Adobe Illustrator for iPad 101: Three Floral Illustrations | Tracey Capone | Skillshare

Adobe Illustrator for iPad 101: Three Floral Illustrations

Tracey Capone, Illustrator & Photographer

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14 Lessons (1h 32m)
    • 1. Introduction to Class & Welcome!

      1:30
    • 2. Downloads & Resources

      1:17
    • 3. Home Screen | Creating a New Document

      3:12
    • 4. Illustrator for iPad's User Interface

      17:06
    • 5. Creating a Color Palette & Background

      5:39
    • 6. Vase Illustration with the Shape Builder

      8:03
    • 7. Vintage Can With the Pen & Text Tools

      13:03
    • 8. Bud Vase with the Pencil Tool

      6:33
    • 9. Flower Illustration with the Pencil Tool

      14:07
    • 10. Flower Illustration with Radial Repeat

      8:10
    • 11. Creating Leaf Shapes

      7:56
    • 12. Adding Final Textures with Clipping Groups

      3:35
    • 13. Exporting Your Document

      1:01
    • 14. The Class Project & Thank you!

      1:08
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About This Class

The long awaited Adobe Illustrator for iPad is here and, in this class, you will learn the basics of the application by creating three simple floral illustrations using various tools within the app.

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Welcome everyone! In this beginner's class, I will show you the basics of Adobe Illustrator for iPad by creating three simple floral and leaf illustrations using a combination of tools within the application. We'll start out by taking a tour of the user interface so that you know where all the tools and settings are. Next, I will show you how to use a combination of the drawing and shape tools to create three simple floral illustrations three different ways. 

What you will learn in this class:

  • The basics of Adobe Illustrator for iPad, including the layout of the application.
  • How to create simple vase and flower illustrations using a combination of built in shapes and the Shape Builder Tool.
  • How to create simple vase and flower illustrations using a combination of the Pencil Tool and Direct Selection Tool.
  • How to use the Pen Tool to create basic vase and flower shapes.
  • How to use the Radial Repeat to create flowers for your illustration as well as how to make adjustments once the repeat is created.
  • How to create basic leaf shapes using the Pencil Tool 
  • How to add embellishments to your shapes using a combination of all of the drawing tools.
  • How to add text to your illustration and set it on a path you create
  • How to add depth and dimension using texture image files with Clipping Groups.

What you will need for this class:

  • An iPad
  • An Apple Pencil or other stylus
  • The Adobe Illustrator for iPad app

Everything you need to complete the class, beyond the list above, is built in to the app or provided as a download. Please see the Class Project section for the downloads. 

This class is a basics class so the illustrations we create will be rather simplistic in order to keep it beginner friendly. The lessons taught in the class will provide you with the knowledge and head start you need to explore creating more intermediate illustrations using the application.

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Who is your teacher?

 Hi! I'm Tracey. Feel free to check out my Profile here on Skillshare for more info on me. In a nutshell, I have been a full time artist for over ten years, starting in photography and adding digital illustration somewhere along the way. I am a lover of all things digital illustration who loves to know everything I can about all the apps out there and share my knowledge with anyone who wants to learn. I have an unabashed obsession with adding texture...the more the better. I have several classes out here on Skillshare as well as a YouTube Channel where I share shorter tutorials on everything from the Adobe suite, to Procreate, the Affinity suite and more. Check out my channel here and feel free to subscribe.

Do you love textural digital illustration as much as I do? Come join my Facebook Group, "Textural Illustration for Digital Artists," where you can share your work, ask questions, get tips and tricks (or share a few of your own) all in a safe, non-judgmental environment. Come join us here at this link.

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I can't wait to see what you create using the techniques you learn in this class so, grab your iPad, come join me, and let's get started! Happy Creating!

