play back what this sounds like. Video with high-quality audio taken by recording device such as this one right here. Okay, so you can already tell it's a much better quality audios. So if you ever get the chance and you're making videos, I highly recommend using an external recording device to record your audio. Or even your mobile phone is generally pretty good audio. And then synchronizing it inside Premiere Pro, it's really going to help your video performance. So that aside, I'll show you how to do this. We're going to synchronize these together. So firstly, I like to just expand out all of these audio tracks. I can see the waveform. Now there's different ways you can do this. You can actually take the node here and you can expand out. This will expand at all the video track layers. And then down here that will expand at all of the audio track layers. Or you can just go over it inside this little empty space here. Hold down the Alt key or the Option key that will expand out this track here. If actually hold down the Shift key and then do the same thing with your scroll wheel on your mouse. It will actually expanded all of the tracks simultaneously. So shift is a really cool way. You can just expand out all of these audio track simultaneously, just like that. Or if you hold down Alt or Option, you can do one track at a time just like this. And I'm just using the scroll wheel on my mouse to expand these out. And you want to expand these tracks out so you can see the waveform here, right? And looking at this waveform here, there's two different ways of going about this. There's two different ways you can synchronize these together. The first way is the automatic way. It's called synchronized. So literally just selecting all of these clips here, right-clicking, then going to synchronize it, click on that, and then make sure audio's selected. And then he was his track Channel 1. Click Okay. And in Premiere Pro will automatically shift, if you notice there just a second ago, that audit Premiere Pro will shift this audio to align it with this audio here. If I zoom in here, you'll see that we've got these little spikes in the audio. So in sort of a production feature film, they use, the producer uses what they call a clap board. I'll show you what it looks like. You would have seen all of these, these little clipboards here. So this typically claps out an audio spike so that when the footage gets sent to the editor, it looks like this in the wave forms, you'll see these little spikes here. And it just allows in post-production to align the audio with the visuals, right? So if I play this back, so it's just a very distinct. Part of the waveform. It's just much easier to align the waveforms by clapping at the beginning. And then of course you can just cut that out, right? So that's why we clap or that's what they use a clap board. If you'd have a clipboard, just clap. That's what I do. That's what I've been doing for years now. So this is the automatic way of doing it in Premiere Pro. It's called synchronizing. Now if we zoom in and just see how well Premier Pro has done this, because what I do synchronizing, I used to do synchronizing a lot, but I found that 80, 90 percent of the time, Premiere Pro would get it right, but it wouldn't be absolutely perfect, which is why I like to do it manually and I'm going to show you how to do it manually. Zoom out, and I'll show you how to do this manually. Okay, so to do this manually, the first thing I want to adjust or change is change the timeline to audio time units. So at the moment, it's if I zoom all the way in, okay, I'm down to singular frames, right? But I want to go even further in detail. So I go over here to the hamburger menu on the sequence, click over here, and then I look forward to show audio time units. Click on that. And the actual timeline now will display in audio units, which means that I can go deeper and deeper and I can zoom all the way in to singular units of audio, right? So if I make this a bigger screen, so it's easier to see, if I just zoom out, I'm holding down the Alt key or the Option key, and using the scroll wheel on my mouse to zoom in and zoom out. In this case, I just click and drag this audio across. And again, I'm just aligning these spikes up like this. I'm just doing this visually with my eyes. Now. I'm holding down the Alt or the Option key and I'm going to zoom all the way in like this. And as you can see, we can get a whole lot of granular, granular detail just by zooming all the way in like this. But you must make sure that you've got here audio time units displayed. And the scale at the top here of our timeline is set to Audio Units. And we zoom all the way in. Okay? And this is how we can get perfect accuracy. If you hold down the Alt or the Option key, you can use the right and left arrows on your keyboard. And you're pressing the right arrow now. And I'm getting this perfectly aligned. So Premiere Pro, if you do this phi as synchronizing inside Premiere Pro, Premier Pro will not, in my experience, most of the time, will not give you this level of accurate synchronization in my own personal experience. That's why I like to do it manually. I can get much better precision here. Then just doing it through synchronize to now I've zoomed all the way in and I'll just move this across. I'm pretty happy with that. That's almost perfectly lined up. Okay, So we zoom all the way out again. And then I just hit the Tilde key. And then I'll just move this around like this. And then what we'll do is we will change this back to, we'll just remove it. So it goes back to the previous scale. And if we play this back, okay, So what I've just done now is to synchronize. Now, if it's not synchronized, you're usually hear an echo in the audio. I'll give you an example. I'll just like kinda shift this across a little bit. Okay? Okay, so what I've just done now is to get that you get a pretty annoying echo. Okay, So what I've just done now is, and you know that it's not perfectly linked up. Okay, so we play this one with okay, So what I've just done now as our black, okay, so once we've got to synchronize, the next thing we need to do is delete the audio right from this is, this is from the camera. So all you need to do is hold down the Alt key or the Option key, click on the audio and then press Delete. That will remove it, will shuffle this one up here. And then we will take both of these clips here, highlight them, right-click, go to Link. And now we've linked this audio, which is from the recorder, the visuals, and let's play this back. I can buy a recording device such as this one right here. So right now, there's audio being recorded for this level and like here, directly connected to this Sony external recorder. Okay, Perfect. So that is how you synchronize audio and video together inside of Premiere Pro. I hope this was helpful. If you have any questions, please let me know and I'll see you in the next video tutorial. 20. Music & SFX- Working with Automated Sequences: I'll be showing you how to work with automated sequences within your projects, inside of Premier Pro. And we're going to be recreating part of the little introduction that you saw there, which I'll play back for you in just a second. But before I do, I should point out that when you're automating two sequences, or also known as cutting to the beat of any kind of music. The first part of the process, I believe, is very much creative and it's completely within your control. That is something which you need to listen to the music. You need to feel the beat. You need to feel how the music speaks to you. And then listen to the different instruments in the music, time the music. And then based off how you feel about the music, you're going to cut to that. So you might watch what I've done with this particular background track and feel like it doesn't resonate with you or you don't like the part of the music that I've selected to cut to the music of, that's completely your choice. There's no right or wrong answer. This is completely a creative process. So I can't teach that, but I will show you, once you feel the music, I will then show you in this tutorial how to automate sequences to any particular part of the music. So I will play back what you saw in the introduction. And I will give you a breakdown of what I've done and then we're going to recreate it so that start from the beginning. And you'll see here I've got all my little clips here that I've had been cut to these snare at the beginning of this track. And I've got all my little markers at the top here. So I'm going to show you how to drop these markers down, how to cut to each of these markers. However, the process can be a little bit overwhelming. Hence why it's for an intermediate. And then over here, I'm going to show you how to recreate this part where I've cut too. I believe it's the cello in this part of the track. And I'll show you how to do that. So we're going to recreate this section of the timeline and this section over here. And that's going to be the end of the tutorial. So let's play from the beginning. Okay, that's it. So we're going to get straight into this. So now I'm going to zoom into my timeline and you'll get a bit of a snapshot of what it looks like. We're going to recreate this right now. Brand new sequence here. Now if you're watching this and you haven't done the beginner course, or you've never really done this before, then this is a difficult track to work with, I must admit. So I'm going to give you a little bit of a jumpstart if you're an absolute beginner at this process, by using another track very quickly that you can play around with. Not that one, but it's going to be as it is that one actually. So just I'm speaking to someone who's an absolute beginner right now for about 60 seconds. And then I'm going to move straight into the intermediate stuff. So the key thing to keep in mind, if you're an absolute beginner, you've never done this before, is pick a track that's quite slow, that has a very distinct beat, and then experiment with this process on that song first, this is a good one to start with or play it back. I'll show you what to do. You go and play with this process in your own time and then come back and watch the rest of this tutorial and you can follow the rest of us along with the intermediate. So I'll play this back. So what I want you to do as a beginner is have a look at this waveform here of the audio track. If you can't see that double-click over here, that will expand that trach out so you can see it nice and big. You can also zoom in if you hold down the Alt key on the keyboard, use your scroll wheel just to make that nice and big. You can see here the peaks of the track. So this is really great for seeing where you're going to put those markers. They're on top of your sequence, right? So if you're an absolute beginner, start with this kind of music first, and then you can join me with the intermediate. So I'm going to delete that one. I'm going to drop in the track that you heard in the beginning of the tutorial. Play this back. I really loved that tracker to really call battled kind of track. I'm going to zoom into my timeline. Zoom in, zoom in, zoom in. Now. This is okay, So it sounds like a snare, snare drum and it's very, very fast. And if I have a look at this audio waveform, there's nothing in the wave form that tells me where the beat is, where the drops are to. So it's such a fast successive PID of the snare that it might think to yourself, well, how am I going to, where am I going to set the markers to cut to the markers. What I personally would do is zoom into your timeline as much as possible so that you're now down to singular frames. So now with your playhead, you'll see this little line here that's representing a single frame, frame, frame, frame, frame. And then we'll add what I would do is set a marker to every single frame, which is what I've done over here. Frame, frame, frame, frame, frame. So we can do the same thing. Take the play head over here, you've got Add Marker. If you press that, it will drop a marker called a sequence marker at the top here. By default it's a green color. Now, I'm going to take this scrubber, move it across by A-frame, do the same thing, move it across, same thing, same thing. Now, one common mistake that people make is they have their clip selected and watch what happens if I select my clip and I either press, I press the M and M key on the keyboard, drops the marker down here on the clip. And this is called a clip marker as opposed to a sequence marker. So that's not going to work. So we're going to undo that, makes sure the clip has been de-selected, and then move the scrubber along. De-select marker, marker, marker. Now you might be wondering, is there like an automatic, automated way of doing this? Unfortunately, Premiere Pro as of 2020, one doesn't have an automated feature for dropping markers based on beats per minute or some kind of beat detection. Whereas audition has that feature, is actually a plug-in for Premiere Pro Edit, which I believe I've got, I did have it open, but I've closed it now. I'll show you that later with beat edit, it's an extension and it will detect the beats in your music and will automatically dropped down markers and things like that. As opposed to having to do it manually, which can get pretty time consuming. And it's not terribly accurate when you're doing it by hand, but unfortunately, we have to do it by hand. So now that I've got all my markers set, the next thing I need to do is I need to go over to my project window. I need to get my clips. And now what I've done just in terms of organization. I've got my music in one folder or one bin, and I've got my clips in another bin. And all of my clips here have been set up in ListView. I suggest changing this to Icon View. And if you click down here icon view, it just makes it a whole lot easier to work with these clips. And then I am going to open up each of these clips into the source monitor box. And I'm going to set an in point by hitting mark in. And then I'm gonna set an out point. And this selection here which is shaded, I'm telling Premiere Pro to import this shaded piece against the markers that I've said. So this is the first clip here in the bin. This is the second, the third, the fourth, the fifth. So the first thing you need to do, change the icon view, change the actual order that you want the eclipse to appear in the actual sequence. So first, second, third, fourth, fifth, you can click and drag and move these around to change the order, the order that you select here, either by holding down the Control or the Command key, and selecting with your mouse is the order that you're going to tell Premiere Pro, you want to drop into your sequence, okay? So first and foremost, go through each of your clips, set an endpoint and an outpoint, have a shaded piece that you want to use. And that's shaded piece, which I've done over here already. Shaded piece that I've done here already. These will be dropped into an against these markers. I'll just continue to go through market endpoint, market out point, next clip, but looks the same as that one. I'm just going through super-quick. I'm not even really thinking about this just to speed up and save some time in our we've already got it in and out there as well. In an out. So keep going through in, out, in, out. Okay. You get the idea. Okay, So once you've done that, then you'll just select all the clips here in your project bins. So Control or Command a that will select all of the clips. Click here where it says Automated a sequence. This little box will pop up. And then where it says ordering, just select, sort order, just make sure that's selected. And whereas his placement, you'll select at unnumbered markers. Because we've already got those markers set here in our sequence already. So we want Premier Pro to cut these clips within this Indian outrage against the markers set here already on your timeline. To make sure that's selected. Go to method. And if you select, insert, it just means that Premiere Pro will push everything else along in your timeline. It's best to set override because it's kinda drop these clips straight over the top of the music is not going to push the music along the timeline. We could have actually locked that layer. We could even do that now, just so that we're not going to affect our music. So we can lock this layer by hitting the padlock. They're going back in here. So sort order has been selected at unnumbered, Barker's override has been set. And then where it says still clip duration, use IN OUT range. We're pretty much telling Premiere Pro to only take the parts of the clip where we've set the in and out range. In and out points where it's shaded. And then if we move further down, we have here ignore audio selected. So you'll find that with these clips there's a little audio waveform. We don't want Premier Pro to drag in the audio, just the video. So we tell Premiere Pro to ignore the audio. Then we click Okay, and then the magic happens. So now it's Premier Pro has cut to cut these clips to each of these marker locations. And it's even put the final clip there at the final marker as the entire in-out range there, right? So pretty cool. It's that easy. Now if we just zoom in and play this back. All right, It says we haven't used the exact clips that we used in the introduction to the tutorial, but you get the idea. So you see how easy that is. And then the second part that I want to show you how to do, if I just delete this clip and move over here, we're going to play this section of the track. Okay, so now we're going, I'm going to show you how to automate to this part of the background music into little bit more technical. But this is an intermediate course, so this is the perfect place to learn. So I'm going to pay this back. Okay, Let's get into it. So I'm going to unlock this track and