Adobe Premiere Pro CC 2020 - The Basics of Video Editing | Rance Keating | Skillshare

Adobe Premiere Pro CC 2020 - The Basics of Video Editing

Rance Keating, Video Production + English Teaching

Play Speed
  • 0.5x
  • 1x (Normal)
  • 1.25x
  • 1.5x
  • 2x
30 Lessons (2h 58m) View My Notes
    • 1. Introduction to this Adobe Premiere Pro CC 2020 Class

      6:17
    • 2. Starting a New Project + Project Settings in Premiere Pro

      5:35
    • 3. Learning How To Use Workspaces + Panels PART 1

      4:01
    • 4. Learning How to Use Workspaces + Panels PART 2

      5:55
    • 5. Creating Your Own Workspace Layout PART 1

      5:03
    • 6. The Project Panel + Creating Bins in Adobe Premiere Pro

      4:09
    • 7. Introduction to the Timeline PART 1

      5:05
    • 8. Introduction to the Timeline PART 2

      4:18
    • 9. Creating Your Own Workspace Layout PART 2

      4:43
    • 10. The Audio Track Mixer in Premiere Pro

      2:17
    • 11. Creating Your Own Workspace Layout PART 3

      6:44
    • 12. Sequence Settings PART 1

      8:21
    • 13. Sequence Settings PART 2

      9:01
    • 14. Frame Size + Frame Rate

      7:52
    • 15. Editing Talking Head Footage with Jumps Cuts PART 1

      7:49
    • 16. Editing Talking Head Footage with Jumps Cuts PART 2

      7:48
    • 17. Editing Talking Head Footage with Jumps Cuts PART 3

      7:35
    • 18. L & J Cuts, Zoom Cuts, Broll Cuts PART 1

      6:51
    • 19. L & J Cuts, Zoom Cuts, Broll Cuts PART 2

      7:21
    • 20. Adding an Adjustment Layer in Adobe Premiere Pro

      2:58
    • 21. Finding Premiere Pro Graphics Templates for Your Project

      7:17
    • 22. Basic Color Correction & Lumetri Scopes PART 1

      7:03
    • 23. Basic Color Correction & Lumetri Scopes PART2

      6:54
    • 24. Color Grading: Adding a Stylized 'Look' to Your Footage

      5:50
    • 25. Color Grading: The 'Hollywood' Orange & Teal Look, & Using LUTs

      7:23
    • 26. Lumetri RGB Curves: Adjusting All Colors

      8:30
    • 27. Lumetri RGB Curves: Adjusting Red, Green & Blue

      4:05
    • 28. Hue Saturation Curves: HUE vs SAT

      7:17
    • 29. Hue Saturation Curves: HUE vs HUE

      2:39
    • 30. Hue Saturation Curves: HUE vs LUMA

      1:35

About This Class

Adobe Premiere Pro CC 2020 - The Basics of Video Editing

If you are new to the whole world of video editing with Adobe Premiere Pro, video production, video content creation etc then this beginner video editing class will help get you started as I walk you through the basics of using Adobe Premiere Pro CC 2020.

Maybe you've set your sights on becoming the world's greatest YouTuber, maybe you want to get freelance video editing work using Adobe Premiere Pro, or maybe you just want to make some entertaining cat videos for your mom that have a level of video editing professionalism above the rest. All of these goals can be achieved by taking this Premiere Pro video editing class. 

If you've decided that Adobe Premiere Pro is going to be your video editing program of choice from now on to edit some professional looking video content, then this Premiere Pro video editing class is going to take you through all the basic video editing skills and techniques that you need to edit professional, great looking video content using Adobe Premiere Pro CC 2020.

473dd1f4

Some of the Adobe Premiere Pro CC 2020 video editing topics that will be covered are:

  • Starting a New Project in Premiere Pro + Project Settings
  • Learning How To Use Workspaces + Panels in Premiere Pro
  • Creating Your Own Customized Workspace Layout in Premiere Pro
  • The Project Panel + Creating Bins to organize everything 
  • An Introduction to the Timeline in Adobe Premiere Pro 2020
  • The Audio Track Mixer
  • Sequence Settings in Premiere Pro 2020
  • Frame Size + Frame Rate
  • Editing Talking Head Footage with Jumps Cuts
  • L & J Cuts, Zoom Cuts & Broll Cuts
  • Adding an Adjustment Layer
  • Finding Premiere Pro Graphics Templates for Your Project
  • Basic Color Correction & Lumetri Scopes in Adobe Premiere Pro CC 2020
  • Color Grading: The Creative Section
  • Lumetri RGB Curves: Adjusting Red, Green & Blue
  • Lumetri RGB Curves: Adjusting All Colors
  • Hue Saturation Curves: HUE vs HUE
  • Hue Saturation Curves: HUE vs LUMA
  • Hue Saturation Curves: HUE vs SAT

And keep a lookout because I will be adding a few bonus sections to this Premiere Pro 2020 class, coming real soon! Best of luck!