Intro and Outro song: "Jazzy Frenchy," by Bensound.com

Transcripts

1. Introduction to Class & Welcome!: Hi everyone. I'm illustrator and photographer Tracey Capone, and welcome to my class. The long awaited Adobe Illustrator for iPad is finally here. In this beginner friendly class, I'm going to take you on a tour of the application, as well as show you how to use a combination of the tools to create three simple floral illustrations. First, we'll take a detailed look at the home screen and user interface where I'm going to show you how to set up a new document, as well as give you a run down of all of the tools, the taskbar, and the touch shortcut. Next, I'll show you how to use a combination of these tools to create three simple floral illustrations three ways. We will explore sampling colors to create a color palette, the pen and pencil tools, as well as the amazing shape builder tool which allows you to create new shapes with a swipe of your pencil. I'll also show you how to use texture image files with clipping groups to add beautiful depth and dimension to your individual elements, as well as your illustration overall. Finally, we'll take a look at how to export your documents either for a quick post on social media, or to be able to use in other Adobe applications. For this class, you're going to need an iPad and the Adobe Illustrator for iPad application. Now it was built with the Apple Pencil in mind, so that's what I'm going to be using in class. But you can use any compatible stylus or your finger. This brand new application is already filled with the kind of tools we've all come to expect from Adobe, and I can't wait to show you how to use them to create your own beautiful floral art. Let's get started. 2. Downloads & Resources: Adobe Illustrator for iPad already includes most of what you're going to need to complete this class. I have provided you with a link to downloads of the exact textures I'm going to use in my illustration, which I've pulled from the Unsplash and Pixabay websites, where you can find tons of free used images for use as a reference image or in your designs. I've also provided you with the exact color palette that I'm going to be using in my illustration in case you want to use it in yours as you follow along. The downloads link can be found in the projects and resources section of the class. You're going to need a password to access them. I'm going to put that up on the screen now. The downloads are automatic, if you have Dropbox on your iPad already, they're going to feed directly there. If not, then they're going to download to the Downloads file right on your iPad. You don't need to import anything at this time. I'm going to show you in the class how you can use the files I provided. Just make sure that you keep them in an accessible file such as on your iPad or in a Cloud file. In the next section, we're going to take a closer look at the home screen for Illustrator for iPad where you can create a new document. I'll see you there. 3. Home Screen | Creating a New Document: Before we begin creating our illustration, I want to take you on a tour of the user interface for Illustrator for iPad. We're going to get into the details of the taskbar and toolbar. But first I'm going to take you back to the home screen and you can access it by hitting that little arrow on the left side. Then this is the first screen that you're going to see whenever you open the app and you can go in a number of different directions once you're here. This top part is going to allow you to create a new document. The bottom is going to show you your most recent documents. The right side here you can access any of the features that Adobe app is working on for the application. As of this recording, this application has only been out to the public for about a week and a half. There's a lot more that Adobe is planning to add, and you'll always see a running list right there. You can also suggest a feature or if the feature has already been selected, you can vote on it as well. On the left side here you can toggle between the main home screen. You can go to your work section, which gives you all of your documents including your deleted. The learning section gives you access to hands-on tutorials, which are actual documents that as you're going through the tutorial, you can use the tools that it's going over. At the bottom, there are video tutorials as well put out by Adobe. This last section allows you to access live streams by other Adobe artists. I'll show you when we get into the actual user interface how you even start your own live stream if you want to. Then featured projects by other artists. Down here at the bottom you can create a new document or import an existing one. I'm going to go ahead and create a new document, that's going to take me into the screen and there's a number of options at the top. The most recent ones are your recent documents that you've used. If you've saved any documents like I have here, these will come up there and I'll show you how to save a document in a moment. Then there's baked in documents that Adobe has put out there for Print, Screen, and Illustration. If you click into one of them, you can select one. It's automatically going to populate the information over here and you can make customizations to it. For the purposes of this class, I'm actually going to go into the Print section and select Letter. Now I want my illustration to be horizontal, so landscape and not portrait. I can just go here to the Orientation and click. I only need one artboard. I actually want to change my color mode to RGB since I want it to show up on the screen. If I wanted to, I could save this size simply by clicking that. I can rename it if I like. Now I already have this saved, but if you want to do that, that's all you would do and then click "Create file". Now I'm actually going to go to my saved documents here and I'm going to click on the one I already created. Again, it has all that information. I'll hit Create file, and now I have a new file already to go. In the next section, we're going to take a closer look at the actual user interface. I'll see you there. 4. Illustrator for iPad's User Interface: I've opened up one of my existing illustrations just so I can take you through the user interface and show you how some of these tools work. We are actually going to be using a combination of the tools that I'm going to show you to create this illustration. But let's just take a quick tour before we begin. Your undo and redo are here if your actually perform a task that requires undo or redo, those will light up. You can also use two-finger and three-finger tap to undo and redo. Your export menu is here, you can do a quick export as a PNG, for example, if you just want to do a quick export so you can save it or share it on Instagram, you can do that here, and this is also where you'll start a live stream if you want to do that. That runs through to the Behance network, you would simply start a live stream. I believe it gives you the option to test it out before you actually go live. I haven't personally done it myself, but it's worth checking out. If you need to save your document in a different format, and we'll be doing this later, you can click here and it's going to give you the multiple formats available. For example, if I were creating something I wanted to print on a laser, I would save it as an SVG. This next section is your help section. You can, again, take a tour of the application. You can get a list of the gestures beyond just two-finger and three-finger tap. This next one are the touch shortcuts. Now, these are the shortcuts that you would use with this little touch shortcut button. I'm going to pause here for a second and just show you how this works. This is this little button and you can hold and drag it wherever you want on the canvas. I keep it off to the right since I'm left-handed, I just find it easier that way. You can place it anywhere you like. It works with a primary and a secondary mode. Right now it's dormant, if I click my finger in there, you're going to see the middle is lit up, but the outside is not. That's the primary mode. If I drag my finger out, the whole thing is lit up, that's secondary. How this functions is dependent upon what tool you have selected. If you go back to this help menu and tap on view touch shortcuts, it's going to give you the tool or the action, as well as what the primary and secondary modes of the touch shortcut does. Back in the help menu. Finally, the last analyst is the keyboard shortcuts. If you happen to be using a Bluetooth keyboard with your Illustrator for iPad, which you can do, that's going to give you a list of all of the keyboard shortcuts that work with the application. If you go here to this cog, this is the settings for both the document as well as the application itself. Again, you'll see the name here, if you tap on it, you can change the name of your document. You can change its units. It's also going to give you some basic information about the document itself. Then I can tap into app settings and I can customize my experience with the application. Starting with general, I can change my toolbar, which is this bar here to the other side, if I'd like. I can change my color theme from anywhere from dark to lightest. I turn scale strokes and effects on, and I keep it on. Right now in the way that Illustrator is set up, there's no variables when it comes to strokes, you get what you got. What they are working on though is having variable strokes, which means your stroke could be smaller in spots and wider. I set mine to scale with whatever I'm scaling up and down so that I don't have any wonkiness with those strokes where I have variation. I always automatically turn this on now so that when there are variables strokes out there, I don't have any issues. It's totally up to you whether you want to turn it on. This next one is input. Illustrator for iPad was built with the Apple pencil in mind. There is a separate little menu just for the Apple pencil. You can turn on palm rejection. You can also select what you want a double tap to the pencil to do whether it's one of these options or no action at all. Then you can access that touch shortcut function list again, the same one that's up here. You can also turn on a blue dot so that if you're like me and you do classes or tutorials, you can have a blue dot show up wherever you tap. Units, the standard units for a document is points. You can change it if you always want it to be inches, centimeters, millimeters, whatever you'd like pixels. I'm keeping my own points because, again, that's just standard. This'll give you basic account information and then specific information about the version of Illustrator that you're on, as well as links to various Adobe spots. Finally, a repeat of the help sections that you can find there, as well as a rate or a report bugs if you need to. This last icon is the view mode, and you can toggle between outlines and preview. Now where this helps is, if I zoom in to these leaves here, I can't see any issues with my nodes. If I change to outlines, I can see if I zoom in, I have this little wonkiness here because of the way I drew my leaf. Now it really doesn't matter, but if I wanted to change it, I could go in here and I could get rid of that, and I no longer have that issue. That's the top bar, let's take a closer look at the task bar here on the right. Starting with the layer panel. I highly recommend creating things in layers as much as possible. You can add a layer simply by touching that