I'm going to zoom in. And so again, if you look at this waveform and I play this back, now, believe that to cello in the background there. So I want to try and edit to the cello. Now, the way I do it is I make the timeline panel larger, so I have a full screen here and I want to play this back. So what I'm gonna do is I'm going to set an in point. Before I do that, I'm going to set an endpoint and an out point. And I'm going to have this loop back. So here on my toolbar, I've got here versus Loop playback. The reason for that is because I want the playhead to loop inside the in and out points. There's a reason why I'm going to do that. And you'll see why in a second. If you don't see this button here, you click on the little bug button editor tool. And then you'll see that you will find this button called loop playback inside of here. And it's right there. Actually, you will click and drag it down onto the toolbar and then click, and then you'll just click. Okay. So I don't have it anymore. Where is it? I'll just get it again and drop it there. There we go. So just make sure you've got that little button there. You make sure it's turned blue. And that means that the plate, the scrubber, sorry, the playhead, will then move or loop inside of this shaded area. I'll show you what I mean. Okay, so the next thing I'm gonna do is I'm going to slow this playback speed down because this is the truth. That is so fast. I can't press the M key on the keyboard fast enough to drop markers down as way too fast for me. So a technique that I like to do is I make this full screen and I play this back. Okay, now that we're ready to go, I am going to set myself up, so I'm going to de-select the clip. So the clip is not selected. I'm then going to hit the plate. I'm going to hit the Spacebar on the keyboard. This is going to play the track. And then I'm going to go and hold down the Shift key and then press the J key on the keyboard. That's going to slow down the playhead. That's going to allow me time to drop them markers down on the sequence. I know that sounds like a lot, but I'm going to explain this as best as I possibly can. So I'm going to hold down the Shift key and then press the J key, the slowdown, the play head. That will allow me time to listen to the cello or that whatever that instrument is that I'm trying to set markers to. And then I'm going to continue on. So let's go. So I'm gonna hold down the Shift key J and J, j, J. So it's really slow. J again. So it's now really slow. So that's slow enough that I can add markers to it. Here we go. So I've just bashed the M key on the keyboard. And while I've done that, I've dropped these markers here on top of the sequence. So they're not perfectly laid out because, you know, I'm, I'm listening with my ear. I'm also recording this at the same time, so my computer's lagging a little bit. But all I need to do is go in and set and just to move these markers around, just to make sure that they're set at around the same number of frames apart. And then from there we go. Okay, so you get the idea, it's not perfect, but you get the idea. And then we'll set, we'll set another marker here as well. Okay, and we'll play this back. Okay? So now that we've got our marker set, we can then do what we did before. And we can go through, go through our clips here, and we can set in and out points, do the same thing we did before. And then I'm going to just go through this very quickly. I'm going to select all of these clips. Go to automate the sequence, click on that sort order selected at the unnumbered markers, Overwrite edit, and then use that range, ignore audio, and then click Okay. And voila. Now if I play this back, so I suggest playing around with this, listen to the music, feel it out, and then pick a part of the track that you want to try and automate to try the techniques that I've used. If you're using a very fast-paced track, then remember to hold down the Shift key. By holding down the Shift key and pressing the J key. You'll then slowed down the playhead. That's a big one. So I'll do it again. Hold down shift and Jay Jay, Jay, Jay Jay. Jay says like slow motion. They go. But then when you press the space bar, and then you press the spacebar again, it resets the playback speed. Alright, so I hope this was helpful. If you have any questions, please let me know. Play around with this and I'll see you in the next tutorial. 21. Effects- Working with Effect Presets: How to work with affect presets insider Premier Pro to dramatically speed up your editing workflow. So if you're applying the same kind of effects to your projects, from one project to the next, using effect presets that you can save. And then import is really going to help speed things up for you. So what that means is if you think of Instagram for example, and I'll bring up some, I'll bring up an example and show you real quick. So with Instagram, you probably aware that you can buy presets or filters for your Instagram account to give your Instagram photos sort of a consistent brand image and appearance. And if I, for example, click on this here, you see that all these photos have a very similar appearance because this person is using a filter which makes these photos look very similar. It just saves the person going in and making all of the same adjustments to each of these photos when they can just quite simply apply an effect or a preset to the photos to give them the same look. In Premier Pro, It's kind of the same thing. If you're working with the same kind of effects from one project to the next. You can save that effect as a file or what they call a preset, and then apply that preset to all of your future projects. It's just going to save you a ton of time. And so not many people talk about this. But when you get to intermediate level editing and above, working with presets is essential, especially if you have timelines and deadlines and clients and obligations to get content out, then this is important. So that's still doesn't make a lot of sense. I'm gonna give you a practical example to work with. So I've got a couple of clips here on my timeline, and I'm going to show you how you can save a color grading set of changes as a preset and then apply those changes from a saved preset to the next clip here on the timeline. So I've taken these clips here from Pexels.com. And if you want, you can go to pixels.com and you can download these clips and follow along with me. Otherwise you can use your own footage. So let's go. Okay, so let's look at our first clip here. We have a drone clip here, shot in a forest. And just say for example, I want to do some color grading to this. So I've got my color tab here, and I'll go over to the Creative tab. And I'm just going to create a little bit of a look here to go to my lats. And I want to put the vision x Rec 709 over the top of this. Then in addition to this, I want to increase the intensity a little bit. I want to give this more of a faded film look. I want to sharpen it. I want to give, it's all want to reduce the vibrance, increase the saturation. Maybe reduces saturation. And the TIM to my drop that a little bit. Okay, well how else can I can maybe give this a vignette to add a little bit of a vignette. And maybe even too much of a vignette or drop that back a little bit, increase the feather. Okay, great. So I've made a set of adjustments to this clip. As you can see, we've got those adjustments there. That's how I want this to look. They'll just say, for example, after I've made all these adjustments, I want to apply all of these kind of creative adjustments to every future project that I make. Or maybe not every, every future project. But maybe I just like this so much that every now and again, I want to apply this exact look to some of my future projects. What do I do? So I go over to Effect Controls here, I scroll down and where it says lumetri color. I will save this as a preset. Now, everything that we've adjusted over here on the right-hand side has actually been created as a set of values on the left-hand side here. So for example, if I click on the Creative tab, you'll see here that we've got vision x, we've got intensity, faded film sharp, and vibrance saturation. All of these values will change when I change these values over here. And you'll notice if this value changes, that value changes. So essentially it's all changing under this effect called Lumetri control, sorry, Lumetri color. So I right-click and click on Save Preset, and I give this preset a name, I'm going to call it Brad's amazing color, grade, for example. And under type, I'm just going to leave it at scale for now. This is kind of relating to the use of keyframes, but for now, I'll just leave it at scale. Click Okay. And that will save that as a preset. Go down to effects. And then under Presets, I click here, drop that down, and then I'll see here, I've got breads, amazing color grade. Now, whenever I start a, start up a new project, I can quite simply take this preset and drop it over to my clips. And that will immediately apply that exact same preset to any of the clips that I apply it to. If I want, I can export this out as a file, as a preset file, because sometimes what happens, I completely re-install Premiere Pro. And so that's exactly what I've done here. In fact, of a lot of my presets have now been taken out and installed on my hard drive. So I'm yet to re-install all of my presets again. But what I'll do is I'll right-click and click on export presets. And then I'll export the preset out. And then I'll store that onto my mind as symbology system. And when I'm ready, all then import the presets again by clicking on, right-clicking on Presets, click on Import Presets. And then here I can import those presets again. So it's very easy to export presets and Import Presets. You can even buy presets from motion array or Envato Elements. And you can import those into your projects directly, which I've done in the past. For example, here we've got text effect bounce. So for example, here are a set of presets for text effects. So for example, if I get my text over here and just say I like a certain type of effect to be applied to my text in each one of my projects. Then I can just go down to text effect, bounce, go to shake and go, Oh, I like this preset. I'm just going to drop it straight onto my text layer. And so I play this back. There we go. So if I click on this text layer and go over to Effect Controls, you'll see here that all the key frames relating to rotation had been applied automatically. We have a transform effect suffer click on Transform. We have all these position keyframes here. So all of these position keyframes have all been saved as, as part of this preset, right? So just makes it so much easier. I don't need to go through and recreate all of these keyframes for rotation and transform. It's all within the preset itself, and that's essentially it when it comes to Presets. If you have any questions about using presets, be sure to let me know. Otherwise, I'll see you in the next tutorial. 22. Effects- Stabilise Shaky Footage with Warp Stabiliser: So I'll be showing you how to stabilize your shaky footage inside of Premiere Pro that you've may have shot from your phone. And in this example, I've got a couple of clips on the timeline. A few that are shot this morning on my phone, on my walk. And here is the before of a really shaky clip. And I'll show you how to make it nice and smooth using Warp stabilization, it's very easy to use. I'm going to explain it in just a second. But before I do, I firstly need to point out that if your intention is to film really smooth shots in your project upfront, then I always suggest trying to achieve stability in camera before you even think about trying to achieve it in post-production, in Premiere Pro or any other editing software, it's gonna make your life a lot easier when you're in post-production, cleaning up any kind of shaky footage. If you try and achieve most of that in camera. For example, if I go over here and I'll show you, you can get Gimbels and stabilizes for your smartphones and for your cameras that range in all different prices. If depending on your budget. But if your ultimate aim is to achieve smooth shots upfront, and that's the kind of look that you're going for in your projects, then this is definitely the investment to look for. However, just say for example, you just have a couple of clips and you just want to stabilize them. And you don't you're not using any of this equipment like what I've done this morning on my walk, I just had my phone in my pocket and I thought I'd just take it out and start filming. And so this is the before and this is the after using Warp Stabilizer. So I'll show you how to do it. So I'm inside a project here that a couple of clips in the timeline, feel free to bring your own footage. And I'm going to go to these two arrows. Click on effects. And in the search I'm going to type in warp stabilizer. It's going to come and distort. This is the effect that we're going to use and I'm going to drop it onto this footage here. Okay. So as you can see, it's pretty shaky, right? And I'm just going to drop that straight onto the clip. And it's going to analyze that clip. And it's going to apply some algorithm functions and it's going to stabilize it now for go into Effect Controls and scroll down over here. It gives me Warp Stabilizer effect. And it's telling me that it's analyzing frame-by-frame and applying stabilization. And I'm going to explain these various functions in just a second and the ones that really do concern you. Well, after this finishes, okay, let's play this back. It is nice and smooth. Fantastic. It does look like I've actually used a gimbal, but I haven't. I'm just walking, so I'm really happy with that result. So if I go into Effect Controls and break down what's going on here. Now I suggest you use your own footage and play around with some of these settings that I'm about to go through. Because it will depend on the footage that you've shot. Some settings work best with different types of footage. But let's take a look. So under stabilization and under result, It's set to smooth motion. This is the default setting, okay? Now, typically in my experience, if I'm standing still and I'm panning the camera and I'm holding my phone and I'm standing stationary. And I want to stabilize that kind of shot, then I would typically select no motion. No motion is really telling Premiere Pro to strip out all motion in the shot, including the motion of you actually walking. Now you want to kind of keep that if you're in a shot. Like for example, in this case here, I'm actually walking in the shot and I'm filming at the same time. I don't want to remove the motion of me walking. Okay. I just want to remove a lot of the war penis and the shakiness in whatever is happening in the frame itself. The other subjects and things like that. So that's when using smooth motion is best for this kind of shot. So in other words, this setting is really beneficial. If you're wanting to simulate the camera being on a tripod, then you would select No motion. Otherwise, in this case, smooth motion is the better option. Smoothness is set to 50 percent by default, it's always going to be a trade off here. So the lower the percentages here, the more rough and shaky it's going to look. And the higher the percentage It means, the smoother it's going to be. But there is a trade off and we'll talk about that as we move down where Premiere Pro will attempt to try and crop the clip and autoscale that clip to try and achieve as much stabilization as possible, which does mean that you will lose some pixels around the edge of the frame, as Premier Pro tries to compensate by using more smoothness in the shot. So. We move down, we have method now by default it's set to, I believe is set to subspace warp by default. However, the other option that is beneficial is position, scale, and rotation. So this is essentially the method that Premiere Pro uses to stabilize the shot. And one, this is, I'd like to think of this like levels. So position is the most basic method followed by position, scale and rotation. So Premiere Pro. In this method here, we'll attempt to layout, position, scale and rotation keyframes to achieve stabilization. Perspective can kinda look a little bit weird if you use that. In my experience, subspace warp is the most complex method, but I suggest playing around with position, scale and rotation and subspace warp. If we move down, we can tell Premiere Pro to preserve the scale. So as mentioned before, Premiere Pro, in a method to try and achieve stabilization, will crop in the frame. So that means that you might lose some pixels or information around the frame itself, but you can tell Premiere Pro to not do that. I always recommend just leave this unchecked and moved down to framing. So this is how Premiere Pro achieves the stabilization. So I typically leave it to Stabilize crop and autoscale. You can change this and you can see what it looks like. What Premiere Pro is doing behind the scenes to try and achieve stabilization. So I will just show you if you have a look closely, we have black bars here. So if I play this back, you can actually see what Premiere Pro is trying to do to achieve stabilization is running a little bit slow because I'm also recording the tutorial and Anita render this clip out. But you can see there that Premiere Pro is working hard to try and stabilize. So I'll set this back to Stabilize crop and autoscale. And then here you'll see where it says autoscale a 104% or a 103.6%, which means that Premiere Pro has cropped in the clip by an extra 4% to achieve stabilization. So that means I've lost 4% of pixels around the edge of my frame here. So if we go down to Advanced, if for example, we've got another setting that I like to play with his crop less smooth, more. So as mentioned before, it's always good to keep