Transcripts

1. Introduction to this Adobe Premiere Pro CC 2020 Class: Hello everyone. Welcome to this Adobe Premier Pro Course. I'm gonna tell you now, but it's all about, okay, so first I'm going to show you how you can start a project and then how to play around with the project settings. Now, click on EU project. Now, the first thing that you're going to see is this project settings box. And then within that there's a bunch of different workspaces and panels that you gotta learn how to use that to learn how to flip between them very easily integrate, especially with the panels, you gotta, you gotta learn how to close the panels on doctrine, pushed them into certain spaces. Just pay attention to options that you have up here. They are basically different layouts that you can use within permanent probe there called workspaces. So what if you want to push this panel back into your workspace somewhere? Okay. What I generally do is I just put the mouse over the name of the panel and then I just click hold and drag. And now you're gonna see some crazy stuff going on. And then after that, I'm gonna show you how you can customize your own workspace. Because in Premier Pro does it kinda more advanced way to use the workspaces and panels dance. They want to focus on color, then they would jump to this column workspace. And now over here on the right, you continue to Demetri color and layout changes a lot. And we've now down here you have the project panel and to the left, now you can play with the effects controls. It has a very advanced way, but there's a very kind of, you can customize your own beginner and I layout and workspace to use within Premier Pro just to make things easier in the beginning, I always like to keep this source panel and a program panel over here so I can always preview the video. I always like to keep the timeline very wide and down the bottom like that. So here I can flip between the B-roll been music bin, the sound effects, and then I'm going to show you how to use the project panel and how you can use bins to organize or if you are footage or music or sound effects, things like that. Okay, just organized a project. I'm gonna call this one talking head video. I'm going to add a B-roll being some music, some sound effects. And then I'm going to give you an introduction to the timeline. Okay, so just going to show you all the different tools that you can use to edit your footage or music or sound effects everything within the timeline. I'm going to explain the different audio and video tracks, all of it. And then I'm going to show you how to use the audio track mixer because you have to get your volume levels, correct. I mean, you've got your sound effects and music, the audio from your main footage. So you've gotta know how to balance those module levels just to get a good sound. Okay, and then I'm going to show you sequence settings because within your timeline, you can open up a bunch of different sequences, okay? Now before you export, you gotta make sure that you're using the correct sequence settings. Just basic things like frame rate, resolution and things like that. You've gotta make sure that you've just gotten good sequence setting setup. If you're a beginner, things like frame rate and frame size can be pretty difficult to understand. So I'm just gonna do my best to try and explain those things very, very simply. But now what if we trapping other clips there have different frame sizes on here. You can see how it looks. Over here. I dropped in some footage from my Olbia screen recordings, and you can see that the frame size is smaller. The aspect ratio is still 16. But if you go down here and right-click and go to Properties, you can see that the footage has a frame size of 2560 by 1440, so it's smaller and you can see it here. It doesn't fit the sequence and frame size. Now if you're editing talking head footage is a way to cut all of that talking head footage together just to make it really snappy Without Borders and the, ums and things like that. There are things like L cuts, J cuts, and even crazy sounding zoom graphs. Okay, I'm going to show you all of it. We're going to look at adjustment layers. And then I'm going to show you how you can go and find Premiere Pro templates. Basically they are like graphics templates that you can just go get. You can pay for them. There's free ones as well, but you can just get them, bring them, put them into your project and they look really cool. Things like lower third and tidal and things like that. And I'm also gonna show you where you can get stock video, stock footage, sound effects, stuff like that. And then we have calibrating, okay, we have color correction and calibrating, okay? So you've got color correction, which is basically correction. You're just making sure the video looks somewhat ok. And then you've got a more stylistically color correction and call it drag this one up just a little bit. Okay, now if we come here, go to full screen location and they just edit. Okay, you can see there that it's added this nice little Hollywood Argentina look and what the basic correction, and I'm gonna go into contrast and shadows and highlights and all of that. You can follow the waveform here. So I'm just going to bring it up just a little bit. Okay? And I'm following this waveform here. So you can see it kinda rising there. Or if I come down here, bring it down, you can see the waveform to robbing. You don't want them there. You want everything to lie in a balanced way between 0. That the creative stuff is RGB curves. I can bring it up to brighten mid tones, or can bring it down to dark in the mid tones, There's hue saturation curves. Now let's go to the eye dropper and then select this hw. Okay, this is the hue we've selected. Now we're gonna change the brightness and darkness to it. So let's come here, go up. Now it's going to be brighter. Come down and we're gonna make it darker or on location. And then just edit all of that together. Okay, and make it brighter doors or on location. And then just edit all of that together. There's a bunch of different options. So I'm gonna go into water, but basically there's tons a little skills that you can learn, okay, so I'm going to go into most of the skills that you need just to make a good final video product. So I hope you enjoy the course z. There. 2. Starting a New Project + Project Settings in Premiere Pro: Okay, so look, I'm gonna try and make this easy, and I'm just gonna try and give you a basic presentation of the layout of Premier Pro. So now the first thing you've gotta do is you've got to download this creative cloud app. Now for those of you who haven't done it, I mean, obviously you gotta go to Adobe.com and you gotta download this Creative Cloud App. So after you download the Creative Cloud app, then you're gonna get this little shortcut here. And that's going to give you access to all the creative apps like Lightroom, Photoshop and obviously primer probe. So inside this creative cloud app, you can obviously go through and install all of the different Adobe Creative apps. Now, what you wanna do is go to Premier Pro install and then open. Now, when you first open Premiere Pro, you're not gonna see these recent project files, but you are gonna see New Project and open project. And you can also go through and take a little tutorial that's within Premier Pro. Now click on New Project. Now the first thing that you're going to see is this project settings box. And after you click OK and open up your project, you can actually come back to these settings by going to File, go down to Project Settings, click on General, and then you can change some of these settings again. So what you're basically doing here is you're creating a Premier Pro project file. Now after you create a name or project file, it's going to look something like this. Now, I'm going to call this file Premiere Pro, basic layout. And I have a location. So over here you can choose the location for where you want the project file to be saved. So click on browse. So the permanent pro, project file that you're going to create is actually a very, very small file, okay? So you've got your footage, you've got your video footage and your photos. And generally for me, I keep that on my external hard drive. So what I do is I keep the external hard drive plugged into my PC as I'm editing in primer probe. So now you can choose whether you want to save your Premiere Pro project file on your external hard drive or directly on your PC. So I'm going to save this project file on my desktop. Okay, so I'm gonna go there, make sure it's on desktop. And then we're going to just right-click and create a new project folder. And I'm going to call this project folder Premier Pro basic. The out. I'm going to go in there and then I'm going to save this project file. So up here you can see it saved on the desktop in this folder. So just think of this Premiere Pro project file as a small little file with a saved list of commands. Okay, so as you're editing within Premier Pro, the program is accessing your media footage, video footage, and your photos. And generally I keep all of that on my external hard drive. So whenever you make edits within Premier Pro, Premier Pro is going to save those edits, save those settings on the small little project file. And generally, I keep that on my desktop. If you're Premier Pro project file is saved on your desktop and all of your footage is on an external hard drive. You need to keep the external hard drive plugged in to your PC while you're editing within Premier Pro because the program needs to access that footage. Now, if you have GPU acceleration options available, choose one of them because the program is going to use your graphics card and you're editing is going to be much faster. If you only have this option available software only, then it's just gonna slow the whole thing down. These two options here are just talking about the video and audio display formats within the Premiere Pro, you know, within the editing program. And so I just leave these the way they are. Now for these two options here, you only really need to worry about them. If you want to capture video footage directly within Premier Pro, you can connect your camera to your PC. And then within Premier Pro, you can capture footage at the, this option here is for a lower resolution, this one is for a higher resolution. But you only need to worry about this if you want to capture footage directly within permeable. Now if you come up here to scratch disks, here, you can choose the paths or locations where you want certain things to be saved. So remember I created a folder on my desktop, Premiere Pro basic layout that folder, if I capture a video within Premier Pro, it's going to be saved in that location. And over here you've got documents, user documents, Adobe Premier Pro. So look, because this is a Beginners Course. I'm not gonna go into details, but I mean, it is pretty easy. You can choose the different locations for where you want these things to be saved. I think in a future course, I'm going to take a more detailed look at all of these settings now, go a little deeper with these details. But right now, I just want to get all of you to the main topic of this course as quickly as possible. And again, over here for ingests headings, if you're a beginner, you don't really need to worry about this. So I'm not, you can just leave everything the way it is. So basically, we've named this project. We've chosen the location for where we want to save the file and we've chosen GPU acceleration. Now we can go in and click OK and we can start working on this project. So I remember, as I was saying before, you can actually open up those Project Settings again by going to File, then all the way down to Project Settings, click on General, and then you can change these settings again. 3. Learning How To Use Workspaces + Panels PART 1: So the first thing I would say here is that just pay attention to the different options that you have up here, okay? They are different. They are basically different layouts that you can use within Premier Pro. They're called workspaces. Okay, so this is the color workspace, the editing workspace, the audio workspace, et cetera. You can also come up here to window, go to workspaces and they change the different layouts from here. Now we're in the editing workspace. So just notice here that you have different panels, okay, over here you have the project panel. This is where if you double-click here, you can go and search for your footage. So you can go to your external hard drive and you can locate the footage that you need any can bring it into this project panel. From here you can drag your video footage and your photos over to the timeline, this timeline panel over here. And this is where you're gonna do all your editing. You're gonna cut your music, cut your clips, add photos, add more footage and affects, things like that. But before we get into all of that, I just want to show you that there are different panels, okay? And if you can't back up to workspaces, basically you can choose different panel layouts to work with. I mean, if you come up to audio, this layout will be more suited. I mean, the panels that you see will be more suited to editing audio. Come up here to color. You're gonna get some color panels to work with. One really great workspace to use when you're just starting out with Premier Pro is this learning workspace, okay, so if you come over to the Learn panel, you'll see Get Started. Now if you click on get started, you will basically be given a guided tour of the basic layout of Premier Pro. For example, if we come down to learn the basics and click on Get Started. You'll see for interactive tutorials that cover each step of the video editing process needed to create or first movie. So you can come here and you can really learn the basic tools that you need to use and permit probe, which is basically what I'm trying to present in this specific video, but I really want to get on to other topics that are not covered in this running panel. And before I forget, if we minimize the program, come here to the desktop, we can see the folder that I created. And if we open the folder, we can see that permit pro project file that we created. Okay, now so don't go too crazy or obsessed with this. But what I would recommend is that just for one day, just sit down for a few hours and just play around with the program. I mean, just go through all the different options. Just try and click on these different options. Just try and get a feeling for the basic layout of the program. I mean, what happens if I click on File New and new sequence? I mean, what pops up? This pumps up and to try and slowly just get familiar with these options. You know what if I come down here and click on this? I mean, what pops up here, but what I would say is just spend a few hours browsing the program. Let me just hover your mouse over the button. Okay, what is this marking? This one, mark out, okay. What does this clearing clear out? Go in shift. I mean, just OK. And multi-camera record, you know, you're just slowly becoming familiar with the program. You might not know what some of these options are now, but in the future when you come across some of these options, again, you're going to have a reference to, to work with. And obviously these interactive tutorials are very helpful as well. You know, just make sure you go up to the Learning workspace. I mean, click on get started. An important media Premiere Pro kind of provide you with these audio tracks and clips and these project files that you can just play around with. So spend some time just getting familiar with how you can play around and move the different panels around. I mean, if you come here and hold your mouse there, and if you see that icon, you can click hold and drag and you can make the, this panel larger. Or we hear click hold and drag. You can make the project panel smaller. So for every workspace that you want to use, you can go in and you can resize the panels. 4. Learning How to Use Workspaces + Panels PART 2: So one of the best things that you can do to improve productivity when you're editing, I suppose, is to create your own custom layout. So I'm gonna show you how you can create your own custom Workspace Layout. But first, we're gonna look at some basic fundamental panels that you just need to work with. So the first panel that you just really need to work with is the project panel, okay, so over here, when you double-click, you're basically gonna go search your PC or your external hard drive and you're gonna go and search for the footage that you need for this project. And then you're going to bring it here to this project panel. And then what you can do is you can click and drag it over timeline. And in the timeline you are going to cut and play around with the footage and add music and things like that. So I'm just going to show you that quickie. Okay, so over in the project panel, come over here, double-click. Now, over here you can go to your desktop if your footage is there. But for me it's on the external hard drive, so I'll click here. I have a folder here called my footage. And now I'm going to go in, see over here I have some photos and down at the bottom I have some video footage. I'm just going to hold Shift, select a few of these and bring them into the project panel. So later I'm going to show you how you can organize everything in the project panel. But for now, I just want to basically show you how you can customize the Workspace Layout. So the project panel is where you're gonna keep Oliver footage. But over here, the Timeline panel is where you're going to edit all of your footage. So over here it says dropped meter here to create a sequence. So go over to your project panel, select a clip, click hold and drag it and drop it here into the timeline to create a new sequence. Now this over here is the Tools panel, okay? All of these here are different tools and you're going to use these tools when you're editing your footage in the timeline. So the project panel, the Tools panel, and the Timeline panel are very important. Now, if you come up here, you've got the program panel and you've got the Source panel. The Source panel previews the footage that you double-click on here in the project panel. Okay. Now when you come up to program panel, the program panel previews the video that you create here in the timeline. So we'd seen Program panel now, but if I double-click on one of these, it's going to hop over to the Source panel. So let me just try that. As you can see. Now, I can come over here to this little slider and I can drag it and preview the clip this way. Or I can come over here and press Play or press Spacebar on the keyboard. And press Space-bar again to pause, I can preview all of these clips here really quickly by double-clicking on them and pressing Spacebar to watch them in the Source panel. Now, I'm going to add another clip here to the timeline, just so you can see what it looks like to preview the video here in the program panel. Okay, so I'm gonna go down, select the clip, I'm going to click hold and drag it and drop it there. Now, come up there, put the slide are there. Or maybe move it up just a little bit. Press spacebar to preview, and it's going to preview here and the program panel. Okay? So your preview individuals that you're creating here. So what you can see is that you're really going to be using these panels a lot. I mean, they're the basic fundamental panels that you need to work with. So when you create your customized Workspace Layout, I mean, these are the core panels that are going to be there. So what if you don't need a panel? Well then over here you can see these three little lines next to every panel, okay? You can see if you click on source, you've got these three little lines that come up. So we don't need the Learn Panel for now. Okay, so I'm going to click here and you can see that you can close panel. You can remove the panel completely over here. You can conduct a panel and it kind of pops out of there, the workspace. So over here you can see that you can move it around. Now, I don't need this panel for my customized layout, so I'm just gonna close this panel. So what if you accidentally remove a panel and you want to bring it back? What they've just come up here to window and what was at that was the learn panels. So we come down here to learn, click on that and now it pops back up. So what if you want to push this panel back into your workspace somewhere? Okay. What I generally do is I just put the mouse over the name of the panel and then I just click, hold and drag. And now you're gonna see some crazy stuff going on. So you're probably wondering like, what the hell is going on now. Well, basically you're just looking for a space to insert this panel. Okay, so if I go here, let's just added there. Let's see what happens. Ok, so it's all we hear now about what if we want to move it somewhere else? Well, then you just go here again, click on it, click hold and drag it again. And now we're going to look for somewhere else to put it. So let's just say, let's just put it somewhere here. Now you've gotta get all of these different options and you really just need to play around to figure out how the program responds. So let's put it here. Okay, well now it's jumped there, but now I really, I really don't need that panel, so I'm just gonna go here and click on these three lines again. And I'm going to say Close panel beers. And just remember if you want to bring back any of your panels, you can go up to window and you can search through the different panels that you need to work with. You can click on it and you can push it back into your workspace. So hopefully now you're getting a little more familiar with how you can move the different panels around. How you can undocked them, how you can close the panels and push them back into the workspace. Just to create a nice layout debt that suits you. 5. Creating Your Own Workspace Layout PART 1: So now what you could do is if you create a nice workspace layout that you want to use in the future, what you can do is you can save this specific layout. And then whenever you open a new project or start a new project, you can come up here to the, to the workspace panel over here, and you'll see your layer like, for example, this is my layout, this is my workspace layout that I like to work with. And you can click on there and you can go back to your familiar layout. Now for me personally, I like to work with a very wide timeline. I mean, I don't like to work with a timeline that looks like that. You know, if you bring the tools back here, I mean, just imagine trying to make edits here and then zooming in and trying to understand what's going on with your clips. It's, it's impossible. So I like to work with a very wide timeline or something like that. But now the problem is that the project panel is extremely small. Now for me personally, I just like the timeline here at the bottom, like very wide. And then I normally bring up the project panel and I keep it somewhere up here. And then I keep the program panel and the source panels somewhere over here to preview the videos. Let's create this layout, okay, so I'm gonna drag this out. So I can see the project panel. Now over here, I am going to go here. You can undock the panel, but that's going to undock this specific panel here because you've also got immediate browser panel. Okay, now, what if I go here and I go to panel group settings because this is really a group of panels altogether. So what you can do is you click on those three lines. You can go to panel group settings and you can undock the panel group. Now what's going to adopt a full panel group? You can see both panels are here. And if you come back down, now you've got the full timeline at the bottom and it's very wide, but you still got the tool panel here. So I'm going to try and push this panel group here somewhere into this space. But I want the program panel in the Source panel to jump over to the right. Okay, so let's just drag this panel. Okay, so click hold drag. Now over here, I'm gonna put it right there. So hopefully this is going to push the Source panel and a program panel to the right. Okay? So not there because I mean, now it's going to jump and it's going to be to the left of the Timeline panel as well. I don't want that. I only want it here. So I'm gonna choose this option. Okay, so now it's great because he's still got the timeline at the bottom. You've got the Source panel, program panel on the right. And now I have the project panel up here in the space, but I want this media browser in here as well. So I'm going to click, click hold, drag, and I'm going to bring it up. They're not there because it's going to jump below, but I'm going to bring it up to the same level as the project panel and let go. Now over here I can flip between these two different project panels. I can actually click hold and drag it and re reordered. Now, over here on the right of the timeline you have the audio meter panel, okay. If you come up to a window, you can see the different panels that are selected. Okay, so up here you can see audio meters. So that is the audio meter panel over here. So when you preview a clip from the project panel, Double-click press space bar c. Now when I did that, it jumped over to this source panel. So when you press space bar, you can see the audio levels. Or if come down here, if you click there in the timeline and press space bar, you can see the levels here. And now for the Tools panel, sometimes that's kind of handy to keep it here to the left of the timeline. But sometimes I like to keep it up here just above the timeline. So I'm going to click hold and drag it and drop it into this space here. Bring that down. And now generally, I like to keep the program panel quite big like that. So, you know, you get a good view, you get a good preview of the video. And now you've got the tools panel here. It's kinda handy to use. Now you've got a huge amount of space to play around with your timeline. Now if you make a bunch of edits here and you want to preview in full screen. What you can do is click on this panel and click on Control tilda. You know, it's a weird little squiggly key. And now you've got a full screen preview. And then all you do is press spacebar to preview it. And then space bar to pause. And then just press Escape to get back. So a little later I'm going to show you how you can use all these different tools and how you can play around with all these little options here on how you can play around with the timeline. You can zoom in and zoom out. But for now, I just want to go back to the project panel. 