plus sign, you can drag your layers up and down. As long as the layer you create is open, you can take layers from other layer groups and move them up or down. You can rename them. Now, I'm honestly really bad about renaming my layers, but I at least try to organize them, but I'm not always great about renaming them. If you want to rename yours, simply swipe to the left. It's going to give you this little T, and you can change the name, so I would change this to yellow flower. You also have the option in some cases to delete it, so you'll see that delete button. If you only have one layer, you always have to have at least one layer, then you're not going to get that option. It's only when you have multiple layers that you're going to see that delete option. You can also turn a layer off and on with the eye there and you can lock a layer with that little lock. The next section is the properties taskbar, this is going to change depending on what you have selected. If I go up here to my succulents, let me turn this back on, and I select this particular group just like that path, and I go into my properties, you're going to see that anything that applies to this particular selection is going to show up here. Now, if I have something like text selected, for example, now I don't know how I managed to make that go upside down. Let's just go ahead and fix that. If I have text selected with my selection tool, now it's getting me all of the options for the text so I can change my font, I can change my spacing, I can change how it is on the path, the appearance of it, things like that. Whatever you see in this properties panel is going to depend on what you have selected. The precision of the panel is going to allow you to turn snapping on and off, 90 percent of the time I find snapping to be extremely beneficial, two percent of the time I actually find it to be annoying and it gets in the way. This allows me to turn it off and on when I play. You can also turn grids on and turn on snap to grid so that when you're creating objects, it will snap to sections of the grid. I keep smart guides on so that I get the little guide because I'm moving things around or sizing up and down. Then turn that grid off. If you want to use the grid, you can turn it on, you can change the type of grid as well as the color and the number of subdivisions and spacing. We're not going to use a grid in this particular class, but that option is there if you want to, and of course you can turn your overall guides off as well. This next task is the shape builder. Now, right now nothing is lit up because there's no shapes to combine, however, we are going to use this in this class. I actually used [inaudible] to create this vase. I created two separate shapes, selected them, turned on my shape builder and actually selected the shape builder option, and it allowed me to combine them into one curve. You can also perform nondestructive changes here by combining them especially Boolean operations that are nondestructive. The edit taskbar allows you your cut copy and paste functions so you can copy the appearance or one object and paste it to another. You can cut objects, you can paste to a clipboard, things like that. Your align taskbar does exactly what you'd expect. If you have two or more objects selected, you can align them to one another. The object taskbar is going to give you options, to perform on specific objects that you selected and what you see in this menu or what's lit up in this menu is going to depend on what you have selected. For example, if I have two objects and I want to create a clipping mask, if I'm able to create a clipping mask with those two objects, like I did with this table, for example, it would give me the option of make clipping mask. If I can group two objects, it'll give me that option. I could go here if I have a stroke that I want to turn into a fill so that I can add texture to it. That's where you're going to find it. Now some of these are actually repeated in a contextual menu that you're going to see pop up on the screen itself, and I'll show you that in a moment. The type taskbar works in conjunction with the text toolbar. When you add text, like I have here, if I select it, I can then use this type taskbar to make additional changes to it whether it's editing a path, or add it to a path, or turn my text into outlines. Your path taskbar allows you to take a path that you've created with your pen tool, your pencil, things like that, and make edits to it. Again, some of these are going to be repeated in the contextual menu that pops up on the screen when you select this tool here, and I'll show you that when we get to it. But you can also find them here in this task bar. Then finally, the repeat taskbar is where you're going to find your radial repeat, your grid repeat, and your mirroring which allows you symmetry. In this class, we're going to use the radial repeat to create some of our flowers. That's the task bar. Let's go ahead and take a look at the toolbar over here on the other side. This first one is the selection tool, and again, I use that earlier to select this group of succulent here. I can move things around, I can rotate them, I can size them up and down if I want. With my touch selector, I can size up constrained, and again, if I zoom out, I can duplicate it. The direct selection tool allows me to select specific nodes. Where the selection tool is overall, this allows me to drill down even further. For example, if I wanted to select that particular node, I would go to my direct selection tool and I would click on that. It makes all the rest white and that one is blue. I can also scroll across to select multiple nodes at one time. Down at the bottom here you're going to see this contextual menu that pops up. These are common actions that are performed with direct selection tool. They can also be found here in the path taskbar. Same with this selection tool, you're going to see this common actions toolbar at the bottom, but again, many of them are found here as well. The pen tool works exactly like pen tools in other vector programs including Illustrator for desktop, and we are going to use that to create our coffee cup here. Somehow I keep changing that lettering, but we'll ignore that. I'm going to show you a brief lesson on how to use it, and again, we'll use it to create this coffee can here. The pencil tool works similarly to the pen tool, except that it's free form. I'm going to grab a stroke here, if I select this purple color, I can draw out a stroke, and I can make that stroke bigger, and on this common actions toolbar, you can either tap into it and use a slider, or you can scroll up and down, it's totally up to you. Right now I'm scrolling up and down and changing the size of the stroke that I just created. If I want to, I could delete that, which goes to a fill, and it's going to allow me to create a filled object instead of a stroke. We'll be using that to create one of our basis as well. Now, this has a little care here, which means there's another option varied in there. If I tap and hold, it's going to open that additional object, that's going to give me the blob brush. If you are coming from Illustrator for desktop, you've seen the blob brush before. It's going to give me four options here. I'm just going to pick this basic chisel, and just like the pencil tool, it's going to allow me to draw out a line here. I can go to the bottom here and change the size of my blob brush. I can change the smoothness, so this is streamlining. The higher you go, the more streamlined your line is, and it's also going to correct it once you're done, and I can make changes to the settings of the particular brush I choose. If I've made any changes and I want to get it back to its original state, I will just click the "Return" button here. I'm going to go ahead and back out these. I don't use the eraser tool very often. When do, it's when I'm trying to do something of a very precision erase. Down here you can change the size of it. Again, you can change your smoothing options, and you can make changes to the eraser settings if you want. For the most part, I use the shape builders to do a lot of the removing of items, and I'll show you how I do that when we get into this. But the eraser is here in case you need it. This next tool is the shape tool, and again, this has items buried in, and if you tap and hold or tap twice, you'll get the full menu. This allows you to create a perfect shape, whether it has a fill or a stroke, and that'll be determined down here. This works with the touch shortcut. If I grab that square and I start dragging out, I can make that square whatever size I want. If I hold the touch, shortcut down, it's going to constrain it. If I go to secondary mode, it's going to constrain it and size up and down from the center. Again, you can pick whichever shape you'd like here. I already mentioned that the text tool works with the text taskbar over here, so this is going to allow you to lay down either horizontal or vertical text. You can add an art board using the art board tool here. Then finally, if you want to pull in a file, so for example, I pulled in this texture file to add this wood texture to my table, you can do that right from here, whether it's taking a picture with your camera, grabbing a photo from your files on the iPad, or from your Cloud documents, or your creative Cloud libraries, and we will be using that to add some of the texture. This final spot here is where you're going to choose the colors for your fill and your stroke. The top one here is the fill, the bottom one is the stroke, and you can flip between the two. So I can move the color back and forth just by using this arrow. I can also use both at the same time. If there's something that I want to have both a fill and a stroke, I would simply select the color for both. If you want to turn it off completely, you can tap the null sign-up here at the color wheel. You can also pick true black or true white, as well as sample color, and I'm going to show you how to sample color when we pull the color palette in here that I provided with the class. Again, if you want, you can switch between the two if you have an object created already. For example, I have that, I'm going to change the stroke size, I can flip back and forth between the two simply by tapping these arrows. In the next section, we're going to begin creating our illustration, and I'm going to show you how to sample colors to pull and to use in your own illustration. I will see you there. 