in mind that if you are shooting a subject and, or something of importance in the frame, and they're huge and they're around the edge of the frame. You might want to consider adjusting this setting here where there's less of a crop on the clip. It does mean that the clip is not going to be as smooth. It's not gonna be as stabilized, but it means that you're not going to lose key, the key subject on the edge of the frame. However, I always suggest trying, if you plan to use stabilization and post-production, try and keep the important elements of the shot away from the edges of the frame that will allow you to smooth out the shot more in post-production. And then obviously that means you'll have more of a crop, but then you'll have as smooth as shot. So otherwise they're the only settings that I typically use. I do suggest playing around with these settings in your own time, specifically, smooth motion, no motion. Depending on if you're walking with the camera or if you're stationary like a tripod, adjust the smoothness percentage here. Also play around with the two settings, subspace, warp and position, scale and rotation. Those are two settings that I use depending on the kind of shot that I have. And then I set stabilized crop and auto scale are typically don't touch this one. And then I moved down to Advanced and I adjust crop less smooth more as well. So play with those few settings there. I also have one more clip to show you real quick. I actually, this is my girlfriend here running. We're in the USA and I'm running with a camera in this case, and it's really, really shaky. Now in this particular example, I might want to run with this because it might be the stylistic choice of the shot that I'm going for. But just say for example, I want to stabilize this using Warp stabilization. I'll show you what has happened. I've already applied it already just to save some time here. So this is the same clip With Warp stabilization applied. And if we go through the parameters real quick, we've got smooth motion because I'm running with the cameras. So I want to leave that as smooth set to 50 percent of leopard at subspace. And I've got stabilized crop and auto-scale set there and have a look at this of a play this back. It is much, much smoother, but you'll notice that this is cropped in a lot more because Premier Pro is really doing its best to stabilize this shot. I'll show you real quick. If we click on this clip, go down. Premiere Pro has scaled in this clip by a 100, by an extra 43% to a 143% cropped in to try and achieve the stabilization because this clip, as you saw before, this is where it's normal crop. It is really, really shaky, right? But you can see it's cropped in a whole lot more to try and achieve stabilization there. So I hope this has been helpful. I suggest playing around with this in your urine footage. If you have any questions, let me know and I'll see you in the next video. 23. Specialty- Multi Camera Editing Fundamentals: I'll be showing you how easy it is to cut between multiple camera angles inside of Premier Pro. And this is particularly helpful if you're filming on two or more cameras. And you wanna really fast and easy workflow to cut between those different camera angles. Now following this tutorial, you will save hours of time just by following this very simple workflow editing with multiple cameras. And so if you want, you can actually follow along in this tutorial by using the supplied footage that I'll be using either as a link after this video, you can just click and download the supplied footage. Or if you go to the Resources section of the course, you can download this footage from the resources section. So let's get straight into it now. I've got three clips here in the Project panel. And these three clips here is me flying a little Cessna 172, and I've got three cameras set up here. That's me. I've got three cameras set up here. We've got one camera on my face, and this camera is the primary audio camera. So in other words, the air traffic control and me speaking into the microphone, I've set up my little homemade cockpit voice recorder and so that it's feeding directly into this camera angle. So this is camera one. And then I've got this camera here, which is behind me at the back of my head and you can see the instrument panel. And then if you look closely, there's another little camera there. So I'll zoom in. There's another little GoPro cameras sitting on the dash. So that's Camera 3. Okay, So the carrot there that you're looking at now, this camera two and then camera three is the outside dash camera. So I'm going to show you how easy it is to cut between these three angles with all of these video clips sync together. So one thing to keep in mind is to know up front which of your cameras is the primary audio source that you're going to be using. So before I even set up a multi-camera sequence, I know straightaway this camera angle, camera one, I've got here face cam audio. This is my primary audio source. The audio source from these two camera angles here is useless, right? It's just the aircraft noise. I'll play it back for you. Okay. It's absolutely useless noise. It's just the aircraft engine. Okay? So you need to think about this upfront. Which camera is your primary audio source? And then all we need to do is select these three clips because we want these three clips to be part of our multi-camera sequence. Right-click and then go to create multi-camera source sequence. Click on that, and then this little box is going to appear. So inside synchronized point we have several options. Now in this case, we're just going to leave it at endpoints. We're going to move down and you'll see all these options here. It says he moved source clips to process clips, been just leave that ticked. And if we move down, we've got here audio sequence settings, camera one. Okay, So what that means is that as we are telling Premiere Pro which camera to cut two, it is going to take the audio from whatever we select from here. So if we leave it at camera one, it doesn't matter which camera we tell Premiere Pro to cut two. It is always going to use the audio from camera one. So this camera here that has audio says he face cam audio, that is Camera 1. So no matter when I select each of these clips during the editing for multi-camera, it's always going to use the audio from the face cam. So I just want to point that out. And then we click Okay, and then what happens? Two things happened. Premiere probe will create a bin called process clips. So if we go into there, we could add three clips here from our three different camera angles. If we go back, we have here a multi-camera sequence, little icon there represents a multi-camera sequence. We now need to create a target sequence. How do we do that? We right-click on the multi-camera sequence. And then we go over here to where it says New Sequence From Clip. We click on that. And now we have a multi-camera target sequence. Now just going to expand this track out so you can see the audio waveform there. And you'll see that it's green, and this is a multi-camera sequence. And the next thing we need to do is click over here on the wrench icon. And then over here it says composite video. Make sure you've selected multi-camera. He must like multi-camera. Click on that one. And the very next thing that we need to do is we need to toggle on multi-camera view. So inside our program monitor box, we're only seeing the view from camera one. We need to see all of the cameras inside of this program monitor box. So we go over here to a little toolbar and we look for it, and we look for that icon there. We didn't see that icon there. That refers to multi-camera toggling. So if we go to button editor over here, click on that. You'll see here it says Toggle multi-camera view. Okay, so you need to click and drag that down into the toolbar. Click Okay, and then you'll click here, and then you'll get a toggle of all of the different camera angles. So we have three camera angles here. And over here on the right-hand side, we have the output. This is what the final product is going to look over here on the right-hand side, we have three different camera angles. And then the final output over here, all with inside the program monitor box. And then all you need to do is you go down to timeline window, take the play head, take it to the very beginning, take it to the very, very beginning of the timeline. And then what you're gonna do is you use your space bar to play and pause the playback. And as you're playing the video, you'll use either one or two things. You can either use your mouse and click to change between different camera angles, to cut between different cabinet camera angles. Or you can use the numbers on your keyboard above the letters, not the key pad numbers on the right-hand side, the numbers above the letters. And you can go one, which stands for Camera one. So press 1 on the keyboard, premise two on the keyboard, and press three on the keyboard represents Camera 1, 2, and 3. So watch what happens. I'm going to play this back and we're gonna do this together. And don't judge my landing, okay? Alright, so what I'm doing, I'm coming into land here at Moore, Robyn, and I'm going to cut between the three different camera angles. So let's go at the moment on camera one. And I'm going to take an outside shot, camera Three, 21. That's just about to land on the second stage of web camera too. Little bit. Back to Cambridge three and, and now down, down for a second. So I'm just jumping between what cuts I want. So right now is sitting on camera three beats on all approach all my wants. Civil rights camera one model in Cambridge x2, gets off the runway, come with written includes. Ever do. Gulf coast of the Gulf cool is chemistry. 75 dots and it's come back to camera one and camera two. Camera one. Camera 1. Camera 2, chemistry. I'll make these changes pretty quick. Can we do number one, get the face in the camera to camera three. And that's it. We have touchdown. So we've now quite simply, we've done a very simple multi-camera edit. And now what you'll see on the timeline is we have all these different cuts on our timeline. So this represents all of the different camera angle changes. So as I scrub along here, we've got here that we're using, we're using camera three, and then we're using camera one. And then we're using camera two. And you'll see as I move the play head, a little yellow box appears around the camera angle that we're actually using for this part of the clip. So if I keep scrolling, and as I'm moving through the timeline, if I'm not happy with a particular angle, then I can easily change that camera angle. So for example, if I look at this clip and go, I'm not happy with the camera angle being number two. I want the camera, camera angle to be number 3. I just select the clip on the timeline, and then I just select the camera angle that I want to use instead. So I'll just select Camera 3, and I've now changed that angle to camera three. If I find that I've accidentally switched camera angles too fast or too soon, that I can use the rolling edit tool. For example, if I play this back and I'll look over here, because this is the output. I play this back. And I realized that this, this change from camera to camera three is just too fast and I want to make that cut sooner that are used the rolling edit tool over here. So I go to my toolbox and my toolbar and click on that and then hold down the mouse and then go down to rolling edit tool or shortcut N on the keyboard. And then my little cursor will change. And then all I've gotta do is just click and just roll edit that. So I can bring that forward or can push that cut down further. If I find that the cut is not in the right spot for me. So if I play this back, now cut is now taking place sooner, just like that. Now back a little bit more. So that's how you do multi-camera editing insider Premier Pro is very straightforward. If you once again want to use this footage of me flying a little Cessna coming into land. And you want to play with this footage, feel free to download it in the resources section of the course or after this video, I'll give you a link so you can download this footage. I hope this was helpful and I'll see you in the next tutorial. 24. Specialty- Speech-to-Text Auto Transcription & Captioning: Good day everyone. I'm filming this on my GoPro hero nine, my brand new GoPro. And I am going to demonstrate these speech to text auto transcription feature inside of Premiere Pro as of July 2021, version 15.4. And so hopefully right now Premiere Pro is accurately determining everything I'm saying with accuracy and capitalizing everything that I'm saying, putting full stops and commas where they should be. Anyway. So this is just a quick introduction on, I'm just talking now to myself, to the camera, and I'm going to show you what my view looks like outside of my kitchen. So right now I'm in Melbourne, Australia. We're currently in lockdown and it is overcast and it's been raining on and off all day. All right, Tanga, jump into the software citizen. There you have it. That's an example of the speech to text audio transcription feature inside of Premiere Pro. In this tutorial, I'm going to walk you through how easy it is to get any of your video projects where there's either yourself monologue into camera, which is what I've done here in this example. Or if you've got an interview with multiple speakers, I'll show you how easy it is to have Premier Pro, figure out all of the speakers in the dialogue and make a transcription of what everyone is saying. So we'll jump straight into the tutorial and I will use the clip that you saw in the introduction as the example here. Feel free to use your own footage and follow along with me. So let's go. So to find where you go to find this feature, you'll need to go over here to the top left hand corner and click on the two arrows. And then you'll see the option for text in the drop-down menu, you click on that. If you're not seeing that text option, you might have to go to Window and then go down to text. Click on that. And then you'll see text pop up somewhere up here in the top left-hand corner. So let's go back into it. And so by default you're probably going to be seeing this window here with three buttons, three options. Click on transcript and then click on this button here. Create Transcription will click on this one. This little dialog box will appear. And so we have sequence name, sequence length, and we have audio analysis. So we're telling Premiere Pro where to analyze the audio from. So at the moment I've got a clip here on my timeline. And it's an audio track layer one. And that's where I want Premier Pro to analyze and create the transcription from. So I go to the drop-down menu here where it says Audio on track to hit the drop-down and make sure that's selected audio one, because that's audio track layer one, where my dialogue is located. The language option I want Premier Pro to transcribe too, by default set to English. But of course I can change it to Spanish or German or any other language depending on what is the spoken language in the dialogue. And then here I've got a number of different options transcribe in point to output only. And then all these other options here which you can just leave as is, because I don't have any in or out points set on the timeline. So you can just leave that alone and then click on transcribed. It is that simple. So depending on how long your how long your audio track is will determine how long this process will take. It will upload to the server. It will do the transcription, and then we'll send it back to Premier Pro. This might take a couple minutes, but we'll speed it up so we're not waiting around for it. And there we have it, it is all done. So here we have our transcription. Now, I checked through the transcription and it's mostly correct. I was quite impressed. And so they've even in this case capitalised a lot of the words that should be capitalized, they are full stops and commas where they should be. And if anywhere there is a mistake, it's quite easy just to jump in, double-click on the text and change things such as here where it says as of July 2021, version 15 for probably would be handy if I actually write in the number 15.4, but you get the idea, right, and then Enter. And so I have a look through, and I can also change these, the speaker here by clicking here on the three dots here, and then going to edit speakers. And I can actually edit this and create this as myself and name the speaker as myself. And then click save. And then if you've got dialog here from multiple different speakers, you can go through and you can edit the name of each of the speakers. Speaker one, speaker, two, speaker three. So in this case it's just me. So my name will be down through the entire transcription. And as I move the playhead along, I'll just mute this on my timeline. As I move the playhead along here, you'll notice that the word to highlight according to what is spoken inside of the audio track there. So as, as, as I scrub this playhead along, you'll see that the, the words will get highlighted as I move along. And what I also like about the auto transcription feature is that there's a search box. So if I'm looking for a very specific keyword, I can just type it in Premiere Pro. And it will take me straight to the key word and I can make that change or I can delete it or whatever, right? Also as well. Once I've, once I'm happy with this transcription, I can then go over here to where it says create captions. Click on that, and then this little box is going to appear. So this is where I tell Premiere Pro how I want those captions to be created. So here it says the Create from Sequence transcript, which is what we've just created. And then if I hit the drop-down, I've got here different standards for captions. So subtitled default is what I'll leave it as and then hit the drop-down. This is the standard that I'm going to, that I'm going to select here, subtitle, and then I'm going to continue through identity. They change any of these other settings and then click on Create. And Premier Pro will now convert the transcription to a caption, and it will now overlay the transcription as a subtitle along here on the very top track here, which is the caption track or the subtitle track, which by the way has its own set of properties. So I can I can hide it or I can unhide it by hitting the eyeball there. You'll see here it's got C1, which means obviously caption one or caption track one subtitled track 1. And of course, it actually puts the captions onto the onto the timeline. And I can scrub through here, I can zoom in. And I have these individual captions, which are individual clips that as I move my playhead along, I can see it also show up here on the left-hand side. I can jump into by double-clicking and making changes. As such. It's very easy to do. I can also go in and I can change the color, the font, and all of that, which I do talk about in another video by just simply clicking on one of these here on the timeline and then going over to the graphics panel, clicking on graphics, going over to the right-hand side. And I can change here the text or the font. I can change the color, the fill, and all of that kinda stuff. So essentially, this is just like a text layer, like any other kind of texts. You can change all of the properties over here. But just make sure that if you want to keep things consistent, that you kind of select everything at once and make that consistent change across all of the caption elements on the timeline here. Also, what you can do is you can export the caption as a caption file because you may not want your caption to be burned onto the video like this. So quite simply, you can just go back to text, which is we go Window and down to text. And we can go to where it says captions right up here. So these three little dots here. So click on that. And then where it says Export does SRT file, you'll click on that and then you'll actually get the option to create a SRT caption file, which we'll call example captions file. And then you can upload this captions file as a separate file to YouTube if you're creating a YouTube video or whatever is the case, so you get the idea. So, so I'll talk more about captioning and all these other features in another video. But that's essentially how you do a simple auto transcription with your videos inside of Premiere Pro. If you have any questions, let me know and I'll see you in the next tutorial. 