6. The Project Panel + Creating Bins in Adobe Premiere Pro: Alright, so you can change the view that you have here, okay, so if you come down here, you can go for a list view or you can go for an icon view, which I generally prefer. So when you shoot footage on your camera, your camera will normally name the files using numbers, as you can see here in 197419781989. And then when you bring them into Premiere Pro, you can list them here. I mean, you can sort them in ascending order. And then what I do is just according to the name of the eclipse has also a cool little free-form way of sorting or icons. I mean, you can just play around and sort them into little free form groups. But generally I just go for this icon view. Over here. If you come to the slider, you can make your own icons bigger and smaller. And then the other thing is that if you come over here you can see new bin, okay, so I'm going to add a new beam into this project panel here. Okay, so left-click on that. Now, if you go up to the top, you can click here and you can rename the benton. So I'm going to name this B-roll. Okay, now what I'm gonna do is I'm going to move all of these clips here into this bin. So I'm going to click there hold Shift, and then press the right arrow or the down arrow key, but the right one for a state to go to that clip and then down, select all of these clips, go back, click hold and drag them over into this bin. Now you can see that I'm still in the project panel, but now if I double-click here, I'm going to enter this bin. And now we have these B-roll clips. So as you can see here, I mean, we're in the B-roll bean. Now, this little icon here that's kinda like a backspace. So if you want to jump back to this project panel, you can just click on that. And he jumped back. And now we see we've got that bin. So generally I'd just like to keep things organized here in the project panel. So what I normally do is I add a music bean, sound effects being a B-roll pin, maybe a talking head video bin. So I'm just gonna do that quickly. So now let's say that you've got some music and you want to bring it into your project. Now, I would just go up to the music and then double-click. And now over here you want to bring the music into Premiere Pro, so you just double-click here. And then I would just go to the location where my music is stored. And then just double-click For me it's here. Written music. And I'm going to bring in this motion or a music. Now come here, click hold shift and the down key to bring all of it in. And then open. Now if you want to preview one of these tracks, all you do is click once and then press space bar, and then space bar to pause. And then o here to jump back. Now, I'm gonna do the same for sound effects. And double-click here. So now you've got a really good preview screen over here. And then over here everything's organized well between your footage or B roll your music or sound effects. And then you can just very quickly drop in your footage or images or sound effects and your music onto the timeline to work with. 7. Introduction to the Timeline PART 1: Now over here you can see A1, A2, A3. Those are the audio tracks and you can basically drop in music sound effects. And you can also do kinda like a voice-over. And then if you come up here, you've got V1, V2, V3, and these are video tracks. And basically over here you can drop in video footage, but you can also drop in images and add things like titles and adjustment layers. But I'm going to show you that later. You can also add more audio and video tracks. You just gotta come over to the right, make sure you're in the view the DVD section. Right-click and click on Add track or even delete track. Ok, so I'm going to add a track here. Now I have another v for another video track. And then same thing here with the audio. And just, and right now I have another A4 audio track. So if you want to add some video footage to the timeline, just go over it to one of these bins. My B-roll, and I'm going to click hold and drag it to the timeline. Now you can see there's two parts to it. The top part is the video part there at the bottom is the audio track connected with Eclipse. So you can see here, I'm gonna put it in the V2 track, but if I go down, I can add it to the V12. And you can see below that I can choose between the a2 and a1 and track, I can even go to the A3 track of L1. For example, if I want to put this overlaying the other clip that I can do that. And now when I press play, I mean it's going to jump to the next clip. So now let's say I want to add to music. So I'm just going to go up here and backspace back to the original view. Now have my music bin. So double-click. Choose a track generally just preview one of them. Okay, I'm going to preview this spacebar. That's cool. Press space bar to pause now I'm going to click hold and drag it down to the one of these a2 or one of these audio tracks. Ok, I'm gonna put it here, add a2. Now let's preview this and just press space bar here as well. So now over here you can see the audio levels for this, for the timeline basically. And I'm going to show you later how you can adjust all of these volume levels. Okay, cool. So I've got some good footage here. I've got a good music track. Now, I want to add a sound effect. So I'm gonna go here and jump back. And I'm gonna go to my sound effects been double-click, and I'm going to preview one of these. I'm just going to add this guy spacebar to preview. Now I'm going to click hold and drag him down to the A3 track. Now, just, I'm going to bring the slider back and I'm going to preview or less. So you can see here that the, this track is too loud and we can't hear the sound effect. So what you can do is jump over here to the right. And now you have these kinda, it's called them zoom sliders for the, for the video tracks and the audio tracks. So what you do is you come over to one of the ends and you just click hold and you adjusted. Ok. Now if I go up and they called Bring it down, I can see you have a much larger view of this a2 audio track. Ok, so if I go up, I can go back up to a1, again, go down to A3 and A4. So let's go to a two. Now, I want to bring this volume level down so we can hear the sound effect. So when you see this little icon, click hold and drag it down, okay, and I can preview it. So that's OK. Maybe I'll bring it up to a little bit. C. Now with this slider over here, I'm just going over and I'm putting it wherever I want. And then just a preview it really quickly. I'm just hitting space bar. Okay, so I'm gonna go down to the sound effect there on the A3 track. And I'm just going to bring this up so we can hear it. Ok, so if I bring the slider here, I want to see whether I'm able to hear the sound effect or not. And then Spacebar. Okay. That's probably way too allow because he saw it clipped here. So I'm going to bring it down. This over here. That's basically saying that your audio has clipped. It's basically too loud. You gotta you, you wanna keep it somewhere here. Ok, so it clipped again, but Amin is not too bad. Okay, so that's a little better. It didn't clip. 8. Introduction to the Timeline PART 2: So now let's jump back and add an image to the timeline. Okay, so I'm gonna jump back here. And now I need to add a new bin, okay, because I've only got music, sound effects, talking head footage and B-roll footage, so I need images. So come down here to a new bin. Click. Now I'm going to rename this images. So now I'm gonna go over double-click and then double-click again. I'm going to go and find an image. So here I have a light room folder and I'm just going to choose one of these. Okay, so now in my images folder, I have one item, this image. Now I can click hold and I can drag it to the timeline. Now I can put it on in the V1 track, the V2 track that we retract the v4 track doesn't matter. I can overlay it. Now, let's say, for example, that I'll put it here and we'll just bring the slider over. And you can see that it's way zoomed in. So all you do here, if you right-click on the image and then you go to scale to frame size. Now you can also choose set the frame size, but if you want to do any kind of editing or resizing later in the project, set the frame size, you're going to lose some quantity in the image. But if you scale to frame size later on if you make some changes or if you resize or re-scale the image or you're not going to lose any quantity. So I will just go with that one. Now you can see that the, the image filthy the frame. So let's just go and preview this. So as you could see, we had some video footage and then it jumped as a still image. And now you can set the duration of that still image. I mean, you can right-click and go to speed and duration. So let's just change the duration to about ten seconds. Okay, so over here, if you see this little icon here, you can click hold, and now I can move it. I can change the duration. So let's go for like somewhere around ten seconds. Now, if I want to make it exactly ten seconds, I can click here and go there and add a 0. Okay? You can see there that it jumped because it jump now to ten seconds. Now one thing to realize is that if you add a lot of music and sound effects and voice overs and things like that, you know, to the A1, A2, A3, etc. Audio tracks. For example, here I've got music and I've got a sound effect. Ok, so now when I preview, when I press play in the timeline, you're going to hear the sound effect and the music at the same time. There's no preference for the music track or there's no preference for the sound effect, you're going to hear them both equally, okay, they're going to be mixed in together. But when you have a look at the video tracks, now, there is going to be a preference to watch. You're gonna see, just think about if there's anything above video footage or an image, you're going to see that thing. Let's say for example here we've got some video footage. Now, if I click and drag this image to the V2 track, now I'm just going to reduce the duration just so we can have a look at this property. I'm going to say two seconds. Ok, now it's, now it's a very short duration. So now if we preview first, you're going to see the video footage and then it's going to jump for two seconds is going to be over here in the preview screen. This is the final video that you're going to export. You're going to see that the image for two seconds and then it's going to jump back to the video footage, okay? Because the image is above the video footage, the image has preference. If I put another image up here, now that one has preference. Okay, so let's just preview this. Anyway. That's just a very basic explanation of what you can do in the timeline. When I go into some of their layouts, later on I'll, I'll go into some more details. But now I just want to keep looking at this, you know, overall kind of layout because you want to create it like a nice little workspace to, to work with him. 9. Creating Your Own Workspace Layout PART 2: So now I think for most people what they like to do it, they like to hop between these different workspaces whenever they, for example, if, if they'd done putting everything here in the timeline, then if they want to focus on color, then they would jump to this color workspace. And now over here on the right you can see that the metric color and then the layout changes a lot. I mean, now down here you have the project panel and to the left, now you can play with the effects controls. Now come here, you can click that to bring their, the workspaces down again. And if they want to add some effects, they would jump to Effects. And now all of the effects panels are here, but things jump around a little too much for me. Over here we have the audio, so you can play with the audio levels. But now just partially just for me, this is just the way I work. I always like to keep the Source panel and the program panel over here so I can always preview the video over here. I always like to keep the timeline very wide and down the bottom like that. I always like to keep my audio levels over there. And then what I'd like to do is I liked instead of hopping between these workspaces, or like to hop between them here, okay? I like to keep them all here. So I'm going to show you how you can add. If you want to focus on color, you can put in the color workspace here and you can jump in here and change the color. And you can still keep your timeline here and program panel here. Or if you want to change the audio levels, are just like to flick through everything here, keep it here in this nice little small space. So now let's just jump back here in the project panel. Now you've got all your bins. Now let's just say that you've done a bunch of editing here. You've added your footage and your images, and your music and your sound effects. Now, let say that you want to work on some color grading. What I would do is come up here to a window. Now you have all of these little panels over here. A very important thing to use if you want to play around with the color in your footage is geometric color. Now, you can see that there's little low metric color popped up over here. Now, I don't want to keep it here because I want to create this little customized workspace for myself. So what I'm gonna do is I'm going to click hold and drag it over here. Now, I'm going to leave it somewhere there. Now you can see that over here we've got the project panel. Okay, so I can go and search through the images and the B-roll and stuff like that. And if I quickly want to go and do some color grading, just hop over here to LA metric color. Or I mean, you know, because this hint Gallo bit crowded, you can just click here and click on Color. So now as you can see here, I can, I can make the image warm or I can make it cooler. Double-click here to bring it back to normal. But I'd just like to keep everything here because I don't know why it's just more efficient for me. So now let's say that you want to add some effects to some of these clips. So what you can do is go up to window. Now, have a look for the effects panel. Now, click on that. Now here. Now you click hold and drag it up to here. Now it's becoming one of these options that you can flip between. So here I can flip between the B-roll been the music bin, the sound effects, low metric color and effects. Okay, so if I want to add a little video transition, Let's go to dissolve and less say dip to black. So let's just click hold and drag it to the beginning. Ok, so if we go back to the beginning, now you're gonna see it fade in from a black screen. So press spacebar to preview what's in the timeline. Okay, so we've got a little cool fade in from black. Or let's say that you want to add a title, okay, you want to add some text to appear here over the foot. Now what you do is you go up to window and you go to central graphics. Now, I don't want it over there, just that's just my preference. So I'm going to come up here. I'm going, you can come to these three little lines and you can click on undock if you want. I mean, but you don't have to. You can just click here, hold and drag it up here and let it become one of these options. Or let's say now, you want to play around with the audio levels, okay? You'll wanna make sure that your A1, A2, A3 audio tracks have good volume levels. I mean, you can you can adjust all of them individually. So what I would do is I would come up here to a window and then come down to the audio track mixer or panel. Click on that. Okay, so i don't always wanted there. I, I want to be able to flip through the different options here. So I'll click hold, drag it here to let it become one of these options. 10. The Audio Track Mixer in Premiere Pro: So let's just say that I've just been doing some color grading and i'm finished with that now, I want to hop over and adjust the volume levels. So then I'd just come up here, go down to Audio Track mixer. And now I can play around with these audio levels very easily. So you just press Space-bar or come here and you know, just a preview of the timeline. As you can see over here, we've got the a one, you know, the A1 audio track. Now that is the audio track connected with the video footage. Okay, so it's very soft at the moment. But as we can see with the a2 track, you know, the music track that's louder. So I'm just going to bring that down. Ok. Now I can raise the A1 track. That is basically the volume from the video footage. And you could hear that chalk just going in and the music was very low. And I mean, let's just bring the sound effect over here. They call it drag it. Now, that is going to be the A3 audio tracks. So here I can make it very low or can make it higher. Okay, so you're definitely going to hear this now, okay? Or bring away down. And you're probably not going to hear it. Very soft. And then over here we have the master, okay, so the master audio track, I mean, that is basically an average of all of these put together. If you reduce this volume, it's going to on average reduce all of these volumes together. Okay, or bring it up. So you can see here now that all the different volume levels are a little bit off. I mean, there's too much sound coming from the videos. I want to bring that down. I want to bring the music backup. But the master is too high now, so I'll bring down the master a little later. I'm gonna go into more detail, but I just want to show you that so you can get this basic overview of a good layout or workspace to work with. 11. Creating Your Own Workspace Layout PART 3: So I'm just going to quickly go through all the different panels that I normally use when I'm editing. Okay, so let's go to window. Now if we go down the audio clip mixer and never really use at audio meters yes. The audio track mixer? Yes. You can see we have it over here. Captions, no capture know, Edit to tape, no effect controls. That's very important. I'm just going to widen that. I'm going to click hold and drag it into there. I mean, normally you would see this if you jumped over to editing. But I was creating this workspace from the Learning workspace, so I kind of had to add it in, but naturally you would see it here. So let's just go back. So Effect Controls, yes. Effects, yes. Essential graphics, yes. So now that's what we hear. Essential sound. Yes. Now that's over on the right. Okay, I'm going to show you later how to use this, but as click hold and drag it over here, put it there. So now you can see here we can hop between all of these. Backup to a window, events, no history, no info. Know, learn. No libraries, no, no metric color, Yes, we have that luminary scopes that can be useful. Let's bring that over there. Markers and no media browser. Yeah, maybe I never really used it. Metadata, no production, no program monitor, progress projects reference monitor. She now okay. Honestly, for me, that is pretty much all I need to edit. I've got my preview screen, my source panel, program panel, huge timeline, audio meter over there at the end. Then over here I can hop between my different bins. You know, the music being B-roll, sound effects, images. And then here, if I needed effects, click on that. Effect controls no metric, color and essential sounding central graphics generally, that's why need, as you can see, it's very quick. Okay, so let's say that you're pretty happy with this new Workspace Layout that you've created and you want to save it so you can use it again in the future. You know, you want to keep coming back to it. So go up to window, go to workspaces. And now you can see these different workspaces here, yeah, and the color workspace, the graphics workspace, et cetera. They are basically over here as well, but you can, you can access them here or got a window workspaces and they're over here. So at the moment you can see that we're still in the learning workspace, okay, because I started it out there and then we made some changes to the layout. And now we're pretty happy with that layout and we wanna save our own customized workspace. So what you do then is you come down to Save As new workspace. And I'm just gonna call it my favorite workspace. Click OK. Now you can see that you can access it over here. Okay, so we were in the Learning workspace. Looks the same, but if you go to color and it's going to be different, you gotta audio, that's going to be different. But now over here we have my favorite workspace. And you can also access it if you come up to window workspaces. Now it over here. So now that workspace is saved. So every time you open Adobe Premiere Pro, you can go back to that workspace. It's always gonna be there. And just for example, if you make some changes to this layout or, you know, you add extra panels, then you can come down here and you can say save changes to this workspace. And it's going to save this new layout. So honestly for me, I mean, I just worked pretty well this layout. I mean, maybe you would work well with a different layout. I mean, you just got to play around and create a nice little workspace for yourself and then save it. So I have to bring down all of your footage and your images and your music and your sound effects and after editing everything in the timeline. And I mean, you know, when you're happy with the final video in all you need to do is export. And then you just go to the point where you want to start the video and press IY on your keyboard to mark the end point. And then you go to the point where you want to finish the video and you just press o and your keyboard. And then what you do is you go up to File and click on Export Media. And I'm gonna go through all of these different settings a little later. The thing is, is that you can work with any kind of layout or workspace that you want to mean. At least you know how to undock the panels and move the panels around. But just like I would say that this layout is a very good beginner layout to begin with, because you've always got the preview screen at the top right, and you've got this big wide timeline at the bottom. And then over here, you can just play around with the different options here by flicking through them. But I mean, the other option, you know, when you get to a more advanced level is they come up to these and just hop between these different workspaces. These are more dedicated workspaces. So if you want to play around with color grading, then you would hop over to this color grading workspace. And now you've got everything here, but at least now you know how to undock the panels and move them around, for example. And you know how to put them back and you know how to add more panels. So if you want to work with these different dedicated workspaces here, I would just recommend really understanding, you know, how to close panels and undock panels and then come up to a window and add extra panels and push them into areas that are comfortable for you. For example, with my basic beginner's layout, if I want to do some color grading, I would go to geometric color. Okay, now I've got an elementary color, but now what if I want to play around with luminary scopes? Well then I've got geometric color here and then I would change our telemetry scopes. But I mean, the thing is you gotta work with both at the same time. So what I would do here is just undock, move it over here, go back to the Mettrie color. And now we just need to put it somewhere kind of convenient. And now I could play around with the exposure and I could see things changing with elementary scopes. At the more advanced levels of color grading, you would need liberatory scopes. But if you work with this dedicated color grading workspace will then you've got these options here and you've got an elementary scopes. So for example, you could play around with limited color. You could change the contrast and the exposure. And you could see things changing with luminary scopes over here. And at the more advanced levels of color grading, you would need to understand how luminary scopes works. So that covers pretty much everything in terms of setting up a good basic layout and workspace to work with every time you open up Premiere Pro. So now we're gonna move on to the next section. 