5. Creating a Color Palette & Background: We're ready to begin creating our illustration. The first thing I want to do though, is show you how you can sample the Swatches in the color palette PNG that provide it with the downloads. You're welcome to use what other colors you'd like. But I wanted to provide you the ones from my illustration, in case you want to use them. Now, the first thing I want to do though, is pull the file, that PNG file that I provided into my Document. So I'm going to go to my Import menu here, and mine is saved here in My Files. I'm just going tap on that file. I'm going to decrease the size of this and just move this off to the right so that I can see what I'm doing. The next thing I want to do, is go to my Color wheel here. You're going to see that little eye dropper at the top. Now, if you're not seeing these basic colors with this little plus sign, it means you're somewhere else in your Libraries or one of the themes. You just need to keep hitting the arrow back here until you see that. This is document specific, so once I leave this document, whatever I sample here is no longer going to show up in other documents. If you want something to work globally across all documents, then you're going to want to use your My Libraries and you can do that through Capture, and it'll automatically pull into any of the applications that use Libraries. But for right now, we're going to assemble those for this particular document. So I have my little swatches along the bottom here, and I just need to go ahead and sample them. I'm going to grab my eye dropper tool here, I'll just tap and you'll see this little magnifying glass show up. I'm going to move this around until I've selected the color, and you'll see it show up here, and I'll hit a plus sign. I'm just going to do that with all of these colors, until I have all of them sampled and in my Color Palette. So I have all of the colors sampled, I can go ahead and close this. I'm going to select it and I'm just going to delete it, and we'll have our Blank document again.Now, I have my colors ready to go. What I want to do next is create some layers. I find that when I create some layers in advance, it kind of drives me to organize things a little better. I'm just going to tap the plus sign to add about five layers, I can always add more. I'm going to start with this very bottom layer. What I want to do is add a very background color that's going to act almost like the wall behind everything. So I'm going to go into my color swatches here and I'm going to select this off-white color and then grab my rectangle tool here, and with snapping on, it's going to be very easy to start from one corner and drag out to the other, and it's going to stamp right in place. I may end up changing this color when I'm done, but I always typically start out with an off-white color, and then just suggest this I need to. This is really just want to knock back that really harsh white color, but also to ultimately act as my final background. Now, I cannot move this around and I don't want to be able to do that. I could lock in in two ways. I could tap the lock down here in that contextual menu. But I find it annoying to see this lock the whole time, especially, when I start locking multiple objects and each one has a lock on it. I'm going to tap that to unlock. I'm going to go to my Layers Panel here, and I'm going to tap the lock on the layer itself, and then you don't see that. I want to go ahead and select my second layer because now I'm going to add a table, and I want to do that in a separate layer so that I have everything organized separately. I'm going to go ahead and select a color. I can just grab this brown color. We're actually going to be using a texture files, so it doesn't matter what color you select. I just want to choose a different one so that I can easily see it. You go to My Rectangle tool and I'll drag out a rectangle and again with snapping on, it makes it very easy. You can see the guides there. So I'm going to release that I might make it a little bit taller, so I have some room. Now, I want to keep this selected because I'm actually going to pull in one of my wood textures, to replace the color with the texture. So with it selected, I'll go back to my Import menu, go back to Files, and I'm going to go into my Texture Files folder. Now, I pulled these just as samples. I also provided as I mentioned previously, the links to Splash and Pixabay, so you can pull your own texture files if you'd like. I'm going to go ahead and select this brown texture here, this brown table texture. It's automatically going to populate it, might take a second or two. Because it was selected, it automatically created a clipping mask. If I go up here, you'll see that a Clip Group has been formed, and each of those are in that Clip Group. I'm going to go ahead and drag this out so that it gets to the sides. I'm technically dragging out the texture and because this is a separate layer, I could go in here to that image file, and I can drag up and down. If I want it to be in a different spot on the texture file, it's totally up to you, how you want to do it. I'm going to go ahead and deselect that. Now again, I want to go ahead and lock this extent and I need it a little too far. I'm just going to go head into the Image File itself and just drag that out. I want to lock this, again I don't want to lock it from here because I don't want to see that little lock the whole time. I'm just going to lock the layer itself, so I can't make any changes to that or accidentally move it around. Now, we're ready to begin creating some of our shapes. We're going to start by creating a vase using a series of shapes and the shape builder, and we're gonna do that in the next exercise. So I'll see you there. 6. Vase Illustration with the Shape Builder: We have our table in place and our wall in the back. The next thing I want to do is begin creating whatever basis. We're going to use a combination of our Shape tool and the Shape builder to create that. The first thing I want to do is, I want to select my next layer. Now, in between videos, I actually renamed these. Again, it's always good to stay as organized as possible, especially when you begin adding a number of elements. Just swipe to the left, hit the text and you can rename it. I'm actually going to do that here, and I'm going to change this to orange vase. I'll close that. Now, I have this orange color selected. I'm going to go to my square here, and I'm going to drag out a rectangle. Now this is very squared off, I actually want it to be somewhat rounded. This tool right here is going to allow me to do that. If I wanted to only do it to one particular corner, I would go to my Direct Selection tool and I would select the particular corner that I wanted to do that too. But when you're in the Selection tool, you can do it automatically to all four corners right here. Now, I don't want this to be too rounded, just enough that it's not as harsh. Now I want to create a little top to this. I don't have to recreate another rectangle, I can just duplicate this. If you remember earlier, I said that you can use the Touch tool, Touch selector here, on the secondary mode when you're in the Selection tool to duplicate something. I've duplicated that. Now I want to size it down, but I want to constrain it so that I don't lose the shape. I'm going to keep my finger right where it's at. I have it on the Touch Selector on the secondary mode, and I'm just going to make this smaller. It's going to do it from the center, and it's going to constrain my proportions. I just want to move this down a little bit, I accidentally duplicated that. It's going to move it down. I don't want it to be too high. Now, I actually don't want this to be rounding, so I'm just going to go ahead and drag this back up. It's squared off, drag it down a little bit more. Now, I have a bottle shape, I have a vase shape. But if I go to my Layers panel here, I have two rectangles, and I actually want one large curve shape, one one path, so that I can add texture to the overall path. I can do that using the Shape builder. There's a couple of ways that I can select my two rectangles here. I can, with my Selection tool, just drag across to select, and you'll see them selected in the layers. Or if there's a lot of things in the way and it's hard to do that, you can just tap on one layer, hold your Touch Selector and tap on the next one. In order to use the Shape builder, you need to actually have shapes selected. I've selected the two that I want to combine. I go to my Shape builder. Now, it's going to give me the option of doing some nondestructive, basically Boolean operations. That's not what I want. I actually want to create one large shape. I'm going to tap on Shape builder until I have that up at the top here. This works in a couple of ways, you can delete things or you can combine things. You're going to see that I have three different segments here. Now I have the top and something outside, the bottom of this rectangle which is overlapping this one, and then the rest of this rectangle. If I wanted to remove a piece of it, let's say I wanted to remove this piece right here, I can just scribble on it, and it's going to remove it, and you'll see that here in the Layers panel. But what I actually want to do is combine all three segments into one large path. I'm going to draw a line through all three of them, and it's going to combine all three together. Now you can see that here in the Layer studio. Now, this is bland, I actually want to add a little texture to it, but I want the orange of it to remain, and just add some texture on top of it. In order to do that, I need to duplicate that. With my Selection tool and this little contextual menu at the bottom, I'm just going to tap on duplicate. Now, you'll see I have two of the same path in my Layers panel. I'm going to add my clipping mask, my texture, to this top one. Again, with it selected, just like we did with the table, I'm going to go to my "Import", hit "Files", and I'm going to select this whitewashed texture here. It's going to pull it in, it might take a second or two, and I just need to size up. I like how that looks, but again, I want the orange to come through from the bottom while I keep the texture, so I need to change the blend mode of this top clip group here. I'm going to select it. I'll go to my "Properties" menu, and if you recall, I mentioned earlier that whatever you see in here depends on what you have selected here. In this case, it's going to show me the size of this clip group, it's also going to give me the option of changing my blend mode and the opacity. The first thing we're going to do is tap in here, and I'm going to select "Soft light" that allows the color to come through while keeping the texture. I'm also going to drop the opacity just slightly because we're going to add some additional elements to it, I just want a little bit of texture coming through. Let me close that. We have our basic shape, it's got the color, and it has the texture. But we want to add a little bit more to that. Within this same layer, so I still have that selected, I'm going to go to my Blob Brush, and it's already selected here, again, if you just happen to hold, you'll see the two options, Pencil or Blob Brush. I want to grab that off white color. I'm going do it down here, and I want to make it relatively small. I don't want it to be too big of a brush, probably about three. I'm going to set my smoothness to about seven or eight and I'm just going to start creating some little loops here. You can create whatever pattern you'd like, I'm just going up here. I think I'm going to back that out again. I'm going to do something different. I'm going to do this instead, add little waves. You could also do this with your Pencil tool if you wanted to. Now, I'm going to change the background color rather just so that you can see this better. If I change this to black, for example, you're going to see the overhang here. I have the Blob Brush ends hanging over the sides here. Now I can go into my Eraser tool, and I can just start erasing, but that's tedious, I actually want to do it pretty quickly. What I'm going to do instead is I'm going to grab my Selection tool, and I'm going to select all of my layers here. It's selected the entire section here. I'm going to go back to my Shape tool, my Shape builder rather, click on "Shape builder". If you remember, I said if you just scribble through something, it's going to delete it. You can see that it's formed segments here. It's not showing up when I zoom in, but you can see it's broken into segments. If I just swipe through here, it's going to delete any of that overhang. Now, if I hit "Done", everything is just within the bottle itself. Now, I could go in here, and I can group all these together, and I could change the blend mode, but I actually like how that looks, I'm going to keep it as is. I'm going to call this vase done. We're actually going to add all of our vases first, and then we'll go ahead back in and create some flowers. In the next video, we're going to use the Pen tool to create a little coffee can for our succulent. I'll see you there. 