25. Specialty- How to Use Automatic Mask Tracking: So I'll be showing you how to use automatic mask tracking In this tutorial. And essentially, you're telling Premiere Pro that you want to apply a certain effect, for example, a blur effect to a very specific part of your frame. Because you want to blur out number plate numbers. You might want to blur out logos because you're not allowed to display certain logos in your projects. You might need to blur at someone's faces. And I've done this where I've shot videos over on fitness straight. I've had people come up to me and say bread. I don't want my face. Can you take me out of the video? And so either blow them out or completely remove them using this feature called masking. There might be a situation where you want to change I colors of somebody just for fun. And I'll show you how to use automatic mask tracking to achieve that. So these clips here in my timeline now are actually going to be available for you to download as, as an additional resource either after this video or in the resources section of the course. These actually frail got them from Pexels.com. So you can actually go and get them from here. But if you want, I'll give you easy access to them in the course. So let's jump straight into it and we're going to blur out some number plates. So I'm going to play this back and I'm going to have a look at this and go, I'm going to try and blow at this number plate here and a motif employer at this one over here as well. Okay, so the first thing we're gonna do is we're going to go to a little two arrows here, go down to effects. And we're going to type in Gaussian Blur. Gaussian Blur is the effect that we're going to use. We're going to drop it onto the first clip that we're going to go to Effect Controls go down to Guassian blur, and then we have three options here. Now the first thing I'm gonna do is I'm going to just quickly explain that for every effect inside of Premiere Pro, you've got these options here for creating a mask. So you can either create an ellipse or a polygon or free draw. And so essentially, you're telling Premiere Pro to apply this effect. For example, Guassian blur, using these masks to a very, very specific part of a frame. So I'm telling Premiere Pro to take this effect gaussian blur. And I want this Gaussian blur to be applied to a very, very specific part of this frame in this case where, uh, where this number plate is here. Now what's going to help you is if you make the program monitor box bigger and even use this drop-down here to zoom in a little bit so you can apply the mask more accurately. Use these little bars here to kind of maneuver around here. And then what we're gonna do is we're going to take out free draw tool. So we have a pen icon here. And we're just going to draw around this number plate like this. That because it's a rectangular number plate, we could have also used the polygon as well. It doesn't really matter, It's up to you. But when you create this mask, we are essentially creating a brand new mask, which gets created here in the list. It's called Mask 1 and unmask one, we have all of these options within that particular mask. So we can then set the blurriness to whatever blurriness we want. And as we do that, the blurriness for this mask increases. So now we've just blurred out that number plate. So it's that easy. But let me just explain a few things. If I click on Mask 1 here and then I zoom in a little bit more. You'll see here that we have the mass, we have this solid line, and then we have these two perforated lines that are around the solid line here. So what that means is that I'll just zoom in a little bit more. What that means is that we have a feathering region, so the mask itself finishes at the solid line. And then we have a feather region or a region where the gradient of the mask changes between the solid line and the perforated line. So if we take this little note here where I've got my mouse and we pulled that out. You'll see the perforated line increases from the solid line that distance increases. What that means is that we're increasing the feathering of the mass. We're, we're increasing the gradient of the mask. If we pull that back down to the right to make that feather smaller than the gradient is much shorter. And it's much more of a more abrupt gradient between where the mask starts and where it finishes. Does that make sense? And as I pull this node out, this value here on the mask feather changes. So I can either visually changed the mask feather or I can change the value by heating the drop-down here and then just pulling the mask feather this way, right? So you can see here the effect visually in the program monitor box. So I'm gonna leave the mask feather at around 8.1. I'm pretty happy with that. I'm going to zoom out back to say a 100 percent. And I'm going to show you what the mask looks like. So we have our mask drawn. But watch what happens. We haven't finished yet. If I play this, watch what happens. The mask just sits there on the screen. It doesn't track the number plate of the vehicle. If I click back on the mask, the mask is over here. The number plates of it, they're like it's just haven't told Premier Pro to track the number plate, right? So now that we've created the mask, we now need to tell Premiere Pro to track the number plate. So we go over here to mask path, and we have a number of different options. If we hit the play button here, we're going to tell Premiere Pro to automatically track that number plate playing forward. So wherever the playhead is here, to the play head is here. We're going to hit the play button and it's going to take maybe about 30 seconds for Premiere Pro to detect the number plate and to continually move that mask so that it covers the number plate. Okay, so that's now finished. Now we'll play that back and see what has happened. You'll see here that all of these keyframes have been created here, right? Which is just position keyframes that Premiere Pro has automatically generated for us, but it's only generated those position keyframes from where our play head was positioned before we hit the Play button. So we still need to create position keyframes for this part of our shot as well. I'll show you how to do that in a second. So let's play this back and see what Premiere Pro has done. Perfect, So now we've tracked down mask. And quite accurately Premier Pro has tracked that mask to maintain position over the number plate. But over here, we had don't have any position key frames. You see the mask is here, the number plate is there. So what do we do? We bring out we bring our playhead to about here, and then we go back into our mask path and we hit track selected mask backwards. And they are premiere Pro is going to generate keyframes backwards to the very beginning of the clip. Okay, so let's play this back. You can see that now we have some more position keyframes over here. And if we play this back, perfect, we'd now have a perfectly tract mask over our number plate. Okay, so the next one is going to be our logo. Now, I'll let you play with this one, but I'll go through very quickly. I'll show you how to do it. Again, we're going to use Gaussian blur. We're going to drop it over to the logo. We're going to go to Gaussian Blur. And we're going to create a free draw, a mask over the Lamborghini logo. And we do it very, very quickly. As such, and our feathers going to be around there. And then we're going to go to blurriness. We're going to increase the blurriness. We're also going to fix up our mask. And you can always fix up your mask by clicking on these little nodes, pulling them out so it covers all of the logo, just like that. Nice and easy. Great. And the next thing we need to do is hit the play button. But you can actually position the playhead at the beginning. And then just move the mask over the logo like this and position it over the logo. And now we have our play head pretty much at the beginning there. And one more adjustment. Mask path are moving very quickly. So now that we've got our mask in the correct position, we can now tell Premiere Pro to track that mask over the logo. And this might take some time. It really does depend on how long the clip is, but we'll just wait for it to go. Okay, so that's all finished. Now we'll play this back, and now we have a perfectly tract mask covering up the Lamborghini logo. It's that simple. Okay, so the next clip that we're going to work on is this clip of the eyes. I'm going to show you how to change this person's eye color. Now, if you don't apply any kind of mask to this and you just try and change the color of this person's eyes. It actually changes the entire color of the frame. You don't want that. So you want to target the mask to the person's eyes only. So we are going to use the effect of Lumetri Color. Lumetri color. So we gotta affects typed in Lumetri Color. It comes up here. So under Video Effects, Color Correction and Lumetri Color, click, drag it onto the clip, and then you'll see it right here. So again, I'm going to use the free draw. And it creates a mask here, sigma mask one. And I'm going to zoom in a little bit to this person's eyes. I'm just going to do this. I here. Again, you just draw around like this. Very easy to do, just doing this very quickly. If you make a mistake, you can just, you can just pull these nodes in. Okay? I don't want to join them up just yet. Okay, So just like that. And another one here and another one there. So now we have a full mask, it's now complete. And what we do is we go to the Color tab. So I've clicked up on color, go to Lumetri Color. And I can either make the adjustments to color over here, or I can make the adjustments to color over here. Here in Effect Controls, it's up to you, but this is more of a visual representation of these parameters over here on the left-hand side. And in this example I'm going to go to Hue vs Saturation Curve. And I'm going to give this color a kinda give this i a different color. I'm actually going to pull the orange out of her eye like that. So if we go over here, we've got this little bit of orange here, just going to pull that out. So I just pulled that out completely. So before it looked like this. And now I'm going to change it so that Hue vs Saturation. So we've just removed that little bit of orange. Now, if I play this back, you'll see the mask is still in the same spot. We need to track that mask. So very easy to do it same as before. We just go back to Lumetri Color this time, go to Mask 1, hit the play button. And again, premiere Pro is going to track that mask to maintain its position over this person's eye. Okay, that's all done. So now you'll see all these position keyframes have been created. I'm not going to bother creating these position keyframes right here. And they have it. It's that simple. So I hope this was helpful if you have any questions, let me know. But this is quite simply how you use automatic mass tracking for censoring certain parts of your frames in your projects. Let me know if you have any questions and I'll see you in the next video tutorial. 26. Specialty- How to Put Video Inside Text: How to put video inside of text. So we have a project open in front of us right now. I'm going to delete that off the timeline and start from scratch so you can follow along with me. So I've got a couple of clips over here that I've taken from Pexels.com, waves crashing and drone shot here of a coastline. So I'm just going to use the waves crashing clip and drag it over into my timeline as such. By that back. So really cool. And then I'm going to get some text. And so I'm going to click over here type tool. And I'm just going to type something like travel, right? Exactly how I did before. And as you can see on the timeline, it's created like a little text layer here. So I'm gonna hit my selection tool. And then I'm just going to drag this out so that the text covers the entire length of the drone clip. So you'll notice here that I've got the video and this is important that the drone clip is on video track layout one, and the text layer is on video track layer 2. That's important and I'll explain why in a second. So don't worry about the text size and that kinda stuff right now. We'll get to that in a second. So the important effect that we're going to use is called the Track Matte key. So you'll just go to where it says effects. So click on Effects and then overhear your type in Track. Matte key. And you'll see here, that's the effect that we're going to be using it under Video Effects, keen. And it's called Track Matte key. So you're gonna click and drag that over to the drone clip or your video clip. And when you do that, you'll go over to Effect Controls. Over here. Make sure you've got this clip selected. Go to effect controls over here. And then scroll down and you'll see where it says here Track Matte key. This is what we're going to be playing with. Now watch what happens down here where it says Matt, it says none. But I need to tell Premiere Pro where to apply the mat. So we're going to apply to video 2 or video three. So what happens if I select the video to? Video 2 is the layer in which the text is located. Video track layer to make sure that you select the correct layout. So Matt, Video 2 is where our text layer is located. If I select Video 3, nothing's going to happen. So video to selected, if I move this text layer away from this video track layer 2 and dump it on to video track layer 3, you'll see that the effect is gone. So just keep that in mind that it's applying to video track layer two. Now, all I need to do is just move the text around. So click on the text and then expand this out. Right? And I'm just going to reposition it like this. And just as I have explained in other videos on how to manipulate text and change the font and stuff. The same thing, really apply it. So just make sure you go to essential graphics here and you make all of the essential changes to your text in here. So you can center it vertically and horizontally centered the text. You can make it bigger. It's very, very easy to do. But the most important thing, one of the most important things to keep in mind is the actual font that you're using. So I'm using impact. Now, you want to use a very bold font. You know, a really thick font where the actual video is visible inside the text. If I use a different type of font where it's really skinny, it doesn't really have the same, doesn't really have the same impact in I'm playing this back. I'm, I can't really see the video. It just doesn't have the same impact. So you get the idea. So if I just undo that, so this particular font that I'm using for this example is called impact, but there are other ones that you can use. So after this video, I'll give you a list of different fonts that you can play around with Gill Sans. So we'll try this one here. That's okay. I think there's another one here actually. Yeah, it's this one here, ultra bold. So I'll provide a list to you after this video of different fonts that you can play around with and experiment with. So I'll play this back one more time and you'll get to see what it looks like. And there we have it. That's how easy it is to add video inside of text. 27. Specialty- Video Inside Text (Animated): All