12. Sequence Settings PART 1: So what I'm going to show you next is how you can edit a typical talking head video with B roll shoved in on top of it. You know, you would normally see these kind of videos with tech reviews or any kind of product review with the talking head footage, you know, a Roll footage and edit it in a kind of a very snappy way. And then B-roll footage of the tech gear or the products thrown in on top of that arrow. Or you can even see this, but travel videos, I mean, some travel videos, you get the person sitting in their hotel room doing talking head video. And then on top of that, they put it in the role of the air travels. So I'm going to show you how you can start a new project and how you can play around with some of the sequence settings because I didn't really show you that in the workspaces and layout section. So to save your project, you can always just quickly hit control S to save a project like that. So now we've seen this project. Now let's close this and go back to our desktop. And then now let's open a new project. So we want to start a new project. So lets go over to New Project. And now we gotta play around with some of these projects settings. So let's just name this talking head video edits. And the main thing here to remember is that we want to use GPU acceleration. Click OK. Now I'm going to jump over to my favorite workspace because that's the workspace that I like to work in and I just recommended for beginners. So the first thing that I'm gonna do is I'm just going to add a few bins here to, to organize everything. Okay, so come down to new bin. So I'm going to call this one talking head video. I'm going to add a B-roll, been some music, some sound effects, and some images. Now later, if I want to come back and add some more bins, I can do that just down here. And you've been, so before you do any editing, I mean, you actually need a camera and you need to actually shoot this talking head video that you're gonna edit. So I have some already, it's the talking head video for this course and I'm just going to bring that in here to demonstrate how you can edit snappy talking head video. So first of all, let's go to the talking head video bin. So you can either right-click and then click on Import to bring the footage in or you can just double-click. Now, I have some talking head videos over here, so I'm going to bring these. Okay. I'm not going to bring them all in, but I'm only going to bring in these selected videos and then click on open. So the first thing that you wanna do is you wanna make sure that these are sorted correctly. Ok, because if you go up to the top here, you can see that the number, you know, everything's out of order. It is five forty five, twenty nine thirty six forty, jumping back to 30 and then up to thirty one, thirty five, twenty seven, You know, there it's back and forth. So I'm just going to click on one of these and then I'm gonna go down to sort and I'm going to go by name. Okay, now over here you can see 527. 2829303132. That's what I need because I'm going to bring all of these down to the timeline and I need them to be in order. So I'm going to click here, hold shift, and the Arrow keys are right and go all the way down. Now I'm going to click hold and drag all of these to the Timeline. So you just need to understand these little icons over here. Okay, so this icon right here, that it's showing us that this clip right here, that is the sequence clip. Okay. You can see that it's 22 minutes long, okay, 22 minutes and three seconds over here. But the rest of the clips, as you can see, they've all got the same little too blue icons. And these two icons are just saying that this video clip, it has been used one time in a sequence in the timeline, okay? And the linked audio has been used once. So just remember that if you see this little icon here that is the sequence clip and all of these other short or low clips are contained within the sequence. If you come up to this sequence clip, you can click and click again and you're gonna rename this sequence. And you can see down here that the name changed. Now, small little interesting thing that you can do if you want to find where one of these clips are in the sequence, is, you can go to the icon and you can click on it. And then, you know, you'll get this old drop-down option if it's been used twice or three times. I mean, you'll see two or three little dropdown options here, but you can just click on that. And now this playhead slider will jump to that clip. So if you want to find out more information about the eclipse that you brought into your project, you can right-click on one of them and then go to Properties. So now I can see that this clip and all the other clips because I know there were there were all shot on the same camera. So I know that the resolution is 1920 by 1080. I can see the frame rate is 24 frames per second and the audio is at 48 thousand hertz. So all of these clips over here are at ten ADP and they're all 24 frames per second. So before, when I dragged all of them into the timeline for the first time to create this new sequence, Premier Pro automatically created this new sequence with the same settings. So this sequence here is at ten ADP and 24 frames per second. And to check that, just click on the timeline here and then go up to sequence and then sequence settings. So as you can see here, this sequence that was created was automatically set to 24 frames per second, 1920 by 108048 thousand hertz for the audio. And you can see that the aspect ratio is 16 to nine. Now, if I really wanted to, I could change this sequences settings to, let's say, 30 frames per second or 60 frames per second. But I know that all of this footage here is in 24 frames per second. And when, when I export the video at the end, I want the video to be in 24 frames per seconds, so I'm going to leave it like this. But I can also come in and change the frame size, the aspect ratio, and things like that. But I will show you this stuff a little later. So that's probably the easiest way to start a new sequence. I mean, you just select everything here, click hold and drag it to the timeline. And then a new sequence will be created with the same matching clip settings. But let's just jump back to the project panel. Now, you can actually add many different sequences here, each with different settings. You know, maybe one of them has a 1080 frame size. Maybe one of them is at 4K. Maybe one of them is better suited to screen recordings with OBS. And I'm just gonna show you how you do that. And then at the end, when you want to export you, you would have to choose which sequence you want to export the video from. So I'm just gonna go here to the B-roll bin and I'm going to bring in some 4K footage. So here's the form k footage. And you can actually see that you can preview the clip if you go down to this little slider that it's below the thumbnail. And if you bring it across like that, you can preview clip. And you can see here that if we right-click on the clip and go to Properties, you can see the frame size is 3840 by 2160, which is a, you know, there's two versions of 4K footage, but this is the, let's say the lower resolution for k1. The frame rate is at 25 frames per second and the audio is at 48 thousand hertz. So if I want to create a new sequence over here based on the settings of this clip. I can't just click hold and drag it down to the timeline because you can see that it's not possible. I can add it to this sequence, but I don't wanna do that. I'm gonna create a new sequence. But what I can do, you know, have a look at this little icon here, new item. I can click hold and drag it over to new item. And then you can see that little plus symbol and then drop it there. So now you can see that a new sequence was created using the settings from this 4K footage. And now what you can also see is that this cape over here represents the sequence with this little symbol here. And this one here is the original clip. So if I come down here and click on this sequence and go up to a sequence settings. I can see that now we're at 25 frames per second, that the frame size has changed to four k, you know, 3840 by 2160. The aspect ratio is still 16 IS tonight and the audio is at 48 thousand hearts. But if I go back to the talking head edits, I mean, and go back to sequence settings. The sequence has different settings, 24 frames per second, 1920 by 1080. 13. Sequence Settings PART 2: If I want to add some more 4K clips to this sequence here, I will just go back to the bee Robin and then bring in the extra 4K clips. And now you can see that over here, this guy has a little symbol and that they are saying that this clip here, this 4K clip contains linked audio. This guy over here, it's 4K footage, but there's no audio symbol, so it's only video. And you can see that they don't have the little blue icon that this clip here has. These icons here are saying that this cape here has been used somewhere in a sequence. Now if I click on this clip, this cape has video and audio. So you can see down here that you're getting a little V1 symbol, animate one symbol. Okay? Now, if I click on this clip, you can only see that there's a V1 symbol. That means that you will not bring any audio down to this a11 track because there is no audio for this clip. Now if I come up to this clip and if only v1 is selected, I can select A1 or I can de-select A1. But if I drag this down now, it will only bring down the video. It won't bring down the audio. So if I want to bring down the audio, I have to click on this clip and I have to make sure that a11 is selected as well. Now, when I click hold and drag the video and the audio will be brought down into the timeline. And now, as you can see here, this guy here has no audio. I mean, it's not possible to bring audio down. So if I click hold and drag, you are only going to see the video. And now what you can see is that these clips here have blue icons. Ok, you can see the video icon. The video has been used one time. The audio has been used one time over here. And now for this one it has no audio, so only the video has been used one time in a sequence here. And now if we go down here to list view, you can see similar or icons. Ok, this one here is the sequence, and now you have the three 4K eclipse. Now for these two, both of these have video and audio, okay, linked audio with this one here, it only contains video. So now another thing that you'll notice is that this kid over here is at 30 frames per second. But when we originally created this sequence, we used this clip over here. So the sequence was set to 25 frames per second based on this clip. Now when we added this extra clip, this 4K footage at 30 frames per second, that didn't change any sequence settings to sequence settings remain at 25 frames per second, as you can see here. So if we just go back to our icon view, and if we go back to the talking head video bin, and if we go back to the talking head sequence, now, if I go down to list view, you can see that we have the similar symbols. I mean, all of these clips were shot at 24 frames per second. They all have video and audio. Now, if you go down, here is the sequence. Now, all of these clips here are contained within the sequence. Now if you go down to the slider here and you go across to media duration, you can see that this sequence is 22 minutes long. The rest of these are like one minute long, 34 seconds long, et cetera. And then let's go back to. I can't view, and you can see that all of these clips have blue icons. They're all used inside the sequence. So to create a new sequence in the beginning, you can click hold and drag your clips to the timeline, or you can click hold and drag clips into this new item icon. But there is another way to start a new sequence, and that is if you come up to File New sequence. So down here you can name the sequence and I'm going to call it OBS screen recordings. So now you can see over here that you can start a new sequence based on a sequence preset, okay? Now, what I see is that most people generally tend to ignore this over here and they tend to create a customer sequence. And that's what I do as well. So what you can do is just hop over to Settings and then go all the way to the top and click on custom. So a little later I'm going to show you how you can do screen recordings with OBS. But for now I just want to show you some of the settings that I use. If I go to video, you can see here that I'm recording at the moment. The resolution is at 2560 by 1440, okay? Now that is still at a 16 is to nine aspect ratio. And you can see that my frames per second are at 60 FPS. So when I just go back to Premier Pro, now if I want to start a new sequence using OBS screen recordings, I'm going to choose 60 frames per second. And I'm gonna set the frame size as 2560 by 1440 to match what I have in OBS, 2560 by 1440. So down here, what I generally do for Pixel aspect ratio is just go for square pixels for fields. Generally what I see here is that people go for progressive scan and now for the display format. Okay, now, can you see that over here, we've got a little time display format, so we're using time code at the moment. You can see the time, but I can change the frames. Now, if I click OK, if you come down here, you'll see the number of frames used. But generally I don't use frames are used time. And for the sample rate in OBS, you can also go and check the audio settings. Audio I'm using 48 thousand hertz. Now the reason that I'm using 2560 by 1440 as the resolution. I mean, you can see here that the aspect ratio is still 16 is to nine. So the reason why I'm using this resolution is that my monitor can display in that resolution that, that high resolution, as you can see here. So that means when I'm editing later on, I can actually zoom into different areas of the screen and not lose too much quality. But I'm gonna go into that in more detail later on. So now over here you have a video previews, okay, so you're talking about the video that you're going to preview over here. So I just see everyone leaving it to iframe only impact. Okay, so I do that to an attack 1920 by 1080. And then over here you can just pretty much just leave these settings the way they are. And what you can do then is you can save a preset, okay, based on the settings. So I want to do is again in the future. So I'm going to save the presets and I am going to call it OBS screen recordings. And you can leave a little description even I mean, you can say whatever you want. Now when you go back to the preset, if you go all the way down to the bottom, you can see custom. And now you have your little preset ready to go whenever you want to open a new sequence for screen recordings, you can see 60 frames per second and the frame size. Then just click OK. And now we have a new sequence over here, OBS screen recordings. But now you can see that this sequence here, a little sequence icon there that has been placed into my talking head video bin, so I don't want it there. So I'm gonna right-click and click on cut. Now I'm going to jump back and I'm going to create a new bin called OBS screen recordings. So I'm gonna go in there and I'm going to right-click and Paste. And just one thing, don't worry about closing these sequences here on the timeline. Like nothing terrible happens if you close the sequence, all you do is you go back up to the sequence and you double-click and it's gonna jump back here in the timeline. Okay, there it is. Close it, open again. Nothing bad happens. So now I'm in the OBS screen recordings being so I'm gonna get some OBS footage. So I am just going to double-click. And I'm going to go down and select some screen recordings. Click on Open and bring them in. Okay, so now you can see that if I right-click and click on properties, you can see that they are at 2560 by 1440 with 60 frames per second, okay? And if you want to check the sequence settings, just make sure you click on the sequence, go up to sequence settings. And you can see there are 2560 by 1440 AD 60 frames per second. So now another thing that you can see is that all of these clips here have audio linked. So I can click hold and drag it to the timeline. And it's going to bring in the video and audio because both of these here are selected if I D select a1 and if I click hold and drag this, only the video was going to drop. If I click on this one here and if I dislike the video track, then only the audio is going to drop it. Okay, so generally when you click on one of these clips, just makes sure that V1 and A1 are selected because normally you bring in the video and audio and just bring it in like that. So now that pretty much covers everything for the basics of sequence settings. And now I'm gonna move on to the next section. Okay. 14. Frame Size + Frame Rate: Okay, let me just show you something quickly here about frame size or resolution and frame rate. Now remember that all of these sequences here are set to different frame sizes and frame rate. So if we go to the talking head sequence, let's go up to sequence, sequence settings. We can see that it's at 1920 by 1080, and it's also at 24 frames per second. Now, if we go to the OBS screen recordings sequence, we can see that it's 2560 by 1440, okay, so it's a little bigger and attach 60 frames per second. There are more frames per second in the sequence. Now if I go to a foggy mountain sequence, we can see that it's, the resolution is even higher. It's at 3840 by 2160, and the frame rate is different as well. It's at 25 frames per second. So if you're still having difficulty understanding frame size and resolution, and we just give you a clear illustration of how that actually looks over here. We're in the 4K sequence. Ok, so let me, let me just find the sequence clip. Now you can see here that this sequence has a resolution of 3840 by 2160. Okay, so what that means is at going across there are 3,840 pixels and going up, there are 2160 pixels. The aspect ratio is 16 to nine, okay, that is just the, the lowest ratio of that number. So this sequence has a frame size of 3840 by 2160. But you can see over here that the clips that are added also have a resolution of 3840 by 2160. So the clips match the sequence frame size perfectly. But now what if we trap in other clips or have different frame sizes? Well, here you can see how it looks. Over here. I dropped in some footage from my OBS screen recordings and you can see that the frame size is smaller. The aspect ratio is still 16 is tonight. But if you go down here and right-click and go to Properties, you can see footage has a frame size of 2560 by 1440, so it's smaller and you can see it here. It doesn't fit the sequence frame size. And now if we go to the talking head footage, you can see that it's even smaller. So if we right-click go to Properties. You can see that it has a frame size of 1920 by 1080, so it is way smaller. So you can see the difference between 4K resolution and 1080 resolution. Now you can only see all this extra blank space over here because we're in such a high resolution sequence. But if we go to the talking head sequence, that frame size or resolution for the sequence is smaller. So you can see here that the frame size of these clips matches the sequence frame size perfectly. But when we go to a higher resolution sequence, they do not. And if we go to the OVS screen recording sequence, you can see that these clips fit the sequence frame size perfectly. So you can export all of these sequences and they're all going to have an aspect ratio of 16 IS tonight and go and upload them to YouTube, for example. They're all just going to have different resolutions. Now if you are having difficulty understanding frame rate, frames per second, etcetera, let me just try and illustrate that clearly. So if I go to the talking head sequence, and if I just zoom all the way in, press plus on your keyboard. Now let me just go up the sequence settings to show you. In this sequence, we have 24 frames per second. Ok? So over here you can see that I'm at the one minute, 18 seconds mark. Now 1 second would be up to here, one-minute 19 seconds. Now because the sequence was set at 24 frames per second, that means that I would need to move 24 frames to get all the way across to the next second. So if I hit the right arrow key on my keyboard 24 times, I should reach this point here, 1 second later, 24 frames are needed to get across this 1 second. So let me just show you that 123456789. They live over 23-24. And now we're there. You could see that it took 24 frames to move 1 second. So what happens is that with your camera, if you shoot at 24 frames per second with your camera, your camera is kind of essentially taking 24 photos per second. And it's putting all of those photos side-by-side in 1 second. And then when you play through it, you know, it looks like there's motion, for example, let me go back. So there's one photo, the next photo, next photo, next photo, next photo, next photo. Put them all together and you would see motion. Now. So the sequence is at 24 frames per second. And these clips over here are also at 24 frames per second, so they match perfectly. Now, let me just show