7. Vintage Can With the Pen & Text Tools : We have our orange base in place, and the next thing we want to do is create the solo expresso can. I've already created one just to show you the shapes that we're going to make. We're going to use our Pen tool to create a front shape here that's a little curved on the top and the bottom. We're going to use our circle to create a little bit of an oval that's going to be our back piece. We're going to add some metal texture to those to give it a vintagy look, and then add some type on a path to give a nice curved type to give them rounded appearance. I'm going to go ahead and turn this layer off, and we'll recreate that. Now, I just want to go ahead and always try and rename my layers, if I remember to. So I'm going to go ahead and do this coffee can 2. I want to make sure it's selected because I want all of my objects to be placed in there. Now, if you've used Pen tools in other vector programs like Illustrator for desktop or others. Pen tool here works exactly the same. Ultimately, you guide the direction as well as the shape that you create. So let's go ahead and grab the Pen tool. I'm going to give you a little quick study on the Pen tool here. I can tap and create a bunch of straight lines. It's automatically going to create, in this case, a polygon. Now, I have a Fill set. I could go ahead and switch this to Stroke. You can't see it because the Stroke is not very large, but it created a Stroke instead of a Fill. In this case, I actually want to do a Fill so that I can see it as I'm creating it. Then I go ahead delete this. I can also create curves with it. If I tap, tap, and drag, it's going to create a curve to whatever height I decided to make it. So I'm going to leave that out there. Now, if I wanted that same shape, but on the opposite side, I'm just going to release this handle, which is the one that was under my pencil. It's called a leading handle. That's going to tell Illustrator, which direction, which angle I wanted to go in, and where I want my next shape. In this case, I want that same half circle, but on this side, so my leading handle remain on this side. I'm just going to tap so that next half circle, starts heading this direction. If you zoom in, you can see, that the very first part of that half circle follows along that angle. It veers off because I tapped my next note here and told Illustrator I wanted to make a curve. If I wanted to do the same thing, but have everything on the same side, I can tap, tap, drag. Now, if I wanted my next half circle to be on the same side, I need to move my leading handle down and angled so that I can tell Illustrator, that's the direction I want to go. I'm going to do that by using my touch shortcut. So I'm going to hold, and that's going to show break tangent, that allows me drag my handle down, and I can release. Then I can tap again, and I get that half circle on the same side. Once again, that very first part of that half circle starts forming along that handle, and then veers because I tapped a node over here. Now, how can we use this to create our little coffee can? Well, we're going to use it to create a curved line at the top, straight lines on this side, a curved line on the bottom, and a straight line on the other side. Now, when you're creating this, it's not going to be perfect, but the Pen tool is not used to create perfect shapes. If I want to perfect shape, I'll use the circle tool or something like that. We are actually going to use that to create some part of this, but let's go ahead and create the front part. I have this indigo color selected. That's what I'm going to use for this can. I'm going to tap, tab, and drag slightly. I just want a slight curve. Now, I want a straight line on the left side here. So I'm going to hold my touch selector down, drag my handle down. Sometimes it gets a little touchy, so just start over again, and drag it down. When you see it turn pink, that means it's perfectly straight up and down. I'm going to release, tap again. Now I have a nice straight edge here. I'm going to tap again. I might be able to just hold the C, I apologize, because I'm left-handed. It's hard. I'm going to go ahead and tap, and I'm going to drag again. Now it's automatically giving me a smooth node, and that's not what I want because just like on the left side here, I want a nice straight line. But that's okay. I'm just going to hit my touch selector. It's automatically going to change that to a sharp node, when I start dragging my handle up. I just accidentally released that. Then I'll tap, and it gives me a nice straight line. Now this is not a perfect shape, it's a little bit off. My nodes aren't necessarily aligned, but that's okay. I can use my Alignment tool and my Direct Selection tool to make changes to that. I'm going to go ahead, and with my Direct Selection tool, I'm going to drag and select these top too. I want to make sure that they're aligned at the top. I go to my Alignment, and I'm going to tap "Align". At the top, you see a long line at the top. That just moved this node up very slightly. It wasn't off that much so that they're in alignment. I want to do the same thing at the bottom here, so I'm going to go ahead and select, go to my Alignment tool. I'm just going to use the same one. You can just tap, that's fine. So that's just align the two. Now, the next thing is my curve isn't necessarily where I want it. You can see that it's lower point is right here. Actually, I want it more in the middle. So I'm going to take my handle, and I'm going to drag that out a little bit, so that it's more in the middle than to the side. It's also zoom in, and you can see that. You can make adjustments to it as you see fit. I just want to make sure my sides are aligned as well. I can already see this is slightly off, so I'll just go ahead and select these. I want to do a right alignment so that move that. I'll just do a left alignment over here. Now all of my nodes are aligned the way I want. I'm going to go ahead and adjust this a little bit. I don't want to adjust it too much, and give a little bit more of a dip. I actually like the shape of this. I think I just want to make it a little bit more short. I'm not going to hold my touch selector down because I don't want to constrain anything. I actually want to be able to make it a little shorter. Now, I'm going to hold it down because I want to make it a little smaller, but I want to constrain it. I have the front part of my can. Now I could use the Pen tool and create the back part, but I'd rather just use the Shape tool to do that because it's a lot easier. I'm going to grab my circle. I want to make this a little bit darker. Just touch dark, but not a lot. This is going to be the back part of the can, and it's going to be a separate shape so that we can create plants in between the two shape to give the impression of it being hollow on the inside. I have my shape selected here. I'm going to go ahead and just drag out a rough oval. You can see that pink line showing up, which means I'm hitting that corner perfectly. Now this is not exactly where I wanted, and that's okay because these are made up of nodes as well. I'm going to go ahead and tap on my direct Selection tool. I'll zoom in here. Just going to pull this, I'm going to tap on that node, so it's the only one selected. If you just start dragging it, it's going to drag all of them. I'm going to drag this down, and it doesn't matter how far you're dragging down. This is actually going to be in the back. I just want to make sure that my nodes are in place with snapping on it. It actually makes it really easy. It will just snap. I'm going to drag this up slightly to give it a little bit of a curve. I'll go to my Layers panel. I'm going to select it. Go to my Layers panel, I open this up, and I'm going to drag this path below the other one. Now that gives me the coffee can in the front. It gives me a little bit of a back that's a little bit darker just to give that shadowing impact. Now, because it's two separate shapes, I can actually create plants between these two, and it's going to give the impression of being on the inside. This is plain boring. I actually want to add a little texture to it, and I used this indigo color, but I actually want to use a texture. I'm going to replace it with a texture. I'm going to select that path with my Selection tool. I will go ahead and go into my Import menu, tap on "Files". I am going to select this indigo metal texture. Now, it's automatically going to replace that color. I'm just going to drag it up so that there's not any weird elements that I don't like. Because it's a separate shape, I can also drag it around until it's right where I want it. I really like the texture right there. I'm going to go ahead and deselect that. This gives the impression of the vintage can. Now, if I wanted to, like we did with this one, I could just duplicate it. Add the texture to the duplicate, and then change my blend mode. Is totally up to you, but I actually like how this has somewhat of a vintagy feel. Ultimately, it really didn't matter what color I created the front. But I wanted to start with the indigo so that I could get slightly darker than that. Let's go ahead and create some text for the front. If you remember from earlier, I mentioned that your text is created with your Text tool, and then you can adjust it using either the Properties panel or the Text toolbar over here. The first thing I'm going to do is select "Text". I'm going to tap. It's going to give me this little toolbar, this little text thing here. Now, I already have a font selected. It's typically going to give you, I think, Myriad Pro or something like that, and you can change it. I'm going to go ahead. I'm going to double tap to select this whole thing, and you can see it slightly, the whole thing is shaded. I'm going to select my keyboard, and I want to change this to espresso. Now again, because I had already created that other one, it automatically applied the same thing. If you wanted to change your font, for example, with it selected, just go into your Properties panel, and you can change that here. I'm going to go ahead, and with my Move tool, just move this over. Now it's straight across. I actually want it to be on a path, so it's slightly curved along with the can. I'm going to go ahead and move this up here for right now, and I'm going to deselect it. I'm going to use my Pen tool to create a path. Now, I don't need tab color, I don't want to have a Stroke or a Fill. I'm going to go over here, and I'm going to turn those off, so I have no Stroke and no Fill. I'm going to create the path that I want. I'm going to tap, tap, and drag to give myself that slight curve because again, I wanted to have an impression of a curved can. I'll grab my Selection tool, so it selects that path. I'm going to go up to my a Layer panel here, hold my touch shortcut, and tap to select the text as well. Now, this is where the Text taskbar bar is going to come in. I'll