right, so I'm going to show you how easy it is to animate the video inside of your texts and have that text animate onto your screen. And so in the previous video, I showed you how to put video inside of text. Very easy to do. I won't repeat that part. So if you haven't seen that previous video, go and check that out where I show you how to put the video inside of the text here. I'm just going to show you how to animate that text so that it kind of flies in from behind and onto the screen like that. It's very easy to do. And in this video, I'm going to show you how so Let's get straight into it. I'm going to click on this here. I'm going to delete these keyframes and we're going to start from the very beginning. Okay, so we've now deleted our keyframes and we have our text. So I'll just reset this back here. So there's our text on your screen. I might make this a little bit bigger. Okay, So at the moment we've got here a little video on video track layer 1, and then we have some text on top on video track layer number 2. And the font that I've used here is impact. And I talk about this in the previous video, where you should select a font, where the font is quite thick and you can actually see the video inside of the text. And then you just want to make that quite big so it fits up almost the entire size of the frame. And then you want to send to that here. So clicking these two here, center, vertical, center, horizontal center. And then that's pretty much it. And then just do set up the text and the video tracks or that they're pretty much at the same length. So I've got some music here, but I've just muted that track here. We don't really need it. So the oily to do is you click on the text here and we want to zoom. We want to scale that text as much as possible so that it kind of not, is not visible in the frame. So if I keeps like scaling this up, we're going to get to a point where we just can't see the text, right? So I'm then going to take my play head here, take it back to the beginning. And we've got our scale set to some crazy number, 37, 55 in my case here. And I'm insight effect controls just in case you're wondering. And under scale, all you need to do is you just set a keyframe. So you click on the little stopwatch here that creates a keyframe at that scaling point. Then move the playhead along and we'll just drop it here somewhere, right? And then you'll see the play head here as well. And then you can just click and then just scale that down. Kind of as much as you need to. I'm just going to scale it down to around here. And by doing that, it automatically creates a keyframe at the position of the playhead. And then if I play this back, we now have two key frames. And we have our texts, they're flying in from behind. Now there's one small adjustment we can make to this. Now, if you watch closely, you'll see that the text will fly in from behind, but then it was slam onto the screen like that. So we may not want that, we might just want to have that sort of ease in. So just select that key frame there, right-click on that and go down to where it says, ease in. Click on that. And the keyframe will change to an hourglass. So it'll ease in as opposed to slam onto the screen. So let's play that back again. There we go. So that's how easy it is to animate the text that you have video inside of. So let's play this back and then give this a crack. Let me know what you think and if you have any questions, let me know and I'll see you in the next tutorial. 28. Specialty- How to Use Blending Modes: So all of those little clips that you saw in the introduction, there are just different examples of different types of blending modes I've used inside Premiere Pro. So I'm going to show you how you can add a really cool stylistic effect to your videos, make them a little bit more interesting inside Premiere Pro, using these different blending modes. So all get straight into it. Now we have a little, couple of little clips here on the timeline. And we've got some text here over the top of the video. And all we're really doing with the blending mode is we're telling Premiere Pro how we want these different elements to interact with each other. So if you have a look on my timeline here, I've got text over the top of this video clip. So a blending mode is really just telling Premiere Pro that I want the text here to interact with the video in a certain way. So I'm going to show you how to do that in a second. The next little clip here we have the same text over the top of a different video clip of my girlfriend there. And it's interacting differently, again, different type of blending mode. And the next one I'm going to show you is the film grain. So we have some film grain over the top of this video clip. So that's the film grain there and that's interacting with the clip underneath it. And then we have the next example here where we have two video clips stacked on top of each other. And I'm using a blending mode to tell Premiere Pro to interact with these two clips certain way. And then the last one I'm going to show you is the light leak effect. So if we were to just make that one invisible, you'll get to see what the light leak looks like on its own. And I can give you access to free downloads for light leaks after this video or in the resources section. So you can play around with this yourself. So if we turn that back on, I'm going to show you how to make a really cool light leak as well. Okay, so let's go back to the beginning now if we don't use any kind of blending mode, then we'll just have quite simply just text on top of video, which is fine. But he might want to play around with blending modes because sometimes you could make your video is a little bit more stylistic and interesting. For example, if I click on this text layer here, go to Effect Controls. Then go down to where it says opacity and then blend mode. This is where we change the blending mode. We're going to be talking about in this tutorial. So we hit the drop-down there. We have all these different options here. And they're all organized in different categories, right? So not going to go into detail, but I suggest playing around with these different blending modes and just see what works best for you, right? But in this tutorial, I'm going to give you a couple of examples. So I'm going to click on Normal. And so there is no blend applied. So there's nothing wrong with having just plain text over the top of video. But the problem is they're not interacting and they kind of look like they're isolated. And I don't know. I just I think it looks better when you have the text and the video interact in some way. So if we play this back, there's no blend applied, but we need to apply a blend. So make sure whenever you are applying a blending mode, make sure you apply it to the top clips, right? Whether it be the top texts layer or the top video clip, if you apply it to the bottom clips, it's not going to work. So you're blending mode always works from the top down, not from the bottom up, if that makes sense. So make sure you click on the top clip first. Then go to Effect Controls. Go down to blend mode, hit the drop-down, and we'd selected, I think we selected overlay, right? So you can select different options like soft light and hard light, right? Which takes us back to where we were. And you get the idea. So linear burn, right? If we play this back, look quite nice, doesn't it? I like that. Now, I also like to play around with the opacity of the bottom clip. So if I click on the bottom clip there and then go to Effect Controls, go to opacity. Now, originally it was a 100 percent. Now if I play this back, can't really see anything, right? But if I drop the opacity down to make that bottom clip darker than that text becomes more prominent. So really the effectiveness of your blending really comes down to what blending mode use select and water passively you pick as well. So I do suggest playing around with both the blending mode and the opacity slider to get a nice little sweet spot there, right? So this is purely creative process. So if I play this back, it's quite nice. So you can see a bit of a silhouette. There are people training in the background. And the text is nice and clear. And if I click on the text, I'm using linear burn. Okay, That's move on to the next example. So I essentially using the same text, but I'm just using a different blending mode. So click on the text layer. Go up to Effect Controls go to subtract, sorry, click on this drop-down menu. And in this case I'm using subtract. So this category of blending modes are called the Difference category. So if you click on difference there, it'll take the difference between the two clips. Again, you can play around with this. We'll move on to the next one. So this one's a little different. So I'm actually using film grain in this example, which I do talk about in another video. But I'll show you what film grain is. So I'll just turn the background layer off. Actually, I'll turn the background layer on. I'll click on the film grain, and then I'll set the opacity to a 100 percent. So this is what the film grain looks like without any adjustments. So this is just a video layer, a video clip rather, where you can add a little bit of a vintage look to your video clips. If you kinda shooting a little bit of his nostalgia video that you want to add a little bit of a vintage effect to then film grain is a really good way of doing that. Now of course, there's, you know, you can't really see the clip underneath. So we need to click on this film grain and we need to adjust the blending mode or the opacity slider for this one. So if you drop the opacity down, then you'll start to see the clip underneath the film grain, right? So typically I like to set the opacity around 30 to 50 percent, right? You'll see here as we slide it up closer to a 100 percent, you'll see. So that's a little bit too harsh, but that's my personal opinion. You have a play around with this yourself. There's actually a film grain that you can download in this course. This exact one you can download in this course in the resources section. I'll just drop this down and you can play around with this yourself. So that looks a little bit better. Okay? So that's an example of blending film grain into your clips to give them a nice vintage look. Let's go to the next example. Okay, so we have two clips here. And so if I just make the top one invisible, the top layer invisible. So you're only seeing the bottom clip here, right? And we have a clip on top that I've dropped on top there, which is just people running, right? So essentially what I wanna do is I want to blend these two clips together. So I go to the top clip and then I go over to Effect Controls, Dan opacity. Now originally that was set to a 100 percent and blending mode I've set to screen. So screen is another blending mode type that I like to use. This is the one that's saving them. So you've got these couple of categories here, which is, this is the subtractive category. This is the additive category, right? This is the complex category, the difference category, and the HSL category down here, right? But as I said before, just go through, have a play around with them. So if we go to lighten by that back, right? So it looks pretty good. Not my favorite one. Click on this, go back to screen. So I like this one. And then what I do, as I said before, is I adjust the blend mode and then I adjust the opacity as well. So always adjust the top clip. Remember, so click on the top clip, set the blend mode to screen, and then we're going to drop that opacity back a little bit. Now for me, this is purely stylistic. I've got the main subject, my girlfriend, he had training in the clip and I want the effect of people training in the background kind of running through her, if that makes sense. Right? So and I've obviously manipulated the opacity slider, so it's not a 100 percent because that's super bright. You can barely see the main subject. So bring that opacity down to about 20 percent. They're right, around 20 percent, 23 percent by that back. And you see we have people running through her in the background using the Screen blend mode. The last one I want to show you is the light leak. Now this light leak you'll be able to download in the resources section of the course. And you just take the light leak and I'll just reset it back. So this is what the light late looks like. Okay. So just kinda leaks in his nice little effect. You'll see this in a lot of wedding videos. And that's what it looks like without any blending applied. And then underneath that, we've got some people training here at unit 2007. And I want to blend these two together. So we click on the Light lake Here, we go over to Effect Controls, go down to blend mode. And then again, we can either adjust the opacity or we can just select the blend mode or any combination of a blend mode and opacity together. So that's have a play around. So we got screen. And then if we play this back. So it looks pretty good, but I like to keep things pretty subtle. So I might just click on that and then drop the opacity down as well. So I like to drop that down to say 40. And let's put this back so we have a nice little light leak there. So anyway, I'll let you play around with this. I hope this was helpful if you have any questions, let me know. This is an absolute introduction to using blending modes in Premiere Pro, and I'll see you in the next tutorial. 29. Specialty- Create Epic Ink Transitions: So I'll be showing you how to create really cool ink transitions in your videos. Like what you saw there in the introduction. And I'll play back what you saw. And then we're going to break it down. And I'm going to show you how you can apply it as well. Now, first and foremost, the ink transition overlays that you will be using in this tutorial will be available either after this video or in the resources section of the course. And there will be 10 that'll offer to you for free. They're gonna look like this. And there's different ink transitions that you can use. Either from an ink transition from bottom to top, or if you want to use an ink transition from bottom to top left. So, and I'll give you a pack of 10. You can play around with these different ink transition. They're pretty cool. And then you can follow along with me in this tutorial. So you could actually just download this pack first and then come back and watch this video and follow along with me. But once you download them, you will need to import them. And I've got them imported here as a separate bin with our 10 of these ink transitions here. So I'll play back what you saw there in the introduction and then we'll break it down in a brand new sequence and we'll build it from the very beginning. So let's go. So welcome to Africa. This was a very simple little clip that I put together to make a couple of minutes and using, yes, some of these transitions that I'm going to show you. So I'm going to jump into a brand new sequence and I'm going to first and foremost drag in the music that I've used. Now of course, I can't actually provide you with the music because the music is actually license to me and Epidemic sound. But you can just use any music track that has some kind of free access or free rights of use. And there are sites that you can talk about this in the beginner course where you can access free music tracks. But unfortunately, I can't provide these tracks to you. But I'll drag this one in here into my timeline and just drag it up there. Expand this out, this back. Right, so we have our music track there. Now what if it just lock that layer there just so that we don't interfere with that music track at all. And then I'm going to go into my clips. And these clips here, if you want to experiment with this, you can actually download these clips from where I get them from pixabay.com. So go to pixabay.com. I just typed in Africa in the search. And I've got this little map here. Where is it? Yeah, this little map here of the continent of Africa. It's pretty cool, right? So I just downloaded that one and a downloaded if you are the clips from here as well. And then I imported them into my projects. So check out Pixabay really, really nice website. So back into the project. I will then start with taking the map and dragging that into my timeline. I get great. So I'm going to shrink this down. I'm also going to move fairly quickly through this. And so the next thing I'm gonna do is get one of my ink transitions and I'm going to drop it on top. So which one I'm going to use, maybe, maybe this one, I'll just use number 1 and then drag it on top like that, right? I might even just, Okay, so we're going to fix this. I'm going to show you how to make this. If you need to make your ink transitions longer, then I'll show you how you can do that just a second. So at the moment is sitting on top. Okay, so we now need to bring these two together so they work together. So we're going to use the fur, go into these two little arrows here. Got affects, type in Track Matte. I've already got a Track Matte key. And then drag Track Matte key over onto Africa, map or drag it on to video track layer one. So wherever your footages you want to drag this effect onto that footage. Don't drag it onto the ink transition overlay. Okay, then click on that clip there on the timeline go to Effect Controls. Scroll down and you'll see Track Matte key here to settings you need to change drop-down. We're going to select, we want the mat to be selected to the attract layer two, right? So video track layer 2 is where our R transition is at or are over layers. And then we go back to our clip, go down. And then where it says composite using we select Luma. So as we selected Loma, you'll see that the smoke is all the ink is right there at the bottom of the frame. But if we scroll back and start this from the beginning, what have we got so far? It is that simple. Now what do you do here though? Because you might have a situation where your video clip is super long like this. But the transition or the overlay is that it like this is the end of this is all we have. So what I usually do if I want to extend out composites like that, is I go back into my project bin and then I go down to here where it says New Item. Click on that, go to Color Matte and click Okay, and I want to set a white color matt. I'll just call it white mat. Enter. And it's like, Okay, where is it? So it's in here somewhere. I've already created one, so it doesn't really matter. So this is my white color matte. I click and drag it over here just to fill in that gap there. If I want my map to be that long, then I need to make my colormap be extended for the entire length of that particular clip. So it's going to extend out this composite. So if I play this back, excellent. Because if I don't have that there, watch what happens. And it's no longer playing back this particular video clip. Okay, So we'll undo that and we will shrink this down and give it a little bit of sync with the music. And then we just drag in the next clip. So we'll grab which one we're gonna grab, grab this one here. Right? We're just dragged it over, put it on to video track layer two. And then we just grab another overlay and we'll grab this, grab any one of them. This one here, drag it over the top. And so what I like to do is click on this clip here and then go to Effect Controls, scroll down. And then where it says Track Matte key and go Control C for copy or Command C on the keyboard. Click on this clip here, the next clip on the timeline, and then go Control or Command V. And that will paste that effect into that clip. You would have noticed that that popped up there. So we now play back and see what's happened. So what we can do it because that transition starts here. I might just chop this down a little bit and then drag that Ford said it, play it again, right? And where that music is changing, we can just trim this up a little bit and it's pulled back from the beginning. And that's as simple as that. How you create ink transitions in your video projects inside of Premiere Pro, don't forget to download these transition overlays either after the video or in the resources section of the course. Follow along with me and let me know. Hey, go, if you have any questions, let me know and I'll see you in the next tutorial. 