you the same thing with a different sequence. So with this OBS screen recording sequence, so this sequence over here was set to 60 frames per second, as you can see. And these clips over here were shot at 60 frames per second. So they match. And you can see over here that I'm at the 30-second mark in a timeline. Now to go 1 second, 14 seconds over there, I will need to jump 60 frames to get across that 1 second. So it's like 60 images put side-by-side, gather in 1 second to give the appearance of motion. So let me just go through them quick and you can see things changing care slowly. So if we hit the right arrow key on the keyboard, you can see there's one photograph, the next photograph, all well, image. Next image. So that's three. So let me go to the end of 345678910111213141516178 to 930. So notice the changes happening there in the previous screen. We want though to the 33, 40 or there's actually something I wanted to do but 345 six fifty seven, fifty eight, fifty nine, sixty, 60 frames. And we move the cross 1 second. All of those frames together giving the appearance of motion. Now what if we mix frame rates in a sequence? So now this sequence here was set to 60 frames per second. So these clips over here were recorded at 60 frames per seconds so they match. But what about this clip over here of the talking head fully to this clip here or shot at 24 frames per second, but the sequence is at 60 frames per second. So let me just zoom in here to show you what happens. So now I'm gonna go to the two minute and 50 seconds mark. So as you can see, the frame sizes were different as well. So what you could do here is just right-click and then click on scale to frame size. Okay, so the clip is going to scale to the sequence, frame sizes bigger. So the sequence here has 60 frames per second, but this clip here only has 24 frames per second. So what you're gonna see is that I'm going to jump forward 60 frames to get to this next second. But with this clip here, it's going to take longer to get to each frame because there's only 24 frames here In this clip between seconds. But let me just show you that. Now I'm going forward one frame in the sequence and it changed. But watch now. Another frame forward, no change. Another frame for change. Another frame forward. No change. Another frame forward. No change another frame forward. Change another frame forward, no change, change, change, change, change. So you can see that I'm jumping forward frames in the sequence. There's 60, but I hope you can see that there are less frames in the actual clip. So if I export this sequence at 60 frames per second, this cape is still going to show up as 24 frames per second anyway. I hope that helped to give you a clear picture of frame size, resolution, aspect ratio, and frame rate. 15. Editing Talking Head Footage with Jumps Cuts PART 1: So what I want to show you next is if you have a lot of talking head footage. Yeah, if you're doing like tech reviews or product reviews or even travel videos. If you have a lot of talking head footage of you sitting down in front of the camera and you know, you wanna put B roll on top of that for are the foundation of the video. Is that talking head footage? Yeah. You want to bring it all together in the timeline and you want to edit everything together in a very snappy way. You know, you want to remove the pole is, is the moments where you're thinking the mistakes you made when you were recording. A lot of people refer to this as making jump cuts. So I want to show you how you can do that in a very, very quick, efficient way. So let me just go back to the talking head sequence. And, you know, I can close these two sequences because I don't really need them right now. And just so we can start from the beginning, I'm going to delete these and the timeline. One of the best things you can do here and then I definitely recommend is just throw on some soft music in the background. You know, throw on Spotify or whatever you want. I mean, just have some soft music in the background while you're editing just to make it more enjoyable. Or you can even throw some music here in the timeline just to get a feel for the kind of video that you want to create. So let's jump back to music. Let's go to the music bin over here. I have no music, So I'm going to double-click and go and bring in some music. So just to get started, I'm going to throw in this jazz truck. Now I'm going to put it at a2 because A1 is going to be the track used for the audio that is linked with the talking head footage. So now I have one track here, but I'm going to have a lot of talking head footage to edit. So I'll want to duplicate this music track and I want to fill the rest of the timeline with this track. So what you can do, they're a very quick way to do it is to hold Alt and then click hold and drag it out. And now you've duplicated the clip and bring it back. And alt, drag it out, bring it back, alt drag it out and bring it back. Or what you could do is select them all. Click on copy. Over there. Just click somewhere here on the timeline and you can click on control V to paste. But now you can see that the pace went into the A1 track. So I mean, just come up here, select and bring them down and bring them back. So now you have a good music tractor to keep you entertained during your editing and what you could do it. I mean, if you want, you could bring in some other music and replace these tracks. If you don't want your pace to fall into the A1 track, all you need to do is let me just delete this to show you. Now we're going to select all of these. Now what you can do is you can go in and lock the A1 track. Ok, so now when you paste, nothing is gonna get pasted in A1, it's going to fall into e2. So control V to paste. And then we go and then you just bring it back. Now you can see there that it kind of snaps onto the endpoints. You can see that there, there's a snap. So there's a little icon over here. If you turn it off, you, you won't be able to snap what's going to be very difficult to match up these two tracks. I mean, you, you would have to come here, click there, and then it can press the plus symbol on your keyboard to zoom in, but you won't be able to match them. They won't snap. But if you go to this icon and you turn it on, now if I click hold and drag, it snaps on a keyboard, press the minus symbol and you can zoom out. And now I've just gotta bring these guys back. And I've got the Snap turned on. So click hold and drag. And you can see that little triangle symbol. And now I can just unlock A1 again. Alright, so let's start editing some talking head footage. So I'm just going to jump back and go to the talking head been double-click. And now I have my talking head footage. Now, there's rarely a few ways you can do this and that is the first kind of slower method that I never really use is you can use the Source panel to mark these kinda like in and out point and then drag only those portions on your timeline. So just for example here let me show you this clip. Now, I know that I want to use a small portion here because back here I was making a lot of mistakes. Okay, I was playing with the phone, keynote was trying to move it around like, I don't want that in the final video. So I'm gonna go here. So to preview the media in the Source panel, I mean you just press spacebar to play and space bar to pause again. Okay, so I want to just preview from there, make sure I'm clicked on to the Source panel. Press Space-bar. Hello, welcome to this course about Adobe Premiere Pro and spacebar to pause. Now on the keyboard, if you click the left arrow key, you will jump back frame-by-frame or P. So you can see I'm going back frame by frame. If I hit the right arrow key, I'm going forward frame by frame. And you can hold it down as well. Now, I want to go back to the beginning of this, somewhere here. Now, all I do is I go to Martin. Ok. Now, click on that. Now I'm going to press play. Hello, welcome to this course about Adobe Premier Pro. Spacebar. To pause now, I want this clip to end here, so I'll just go mark out. Now, I want to drag the video and audio. So I need to make sure that V1, A1 over here are selected. Now, let me just bring the play head back to the beginning. And I'm just going to zoom in to the timeline. Okay, so what you do there is you press the plus symbol on your keyboard. Now I'm zooming in. Okay. Now I'm gonna go back and double-click on this clip. So we have this portion here. Now, if I want to only drag the video and the timeline, I can go to that little icon there, click hold and drag. And now you can see that only the video is being brought. And if I only want to drag the audio, I just go there. Drag audio only and I can bring that in and only drag the audio. But the thing is, is that I want both. I went the video and the audio. So I go up to the main screen, click hold and drag. And now I'm going to drag both the video and the audio. But I'm only going to drag this portion of the clip. So if I go to the timeline here now you're going to hear that portion with the music. Hello. Welcome to this course about Adobe. Okay, so now the music is too loud. So what I'm gonna do is go to Audio Track mixer. Okay, I'm gonna go back. Press spacebar just to play just a little bit. Now I can see the a2 track is very well. The volume is high, so I went to, and I want to bring this volume up a little bit. Hello, welcome to this course about cane out of musics too low. So I'll just bring this up a little bit. Hello, welcome to this course about Adobe Premier Pro is so now that's a kinda laws on NYSE volume levels to work with. And if you want, you could even raise the master level. Hello, welcome to this course about Adobe Premier Pro. So now to keep going, I would have to go back to the bin. So talking head bin and allow it go to the second clip. Now, double-click. Now, let's watch the, the new talking head edit out of Adobe Premier Pro. Now, you obviously wanna make some videos. Now when you use this method, it's very difficult to edit talking head videos together because things just don't flow as you can see from your program. Now you want. And then you have to go in and zoom in with the plus symbol and make further edits. Okay, so I don't recommend using this source panel for when you're editing talking head footage. Just for me personally, I would only use the Source panel when I want to drop in B-roll. 16. Editing Talking Head Footage with Jumps Cuts PART 2: But let me just show you the method that I always use. So generally what I do is I just click hold Shift and then use the arrow keys, just select everything and then go back to the top and then just drag everything onto the timeline, video and audio in the V1 and a1 tracks. So if you just zoom out, you can see the full picture. Now. You can probably see that I included the sequence clip, but you can see that the sequence clip wasn't thrown into the timeline because I mean, it is the sequence only these curves here were thrown on. So what do we do next? Well, I'm going to click on the timeline and now I'm going to zoom in using the plus symbol. I'm going to zoom in there. Okay, so I'm just going to drag this up here just to get a little better view. I want to use the waveforms to edit because if you use the waveforms, you can just move very quickly with these talking head edits. So over here I'm going to come to the slider and I'm just going to adjust things so that I can actually see the wave forms. Now I'm going to bring this down again. So how is that? Yeah, I can actually see, you can see these pauses and you can see that the bit where I'm actually talking. So I'm just going to bring that up and maybe just play around a little more just to make it bigger and then bring it down again. And now that's pretty good. I can see exactly where to make the cuts. And now you've also still got a big preview screen right here. So generally what I do is I just bring it back, press Spacebar and sorrows and I want to see where I can make these cuts. So it's gonna be somewhere there. So now over here you have your tools panel. So I'm just going to bring this down, make it a little neat. Now we want to use this tool here. It's the razor, or you can press a C on a keyboard as a shortcut. So if I'm over there and I click See, you can see that the icon has changed to the razor. Now just come here and click now to go back to this selection tool. The shortcut is V. Ok, so just press V and now I'm back to the Selection tool. So with the selection tool, I can click here, I'm selecting the video and the audio, and I can just press delete. And then I can go here and click hold and drag it back to the beginning. But now you can see that we have created a little gap here. I mean, the thing that I wanna do is I want to bring all of these clips. If we just zoom out. I want to bring them all back and to snap on to that point. So what do I do is, let's just zoom in again. And I'm just going to undo this. And to do that, you can press Control Z. So you can see that clip jump back. So now what I wanna do is I want to bring this clip back, starting point, but I want to bring all of them together at the same time. So what you do there is you go up here to the tracks, select forward tool, or you can just press a key on your keyboard. Ok, so let's press a. So now when you see these two little arrows, now you can click hold and drag everything back to a certain point. The problem is, is that we have the music tracks. So if you see me click hold and drag there, not going back. Okay, so the problem is, is that I gotta move this up and I need to lock the music track. Ok, so to do that, we just go down to this little locks and mole ME, click that. Now what you see is that if we click hold and drag everything back, it will go back. If we just zoom out, you can see that everything came back together. So if I go here, click hold and drag, you can see that I can move everything and the music tracks don't move because it's locked. Now, if I want to click hold and drag everything back, it's easy. So basically for this little tracks leg forward tool, at the point where you click hold and drag everything in the timeline to the right of these two little arrows, you know, video and audio included, all of those things will move together. So you can see that if I, let me just go back to this selection tool. Now if I click here, now let me press a again to use this tool. Now if I click hold and drag only these guys here to the right of the two little arrows will move and then control zed to undo. So let me just add some textures to show you. So I can just add some random text, okay, back here. So we can show now we've gotta zoom in to actually see that text. I'm just going to make it a little bigger. So may not make a bigger. Now if I use the tracks leg forward Tool, everything to the right, including the text, will move together with the video and audio. Okay, you can see it all moves together. Then just control Z to undo, control Z to undo that text, make it disappear. So let's just go back to the beginning and zoom in again and minus the zoom out. Now if I press play here, you can see that there's going to be a little bit of a pause between these two clips. Meet, Hello, welcome to this course about Adobe Premier Pro. Now, there's kind of a short little pores there. So what I wanna do is I want to cut here and I wanna cut here to create a jump cut. So what I could do is I could bring the play head here and hit the right arrow on your keyboard. Just move forward frame by frame. And then you can see in the previous screen, you know, you can use that to nowhere to stop as well, or you can just use the waveform. You can see that I stopped speaking here. Okay, so somewhere there should be ok. So now what you do is you can click on see to get the eraser tool and they'll come over here and you've got this snap selected, so things snap, okay, you can see these two little triangles at one. Now, click there and make a cut. This is just one way to do it. And now go back to the selection tool. I can click and delete. And now what I could do here is right-click and then click on Ripple Edit and now everything to the right of this in a timeline book jump back. Okay, so if we zoom out, we can see that everything jump back except the music track because that's locked. Okay, the a2 soundtrack, and let's go back up. Ok, so you really just want to follow these waveforms when you're editing talking head for legitimate. Let's just zoom in again. You will zoom in to where the playhead is. Okay? If the play head is here and you press plus, it'll zoom in there to that point. So oil is focused on where the playhead is. Okay, let's delete that little text there. Now let's go back to the beginning and press plus the zoom-in and minus. Ok. So now let's press Space-bar. Hello, welcome to this course about Adobe Premier Pro. Now, there's a little bit of a pause there left in the next one. So what do I do is I will bring it back to there because I know that where I begin talking, you could go and use the razor tool and click there to cut. Or what you could do is come up and use this tool. It's the ripple edit tool, or just press B on your keyboard. So press B. Now when you hold the mouse over the end and the beginning of each clip, you will see this little yellow icon. And what you can do here is I want to get rid of this portion here. So what I do is I go back to the beginning of the next clip, not here. If I want to do this one, I would click hold and drag and I could bring him back, but I don't wanna do that. I want to keep that. So I go to the beginning. Here is selecting the end point. This is selecting the beginning point of the next clip. So I would just click hold. Now I can drag it up to that point where the playhead is at. And now, if I let go, everything to the right of this tool in the timeline is going to jump back. Okay, you can see that point there. Let me just undo that control z so you can see, okay, so with this, what is it called? It's the ripple edit tool. Press be forever the shortcut on your keyboard go here, you see you don't have to do any cuts and then use the selection tool to select the portion you want to delete and then bring everything back. I mean, this is a very quick way to make quick edit to your talking head footage. So make sure this is selected. Click, hold and drag, and everything jumps back and you make the cut. 17. Editing Talking Head Footage with Jumps Cuts PART 3: So now let's just preview list. Hello, welcome to this course about Adobe Premier Pro. Now, you obviously wanna make some OKs. Now you can see that that is a very quick jump cut. I mean, as soon as I am talking, I start speaking. It was about Adobe Premier Pro. Now. Now partially for me that jump code with a little too quick and a little too jarring. So what I would do here is I would go back here and I would choose the tracks leg forward tool and just press a. Now I would push all of these ford. Everything to the right of these two little arrows is being pushed forward except for the music track because it that's locked. So now what I would do is go back to the selection tool. And I would go back to the end point and just bring back a little bit of that clip. Okay, just bring back a little more. Now I can see some of the silence coming back and they go back to the tracks leg forward tool and bring everything back again just to see how it works. It's about Adobe Premier Pro. Now, you obviously easy now for me personally that works a little better because you know, there's a little bit of a pause and it just works in this situation is not too quick, is not too jarring. So now let us try and move a little quicker. So let's just try and zoom out a little so we can see things. And now we can press spacebar to play. But if you want to move quickly through some footage, you can actually press L to speed things up. So I'm going to press space bar. And so then the thing is, is that there's ton of personal details. Ok, so if you have a lot of talking head footage, I mean, you don't have to watch all of it at the normal speed. You can press L on your keyboard to speed up. So now over here you can see that we have a lot of space that we need to delete. So let's just press play complex program to use. So I don't need any of that. Now, I can zoom in and I can press forward or back just to get the perfect point and kinda watching my facial expressions as well. Now, I generally would go somewhere there and then zoom out. Now go back to this tool, the ripple edit tool, or just b. Ok, so select that. Now go over here, make sure it's not facing backwards. I mean it has to be facing forwards like that. Then click hold and drag it out to that starting point. Now you see you made the cut and everything to the right of it jumped back. So this is a very, very quick way to get through footage. And let's go and preview very complex program to use. Now, you obviously want to make it a bit. Now you see that's a little too quick for me. So what I'm gonna do is control zed to undo. Now I'm going to come back here and just leave a little bit of a pause just to make a more natural, something like that. Come back. Bring it to that point. Unless preview, spacebar, very complex program to use. Now you obviously want to make a video. And you see for me partly I just like that kind of jump card. I don't like it to be too quickly or too jarring, like I liked the small little pauses, but it really depends on you. I mean, you need to create these jump cuts according to your style. So now coming up here you can see that we have too little moment where maybe I was thinking, but there are some pauses. So let's just see how that goes with Premier probe. So there is, you see, there was a little moment there where I had to think so if I want to take that away, you know, if I want to make things a little more snappy, I could bring it back. They're generally what I would do is bring it back. A point like that. Quickly press to see, cut and then Spacebar, spacebar to play and pause quickly. Bring it back to a little bit, a few frames. Maybe they're cut, press V to get the selection tool, click, Delete, right-click reparative. Now I can go back and preview with Premier Pro. So there is a ton. I just got rid of that small little pores. It just makes this footage a little easier to watch the video with primitive probe. So there is a ton. Now for some reason, I don't feel the need to delete this pause, but I mean, if you get a lot of pauses, you might need to cut out some of them. So let's just watch this next program to use. Now, you obviously wanna maybe whatever for a program to use. So you see that little breathe in there sometimes I would want to cut those out so I will just go there with the right arrow key. Quickly hit C on the keyboard, cut and then bring this guy forward. Maybe back one or two frames. Hit BY, come here, click hold, drag amount, and then preview is programmed to use. So you can go out, you see that jump cut just makes things way more fluid. You don't have that deep breath. The thing is you can't add a cut at every single second. I mean, you, you, you gotta have moments where you just have fluid talk and you will get frustrated and honesty. You'll just go crazy. So there I would cut about there, maybe bring it back one or two. And then the quickest way to do this is again hippie here now it's facing backwards. Yeah, now click hold and drag it back. Now, everything to the right of it will jump backwards. Okay, so now you've gotta get used to doing this very, very quickly. So what I would do sometimes is just hit the play head right there. And I know the more you do this, the more you kind of get a feeling for this. And you can gauge the amount of pores that you need for each clip. So I would just gauge it about there. He'd be bring this guy all the way up. Now, another thing that you can do is if you want to preview in full screen mode, you can go put your pay headway or where you want to start. Now, hit Control tilda. It's a weird little squiggly key. Okay, so now we're in full screen. Now press Spacebar. In honesty, you'll just go crazy. Now, there are a lot of tutorials out there that now previewing in full-screen by hitting control tilda is just a very useful thing to use depending on the kind of footage that you have. You know, you might not always needed, but sometimes it's really useful. And you've gotta get used to hitting space bar to play, spacebar, to pause, be replayed it, and then Spacebar control tilda to jump into full screen, pause and then escape to get out of full screen. You've got, I started using all of those keyboard shortcuts if you want to edit this footage very rapidly. So I know that over here, I want to make cuts on gonna zoom in, zoom out a little. Now, let's just jump back a little. Maybe they're cut. I can hit V, select, delete, right-click regulated, and they jump here, jump forward a few frames, maybe back because I always like a little bit of a pause for, for the next clip. And then I can, you know, you can either go two ways. You can hit B, get this little icon, click hold and drag him all the way out. Or sometimes it's faster for me to just hit C V. Select, delete, right-click were blended. So let's just preview that. So I'm going to hit Spacebar controlled tilda to jump into full screen mode. Because on the tools needed to create that final video, you see the most important thing to me, I spoke and then Escape, come out of full screen, getting familiar with those shortcuts and those tools really helped me to edit things fast. So what I do is I bring onto that talking head footage, onto the timeline. You know that you're a role. And then what I do is just slowly go through onto that footage, taking out all the mistakes, all the pause is all of those kind of awkward moments. And then after editing everything, it would look something like this. And now with this basic arrow footage, now you can start throwing on B-roll and titles and music and sound effects and doing some color grading, etc. So this to me is the foundation. Now on top of this a roll. Now I can start throwing on B-roll titles, do some color grading, you know, throwing some sound effects, et cetera. 