tap on that, select "type on path". It's going to add it, and it's going to automatically add it to upside-down, but that's fixable. The first thing I want to do before I do anything else though, is changed this to a later color, so you can better see it. I'm going to go ahead and just select that off way color. Now this can get a little tricky. I found a couple of times now, where it's just I ended up upside down for no reason, but it's easily fixable. The first thing I want to do is I'm going to start dragging this handle here, so you'll see it. You'll start to see these disappear because I am decreasing the space for the text. I'm going to release, and I'm going to take this handle, and pop it to the top, and then drag the whole thing over to the left, and then drag this red handle to the right. That's giving me the space for the text. If I want, I can move this over a little bit into the middle of the path using this handle over here. I could use this handle, I can rotate it. If I wanted to change the path itself, I could go back in to my type here, hit "Edit path" and it's going to give me the node poles to be able to change it. But I actually like how this looks, so I'm going to go ahead and release that. Now, I want to change the blend mode of the text, just to blend it in a little bit to the can itself. Again, I selected it, and I'm going to go to my Properties. I'll go to my Blend mode, and I'm going to pick Overlay because that should give me the texture, but still give me enough text that you can still see it. There is our can for our succulents. I'm going to leave this empty for right now. We're going to add all over plants at the same time. I think I'm just going to go ahead and select it, and make it a little bit smaller just to make room for our other one. I'll move this over here. In the next section, we're going to create our final base, using our Pencil tool. So I'll see you there. 8. Bud Vase with the Pencil Tool : We're on to our final vase and we're going to create that using our pencil tool. I've gone up here and I've selected the pencil tool. I'm going to select my color, I want to use a fill. I'm going to select this reddish color, and I'll go ahead and select that in next layer. I want to rename this, red vase. I'm going to grab my pencil tool and I want to turn my stroke off. I'm going to go ahead and select the red for the fill. Because I backed out, it automatically changed it back to white and black, so you just need to reselect it. Again, this is just like the pen tool. It's not going to be perfect at the offset, but I'm not worried about that. Part of the reason I like using the preform tools, it's because it gives it that hand-drawn look. I don't always want it to look perfect, I actually want it to look fun. I'm not too worried about that. I'm going to go ahead and start drawing out my shape. Now, I want that to be a straight line. I'm going to start that over again so you can see it. If you keep going, you're going to get a curve. If I just keep making a curve shape, that's what I'm going to get. If you want a straight line, if you hold until that blue dot, it's going to give you a sharp node, and it's going to keep giving you sharp nodes as long as you hold and see that blue dot. I want to create a genie bottle looking one. I'm going to go ahead and I'm going to draw it down. Actually I'm going to hold, and I want to draw down again and draw a nice flat. It's almost like a beaker shape. Not going to be perfect, and I'm okay with that. It's a little bag base. Now, I'm going to release and tap to close that. My curves are off a little bit, but I can go into my direct selection tool and I can move things around. I can also get rid of nodes that don't have any point. I'm going to tap on this particular node, it's not doing anything for me, so I'm going to use this smart delete and delete it, and you can see it doesn't actually change the curve at all because the node wasn't necessary. If you do delete something like this one, for example, where it changes the shape just back out of it, you can two-finger tab and back out. Now that I've gotten rid of some of those unnecessary nodes, I can use my handles between these two to adjust my shape to where I want it. I'm not looking for it to be perfect, I just want it to look a little bit more uniform. I managed to create a node there that I don't want, so I'm just going to delete it. Again, I used the smart delete, let's use my handle to pull this out. Now, I want these two to be aligned, so I'm going to select them, go to my Alignment, and I'm going to go ahead and tap bottom align. I'm going to do the same thing here. I'm not going to play around with this too much because, again, I'm not really worried about it not being perfect. I want it to look like someone made it. That is going to get a little bit more narrow. We have our vase shape. I could continue to play around with this if I wanted to, but I actually like how this looks. I want to go ahead and I want to add some texture to these, but again, I want the red to show through and I want texture on top. I'm going to go into my path here and I want to make sure I duplicate it, so I have two paths. I'm going to keep that top selected. I'll go into my Files and grab one of my my textures here. I think I want to grab this rusty looking texture and see how that ends up looking. It's going to pop it in place, and I'm going to move it to where I want it. Now I can go into my properties without selected and change my blend mode just to see how I like the various options. I really like overlay on it because it really shows the texture, but it also shows the columns, so I'm going to drop the opacity slightly. I like the vase. I want to add a little bit more to it though. I'm going to go up to my blob brush again. I'm going to tap and hold, select my Blob Brush, and I'm going to select the Basic round and pick, I think, this pink color, over down here I make it relatively large. I want it smoothing out about seven or eight. I'm just going to start, that's not wide enough, I think I want to back out of that and make it a little bit later pink so that it really shows up. Then go ahead and just swipe across, make different shapes. Again, I'm not worried about the overhang. I'm going to go ahead and select everything in here. I'll grab my selection tool, select the whole shape, go to my shape tool or my shape builder rather, select Shape builder. Sometimes it takes a beater to, don't worry about it, and I'm just going to swipe through each of these little overhangs. Now I have this red vase with the pink underneath. I actually want to change the blend mode of those so the extra is coming through. I'm going to go ahead and I'm going to tap and select all of them and just change my blend mode to something like soft light or overlay. I'm going to end up losing the pink, but I don't think I'm worried about that. Either that or I could do it normal and just see how that looks if I drop the opacity. Let me move this out of the way, sometimes that gets in the way. I'm just going to go with soft light. I was using the pink, but I actually really wanted to be a subtle straight, I don't want it to be too much, and I really like the texture more than I need the color. I'm going to call that done. In the next section, we're going to begin creating our flower shapes, again, using various tools to create them. I'll see you there. 9. Flower Illustration with the Pencil Tool : We have our three bases in place. We're ready to begin creating our flowers. I am going to create two flowers using the Radial tool for this one. Actually, I'm going to create a poppy flower for this one. I'll put two flowers in here, and we'll do some succulent in this one. I'm going to turn these two off for right now. I'm just going to turn off the visibility. We're going to focus on our orange vase here and move it over for a moment and down, so we have some room to work. I've added some new layers. Again, I want to go ahead and create each of my flower sets in its own layer. Now you could also create it within the vase shape itself; it depends on how you want to organize yours. I'm going to go ahead and just select this layer eight. I'm going to rename this Poppy flower. We're going to use the Pen tool for this. I'm going to go ahead back up here, hold, and select my Pen tool. I want to select that same red that I just used for that last vase. I want to make sure it's on fill, I'm not using a stroke. I'll just zoom in here. I'm going to go ahead and just draw a shape here. Now, if I turn this to outline, you can seen that I have a really weird shape here. I'm going to go ahead. I could either drag this down with my Direct Selection tool. I can select it, drag it down. I'm going to actually delete it. Then I'm going to go ahead and close my shape. I'm not really worried about this particular shape because it's the background, I'm actually going to have two things in the front. If I needed to, I could grab my handles, I could change one of them to a smooth node, and use my handle to drag that out. It's totally whatever you wanted to look like. But again, I'm not worried about this because this is my backup part of my flower. I'm going to grab my Pencil tool again, and I want to create just a slightly darker version of that red. I'm going to draw out some more petals here. I keep doing this, there's no way to rotate the canvas yet. That apparently is something that they're working on and I hope that they work on it very soon because I find myself constantly trying to rotate my canvas. I'm going to go ahead and draw a second shape here. I want it to be slightly open so you can see what's behind it. Now if I go in my Layers panel here, I have three different paths. I want these paths combined into one. Again, we're going to go ahead and use our Shape builder. I'm going to select the first one I'm going to hold my Touch Selector down, and select the second one. I accidentally locked it, so let's unlock it. I will grab my selection tool, so it's officially selected. Go to my Shape builder, tap "Shape builder". I'm going to zoom in here. I want to draw a line across all three segments here, so it creates one piece out of it. Now I'm going to hit Done. I have this little knobby thing here, and I don't want that. I'm going to go into my Direct Selection tool, and I can actually delete one of those nodes. That's going to get rid of that little shape that I don't want. This is my flower shape. I actually want, I think I'm going to make this whole piece a little bit darker just to give it a little bit more definition. Here we go. Now, I want to create a little middle piece for it. I'm going to go to my Circle tool here, and I'm going to select this yellow color. I'm just going to drag out an oval shape. Grab my Selection tool, and I want to drag this between these two paths in my Layer panel. Because when I drag this over, I want it to be behind this front piece. I'm just going to go ahead and turn that a little bit. I accidentally grabbed that, make sure grab my lips, and then move it to where I want it. I have my flower shape, I want some of the little spindly things, the stamens. I'm going to go ahead and use my Blob Brush to create those in a, I think I'm going to use a black color. I'll go ahead and tap and hold, grab the Blob Brush. I'm going to use the basic ground, and I'm going to create a really small brush, a pink one actually. I'm going to start with black, I may end up changing, we'll see. I'll just go ahead and start drawing out little shapes. It's automatically going to smooth it for