30. Exporting- Exporting Transparent Video (with Alpha Channel): A few people have asked me how to export transparent video with alpha channel inside of Premiere Pro, which is really handy from a flexibility point of view. If you're working with titles, for example, and you want to create your own custom title inside Premiere Pro. And you want to use the same title across each of your future video projects. You can do that if you export that title with an Alpha channel or a transparency map, which then allows you to overlay that title over your future video projects. Now that probably doesn't make a whole lot of sense. That's why I'm going to show you how to do it in this tutorial. So Just, so for example, I am just here in the Essential Graphics panel. And just say for example, I take one of these graphic layers here and just say for example, I want to customize this. And I'm going to do it right now and I'm going to talk very quickly. So in here I'm just going to type in something like my name. And as you can see, I've got a black background, right? So if I were to export this normally as we've done in previous videos, episode one, then it's going to export the animated graphics with this black background. So if I play this back and have a nice little animation there, so just say for example, I want to use this animated graphic in future video projects in all of my future video projects. Now, as mentioned, if you export this normally as an H.264 or an MP4 file as you would any other normal video for YouTube or Facebook, it's going to export. Everything is going to export this black background as well as the texts, which means you can't use this text or this graphic in future projects because you can have this black background. So we need to export this without the black background. So we want to create a, what they call a transparent video with an Alpha channel. And so it's quite basic to do. I'll show you how to do it. So we have our animated text here. And then we're going to export just this animated graphic. So we go over to File export and media. And we have here format. Now, usually you would have selected H.264, right? As we've done in previous projects. But in this case, because H.264 doesn't support alpha channels or transparency videos, we need to change this format. And we need to change it to a format that does support alpha channels, which is quick time. So we changed that to QuickTime. Under Preset, there are only several options in the list that support alpha or transparent channels or transparent backgrounds, which is Apple ProRes 4, 4, 4, 4 with Alpha. So that's one you could select. The other one is going to be the GoPro Cindy form option. You can either select the one with alpha or the one with alpha at max bit depth. In my experience, I can't really notice a visual difference between the two. I typically just select the one without the max bit depth. Saves a bit more time when it comes to encoding. But you've really got to get two choices here. So Apple ProRes 4, 4, 4, 4 with alpha, or this one here, right? So for now I'm just gonna go the GoPro sinner form. And as you may have noticed, there's changes from a dot mp4 to a dot MOV file. So this is going to export as a dot MOV. Both export video and audio selected to leave that as is. Now if we move down to the video tab, we've got Video Codec. It automatically selects the codec which is GoPro Sydney form codec. We're going to leave that under the video settings for quality. By default is set to the four I usually leave it up for. If you want, you can drag that up to five, right? It's up to you. And if we scroll down 1920 by 1080, right, 30 progressive square pixels. So all that's the same. Leave everything else as is, and then just double-check to make sure that this is selected to RGB Alpha or RGBA, 12 bits per channel, or baby, BPC with alpha can't really see that on the end there. So that's RGB Alpha, 12 bits per channel plus alpha. It's kinda chopped off my screen there. So just make sure that's selected, okay. And then we scroll down, everything else is fine. We don't need to touch anything else and leave this setting alone. Makes sure that this is untyped. Once you've done that, you can export this out. Now if you have a look in the preview window, you'll see this black background that's going to disappear. It export. It's going to take a few seconds. Okay, so that's all exported. So now what I'm gonna do is I'm going to import what we've just export it. And I'm going to prove to you that it has exported that with an alpha channel. Okay, So this is the video that has just been exported with an alpha channel. And there it is, there. I've just imported it here into the project panel. So it's got the black background there, but how can we prove that this has worked? So I've got a little drone clip here. I'll drag the drone clip over onto my timeline like this. And then all I gotta do is drag it over the top of the drone clip and you should just see the text. So if I take the transparent Video, drag it over the top. So as you can see there, it is transparent. The black has been rendered out, and there we have it. So that's quite simply how you create a transparent layer or export transparent video insider Premier Pro. It is that straightforward. You can do this with any kind of video footage with a black background. You could kick it out and then you can export that with an alpha channel. And that means that I could technically use that video clip, that dot MOV file in every future video project where I want to use this exact same title. And that's all there is to it. So if you have any questions, let me know and I'll see you in the next video tutorial. 31. Exporting- The Best Export Settings for YouTube: So you've finished your project inside Premiere Pro, and now it is time to export for YouTube. So in this tutorial, I'll be sharing we do the best export settings for YouTube. And I'll be using one of my old projects on your screen right now to demonstrate how to do that. And so I'll also be sharing with you a few common mistakes that people make when it comes to exporting to YouTube or Vimeo or Amazon or wherever. So we'll get started by using my old project here. So the first thing is, is to get the sequence up on your screen like this and make sure that there's a little blue box around the sequence. Sometimes you might have the box over here in the top left or in the program monitor box. Just make sure you've selected the actual sequence that you wish to export. Now in this case, I've zoomed out and I can see all of my clips on my timeline as such. Now, there's two ways of doing this. The first way is to take the playhead, take it to the very beginning of the sequence, right? The very beginning there, and then press I on the keyboard that will open up an endpoint. So now that's all shaded all the way to the end. And then we take our playhead to the end. We hold down the Shift key, and then we go to the very last clip of our timeline. And then we press the O key on the keyboard, right? So if we don't hold down the Shift key, I'll zoom in just so you can see this. If we don't hold down the Shift key, the playhead will not snap to the very last clip on the timeline. So hold the Shift key down, move the play head, and then it will snap to the very end. And then you just mark a little O on the keyboard, and that will mark an out point for you. So now we have this shaded region where we're telling Premiere Pro to render the entire shaded region from the endpoint to the outpoint. So everything inside here is going to be rendered into our final video. And then what we do is we go to File Export Media, or we press Control or Command M on the keyboard. And that will bring up the same dialogue box. I'm just going to ignore this for now. Click Okay, you shouldn't be seeing that, but I'm seeing it because I've got some media that I haven't linked, which is fine, It's an old project. You should be seeing this dialog box. Now need to point this out. This is one of the common mistakes that people make when it comes to exporting videos in general. So down here, we've got the entire sequence from beginning to end and source range sequence in and out. So I'm telling Premiere Pro to only render between the market and the mark out points of our sequence. Right? Now, if I select entire sequence, then Premiere Pro will render the entire sequence from beginning to end. So let me show you what some people do by accident. If I hit cancel here. Sometimes people have floating clips. And I'll just use one of these clips for example, right? Some people have like some clips sitting over here on their timeline like this may be a little bit of B-roll or maybe some sound bites, some soundbites right there. Just kind of sitting over here in this is almost like a scratch pad really. But this is not really what you want to have included in the final video. So if I just clear the in and out points, so right-click on the bracket and then select Clear in and outs. And don't tell Premiere Pro to render in an out. Watch what happens if I go File, Export Media, click OK, and watch what happens. So if I hit the drop-down here, entire sequence, premiere Pro will actually render all of these clips over here, and it'll render these as well. You'll find that in your final video, you will see all of this rendered over here. And then there'll be some black video. And then it'll render these clips as well. And I've actually watched a couple of YouTube videos over the years where the creator has done that. And there's been like a few minutes of black video and then a few random clips at the end of their videos. So it's just, it always pays to watch the video that you've rendered after Premier Pro has rendered it and get yourself in the habit of doing that. I always watch my videos after Premier Pro has rendered them just to make sure that they're rendered correctly. Okay, so we'll just go back. And so now we'll tell Premiere Pro to only render the shaded area. So all of these little floating clips over here will not be part of the final video. So we go final, sorry, File export and media. Click OK. Ok. So we've got here source range. So I want to tell Premiere Pro and remind Premiere Pro that is sequence in and out or the in and out points that we want it to render. And then we go over here to export settings. So we have here format H.264. So this is what we want to make sure that it's selected for YouTube specifically, there are many other formats, but I'll talk more about those in other videos. So make sure H.264 selected. And then under Preset, now, if we scroll down, we have all of the options for YouTube down here. These are our YouTube presets. Now typically, for most people, it will be 1080 P or it'll be 2160 pay, which is for k. So in this case, because I've shot and edited this video at 1080, I want to render at 1080. And that's kind of a nice general rule of thumb as well. So whatever frame rate and whatever dimensions or aspect ratio you film your videos in whatever sequence you've created, you want to kind of keep it consistent with your exporting. So if you've shot your videos at 1080 and you've created a 1080 sequence, then make sure you're exporting a 1080. There might be times where you've shot it for k and your sequences at fork. And you want to export it 1080, which is fine, but typically it's not a good idea. If you've shot at 1080 and you have a sequence of 1080 and you export a four K, also known as upscaling. So just keep it fairly consistent. 1080, 1080, 1080 for k, for k, for k, right? So if we have look here at source, this gives you a good indication. So for source, the source was shot at 1920 by 1080 square pixels, 25 frames a second progressive, and the audio was 48 thousand hertz and stereo. So that gives me an idea that my output should be 1920 by 1080. So we have leukemia under Output, 1920 by 1080 square pixels, 25 frames. A second progressive hardware encoding. And we have a few other settings which we'll talk about VBR 1 pass. Don't worry about that. We'll get to that in a second. And then we have 48 kilohertz and stereo. So I like to keep these the same or as close as possible. And then down here we've got output name. So this is the name that I want to give my project and also where I want my project to be stored after it's rendered. And then we just leave these to tick boxes, right? We want to export the video and the audio together. And then we just move down to this tab here, video. And we'll start firstly, 1920 by 1080. Don't need to touch it. And we move down. Frame rate 25 frames. Don't need to touch it progressive, don't need to touch it. Square pixels. Just leave that hardware encoding if we want to use the graphics card over the actual software itself in your laptop or computer, I leave it as hardware encoding. I leave it as high level 4.2. I leave it at 4.2. If we move down, the one of the important settings that you need to keep in mind is bitrate settings. This is an important one because this will dictate how big your final video will be. So if we have a look at this closely bitrate settings at the moment, because we've set the preset YouTube 1080 P full HD. It automatically sets the bitrate encoding to VBR, or also known as variable bit rate single-pass, as opposed to constant bit rate or VBR 2 pass. So I'll talk more about the differences later. But essentially what they're saying here is that Premiere Pro walls scan over and render your sequence in one take right from beginning to end. Whereas for VBR 2 pass Premiere Pro will firstly scan the sequence from beginning to end. It will create some key frames and we'll figure out where all the action is and where there are a lot of cuts in the footage. And it will dedicate more of the megabits to the fast action, to the fast cuts in your sequence, as opposed to slow motion and slower cuts and things of that nature. So again, a conversation for another day. But when we're talking about YouTube here, which already applies a significant amount of compression to your videos. It's acceptable to just leave it at one pass, owes to make videos for Amazon Prime. And so it's different because I'd be setting different presets and I'd be using to pass. But we have to think about the kind of the medium that we're creating, the content for, which is YouTube, it's acceptable to leave it at one pass. And then moving down to target bit rate, 16 megabits per second is completely acceptable when making videos for YouTube. And let me explain why if we go over here to the YouTube Help page. And this is something to keep in mind when you're an intermediate video editor. It's a lot, There's a lot of bad advice on YouTube about the best export and encoding settings. It really does depend on the platform you making the video for. And so because there's a tutorial is about how to export for YouTube, It's best to go to the YouTube Help page and have a look to see for yourself what YouTube recommend that you do. So if we look closely, we got here recommended uploading coding settings. This is for YouTube. And it talks about container format, which is MP4, and then video codec, which is H.264, which is what we've selected already, the frame rates. And if we move down to bit rate, and we have looked at these tables here. So we have two tables, one for standard definition, the other one for high definition. And so we have these different aspect ratios. So for 10 ADP at 48, 50, or 60 frames per second, the recommended bit