18. L & J Cuts, Zoom Cuts, Broll Cuts PART 1: So that was a very basic demonstration of how you can create a lot of jump cuts. But if you create a lot of jump cuts, as you can see here, you know, your video can start to look a little choppy. So what I want to show you next is how you can create smoother transitions between these jump cuts just to make your overall video look more fluid. So lets just zoom into random section. Now, one thing you could do to create more fluid looking jump cuts is let me just call it a zoom cut. Okay, so let's just go into this cut here. Was on the tools necessary. So the first thing I would say is that, so what I wanna do here is make sure this second clip is selected. Now go up here to effect controls. Now you've got a lot of options here to play with, but I want you to focus on position and scale. So now what scale? What we can do is if you hold your mouse over here and click hold and drag to the right, you can zoom in. And if you click hold and drag to the left, you can zoom out. Okay, you can see that there. And if you want to return back to normal, just go here and you can reset. So what I'm gonna do here is I'm just gonna set it to 110. Hit enter. Now you can see that my hair or we hear as kind of being cut-off. So what I'm gonna do is I'm going to go to position. And now over here, if you click hold and drag to the left and right, you can change the position of the footage, you know, horizontally. Okay. So left goes left and right goes right. Okay, so you can change the position, come back here to reset. And for this one over here, if you click hold and drag to the left and right, now this is going to change the position vertically, okay, so left goes up and right goes down. What I'm gonna do is I'm just going to put it there just so you can see my hair at least. So let's go back and have a look at this news zoom caught for and only focus on the tools necessary. So the first thing I would say is that you see now that's just one method. You see for this, for each year I shouted at 1920 by 1080. So if I zoom in too much, you know, I'm going to lose a little bit of quality. So it's better to shoot your footage at higher resolution so that you can zoom in without losing quality. But I'm just going to adjust this a little, bring it up and try again. And now I'm going to hit Spacebar controlled tilda to go into full screen and then work backwards and only focus on the tools necessary. So the first thing I would say is that, that is, you see, that doesn't look too bad now, it just makes the content look a little more engaging. So I'm just going to create some more zoom cuts here quickly just so we can preview it and get a better feeling for how it looks. Okay, so let's just preview this quick to see how the Zoom cut works. Or the story or the entertainment value kind of gets lost in the video. So that's kinda why on creating this tutorial, because I honestly would probably like you don't have to be looking at cleaning or very interesting. And then work backwards and only focus on the tools necessary. So the first thing I would say is that, that is the main focus. And we're going to start from there and then work backwards and focus on the tools needed. Now if you've gone watch some entertaining video content, you know, go find somebody good, okay, so you can basically see what happened there and when we started here. So you can see here, you know, the scale is at a 100%, so it's perfectly fitting the frame. And then over here we just zoom didn't little. We went to 105, you know, we just adjusted the position. And then over here back to normal at 100. Over here a zoomed in to 110. So hopefully you can get a feel for the kind of effect that you can create. But I mean, obviously don't go crazy with it, like just use it in the moments where it works. Now, sometimes if you want to get through a lot of talking head footage, you don't really have to use the playhead that much. You can just use the eraser tool, hit c. And now you can just kind of eyeball it. You know, like the more you do this, the more you'll get a feeling for where you need to cut or you can zoom in if you need. Okay. So I would cut their cut their cut their hair there. But obviously there is bit of a pause. So to me, I mean, that would be the so to me, I mean, it would be OK. So you've gotta watch out for these little things here. I mean, at the end you've got to watch it all through to make sure it's okay. But then just hit fee for the selection tool. Click, Delete, ripple, edit. Click, delays were blended. But rarely I recommend watching through all of your footage just to make sure that there aren't any really big mistakes. So now I showed you how to make a lot of jump cuts to you're talking head footage, as you can see here. But honestly sometimes it can seem a little choppy or little amateurish. So if you want to make your content more engaging, I showed you how to make the zoom caught. Now, there's another method that you could use just to make our videos look a little more professional. And that is something called the L cut. So let me just zoom into one of these jump cuts. Okay, so click on the timeline and press the plus symbol. So we have our jump cut here. So as you can see here, I can click hold and drag. I can drag the audio to the a2 track, or I could drag the video to the V2 track, or the v3 or the v4. But what I wanna do is I want to click hold and drag the audio to the a2 track. Now, I want to bring it back just a little bit. But you see now we need a little more space to see things. So what I wanna do is I want to zoom in more, something like that. So over here you can see this is where I stopped walking. The tools needed now. Okay, so I'll stop talking about there. I don't wanna do is I want to click hold and drag and bring this point here where I start talking and I want it to kinda meet there. So click hold and drag, something like that. And you can just play around with it. You know, just mood frame by frame. And now you can see that the video footage from this second clip is now overlaying the footage from the first clip so you can see the footage playing until here, but then it's going to cut to the next clip, but the audio is going to keep going. So you can see their creators kind of L-shaped. That's the, the L cut. So you're gonna see the footage change over here and then you're going to continue to hear the audio just for a little bit, and it's gonna overlap with the starting point of this audio here. So let's just have a listen to this art from there and then work backwards and focus on the tools needed. Now if you go and watch some, Alright, so it's a very, very small effect, but I definitely think that with all the jump cuts that you use in your arrow or talking head footage. I mean, if you use a lot of these Alcott, it can definitely just add like a very, very small effect just to make your videos look more professional. 19. L & J Cuts, Zoom Cuts, Broll Cuts PART 2: And then what you would need to do to create l cuts for all of these jump cuts is you would need to alternate in a way. So lets just zoom out here. And I'm gonna go here, zoom in a little bit. Now, remember we drag this guy back. So what I'm gonna do is I'm going to hit a and I'm going to click hold and drag and back. So let's just zoom in here. Now what I wanna do here is I want these two points here to meet, Okay, this is where I stopped talking and this is where I start talking, but I want to create an Alcott. So over here let's just click hold and drag him back. And that drag him back a little more, maybe somewhere. Okay, now let's preview this into the video editing techniques. You'll see that they just you. Okay, so hopefully you can notice that very, very subtle L cut effect. Okay, so if I just zoom out there, you can see that I have alternating L cuts. Now I'm just gonna go back and preview all of that day is that is the main focus. And we're going to start from there and then work backwards and focus on the tools needed. Now if you go and watch some entertaining video content, you know, go find some good YouTube channels or even movies, TV shows. If you pay attention to the video editing techniques, you'll see that they just use really kind of basic techniques. I mean, there are basic things like crop and zoom. Zooming into certain clips or images or fading and with the music, or fading in with the, with the audio or fading in from a black screen, or just making sure that, you know, they, they cut the clips at the correct time, you know, adding sound effects or color grading, but that can get a little complicated. But now you've just really got to spend time and really zoom in and make sure that the L cuts meat where you want them to meet and you've gotta make sure that your footage looks fluid. So we've seen the Alcott, But now let's have a look at the j cut. And the cut is pretty much just the reverse of the LCA. So let's go here and zoom in. Now what we wanna do here is we wanna drag the first clip. So let's click hold and drag the audio to the a2 track. Now we want this point here to meet this beginning point of the audio for the next slip. So let's just drag a little. And obviously what you can see now is the second clip, create a kind of a j, the j cut. So I suppose for you you can just play around to see do L cuts works more for you or do j cuts maker footage look more fluid? So let's preview. Not that complicated to create good video content if you go into the details of it. Because he honestly, for me, the jacket just looks a little more fluid to me, so that would be my preference. So what you can see here is that we've got two audio tracks overlapping. But up here you can see that the video footage from this clip is beginning here with the starting point of this audio. But if you want, you could keep these audio tracks locked. Just locked him here. And then what you can do is you can choose where you want the footage to finish and start again. So what you would do is come up here to the rolling edit tool or just hit n. So come up here, go to that cut point there. Now click hold and drag amount. And now the footage is gonna continue, but you're going to hear this audio first. So let's just preview that. Every small little thing in Premier Pro is going to be difficult. But if you only focus, so you can just play around with these alcoves and J cuts and try and use the rolling edit tool to choose where you want your footage to finish and start again. But just remember to lock these audio tracks. If you don't like the audio tracks, this is going to happen. The footage and the audio is gonna move. Okay, so now there is another method to hide their choppiness of these jump cut and that is to use B-roll. Okay, so lets just zoom into one of these jump cut the head videos where you just overlay that talking head footage with B-roll or another form. Alright, so what I wanna do is I want to cover this jump cut here. So what I would do is just go to my B-roll bin. Now, I'm going to choose some of this travel footage here, okay, so I'm going to choose this here. So I'm going to double-click to bring it to the Source panel. Now I'm going to choose a portion of this footage to bring down as B-roll. So let's mark in press play. Okay, and I'm going to mark out now, I only want the video, so I'm going to go here, click hold and drag it down here. So let's just preview this. Now, obviously this B roll here is going to cover this jump cut overlay that talking head footage with bureau or another format would be, you know, go out. And I mean, we can make some changes here. We can bring it back, make it end there. And now let's see that overlay that talking head footage with B-roll or another format would be, you know, go out, capture footage on locate. Alright, so you can clearly see that we were able to hide that jump God with B-roll. So I mean, if you've got a really, really bad jump cut, I mean, just use your imagination to think about the kind of B-roll vet you could use to hide that jump cut. I mean, if you're doing tech reviews, I mean, get some B-roll footage of whatever kind of tech gear that you're talking about or if you're doing a product review, get them good B-roll footage of that product. Or you can even get some B-roll footage of your hands kind of gesturing as you're as you're explaining these things. So there's one last thing that I want to talk about with jump cuts. And that is sometimes when you make a jump code, you can hear a very obvious difference between the audio levels of the two clips. So let's just preview this and you'll see what I mean. An interview format, screen casting. Okay, so there you could hear a very obvious like sound. So what you could do here, audio keyframes, okay, so let's just zoom in here. Now, if you come over here to this little symbol, you can see add, remove, keyframe. Now let's select the clip that we want to work with. And now click here. Okay, now we have a keyframe. Now let's just go back a little and add another keyframe. So if you go here, hold your mouse over the keyframe, click hold and drag. You can raise the volume or decrease the volume. So I'm just going to decrease the volume to create a little fade in effect. You can see here that is that strong sound. So let's just listen to this again. That interview format screen casts. So you can see there that, that are nearly totally took out that sound. So let's bring it down low more. And we can bring this back. And interview format screen casting with interview format screencast, okay, that they're to me sounds a little better. And now what you could also do is come back to this clip and add some key frames. If the right arrow key on the keyboard, just that jump forward frames, add another key frame and just bring this down just a little bit. So let's see an interview format, screen casting. So now you can see that that jump cut there is way more fluid. There's no big jump in the audio levels. 20. Adding an Adjustment Layer in Adobe Premiere Pro: Okay, so now you've got a great foundation to work with. I mean, you've taken all of your talking head footage and you've made all your jump cuts. You've removed all the mistakes. And to make things a little more professional, maybe you've added some L cuts and J cuts and zoom cuts. And maybe you've played around with the audio keyframes. So now what you can do is you can start throwing on B-roll music, do some color grading, add some sound effects, thrown some titles, and I'm going to show you how to do that now. But just before that, I wanted to do one more thing here. And I want to add and adjustment layer just above this, a Roll footage here. And later that's going to allow me to still do some color grading to this footage. After I've added the B-roll, I'm going to be able to collaborate the B-roll and this footage here at the same time. So it's pretty easy. All you do is come up here to new item, click, Go down to adjustment layer. You're gonna see frame size and frame rate, things like that, but it's automatically going to match the settings of your sequence. So just make sure that these details are correct. Click OK. Now you're going to have it here in your main project panel. I mean, you can move it into one of these bins if you want, but I just believe it here. Now, I'm going to click hold and drag down to the timeline in the V2 track. Now I'm going to click hold and drag it all the way out. And I'm just going to leave it there. So this adjustment layer is going to be very useful later on because you won't need to go into each individual clip to do calibrating, all you need to do is go click on the Adjustment Layer, make some changes in color. You know, some do some calibrating. And then the changes that you make to this layer will affect every clip below the layer. So let me just show you quickly. So I'll click on the Adjustment Layer grew up to lament the color. Now, if you see here, for example, if I make the adjustment layer warmer, you can see that on the right, you may get colder and making it warmer. Now that warm color will be shown in every clip, a law. Okay, if I increase the contrast, every clip below will have a higher contrast. Now, obviously, you don't want that much contrast. And if you want to reset these settings, just double-click. Double-click. So sometimes what I do is just minimize the basic correction. I go to creative and then I just choose one of these looks. Sometimes I throw in one of these presets just for when I'm adding be wrong. But I mean, you can make changes later. See you now that effect is very strong, so just bring down the intensity. And now I have a slightly different look. I'm in frustration when it comes to editing. If you just plant things properly before we jump into some, okay, but really you don't need any kind of preset for now. So let's just keep it as none. 21. Finding Premiere Pro Graphics Templates for Your Project: Okay. Now, so you've done a lot of the hard work here. I mean, you've got your talking head for age and you've created all your jump cuts and you've tried to make it look professional. And honestly it's, sometimes it's kinda slow and boring and tedious work, but it's a very important thing to do because you've given yourself a very good foundation to work from now and from now on. Like a lot of the more fun stuff begins where we can go out and find like coup animated graphics, animated titles and really sleek looking transitions and Openers. And we can get some cool sound effects and music and throw it into the project. You know, we can even download lots to make the color grading easier. So you can try and create all those things yourself from scratch, but it's going to be next to impossible. So what you can do instead is there are thousands and thousands of people out there creating these animated titles and these cool little transitions and these openers and all you gotta do is you've got to know where to find that stuff. So next I'm going to show you where you can go download all of that cools, doctor, just drop it into your project. Now the ones that I know the most are motion R3, which I actually use the most. And then countless one called mixed kit, which actually seems to be free, but I'm going to go into it more later. Now, there is in battle, which seems to be a little price here. There is story blocks where you can get stuffed, where well, we have to pay for a stock video and photos. And then over here you've got a free option to get free stock photos and videos. Now all of these things here are gonna keep you very busy. You know, they're, they're great places to find cool animated graphics and titles and all of that kind of cool, fun stuff to come in and drop into your project. So you can see here with motion or if you go up the marketplace, I mean, they've got stock video, sound effects, music, stock photos. And then for me, I use these Premiere Pro templates, alot. So you can sort by newest or most poplar kick-ass items. So let's just have a look at the popular ones. So if you go down here, you can see transitions, more transitions, you can see a 50 transition pack. There's a lot of transitions, but you also have titles. You have a glitch maker in order to get to 350 plus elements, you've got a YouTube pack. Let's just have a look at this YouTube back. So you can see that you can just drop these little elements into your project and you can edit the text and you can even edit the position of this little element. You know, at the end of your video, if you want people to subscribe or like I mean, you just throw this little element into it. So you can just throw in these kind of like animated graphic straight into your project. Okay, and over here you can edit the text and move things around and it's very easy to use. Or let's say that you wanted to add a nice little opener to your video. You could use one of these. Now, when you download this and bring it into your project, you can drop in photos and video footage into these spaces. And I mean, you can change the text there. You can even change the music if you want. You know, you would change this to one of your photos or videos. And it's actually easier than you think. So just bear with me and I'm gonna show you later. Or let's say that you wanted to add some nice transitions. And we've also got lots to help you with your color grading. Ok. And same again, download, bring it into the project and it's kind of ready to go. The reason why I use motion R3 is because it seems to be a pretty good deal. I mean, it's only 30 bucks a month and then you get unlimited download. So you get Premiere Pro templates, you get music, sound effects, video footage, and that's pretty much everything I need. And they're always updating new music, new templates and new footage. So now partially that's just what I use because it works best for me. But if you come up here to mix kid, I mean, it seems like you can get a lot of this, you know, similar stuff for free. So as you can see here, stock video stock music and video templates. So if you go down, you can see they've got stock video and some stock music. But if we go to video templates, you can see that they have transitions, titles. I mean, they've got pretty good openers. What is this an animated texts opener. And then, I mean, if you want this, all you do is come over to download free template. And I mean now it's downloaded, but later I am going to show you how you can bring them into the printer probe. So if you're just beginning with all this stuff, I would say go to mixed Kit star out there, download these templates, bring them into Premier Pro and see what you can do with them. And then if you want to move up a level, I would say, you know, try motion R3 and then it seems like it would be kind of one level higher maybe. Let's go to video and then Premiere Pro templates. So if you come down here, you can see that you can buy individual bundles. Ok, so