me. I'm going to go in different directions. Now, I want these to be above this ellipse, but behind this. I'll move them in a moment. But for right now, I'm just going to go ahead and draw them out. I think I'll do one more right there. Let me go ahead and select these four, grab my Move tool. I'll select the first one, and hold my Touch Selector down, and select all four. I'm going to drag this down behind that front piece. While I have selected this group, I think I'm going to move the whole thing down a little bit, and maybe make it a little taller. Now, I want to add some little circle things at the end. Let's go ahead. That's good. I'm going to go ahead and use my Circle tool again. Actually, I'm going to use my Blob Brush instead. I'm going to grab my Blob Brush on black, I want to deselect this so I don't change anything. I'm going to make it a little bit bigger. I'm just going to tap a dot on the end. If you just tap the circle with your basic ground, that's exactly why you're writing it as a round shape. I like how that looks though. I think I want to make it a little bit more narrow. Again, I'm going to grab my Selector tool, select all five. All of my dots are now selected. Trying to go ahead and make this more narrow. I'm going to rotate it a little bit. Sometimes just moving things around, and I might delete something here and there. I actually like how this looks, I think I'll keep it right there. I may also consider changing the ellipse to a black color. I think I like them better. I'm going to grab this entire poppy flower and just turn it. You get a little bit smaller. Now we need a stem for our flower. The first thing I want to do though is I want to select all of the shapes that make up the top, and I'm going to group them. So I select them all, I'm going to hit "Group". Now I have the top flower shape all in one, so I can move it around all at one time if I need to. I'm going to use my blob brush to create my stem. I'll just pick this green color and just draw down not too big. I'm going to make this a little bit smaller, grab my blob brush, and I'll just draw a little stem. It's going to smooth it out. I want us to be below the flower head. Also actually want us to be below my orange vase. This would be an argument for having everything in one layer. What I could do instead is just move this entire poppy flower down below the orange vase in that way. Right now there's no masking poles. I could erase all the way up. I could use my shape builder to get rid of that shape, or I can just move the whole thing down and that's what I'm going to do. I'm going to create a little leaf for that. I'm going to do that using the pencil tool on fill. I'll change to that same green but on a fill. I'm just going to draw a leaf shape. Because this is a separate shape, I can move it around if I want to. It looks I may end up adding some texture to the leaves. The next thing I want to do is add some texture though to the flower itself. I'm going to go back into this group. Once you add some texture using a texture file to the front here, but I want the red to remain. I'm going to go ahead and duplicate it. With that selected I'll go into my files and I'm going to grab one of my textures. Let me grab this one here. Again, use whatever textures you'd like. I just want it to be something subtle, not anything too much. I want to go ahead and change the blend mode of that to something like Overlay or Soft light, I think I like Overlay. I'm not going to add textures at the back. I may add a texture to this bottom part here. Let me go ahead. The first thing I want to do though, is I want to create one large shape out of these two elements so that I can add texture to the whole thing. I'm going to go ahead and I'm going to select the stem, use touch selector and select the leaf. Then I go to my shape bolder. Again, sometimes it takes a minute to pop up. Let's try that again. Then zoom in here. Now there's four segments. I need to do each segment one at a time. I actually didn't need to do that first one. Now I have a one merged shape. I can go ahead and I can, with it selected, I can duplicate it to make sure I keep the green. Go ahead to my files and select some texture. I'm going to select this greenish one and change the one mode. I'm going to go ahead and drag this out. I want to change the blend mode to soft light and just drop the opacity. That just gives it a slight texture. The final thing I want to do is add some lines to my front here. I'm going to grab a light pink color on stroke. I'm going to use my pencil tool for this. Now I'm creating a stroke and I actually am going to need to cut some pieces off. I'm going to show you how you can do that with the shape builder, but there's something else that you need to do to convert to stroke. Let's go and create them first. I have, let's see, nice light pink color here selected. Let me go ahead and draw. Now they're actually combining with one another, I tap out of that. If you don't let them touch, they won't combine together. I'm not worried about the overhang. I have all of these paths and they're all strokes and I need them to be fill so I can use my shape to what actually makes it easier to use the shape builder. I'm going to select all of them. Grab my selection tool, so it's officially selected. I'm going to go to my object menu and I'm going to choose Create stroke outline. That's what you get from a stroke to a fill. I could've created my lines with the philanthropic stroke, but I just find it easier sometimes working with a stroke. I'm going to go back to my layers panel here and I want to select this, final path, this front part, go to my shape builder, tap on Shape builder. You can see this segment. I'm just going to go ahead and swipe to get rid of, let me zoom in a little bit more, this excess that's overhanging. Go up to the top here and zoom in. Because I don't have these other shapes selected, I'm not worried about removing them. I'm going to deselect this path, keep these selected. I actually want to select them again and group them because I want to change my blend mode or my opacity. I'm not sure which one I want to do yet. I'm going to go to my properties menu, and I'm going to start with just changing the opacity, just knocking them back, all of it. I think I'll stick with that. I'm not going to worry about the blend mode. That is our poppy flower and orange vase. I go ahead and select both of these and just move them over. Let's go ahead and do our flower in our red vase next, we'll do our coffee can last. We'll do that in the next section. I'll see you there. 10. Flower Illustration with Radial Repeat: We have our orange decent place. We're going to go ahead and create our flowers for our little red bud vase here. I'm actually going to create two flowers. I'm going to start with the stems. I already have my red vase here, I'm actually going to rename this two flowers, and I want to drag this below my red vase. We're going to use our radial repeat to create these, but I'm going to start with the stem first. I'm going to go to my blob brush to do that, and I will create with basic rounds, about four. I'm going to select this green color for my stem. I'm just going to start drawing up, and it's automatically going to add it to that layer because I have that selected. Let's draw a second one up. I have it as one path here because they combine, I'm not worried about that. I'm going to create one flower, make it exactly the way I want it, and I'm just going to duplicate it. You can create multiple types of flowers, it's totally up to you. For the ease of this class though, I'm just going to create one and then we'll duplicate the whole thing. The first thing I'm going to do is create my little centerpiece. I'm going to grab my circle here, and I'm going to grab I think this light yellow color. I'm going to turn my stroke off, I'm going to drag out a circle. I want to hold my finger down to give myself a perfect constrained circle, grab my move tool, and I need to make that a little bit smaller I think, and move it into place. It's just taking a moment, it seems. There we go. Now I want to create my petals. I'm going to create one petal and then use a radial repeat you create the rest. I'm going to use my circle, and I am going to select this yellow color. I'm going to match that yellow or orange to that vase and just draw out an ellipse. Now I want the top and the bottom of this ellipse to be pointed. So I'm going to go to my Direct Selection Tool and I'm going to drag across to select top and bottom nodes, then hit "Sharp". I change it from a rounded node to a sharp node. I'll grab my selection tool and make it a little bit smaller and I'm going to drag this in place to make it even smaller. Now I want this petal to be centered on the circle here. I also wanted it too behind the ellipse, so that my petals behind that. I actually thing I'm going to make the ellipse a little bit smaller, that way I can even see the petal better. There we go. I'm going to go ahead and with this selected, go to my repeat menu and tap radial. That's going to give me a repeat that I can then make changes to. The first thing I want to do is use this little dot. I'm going to bring them in. I can make all kinds of shapes with this. I can drag it around, out, but I want to make a nice flower shape with it. I'm going to drag this up into the center. I can remove petals, I can add more petals. I like a nice, subtle amount, I don't want too many. I'm going to go ahead and deselect that. Now, if I want to make changes to one petal, I can make it to the one and it will make it to all of them. But there is a step process you need to do. The first thing you need to do is tap to select the radial repeat. So you're going to see that bounding box with a circle. You want to double tap whatever you want to make a change to. I want to make a change to this petal, so it applies to all of them. The first thing I'm going to do is grab my pencil tool and I might need to back out of that and do that again. Let's go ahead and tap to select the radial repeat, double-tap, and then I'll select my pencil tool. I'm not going to change the color yet because if I do that, is going to change the color of the selection. I'm just going to go ahead and draw some little line shapes here. While there's still selected, I'll go ahead and pick that off white color and that's gone ahead and added it to all of them. Now I want to go ahead and add nice texture to the yellow. I could have done that before I did the radial repeat, it's up to you, but if you decide at the last minute you want to do that is just as easy to change it, I'm going to double-tap. Now it actually selected the lines. I want to tap and select that shape instead. Now selected I need to duplicate that because I want to add texture to that color. So I've duplicated it, and I'm going to go into my files and pick one of my textures here. I think I'm going to pick this rusty texture again. You can see it's added to all of them, so I'm going to drag up. I could leave it as a texture, but I think I'm going to go ahead. Let me see if it'll let me change the blend mode while I have it selected, still I might need to back out. Sometimes you just need to back out, start again. I'm going to double tap to select it again, and now I should be able to change the blend mode. It's almost like you can only do one function at a time right now, and that's all right. I'm going to go ahead and type out of that. I like that, an overlay, I like how that's looking. I think I'm not really liking how these lines are matching them background, so I'm going to go ahead and select the radial repeat, and then I'm going to double tap these lines. Let me go ahead and do that again. Now I've selected that one so I can change the color of all of them. Let me try this pink color and make it a little bit lighter, or I'm going to change that to that color and I think I'll change the ellipse to a different color. So let's change that to this pink. I'm liking that better. I think I'm going to add some little dots on the inside here on this ellipse. I'm going to go ahead and select it. I'm going to grab my blob brush for this. I want to pick that darker pink color, or it's almost red. Actually, I need to make sure I don't select that. I have to de-select it then change my color. Grab my blob brush, and right now it's on four, I needed to be probably about 10. I'm just going to hit this with some dots. Now I have my flower. I'm going to go ahead and with my selection tool, grab all of the elements, and I'm going to group that so that the flower is together just like we did with the poppy. I'm going to hit my touch selector, drag out, and I'm going to add a second flower. I'm going to make this a little bit smaller. I like how that looks. I like the yellow and how it goes nicely with the bud vase. Just de-select that. I could add some leaves to this if I want, but I actually feel like the leaves would be a little bit a step too far. I might make this whole thing just a little bit smaller though. Let's go ahead and use our touch selector to constrain it. I like how that's looking. I'm going to go ahead and in the next video, we're going to create the succulent plant for the coffee cans, so I'll see you there. 