rate is 15 megabits per second. There are people on YouTube that recommend setting this to 30. But there's no point because YouTube is going to compress it anyway. And it just means that we've gone from, if you have a look at this closely, it was already 16. Have looked at the estimated file size. It's over 4 thousand megabytes. Now if you think you're going to get more quality by having a high number, then think again, it just means that you'll file size is going to double in size now is 700 thousand megabytes. But it also means that it doesn't matter because YouTube is going to compress it anyway, right? It just means that we have to live with a larger file size. So just stick with the YouTube recommendations. And then if we move down further, keyframe distance, this is where if we're playing with two paths, then we would alter the keyframe distance. As I said, when you're selecting to PaaS, Premiere Pro will scan once. It will create keyframes around where all the action is in the form h. And then it will go through the second time and it'll render out and apply a greater quality or more megabits per second to the fast action scenes versus the slow motion parts of the scene. But we don't need to worry about keyframe distance, at least that, because we're just playing with single-pass. If we move down in terms of these settings here, I don't really touch that. My might go into more detail on them later. And then if we have a look here, we've got our estimated file size, just over 4 thousand megabytes for gigs in this case. And then we just hit Export. And one last thing I want to point out is the publish option here. Now years ago I had a really slow internet connection. And so what I used to do when I finished editing my videos light at night, is that I would go to Publish and then I would tell Premiere Pro that after it rendered my project to automatically upload that video to my YouTube channel. So if you click on Publish and scroll down, you can actually click on YouTube here. And you can sign into your YouTube channel. You can select the channel name here. And you can also set all these parameters up with title of your video at the description, the playlist, and all of that kind of stuff. And I usually set this to private. I said a couple of tags in here. And then what I do, what I used to do years ago was that I'd hit Export. I'd go to bed. And then this would render while I was asleep, and then it would also upload. So by the time I woke up, the video was already ready on YouTube for me to publish. So this is kinda handy if you want a more of a streamline flow from your project being rendered right through to being uploaded to upload it to YouTube. I don't do this anymore because I've got a fast Internet connection now, so it doesn't really matter, but that's something to keep in mind. Lastly, under audio, I don't usually change any settings here. By default is set to AAC. The AAC audio codec is selected. The sample rate is 48 kilohertz and stereo, I just leave those as is the bit rights, 320 kilobits per second. I'll just leave that. And then yeah, I just export it and we're good to go. So I hope this was helpful if you have any questions, definitely let me know and I'll see you in the next video tutorial. 32. Exporting- Bulk Sequence Exporting with Media Encoder: Previous tutorial, I showed you how to export your project once you've finished with it, it's just a straightforward as going through those little settings that I showed you and then hitting export and it will render out and then you wait and it's done. However, here's the alternative. And you will come across this. I can assure you if you are making a lot of projects and you're working with clients or you're making your own content for your YouTube channel or whatever. And that is the situation of your bulk exporting. So you need to render out multiple projects so that you can continue editing insider Premier Pro. So I'm going to show you the alternative which is using Adobe Media Encoder, which is what I'm, I've got on your screen right now. And this is actually free to download as part of your Creative Cloud membership. I highly recommend you just download this through your creative cloud desktop application. And you'll get to see what I'm seeing on my screen right now. And so what you're seeing is the interface to Media Encoder. That doesn't seem like a lot is going on here. But the main panel that where we need to be concerned with, with Media Encoder is the queuing panel. So all of these sick, these are all sequences listed here. And these were all exported from Adobe Premiere Pro. And essentially this is ready for me to hit the play button. And this will render out each one of these sequences as final videos once I hit that Play button. So I'm going to hit that Play button. I'm going to go and have lunch. And by the time I get back, hopefully all of these will be finished. But let me show you how I've done this. So I'll give you an example. I've jumped into Premiere Pro here. And I had to make a very slight change to these tutorial videos that I'm making right now. Just to very tiny change to each of these tutorial videos. Now, if you only followed the advice that I gave you in the previous video, I would have to make the small change in the tutorial videos and then go File Export Media, and then set my preset and then move down and then hit Export. And then I have to wait for five or ten minutes for that to export. And then I'd have to go into the next video. Credit another sequence, make another small change. File, Export Media, or just go Control M. Scroll down, make sure everything's set here. Go export, wait another five or ten minutes. So this is not a very efficient export workflow. When you get to an intermediate level or above in you're making a lot of projects and or you're in a situation like me right now where I have to make just a very tiny change to the sharpness of the videos. This is a terrible workflow. So that's why using Media Encoder will save you so much time. Now you may not come across this right now, but just pin this video in the back your mind, because if you do come across a situation that I'm in right now, go and get Media Encoder and follow this tutorial. So in the previous video, I showed you how to export a simple sequence out insider Premier Pro. And by hitting export down here, you don't need Media Encoder. The encoding takes place with inside of Premiere Pro. However, if you hit X is R, If you hit Q, Premier Pro will send that sequence off to Media Encoder and we'll put it inside that list. And I'll just show you right now. So just have checked over these settings here, and then I hit Q. It automatically opens up Media Encoder. It takes that sequence and drops it into this list here, right here where it says working with nested sequences. That's what we just exported from Premiere Pro. Nao. See here I've got a giant list. And when I hit Play, which I'll show you in just a second, it will start rendering out from the very top of the list all of the sequences one by one. But if I show you real quick, I can look at the first sequence at the top of the queue. And I can see basic information such as if I click here, I can see a bring up a sequence just like insider Premier Pro. And I can change the format. I can set another preset. I can change the output name. I can make all these adjustments here. Click Okay. And then I can go across here and make sure that these video files are going to be going to the same folder. So they're all going to be encoded inside of this folder here. So very much happy with that. If I scroll down, I look, yeah, it looks pretty good to me. And then once I'm happy, I have a look down here where it says renderer, and I make sure that that's selected to GPU acceleration. It just means that all of these are going to render using my graphics card in my laptop. And then I just hit the play button there and watch what happens and I'm doing this live with you right now. Okay, so now that Media Encoder has started just a quick side note, I just had to restart this tutorial recording because I think the computer which is could not handle the fact that I had hardware encoding set here in the drop-down. Because I'm also recording this tutorial using hardware encoding. And I've got Premiere Pro using hardware encoding. So I think it's just too much of a demand on my laptop, so it all crashed and I've had to restart this recording, but then I've changed it to software only, so it seems to be working so far. But this is a real insight to how media encoder works. And you can see here that we'll just go down the list here and I get a little preview of the videos that it's encoding and little bit of information about those videos. But that just means that I can go back into Premier Pro and I can continue working on another project. And it doesn't hold up Premiere Pro. In a traditionally if you go File Export, insider Premier Pro, you don't need Media Encoder, but it just means you have to wait and you can't do anything else inside Premiere Pro until it finishes rendering the project. Whereas now I can just continue with this project here. Go Control M. Once I'm finished, all go File, Export Media. And I can export this sequence out, and I can send that one off to Media Encoder as well. So I can go through all this again, click on Queue, and that will send it off to Media Encoder. So essentially I can just go away, have lunch, and by the time I come back, this all, hopefully all be finished. So I highly recommend using Media Encoder if you're in a situation similar to mine right now, just keep it in mind. I know you probably won't use it most of the time, but there will be times where you will be using it to help speed up your exporting workflow. So if you have any questions, please let me know. Shoot me an email. Otherwise, I'll see you in the next video tutorial. 33. Workflow Breakdown- Editing Workflow Breakdown #1 - AKA Thailand Highlight Reel: So I'll be sharing with you my editing workflow for a project that I finished this morning. And by watching this video, you'll get some ideas around and some of the behind the scenes of how I think and how I structure my own projects. And so I'll give you a couple little tips and things that you'll be able to take away and apply in your own projects moving forward. So that's why I'm going to start making these little workflow editing breakdown videos just to show you some stuff that's very difficult to explain by using singular tutorial videos. So I'm going to play this particular video, which goes from around two minutes. So you can see what it looks like. After this video plays are going to break it down for you. And you can take some notes, you can fast-forward the video or you can slow it down. It's up to you. So I'm gonna play this video right now, and then I'm gonna come back to the tutorial. I hope you enjoy the highlights. I didn't get a chance to come the tile Edit Terrain. Did I go really great place and you feel like you're trading and I was younger. I will occur. So as I said, down low Batty as he held a year, I must say. How can we zoom in? We got it. We got it, Got it. And low at the moment. Yeah. We gotta we think that if they cannot go, we go. And we got it. Got it describes try to try to go against other Magdala. We got a day off, so we gotta get it. Then on a row, we got it, got it. We cannot go without having to go against some data that we get a row and everybody is doing their private sessions now. There's going to be a privates. Anyway, usually do it between the groups losses. The group plots to 0 between ethics seven or 730 in the morning for two hours, in the afternoon at four PM for two hours so you can get products in between the group sessions. All right. Okay. So that's break that down showy. So the video that you just saw is on your screen right now on the timeline, the two minute highlight reel. So I'm gonna go through this quite quickly. Feel free to slow down this tutorial if it's too fast for you. But I'm going to move quickly to get through this as fast as possible. So the first thing is first, before I even open up the software, I think about two things. I think about the story that I'm trying to tell to the audience, and I think about the emotion that I'm trying to communicate. This is my general mental workflow before I even start any kind of workflow inside of Premier Pro. And this is something that comes with time and experience and making hundreds of videos, you start to develop your own technique of telling stories and communicating that story through certain types of emotion. And so the way I've done it in this little highlight reel is that I wanted to communicate the story of how intense this training camp was. I went to this training camp in 20182019. And it was a beautiful camp in the middle of a jungle, very relaxing and also very intense. But I want to communicate those two emotions In this video of around two to 2.5 minutes. So in my head, I wanna make it two to 2.5 minute highlight reel. And inside that two minutes, I want to communicate to primary emotions. The emotions of the camp being in sort of a, a jungle. They're relaxing, laid back feeling of this particular camp. And then I want to finish this highlight reel as being intense over the top, dramatic, cinematic. And I want to communicate that as a separate emotion. So now that I figured out the emotion that I want to get across in my highlight reel. Now it's over to Epidemic Sound World. Try and find music that will help communicate that emotion. So we've got two different types of emotion that I want to communicate. I head over to Epidemic Sound. And using the category function or genre function, I can figure out what kind of tracks I need. So for example, if I'm going for laid-back, I'm I going to hip hop. And I myself listening to all of these tracks that fall under the umbrella of dreamy and. Happy and a centric and funny and hopeful and so on and so forth. I'll go on a very long walk. I'll start listening to all of these tracks. And then I'll figure out what track is going to suit the first half of this highlight reel. And so I decided to go with this one up and down a little golf rays and how can we Zoom in a moment? Okay, So that's more of a laid back, chilled hip hop track, which kinda matches the mood that I'm trying to communicate in the first half of this little montage here. And then the second half is more intense over the top. And I'm looking for a track that's going to help communicate that intensity. So then I got back into Epidemic Sound. I'll go to maybe genre. And then I go to, well actually maybe go to mood. And under mood, I might go with Epic. And so all of us and to all of these tracks. So epic chasing angry, you know, these are the kinds of tracks that I'm going to listen too busy and frantic, and so on and so forth. And then I'll listen to a bunch of these and then figure out what's going to work. And then I'll drop it into my project and play it back. And this is what I came up with. Okay, so there you have it. So that's how I pick and choose tracks, generally speaking, to match or communicate emotion in my little videos. So I'm going to show you a little technique I like to use, which I'll like to think of as track manipulation. Because if you have a look closely, we have two tracks here on the timeline, and I've actually chopped them up a little bit. You'll notice that closely I've actually chopped them up and have manipulated them a little bit. Because remember I've got a highlight reel that I want to be no more than about two minutes long. These two tracks which I've conveniently dumped over here quite long. And I don't want to use the entire length of these tracks. So let me show you a little trick that I like to use. I like to chop them up, take what I want, and then leave the rest behind. So play this back, for example, and I'll show you what I mean. So first one, That's the light backtrack and then this one is the more intense one. Okay. But I obviously don't want to use the entire length of both of these. So what I've done, what I usually do is I listened to a track and I look at these little wave forms here, and I'll just move this up. So, and I'll make this bigger, like this, bigger so you can see the waveform and we'll look at these little peaks. And I like to see what's going on in the waveform by looking at the visual, I can see here that there's some kind of a little buildup here. So I click on that and figure out what's going on there. So I like that little buildup there, right? I can use that somewhere. I'm not sure where, but I'm going to use that somewhere. And I think to myself, I don't really need the first half, so I'm just going to slice that off and now right around there. And then I listened to the rest of it. So it kinda drops off there. And then it kind of comes in a little bit more. That then I think to myself I really want to use that pace. So then I play the end of it. And then I think to myself, I actually like how it just tapers off nicely at the end there. So what I do and every track is different, is I just cut out what I want, cut out what I don't want. And then I might just cut this piece out because I don't want to. So I'm going to delete that pays because I don't really want to use it. And I just slide these together like this. Now this is very, very rough. Okay? So we're going to make this nice and seamless. Okay? So essentially we've cut out a small piece and then I'm going to put a little fade in between, right? So if you go to right-click and then go apply default transitions, this will apply a constant power, right? So this is a really good audio transition to use and listen. It is. You can't really notice a difference, especially when you start adding in visuals, which is what I've done over here. Right? So if we play this back, so I've actually, I've actually align the transition of constant power with