over here we've got lots and this bundled cost $2000. So let's have a look at this. You see now even the quantity of the promo video seems to be a little better. So as you can see, they come with a lot of instructions and kind of guide of how to download these and bring them into your project. So yeah, I would say that invite art looks to be like one level higher than emotionally. Partly speaking, we've got this dynamic urban fast opener. So yeah, if you've got the money to do it, I mean, if you want to pay $17 for one opener, I mean, you can do that. 22. Basic Color Correction & Lumetri Scopes PART 1: We do bid it ddd looking head and do, do, do, do, do. Alright, so let's talk about color correction. It's a huge topic, but you can really add an amazing look to your footage if you do a property. So as I was saying before, if you're a beginner, it's good to use a workspace like this where you can just flip through all of the different options here and keep this basic layout. But now, if you're gonna do color correction and color grading, I really recommend using this color workspace. Because sometimes it's kinda necessary to use both of these panels here, you know, the geometric color panel and the elementary scopes panel. Now if I select this clip here, okay, I'm gonna do some color correction and color grading this specific clip. Now I can select it, come up here to basic correction. And now over here you can see that I can make the, make it a little cooler. I can make it warmer. Okay. I can come down again, increase the contrast. I can decrease the contrast. But the thing is, is that I want my color correction and color grading to match all of these different groups. So I don't want to calibrate and color correct. Individual clips. I want to do everything here in the Adjustment Layer. So I'm just going to come up here and double-click to reset these. Okay, now everything here is back to normal within this clip. So I wanted to do my color correction to the adjustment layer here because, Because if I do color correction and cut upgrading to the adjustment layer, that will affect all these kips here below in the same way. So if I just zoom out here, you know, first minus. Okay, I don't wanna do color grading and color correction to all of these kids. I mean, that's just gonna be crazy. What I wanna do is I want to use these adjustment layers. Because one simple change in this adjustment layer is going to affect all of these clips blow. So let's just zoom in again. So the changes that I make to this adjustment layer here are only going to affect the clip below. There are not going to affect this B roll here, okay? All of the talking head footage here is the same, so we can use one adjustment layer to affect all of that. But with the B-roll, We can come in after and then make some changes there individually to each B-roll clip. Okay, so first we're gonna do some color correction and color grading to this talking head footage, okay, and we're going to focus on this area here. So click on the Adjustment Layer. So if you look up here, you've got a bunch of different options. You've got basic correction and creative curves, et cetera. So you've got color correction in color grading. Just think of color correction as you're trying to get your image back to like a just a very basic natural look and you would just make all of your changes here. Now color grading is where you add like more of a stylistic look to your footage after doing the correction. And then we would come down to this creative panel. And you can also use the rest of these panels. But for now we're just going to have a look at some basic color correction. So if you come over here and just make this a little bigger, now, if you go down to this little wrench icon, okay, click there. Now, this here is the waveform. Now we can add some other things here. We've got a vector scope, okay? Which I never really use. And we've got a slightly different vector scope, and that could be a little useful. You can see here you've got yellow, green, blue, and red. Okay, this can show you how much. For example, here with the blue, you can see this, you can kinda see this kind of waveform here that it's stretching away out of the blue. And obviously you can see that we've got a lot of blue in the footage. So you can see that here. And we've got a little bit of red and then we've got a lot more yellow because you can see this green color there. We've got more yellow and orange. You can see there between yellow and red, we've got this orange block here. Now if we go down, we've also got a histogram and parade. So honestly for me, I think if you're a beginner, I think the two best ones to focus on would be this waveform here and the parade. So I'm just gonna take these two away. And over here you can see the red, green, and blue color channels. As you can see, there's a lot of blue in our Footage. Now the first thing that you should adjust the white balance. Okay, so I suggest having a look at this parade scope as you do it. Okay, so remember you've got the red, the green, and the blue color channels. Now if you come over here, you can do it manually. So just for example, if you click hold and drag this to make the footage cooler, you know, to bring in more blue into the footage. So let's go left. Now, in that parade scope over here, you can see that the blue colors are increasing, okay? And you can see that the warm colors over here are decreasing and you can see what the footage it looks for a very cold, I looked very, very blue, but now if I don't wanna make this footage warmer, now I'm going to increase the amount of red color in this footage so I can click hold and drag it over. And now you can see that blue colors going way down and the red colors increasing. And now look at the photo chair. It's very, very warm. You don't really want that. I mean, it should be somewhere there because ideally, you kinda want these three channels to be at the same level. I mean, even if we come over here to the tint we've got, if we add more greens, you can see the green channel increasing. Come over here, we can decrease the amount of green. Now, there's another thing that we could do. So just come here and double-click to reset. As you can do all of this automatically. Ok, so if you come here to the White Balance Selector, just click on that little eyedropper and now go to your footage and now click on something that's white, okay, so you can see or we, I mean, there's not a lot of options here, but maybe we could use the white there in the monitor. So just click there. And you can see over here that it automatically adjusted some of these values. And you want these channels here to be fairly equal. But I mean, you don't have to have the perfect white balance. I mean, if you want a cooler image, just add in more blue. I mean, if you really want a warmer image here, just added more warmth. It's, I mean, it's really up to you and your own style. Now, after doing the white balance, we don't really need this parade scope because if you look over here, both of these kind of adjust to the same levels simultaneously. So if we increase the contrast, you can see they move together, they go down together. The highlight you can increase. They move together so you don't really need both of them. You only need this waveform here. So I'm just going to double-click here, remains back to normal. Come over to the little wrench and de-select parade. So we're only going to work with this wave form here. Alright, so over here you can see that you've got these two scales, but there's only really two numbers that you, that you need to focus on. That is 0 over here and a 100, ok? You don't want this waveform here to go below 0, or you don't really want it to go above a 100, you know, in a way like audio over here, it's kind of clipping, okay. It's going above. 23. Basic Color Correction & Lumetri Scopes PART2: So the first one here is exposure. Now, if I think that my footages too dark, I can come here, click, hold and drag, and I can just expose the image a little more, you know, just make it brighter or darker. Okay, double-click. Now you can follow the waveform here, so I'm just going to bring it up just a little bit. Okay? And I'm following this waveform here. So you can see it kinda rising there. Or if I come down here, bring it down, you can see the waveform dropping. You don't want that there. You want everything to lie in a balanced way between 0. So I actually want my preview footage here to be a little bigger so I can see what I'm doing with this color correction. So I'm just gonna go here and I'm going to minimize these options. Okay? And I can always bring it back. Just click on that little arrow. And then over here I'm just going to make this wave formula a little smaller. Ok, but we've got a big preview screen here to work with. Now the next thing we have here is contrast. So with contrast, okay, basically you've got shadows and highlights. Now you can have a range between those shadows and highlights. You can have a short range or a longer range and you can affect it here. So if I click hold and drag it up, you can see here that in the middle of this waveform, this upper section here is stretching out and the bottom section here is dropping, okay, because here we have the shadows and up here we have the highlights. So I am just increasing the range between the shadows and the highlights. You can see there the range is increasing. Or if I bring it down below 0, where we're making that range very short. And you can see the way it affects the image, ok? If you have a longer range for the contrast, it kinda gives you that kind of stronger, punchier look. Okay, so it's kind of useful to look at the waveform, but it's, you know, it's also very useful just to look at your footage. What I do is I just kinda get the slider and I go just up and down, up and down until I get to a point where it looks good for me and for me close to 0 here was, okay, alright, so the next two things that we can adjust our, the highlights and the shadows. Just think of the highlights as, you know, all of these bright areas of this footage, okay. And the shadows are obviously all of the dark, kind of shadowy areas. Now, when you adjust the highlight, your only affecting the brighter portions of this footage. Pain when you adjust the shadows are only affecting the shadows without affecting the highlights that much. I mean, they do effect each other a little bit. And if you have a look here at the waveform, if you adjust the highlights, ok, this little slider here, mostly the top half of this wave form is adjusted and it, and it kind of leaves the bottom half alone, as you can see here. The top half kind of moves a lot and the bottom have remained fairly unchanged. Ok, double-click, bring that back to 0 or with the shadows. Now the bottom half of this waveform is adjusted. Leaving the highlights here alone. I mean, they effect each other in a very small way. But now for me partially, I mean, I would have a look at the footage a little more when I'm doing this, you know, I mean, it's up to you to get the kinda look that you want. So I'll come to the highlights. Ok, I'll just bring it up and down. Just experiment a little and keep it about there. So over here you can see that the white here looks a little blown out. So when you, when you bring down the highlights, what you're doing is you're actually kinda revealing more detail. That is last when it's blown out. I mean, if it's, if we bring it all the way up, we lose some detail in the highlight. Now if we bring, now watch here you can see some sharpness return. So if we bring the highlights all the way down, we can reveal more details. Now it's the same thing for the shadows. If you bring down the shadows like that, you know, as, you know, some people say they're, they're crushing the shadow is, you can see here that we have lost a lot of details within the shadow is, you know, we've made those shadowy parts too shadowy and dark, so we've lost in the details. Now if we want to bring out these details, just go to the slider, bring it up and you can see the details in these shadowy areas returned. Obviously you don't want too much, so you gotta kind of adjust and get it to a level that looks nice to you. Okay, so the next two things that we can look at are the white and the black, okay? Now, when you adjust these two things, it's kinda like you're adjusting the shade of each, okay? So it's easier to see what the blacks, if you click hold and drag there. If I bring it down, it's kinda like I'm making all of the black pixels here in this footage, like a darker shade of black. Okay, you can see that. And if I come up, I'm kind of making those pixels like a, like a lighter shade of black there, almost gray and away. Okay, so you just gotta play around. And now over here you don't really want the waveform below 0. Okay, so just come to the VAX now you can see that moving there and the waveforms, so just bring it there, so it's just above 0. But you've kind of got to have a look at the footage as well. I mean, just to make sure it looks good. All right. So you can see I've made a very small change there. Now if I come up here to the white, if I increase it, it's kind of like a making the whites in the footage moral White for bringing it down. You know, I'm kind of decreasing the shade of white. And over here with the wave form, I mean, you don't want it all the way down there at 90, just bring it here just below a 100. Okay. You don't want it to clip like that. You'll want to just below. Okay. So for me, I'm pretty happy with this now and I'm going to move on to saturation. So with saturation, I mean, if you increase it, that would just increase the amount of color in your footage or if you decrease it, kind of pulls all of that color out. So you can see here, we can pull all the color out, bring it back to black and white. You know, we can have a small amount of saturation. You can see there. Or we can bring it all the way up and really saturate the footage until it's oversaturated. And I mean, you can keep looking at the waveform here, just keep it between 0. Now, double-clicked it, bring it back to 0. I think it's a little over saturated to begin with, so I'm just gonna bring it down just a little bit and we're there. Okay, so that is basically color correction. We've just brought the footage back to a general basic natural look. 24. Color Grading: Adding a Stylized 'Look' to Your Footage: So now what I'm going to show you is how you can add more, more of a stylistic look. And this is color grading. And let's just click here to minimize it. And click on creative. And just one more thing, just kinda make a habit of saving a project, okay, as you go along, just, just create this little habit of hitting Control S, OK. Because I mean, computers do crash and you can lose all of your work. So just make that little habit of hitting Control S on a keyboard. Okay, so now this is where we can add more style and more of a look to our footage after the basic direction. So now if you, I mean, if you watch a lot of like filmmaking or video production, YouTube videos, you've probably heard of something called a lot, okay? Now a lot is a lookup table. Now just think of it as it's kinda like a preset. I mean, if you use Instagram, it's kind of like an Instagram filter, but for video, now, there's a very quick and easy way to add a specific look to your footage. Or there's a slower, more advanced way to do it. Ok, you come down here, these options here are there the more advanced tools, but if you quickly want to add like a nice look to your footage, just come here to creative gotta look. I'll click here and you can see that Premiere Pro already comes with its own selection of presets. You know, it's kinda like Instagram filters, but for a video and you can change if the intensity of these looks. Now some of them add like a cooler look to your photogenic. They add more blue colors. Some of them are warmer or they add more kind of orange colors. Some of them add more contrast. Some of them at kind of a faded look. And you just really have to go through and preview all of them. So let's first try and senior space and you can see that it's giving you a very punchy, kinda contrasty look. Now you want to come here to intensity and you really need to bring this down nearly always, OK, and have a look at the waveform there. There's a huge range here with the contrast. So bring this down somewhere there, and that doesn't look too bad now. But my footage already has a lot of contrast and naturally, so I don't want to use this look. Now let's just have a look at this one here and you can see that it's just added kind of Morgan faded look to the footage. You can see here that the blacks here are way above 0. So now over here I look, I mean, if you bring it back down to normal, then it's just they're above 0. But if you want to add more of a faded look, you can raise the waveform here and you can see in the footage it just looks more faded. If you want to go for a blue look, you would come down to one of these options here. Blue called Blue Day for Night, ice, intense Moon and steal. So if we go for steel, you can see there's a lot more blue in this footage, bringing the intensity down, bring it up to a point that looks good for you. Or if you want to go for a very warm look and go all the way down, you can go to this, these options here, gold he, golden, orange, rush, tobacco and Western. Let's just try one of these. Okay. There's a lot more red and orange in this footage. Okay, but you're rarely just gotta play around with these. There's another one here, the matrix, it adds a lot of green. Ok, there you can do to group the green waveform is kind of higher than usual. So just for example, I'm just gonna go with this look here and you can see the intensity is way down at 7.4. Okay, so unlike this, look, now I can come down and over here at faded film, I can add more faded. Look, if I need, I don't really want that. Now for sharpen, you can sharpen image. Okay, now just go to full screen to see that. Okay, now that's way too sharp. Or I can bring it down and I can kind of blur the footage. Gets. So obviously don't want that. So you've got to kind of play around, you know, some people when they're shooting with their camera, they, they bring the sharpness way down in the settings. So if you bring that photo Jane, if it's not naturally sharp, you would just need to add a little bit of sharpness. But for me when I was shooting this footage are kinda use the factory settings of the camera. So it naturally had a very sharp look already. So you could just use like so if I want to bring it down just a little bit, I could do that. Okay. So you could just use like talking him. Okay, so we can play around with the sharpest, the Vibrance and Saturation. And with the vibrance and saturation, I mean, you're just increasing the amount of color and taking out the color in different ways, okay? You just need to play around and see what works for you. Format, okay, so you could just use like Tolkien hated. Okay, but if I wanted, I mean, I could still come up here to the intensity which is add a little more of the look. Okay, format. So you could just use. Now, a lot of this is about going down, making some changes, going back up, remaking some additional changes. I mean, it's a constant process of tweaking and changing different settings here until you get it up that you want. But after doing that, I mean, it's all here in the Adjustment Layer and you don't have to go into each individual clip to, to redo all of this color correction and grading. So just spend time here adjusting each setting, going back, changing settings again and again and again until you get the lucky one. And if you come up here, you can see the original and then the, the look that we gave it. 25. Color Grading: The 'Hollywood' Orange & Teal Look, & Using LUTs: Now, if you come down here, you've got shadow tint and highlighted. What you can do here is with the shadows, you can kinda push more of certain colors into the shadow is, or you can push certain colors into the highlights of your footage. Okay, now there's something called a Hollywood look or an orange and TOO look. So what people like to do is they like to push a TO look into the shadows and then more of an orange look into the highlight. And generally, you know, your, your skin tones would be in the highlight. So it would look something like this. Just come here, click hold and drag it down just a little bit. You can drag up more towards the blue, more towards the tail or even more towards the green. I mean, you can read a play around with this a lot. Just don't do too much if you bring it all the way down. For example, if you click there, now you're really increasing the saturation being in the shadows. Or if you click somewhere there, now your D saturating the color. So just click hold and drag it to adjusted and keep an eye on your footage and keep an eye on your shadows and just push in some colour to the shadows. And I'm going to go for some teal. And now for the highlights over here, I'm gonna push just a little bit of, of a warm color into the highlight. So that's going to be here phase and here i on the monitor in the background. So I'm going to click hold and drag. Now we can do a lot. Just click right there. Now you see the way they're, the highlights and the shadows effect each other. Ok? So you don't want to overdo it now. Bring it there more towards the center. Okay. Now the skin tones lie somewhere there between red and orange and yellow. Ok? So you really need to kind of play around with things. But now you can see here very quickly that we, that we've added kind of more of a, it's like a typical Hollywood look format. Okay, so you could just use like talking head and down. There's a little bit, I mean, you rarely just gotta get your skin tones looking natural. Don't overdo it. Don't do something like that. I mean, I'm looking way too red or orange there format. Ok. Bring this down somewhere there, mark and make a little more green in the shadows format. Okay, so you could just use a talking head and over the ok now, so that really depends on your, I mean, you just gotta play around there to get a nice little orange entail or Hollywood look. Control S to save. Right? Let me just show you that orange and TOO look or that Hollywood look here with this B-roll footage. So I'll make sure that you're clicked onto your clip. Now, I mean, obviously we could go through and do some basic correction and all of that and, you know, add I look here, but I just want to show you how you can quickly add that Argentina looked. So click on your clip. There's one here. Now. Click hold and drag it down. Here, add a lot more, but you can see there it's just kinda looks very nice. Now click hold and drag this one up just a little bit. Okay, now if we come here, go to full screen location and then just edit all of that. Okay, you can see there that it's added this nice little Hollywood Argentina look, you can come back, we can have a look, the, the original. Okay, it looks lot warmer. Or we can click on this again to see the look that we applied. You know, there's just a little more blue pushed into it. We could add some more orange. Okay, come down, add just saturate, did a teal a little more. We can make a more extreme and shoot outdoors or on location, and then just edit all of that together. Okay, it's just a very popular looked to use and it looks nice, okay, the original. And now with our detail. So if you watch any filmmaking or video production YouTube channels, you've probably seen that a lot of people sell lots, pay those look-up tables. You can download those slots. And you can come here and you can go to browse and you can bring the lot into primary probe, okay? Or you can go to somewhere like motion array. Let's just say I'm going to bring in one of these urban nuts. So you see Download, you extract the file based, save it in a, in a certain location, and then come to Premier