cross dissolve with the text. So that's a little technique I like to use. I like to chop up the background track just so if there's anything I don't want in the background track, I just chop it out and manipulate it a little bit to essentially achieve what I'm trying to achieve. And every track is different. Okay, So if we go back over to our other track here, I'll show you one more, one more time. An example with this track here. We've got some vocals there. And I've listened to this. I like that. We can go with that. Okay, So I listened, I've already listened to the whole track like 10 times. So I already know that where it kind of drops off here. I essentially want to kinda take this off and just delete the rest of that off. So I'm only going to use the first part of this track. And then what I'm gonna do is I will put that into the project like this, set some keyframes to change the levels around like that. And then what I wanna do, because we've got here two parts of the highlight reel. We have the more laid-back pot and we have the more intense pot. And then in the middle we have some dialogue. So for me in the way I feel about this project is that I'm trying to transition the audience out of this emotion and into this emotion. We're going from something quite laid back into something quite intense. So I've deliberately placed the dialogue piece in the middle between the two to help people watching transition out of this into the next piece over here, I'll play this back and I'll show you what I mean. And also you'll notice that our tape it off the first track here. Actually I'll just solo these two tracks. Everybody's doing their private sessions now, acre, okay, z you will see that that's being tapered off there. And then I'm starting to taper in this second track here, but I've also cut out a piece of that second track. So if I play this, I'll show you what I mean. So suddenly typer and now rises slowly building up. And then alright, so I know that at that point of the track, I want where drops. I want the action to begin. All right, so that's where the intensity begins, right where it drops there. But you'll see if I go back over here that are taken the beginning here. So I'm kind of using that piece as more or less as suspenseful buildup. And what I do is I just chop that off and I used that piece on its own. So essentially what I've done with this tract is I've used this piece. I've deleted that, and then I've slid these together, right? And essentially I've got these two pieces of the same track. And if I go over here, this is exactly what I've done. I've got this piece here, more or less the buildup atmospheric. I'll play this back. And then I've used a constant power. And you really cannot notice the difference there that I've actually chopped these two tracks to pieces and I've used a constant power and they have it. So that's essentially how I manipulate my tracks. Now, every project is different, but you can, you can do the same thing, just try it in your own projects. Use a constant power to help blend those two tracks together. And you can do it in a way where people watching will never ever know that you've completely butchered the background music. Okay, so the next piece I want to talk about is basic sound design. So this is a whole other topic of discussion, but I'll briefly go through the basic sound design I've done in this project here. But firstly, I'll just give you an idea of how I've laid out my, my tracks here. So we have audio track layer 1, 2, 3, and 4. So all of my dialogue where I'm talking is all on A1, right? So a one, play this back, right place. And, and all my background music is on a2, Right? So those two tracks I showed you before, and then I've got my atmospherics, right? So all my ambience, right? And then I've got my sound effects on A4, and I'll play back my sound effects. So essentially with sound design, with all of these sound effects and atmospherics, it's essentially giving you a project depth. I used to make videos where I just had my visuals and the background music and nothing else. And it was, I look back on those videos and I think our though so, so shallow, they just lacked depth. And it's often that the sound effects and all the ambiance that really gives depth to your project. And i'll, I'll play back what this project will look like if I didn't use any of those sound effects or ambience. So you get to see what it looks like. So I'll just mute all of these. Those two actually are. I'll play that again. I mean, it's okay, but I mean, it's not it's nothing compared to this. Okay, so you get the idea. So have a play around with this in your own projects. Start to slowly implement sound effects and ambient tracks or atmospheric tracks in your own projects. And with Epidemic sound, you can actually search sound effects. We've got a sound effects up here. You don't have to use epidemic sound. You can use other platforms. A lot of other platforms have the option for sound effects in you can look for ambiance here, or whips or whether or waves or whatever. And start implementing these into your own project. So we've got birds, forest. Okay, so you get the idea. There's so many. So spend time on adding these elements into your own projects. So anyways, so what else do I need to show you? Okay, so B-roll, I'm going to show you B-roll, you would have definitely come across B roll given that you're in the intermediate course. So B-roll is essentially just supplementing the story that you're telling, right? So it's what they call cutaway footage or foolish. They kind of augments the story that you're talking about, right? So for example, if I play this back, I've got me talking, which is the a role. Hope you enjoy the highlights. And if you get a chance to come to Thailand to train, and this is the B-roll, aka go. B-roll is essentially over the top of the a role, right? And it does several things. It helps augment the story that you're telling. It also keeps the, the viewer engaged as well. So they're not just staring at my face the whole time. You give them things that are changing on the screen that keeps the viewer engaged, right? So for example, in this case here I'm talking about the camping in the middle of a forest or something. And I use a B-roll clip that is of the forest or the jungle. So I'll play this back to like a training of the jungle, right? So I talk about a jungle and then I use a B-roll clip of a jungle, right? So that's how you would use B-roll. And so I encourage you to use as much be role as necessary to tell you a story, to keep your viewer engaged as long as possible. I'll give you another example. Sarah, between, I think seven or 730 in the morning, two hours in the afternoon for PM, for two hours. And also B-roll is a really good way to hide mistakes or hide cuts in your a roll. So if you're using a script, for example, if you're looking down on your notes, written down in your palm cards or, or something like that, or you've made a mistake, you can actually use B-Roll to cover up your a roll and the audience will never know. So that's another reason to use a B-roll as well. The next thing I want to talk about is blending modes. So I've used a couple of blending modes in this clip, in this video, I'll show you. So here we have a blending mode. And I always encouraged people to experiment and play around with blending modes. Just adds a little bit more interest and a bit more dynamic nurse to your videos. And in this case, I've used, if I click on this clip and go to Effect Controls, I've used hard light to go one to play with. And I've used a capacity at 70, around 75, 77 percent, right? So good example of using blending modes. Okay, My computer's running a little slow because I'm also recording this. And the last thing I want to show you is cutting on action and L cuts. So there's an example here where I have cut on action. That's a very common editing, basic editing technique. Or just find out where I've used it actually. Ok, so right here, I've used an example of two things. I've used cutting on action, and I've used an L cut. So cutting on action means that you are essentially starting the action with one angle, one camera angle, and you're finishing that action with a second camera angle. And then an L cut is what I'll show you in just a second. So I'll play this clip back and I'll show you what I mean because it might be hard to understand, but watch this. So I'll bring this down so you can see it. Okay, maybe just there we go. Let's make this smaller. Okay, so we have this clip here, right here, this guy, the trainer. And then we have the second clip, which is me and the trainer. Watch what happens. Now, play this back. So one camera angle and the action begins. And then now he does a slip and then it cuts to me. One 23. That's finishing that action. So the action starts, the drill starts with this guy here in the first ket, 1, 2, 3 slip, and then it cuts to me finishing at action. At the same time. And it might be difficult to see, but I'll show you another example of where I've used that. At the same time, I've also used an L cut. I'll talk about cutting on action and L cuts in the beginner course. If this is too much for you to understand. That's why I'm going a little bit fast here. But with an L cut, you'll see an L cut. The reason why they call it an LCA is because you've got the audio. So you'll see that these two are linked together. We have the visual and the audio linked together, right? So they have a bit of an L shape, right? You'll see that that looks like a little bit of an L shape. That what that means is that the audio from the first clip will continue to play even though we're now on the visual of the second clip. So we have clip one, clip to right, and we have the Clip 1 and the audio for Clip 1. And then we have the visual for Clip 2. So even though the visual for the first clip has finished, we're still hearing the audio on the second clip. From the audio on the first clip, is that makes sense. I'll play this back. Actually, I'll just mute that. Sorry, I'll solo this. So you notice that. So we're still hearing now that we're on the second clip, you'll see me here. We're still hearing the audio from the first visual. Okay, one more time. So they call that an L cut. It just means that the audio from the first clip continues on even though you're seeing the visual of the second clip. So what I've done is I've actually used both cutting on action and I've used an L cut both at the same time. Alright, so I'll play this again. Right? So I'll show you another example of cutting on action because that's a little bit difficult to see. I'll just zoom out and go over here somewhere. Okay, I'll show you right here. So I'm going to mute all these tracks because it's unnecessary, right? Okay, So essentially with cutting on action, right? I'm only using one cap. There's any one camera filming me the whole time. And a really good way of sort of seamlessly moving between what looks like there are two cameras or three cameras. And only using one camera, you can use the technique of cutting on action. It gives the impression that there are multiple cameras around, but there's not, in this case, there's any one camera the whole time. So for example, I've got here this particular angle, right where I start the action or start my action 12, and then I then switch camera angle, same camera, different angle to complete that action. So I'll do that again. So now I start the action in the first angle, 1, 2, and then 3, which is the hook, now switches over to the next camera angle. So how I've done this, and I'll show you real quick, is I've got two clips here. Both films on the same camera. If I play this back, 12. So essentially I've got 1, 2, 3, 1, 2, and a hook, right? And this clip over here, and I'll just unlink and I'll show you this clip over here from the other angle. If I scratched his back the other way, you see that I'm doing the same thing, 1, 2, 3. So I immediately know, argh, I'm doing the same action on this second angle. I'm going to put these two clips together and do a cut on action. But I'm going to cut the action so that it's on the hook right there. So then I align these two in such a way, 12 and then right where I begin the hook. Look at this clip here. There we go. It's close enough, right? So one more time, 12, and then there we go, three. So that's called cutting on action. And that's essentially what I've done here for this, these two clips. And the last thing actually I want to mention, I forgot to mention this is about the audio. So essentially, when I'm mixing audio and I'll talk more about this in the beginner course when I get all my sound effects and my ambience and my background music on the timeline. And I've got everything in the right place. Then it comes to a point where I need to mix it and make sure that it's mixed properly and you're I'm hearing everything that needs to be heard and things that might be too loud. I bring them down in terms of loudness, right? So the other thing I'm going to mention in this part of the tutorial, because this is quite a big topic in itself, is I'm just going to mention the fact that when you are mixing your audience, makes sure that the output over here in your meters is around between minus 12 to minus six, right? So minus 12 to minus six is a good ballpark to get your meters kind of flop firing and between. Make sure you don't peek at anymore than n minus 3 or minus 2 and never ever go into the red over here. Never. So if I play this back, I'll show what I mean. When I'm doing the final check on the audio. I'm only looking at this meter over here. And I'm making sure that those meters are between minus 12, minus 6. And sometimes, and this is what I've done here. I've used keyframes because this piece here, if I just solo this out, alright, so I'll just delete these keyframes and I'll show you what I've done here. And if I just solo these three. So at that point there, what will happen to the meters? Little bit too loud. So what I've done is I've gone in with my pen tool and I've just dropped this piece down, right? So it's not as loud there, right? So I'll play this again. That's much better. You see what happens if I just have any of my sound effects a little bit too high and volume. See it peeking, that's peeking out there. We don't want that at all. Okay, so you really want to just spend time going through here using these rubber bands. They call them rubber bands and your selection tool and just kinda clicking and dragging these down. Also you can right-click on these little sound effects, go to Audio Gain. And you can either adjust the gain in here. So I can put three decibels or minus three if I want to drop the gain by minus three decibels, right? So that's generally how you do it. I took more about the detail of this in the beginner course. I'm not going to spend a lot of time on it, and that is it. So I hope this was helpful. I hope you able to take a few things away from this. Otherwise, if you have any questions, definitely let me know. If you're not sure of anything, maybe re-watch this tutorial. And again, I'll talk more about a lot of these concepts, the basic concepts in the beginner course. Otherwise, I'll see you in the next tutorial. 34. Conclusion- The End of a Chapter: You've made it to the end of the course. This is the last video for the series, and this is a goodbye video. It's also a congratulations video. And it's also a thank you video because I am really honored and privileged to be able to share my knowledge and experience around premiere probe with everybody who's spent time watching these videos and even maybe come from the beginner series. Well, that's over 15 hours of me just pouring out everything I've learned over 5.5 years of experience with using Premier Pro. And I've made 3000 or 4000 videos now just in this software alone. Everything from scuba diving, flying, kick boxing, fitness, all sorts of things. You know, climbing mountains, vlogs, lots of different types of content that I've made would the software. And so I never thought that I would be in a position in a 5.5 years later where I'd be sharing all of that with everybody watching. And so I've made this course because a lot, quite a few people who are messaging me asking for the intermediate course. And I thought about it for a while and then I decided to put it together. And so I'm going to continue to add videos to this series because there's still a few different ideas. I have this still people asking me questions about certain things. So if you have any questions at all, I will make some extra videos to put into this series. So even though this is, it seems like the end and it's kind of a happy moment and a sad moment all in one. But just realized that I will continue to add videos to this series. So if you do have any questions, do come back to this course. And I might have answered them by adding an additional videos that you haven't watched. So feel free to message me or email me any questions. I'll be more than happy to help you out. But as I said in the beginner course, you know, at the very end, it's not the end of the journey. It's almost like the beginning of the next chapter. This is a learning process for everyone, even myself. And I continue to find different ways of storytelling with this software. So the way I teach and what I've learned over the years does continue to evolve because my style kind of changes. I like to experiment with different things as Adobe afraid to try different things. And don't be afraid to be really creative and try anything you've got on your mind. Just try it and see what happens. And this is a fantastic journey and I hope that you continue your editing journey and let me know in, in so many years to come where that takes you semi, semi miles, I'd be interested to see where you guys end up. So thanks again for tuning in and I'll see you sometime in the future.