Pro. Now, go here. Now I'm going to click on browse. I want to bring this latIn. Okay, now I've saved this file over here. It's in motion or a lots. And I'm gonna come over here to Lutz and I'm gonna go down to the urban nuts. That's where I'll save them. Now, you can see that they are dot cube files. Okay, so all you do is you click on a certain lot, click on Open. And now you can see that it is applied to the footage. It's over here, Urban lot or one. Ok. Now, so I already added that orange TO look. So I'm just going to reset it by double-clicking and it goes in and a resets and then double-click here again, okay, now so we don't have the orange and TOO look, we only have this urban lot look. And then we can just come down here and reduce the intensity. And now we have this specific look. Okay, or let's go try another one. Browse to okay. It's a lot warmer, adjust the intensity doors or on-location and then just yet, and just keep going through until you find a good lot that you like outdoors or on-location. And they just edit, all right, pretty much the same as Instagram filters just for video. Very, very easy to use. But now let's have a look at the more advanced way of color grading or footage. Okay, just remember, color grading is adding more of a style or more of a look to your footage. Color correction is just doing the basic corrections to make your footage look natural. And then you do the color grading. So you can still add a look and then do color grading. But what I'm gonna do is I'm just going to start from scratch and click on none. Okay, if, if you need, you can still sharpen the image or, you know, it takes some of the sharpness out or add some faded film. Maybe let's add a little more vibrant. And the saturation. You don't need too much. Let's just leave it at 0. And maybe we can add a small little Argentina look not too much or on location. And I'm going to show you how to colour grade with this 40 tier, not the, not the talking head footage. So I'm not going to click on the Adjustment Layer. I'm gonna go here and click on the B-roll clip. And now if you look down here, I still have the note that I added to remember that we've needed footage shot outdoors. So let's just bring the be rolled back. Now, I don't need this note anymore, so I'm just going to delete that and bring them down. Delete this one as well. Ok. And over here we can adjust the tin balance based on the shadow attained and the highlight TIM. Okay, so bring it all the way down. Changes, look all the way up, more blue. Let's just get it to a point that we like, you know, on-location and then just 26. Lumetri RGB Curves: Adjusting All Colors: So let's just minimizes creative panel and we're going to have a look at curves. Now, curves can be a little tricky, but it's very interesting as well. Now, you could come up to basic correction and change the exposure and the contrast and the highlights and shadows and things like that. Or you could do all of that using curves. Okay, but this line here, now for a lot of you, when you're shooting footage with your camera, maybe you don't use log footage and flat color profiles, things like that. Maybe you're just using the standard settings that are already set within your camera. So when you shoot footage in standard settings, you know, you know, they normally have. The sharpness is very high. There is a lot of contrast. There's already a lot of saturation kind of baked into your footage. Whereas some people shoot with a flat color profile, which basically is like a very unsaturated, it's not a very sharp image. But what that allows people to do is it allows for more flexibility in color correction and calibrating. Like for example, for me, I shoot in similar style with the count and 50. So I'm just going to show you how you can do color grading with these curves, with standard footage and very flat Fuji. And just to let you know, this is what standard footage looks like with a lot of contrast and sharpness and saturation baked into the footage already. And this is what flat footage looks like. It's just, you know, it's more desaturated. It's a little softer and it just allows you to bring out more detail and more colors in color grading. In a way it kind of like saves more information in the footage. So now let's have a look at these curves. So now have a look at this line now and just think of it as down here we have the dark is point, and up here we have the lightest point, okay, down here we have the shadows. We have their mid tones over here and up here we have the highlight. Okay? Now what you can do is you can manipulate this line to change the contrast and to darken the shadows and to brighten the shadows and things like that. So for example, you can click on the line and now you have a point that you can manipulate, okay? Now this is at the mid tone range, so I can bring it up to brighten the mid tones, or can bring it down to dark and the mid tones, ok, double-click to reset the curve. So now over here you can see that the bottom of this waveform is going past 0. So i want to bring up the bottom of this wave form so I can go down here to the dark as point. Let's just put a little point there. And we can click hold and drag it up. And now you can see that we can drag the lowest point of the wave form and leave it at just above 0. That's going to be the darkest point in the footage. Now for the bride is part of the footage. You can see up here, we can click hold and drag it down a little. When you drag it down, basically you're making the highlights dimmer. Okay. So we can drag that down just below a 100. If I come down here, if I click hold and drag everything here past 0, basically we're deleting all of this information in the wave form. So we don't really want to do that. We want to keep most of the information. Keep it at just above 0. And same again for the white. If we come up here and if we blow out the whites, okay? That information here is going past a 100. It's, we're deleting information in a way. If we want to keep that information, just keep it at just below 100. So what we're doing here you, here you can see that this white dot here is selected. So what that means is that we're affecting every color in this footage, okay, afterwards, if you click on these individual color channels, you can specifically affect all the greens and the footage or all of the blues and all the rates. But if you're over here, then you're going to affect all of them together. As you can see here, we've got the red, the green, and the blue. Now if I play around with that, they're all going to move together. But later if I come here to the blue channel, I can specifically move the blues, the greens. And if you look at the wave form over here on the left, just pay attention to the Greens. If I come down here to the shadows, I can manipulate the Greens only in the shadows. Okay. They'd highlight aren't really being affected that much. Okay? Or if I come to this top point here, now paid, pay attention to the top half. And the greens are being manipulated in the top half of the waveform did the highlights basically. So if you have a look at all these shadowy areas in this footage, okay, all these dark areas here. Now, down here we can manipulate the shadows, up here, the highlight. So if I click there, now, create a little node. Now if I click hold and drag up and down, now I'm gonna make all of the shadows in the footage darker. Okay. As you can see, there are all getting darker. Now if I bring it up, I'm making I'm kinda like bringing details out of the shadows. Okay. I'm making the shadows brighter and we can see more details there in the trees. Bring it down. Now, we kind of lose information in the trees. And now up here for the highlights, let's just add a little node there. Now we can click, we can make the highlights dimmer, okay? You can see there, especially pay attention there. If we go back to normal and then bring it down, we're making everything dim there. And if we bring it up now we're gonna make that part brighter. And just notice there that if you have a little node point here and if you manipulate the highlights, you'll notice that the shadows don't change much at all. Same for the shadows. If we come down here, if you have a little note there, then the highlight won't really changed at all. I mean, they'll change a little bit, but they'll remain relatively unchanged. Now the thing is, is that this standard footage already had a lot of contrast and sharpness and saturation already baked into it. So it's kinda difficult to make changes here and make it a big difference to your footage. But now I'm just going to show you how to use this curve with flat footage, okay? And you're gonna see that we can do a lot more manipulation with this curve. And as you can see here, I haven't done any basic correction or, you know, I haven't added any lots or looks or anything like that. Okay, so we're just gonna go straight into curves. So now over here you can see the waveform and you can see that the lowest point of the waveform is way above 0. Okay, so first of all, I want to drag that down. So let's just get a node there. Click hold and drag it down somewhere there just as a start. So you can see here is Sharad is a lot more, while the black color is lot more natural-looking. If we bring it up and kind of turns a little faded in gray, we don't, well, I don't really want that song and drag it down, make it look more natural. And then the other thing that I wanna do is I don't want this to be overexposed and blown out. So I want to get this point here and drag it down a little, just have it there just below a 100. Now it's a good idea to put a point there and a point there so that we can play around with the highlights and the shadows. So what a lot of people like to do is they like to create kind of an S curve. Okay, so come down here to the shadows. And now we can darken the shadows a little bit, just a little bit. Okay, to create more contrast. And we can come up here and drag this up just to brighten a little. And now that footage is a lot more punchier and contrasty. And then what I see some people doing is they like to add a little bit of a cinematic look to their footage. So what you can do there is just drag this bottom point of the waveform just up a little bit just to create a small faded effect. So come down here, grab this point, just drag it up a little. We can preview that. Shoot outdoors or on-location. Okay, that has like a slight cinematic feel to it. 27. Lumetri RGB Curves: Adjusting Red, Green & Blue: All right, so I'm pretty happy with that. And now I'm going to show you how you can play around with these individual color channels. So let's say first of all that you want to make this sky here just a little bit warmer. One thing you could do is you could go to the red color channel now where we're gonna be playing around with the highlights. So let's just create a little note there. Now over here, we can click hold and drag and add more red into the highlights. Ok, you can see there that the sky is a little more warmer. But I don't really want to do that. Let me just reset that by double-clicking. Okay, instead, I want to take out green and blue. So let's go there. At a node. There's take out Green from the height, okay? There you can see the sky is a little darker, but it's still has some blue. So let's go take out some blue from the highlights. Ok, so there you can see that this guy has a little warmer look to it. And if we go back to the red, I mean, we can put a node there, we can actually add a little more red. Okay, so that's one small thing you can do to make the sky local or warmer. And you can actually see it here in the waveform as well. I mean, if we drop the blue highlights and drop the green highlights, you can see the colors here disappearing and only leaving the red, for example, let's do that and see that green dropping out. And if we go to the blue, you can see the blue dropping out and just leaving the red. And you can see this effect but the mid tones as well. So if we go into the red channel, create some nodes. Now we can boost the reds in the mid tones. Ok, now we're getting that kind of look at it. It looks pretty good. Or if we just reset that, do some green. And the mid tones. We said let's try that blue. So there's many different looks you can go for if you just understand how to use these curves and it's the same for the shadows. What if you can see red or green or blue in these shadowy areas? I mean, what if you want to pull those colors out of the shadows to make them look more natural within. Just come here. Maybe click there. Let's try this 1 first. Now let's pull the read out of the shadows. K down here you can see the reds disappearing. Okay, so that's not really working that well because it's effecting the whole curve. So let's reset that. Now let's come up here. Now let's try. Ok, there. You see the dark day, the blacks, they're there, they're getting a little more black. So let's try the green and the blue. Ok, now what you can see is that the reds, the greens, and the blues have been pulled out of the shadows. So the shadows are more naturally dark and black. Whereas in the highlights we still have the reds. The greens and the blues are, the blue is here in the mid tones. And they just edit all of that together. So let's just say that. Okay, so here is the flat footage and now here is the color correct data and calibrated footage. So hopefully that gave you a good understanding of how you can play around with these RGB curves? Yeah, just remember you've got the wide channel that controls all the colors. And then you can go into these individual color channels. And it just seems to be a more advanced version of color correction and compare it to this basic correction. 28. Hue Saturation Curves: HUE vs SAT : So we had a look at RGB curves. Now let's look at hue saturation curves. Okay, so let's come down here to the hue saturation curves. And we have Hugh versus saturation. Now, let me just explain hue, saturation and luma, okay? Hue is basically just another word for color. Okay, there are many different colors. And you can see here red, orange, yellow, green, teal, blue, pink, red. Okay, you can also call them, cuz these are many different hues. Going across. Saturation refers to the amount of color that you're pushing in or pulling out, okay? You can have very saturated or unsaturated luma kinda refers to the brightness or the darkness of the color. Okay, but we're going to get onto this later. So you can see here we have Hugh versus saturation, we have Hugh versus HW, HW versus luma. Okay, now the first one, that's what we're going to change things based on. Ok, so for the second one here we have saturation. So with this curve here, we're going to change the saturation based on certain hughes, Okay, down here we're going to change the Hughes based on certain hues that we have selected down here. We're going to change the LUMO, the darkness, or the brightness based on the hue that we select. Now this is where things get very interesting. Okay, so let's have a look at HEW versus saturation. Now let's just say, for example, that I really hate this pink bag. I really don't want the saturation that is in this pink bag and in the shoes, you know, it's like too much. So let's say that I want to bring the saturation out of only the pink bag and the shoes and nothing else. Now, you can come here, click and drag all the saturation down. We can D saturate every color or every whew. Okay, double-click to bring it back to normal. Let's just say that we want to select only this pink color. Now one thing we could do is we come to the curve and we can create points, okay? And create three points. At the point, they're in the middle and we can bring it down or we can bring it up to increase the saturation. But if you want to be more effective and choose the specific color, now, double-click here to reset. Now, go to this eyedropper. Now we're going to click on this bag. Okay, you can see that a wasn't really over here in this pink region where were are thought of was it? It's a little moreover. So this here is the exact color of that bag or Well, the point that we selected. So now you can see that if we go to this point and drag down, just watch the bag where the saturating the color of that ping back. Okay, now look at it. Now for me that Telemann too bad, or if you really wanted to, you could drag it up and increase the saturation. We are changing the saturation based on the color that we chose. For here, the Hue we chose this color, and we're going up or down to change the saturation. Let's leave it somewhere there. So these two points here, I like anchor points, okay? Now, if there are very close to each other like that, then when you drag this point up and down, it's only going to affect like a very narrow band of color, ok? And sometimes it can look a little unnatural. So if it looks a little too unnatural than just trying to widen these anchor points here, you're just going to see. A better blending of colors in the footage. If you do it that way, it's kinda like a safer way to do it. But if it looks okay, I mean, you can leave them pretty close to each other. So let's just try that with these trees, okay, because these trees are just looking a little unsaturated to me. So let's go to the eyedropper. Now, click on the tree. Now let's go there and bring the Saturation up. You can see the trees are getting more green. Ok. But if you wanted, you can come here and you could widen. Less D saturate the trees. Okay. Now the tree that very kind of gray looking bring them up. And just, I mean, it's a little safer. You can basically affect more of the greens in your footage. If you just keep these anchor points kind of wide apart, you know, you can affect some of these greens as well. So to me it looks just a little more natural like that if there are wide apart. Now one more thing that I wanna do here is this building here is type a one-to-one, and it's kind of like a very important icon of the city K. So what I wanna do is I want to push more blue color into it. Well, specifically more teal. So let's go to the eye dropper and now let's select OK, so I'm going to use this little point in here. So let's click hold and drag him up. And now you can see there that there's a little more vibrance in this in Taipei one-to-one in the building. But you can see that it affected the green here a little bit. And let's go down here. You can see that it's affecting this top thing here. Okay, so what I wanna do is I want to drag these greens. I don't want these greens too to be affected so much Solon or drag them over. Click here and drag him down there. And I'll want only the greens in this range here to be affected. I don't want the greens, they're affected because I can see it affecting this material. Let's bring it up. I can see this building type, a one-to-one kind of popping out with more color. K. We can drag him back if we don't like the greens. You know, we still want there, the green colour of the trees, but we don't want this here looking at natural. Okay, and what I can do is come here, get alone, know dare try bring this guy up, see how that changes things there now one-to-one Israeli popping out nicely. But if I do that now we are going to affect these blues as well. Okay, if I bring it down, just wants those blues. Okay, they get a little D saturated. But there, okay. So now if we go to full screen, that's kinda popping out nicely for me. Okay, so, uh, might look a little unnatural in places. So you just got to play around with this stuff a lot. And you can see here with the changes that we made to the hue saturation curve, it's going to affect all of the footage. So let's just play that through what ensued outdoors or on location and then just edit all of that together. So let's just say, ok. So one more thing here that I don't like is I don't like this taxi being that saturated. Okay, so I wanna take the yellows out. So let's go back up to the eye dropper. Click on that. Now, let's play around with this to get a nice even that already. I mean, that looks nice to me. And just try and bring this down. We can go for very unsaturated look, but just something like that. It looks ok outdoors or on-location. And they just edit all of that together. So let's just say, ok, now this stuff really depends on you. I mean, you, you know, how much saturation and non-saturation you like. 29. Hue Saturation Curves: HUE vs HUE: Okay, so we're finished there. Now let's have a look at HEW versus whew. Okay, so that's basically color versus color. So now in the one before we changed the saturation based on the hue that we selected, based on the color that we selected. With 101 here we selected kinda teal and we increased the saturation. But now here with Hugh versus Hue, we're gonna choose a color, select the color, and we're going to change the color of that color. It sounds weird, but I'm gonna show you, okay, so now the first thing that you gotta do is you really got to work with a color that is not really within the rest of the footage. Let's use that taxi. Okay. Because there's not too much yellow in the footage. Okay. Because if we change the color of the taxi, if there was more yellow and the footage, we would affect those colors as well. So let's go for the taxi now, hue for ourselves, Hugh, Go to the eyedropper, select the taxi. Now we have selected this hue. Now when we drag down and up, we're actually going to change the color of the taxi. Ok, so let's go here. Click hold, drag them down. Now he's Green, Okay, now it's very, very green. Ok, now it's almost blue. So let's go up. You can see in the rest of that footage that not not much else is being affected. Okay. It's just the color of the taxi. Let's go up. We can change it to a pink color, all the way up to whatever kind of color this is. Now what we can see up here is that these colors are being affected. So just watch out for that. Sea water would really do with this is just play around very, very close to the line. Don't go too far because you can really affect a lot of different colors here. So stay close to the middle. Okay, so we're changing the color of a certain color that we have selected. So let's have a look at that footage. Shoot doors or on-location. And they just said, okay, if we wanna change the color of this pink bag, well then just come to the eye dropper. Click. Now we're gonna change the hue of this color that we selected. So let's drag it down. Kind of orange or something like that. Can make a purple. But just stay close to this line here. Doors or on-location. And then just put just remember that if you do that, that exact color, if that color is anywhere else, it's going to be affected as well. 30. Hue Saturation Curves: HUE vs LUMA: Okay, next one, Hugh versatile luma. Now hue is color. Luma is kinda like the darkness and brightness of a color. So now let's say that we want to change the brightness of this orange color here. Okay, so let's go forward a little bit. There. Now, let's go to the eye dropper. We're going to select this hw. Okay, this is the hue we've selected. Now we're gonna change the brightness and darkness of it. So let's come here, go up. Now it's going to be brighter. Come down. We're gonna make it darker on location and just edit all of that together. Okay, and make it brighter doors or on location. And then just edit all of that together. Ok, so you can see that if you really understand how these curves work, you can really do a lot of cool things. So you just gotta make sure that you choose kind of isolated colors. Because if you choose something like green here, I mean, Taipei 101 has a little bit of green in it and this tarp looking thing here has green. So if we come here, select green from the tree. Now over here, if we bring up the tumor, you can see 101 getting effected. Yeah, so just watch out for things like that. You know, there's not much change to the green and the tree. And we're still seeing this. We're still seeing 1-1 getting affected.