11. Creating Leaf Shapes: We're on our final one. I've already turned on my espresso can layer. I renamed one of my layers succulent and I've just pulled it down to the bottom here. Now I'm going to do a mix of layers that are all going to be succulents. This is yours to create however you'd like. If you remember from my original illustration, there's was a mix of things. I'm going to go ahead and do a couple different ones. Without layer selected, the first thing I'm going to do is I'm going to grab my pencil tool. I want to grab that rusty color and I make this on stroke. I'm just going to draw up a stem. Now, I don't currently have the stroke set to anything. I'm going to go ahead and select it with my selector tool. This is the strokes that I'm going to drag up from here. You can change the width of your stroke by dragging up and down, stick to about four. Now I want this to be in-between my elements in the can. I'm going to go ahead and drag this up between the code group and the path behind it so that it gives you appearance of going into the can. Now, if I want to, I can go into my properties panel, and there's a number of other changes that you can make to your strokes down here at the bottom, I can change to dotted lines if I needed to, I can change my ends to rounded. If you zoom in here, you can see this is rounded now as opposed to squared off. In this case, it doesn't matter because I wanted to add leaves to it. But if you're going to see the bottom of it and you wanted to see around in bottoms, go ahead and change that. I'm going to go ahead and create some leaves now. I'm going to use the same pencil brush and the same color, but I want to switch this to a fill now. I want to make sure I'm still within that layer. I'm going to go ahead and draw some rounded leaves with my pencil tool. Now, again, there's no word seen on this, so I typically just do one side. You could always rotate the whole iPad. Again, hopefully they add that very soon. I'm going to go ahead and create that one. Now because these are all separate layers, I can tap on one and I can change the direction. It's really handy when you're working with vectors like that. I'm going to go into this layer here. I'm not going to worry about adding texture to it. I'm going to combine it with the shape builder, but I'm not going to use the shape builder while I slave, I'm just going to do a combine all. The first problem with that is I created a stroke, and you can't combine a stroke which fills. I'm going to back out of this, I'm actually glad that happened so you can see how to fix it. I'm going to go ahead and select the path here and I need to change this from a stroke to a fill, we did this earlier. I'm going to go ahead to my object, create a stroke outline, and now it switched it to a fill. I'm seeing, well, one of my leaves is a little off, so we'll go ahead and change that. Now I can go ahead and I can select all of those layers, go to my Shape builder, and I'll do a combine all. This is a nondestructive combine, so I can change it if I want to, it's basically creating group in my layers panel. I'm not going to worry about adding textures to that, I'm actually going to be adding an overall texture to the entire thing. Sometimes I just like to leave certain ones undone or flat rather than texturized. I'm going to go ahead and create another one going this direction, but I want to choose a different color. I think I'll pick this darker. Actually, I'm going to pick this teal color. Once again, I want to make sure I'm in my succulents layer. I'm going to use a stroke. I'll just draw it up. I just need to make sure that my stroke is a little bit bigger. I'm not going to worry about it being squared off. While I have this selected, I'm going to go ahead and create a stroke line out of it, and go back to my pencil tool. Now I want to create some pointed leaves on this one. I'm going to go ahead and just draw up. If you hold, it will automatically close it. So again, I want to hold, it's going to let me change the direction. I'm going to keep doing that all the way up. Again, whenever you hold and that little blue dot appear, it's creating a nice sharp node for you. Then do this one. I'm going to go ahead and select all of these and I'm going to combine them again. I could just as easily use the group here. I think I'm going to move this over. I may get a little bit smaller, I want to constrain it all. Let's go ahead and create one last little enum here. I think I might move my flowers in red vase over just slightly. I'm going to create one last little piece here. I want to make sure my succulent are selected, my succulent layers rather. I'm going to grab this dark green color. Again, I'm going to select my pencil tool and I'm going to let it to do the whole point thing. I'm actually going to create this in this direction that I can always rotate it. I'm stopping and holding and letting it give me a nice sharp node and then I'll close it. I grab my selection tool and I'm going to rotate it, make it a little more narrow, bring it up. I think what I want to do is duplicate this. I'm going to go to this back one and have this lighter color. I'm going to drag up from the center just to let it peak out a little bit. It gives you that shading. If you wanted to, you could add textures. These again, I'm going to show you in the next and last section how to add some overall texture. But I'm going to call this done for right now. I think the only thing I might do is I'm going to highlight and select both of them and maybe make it slightly smaller. Oh, I didn't select everything. You need to make sure that you select the whole thing. I'll move that over here. I like how that's looking. The final thing I want to do is add some texture to my background here as well as an overall texture on the top. We'll do that in the next section. 12. Adding Final Textures with Clipping Groups: We've added texture to your objects as we went along, but I want to add some final texture to my back wall here, as well as an overall texture that just ties everything together. I'm going to do that in the exact way that I've been doing it throughout. The first thing I'm going to do is go to my background layer. I want to make sure that it's unlocked. I'm going to duplicate that rectangle that made up that back wall, because if you remember if I want to keep the color but just add texture I need to add a duplicate of it and add the texture to the duplicate. With the rectangle selected, I'll go to my Import menu, grab "Files". I think I'm going to use that whitewash texture that I used for this bottle here. It's a little bit too much. It's pulling the eye away, but that's not a problem. I'm going to go into my properties panel here and I'm going to change the blend mode to something like soft light. Maybe drop the opacity just a little bit. It gives it that nice texture, but it's not overpowering. Now, I want to put an overlay texture over my entire illustration just to bind everything together. I'm going to use that same rectangle that I used for the background because I already know that it's the exact size of my illustration. The first thing I want to do though is create a layer on the top here so I'll hit "Plus". I'm going to go ahead and rename this top texture or something like that. I'm going to open that file because I want to be able to move the duplicate I made down here into it. I'll select the rectangle, hit "Duplicate", and then I'm just going to drag this up into that top texture layer. Now, right now it's covering everything, but that's not a problem because I'm going to replace the opaque color with a texture. I'll go to my Import, hit "Files", and I want to pick one of the most subtle ones here. I don't want anything that has too much texture because again I don't want to draw the eye away from everything else that I've created. I think I'll pick this one here. It's going to go ahead and replace that rectangle with the texture, I'm just going to drag it out, and then I'm going to go ahead into my properties and I want to change the blend mode. Now, I like soft light. I tend to gravitate toward softly because I like how it gives you some subtle texture, but it's enough that you can see it. Let me just try some others though. Overlay is just a little bit too much. I might also try some of the others. Now, you could do color burn and just drop the opacity. It allows you to add the texture while also enriching some of the colors that you can use. It's totally up to you. I think I'm going to stick with soft light though and just keep the opacity on the higher side. If I were to turn that off and on you can see the difference in the texture, let's try that, and you can see it's added it to the elements that I didn't add it to before. I might just drop the opacity just a little bit. It's always a good idea to turn your texture on and off just to see if it's adding too much or you need to change the blend mode or something like that, or even change the texture. I like how that's looking, I like the overall texture. I think all of the textures within the illustration are fine, so I'm going to call this illustration done. In the final lesson I'm going to show you how you can easily export your illustrations either as a quick export for social media or as a full publish to use in other Adobe apps as well as other applications. I'll see you there. 13. Exporting Your Document: We have our three floral illustrations, were ready to export it. I mentioned earlier that you can go the export menu and there's a couple of ways that you can do this. You can quick export as a PNG, it's going to flatten it and save it automatically as a PNG that you can either save to your files or you can save it to your iPad. So you can scroll down here and do save image or save to files, save it. You can also, if you at that point you want to rename it, you can do that as well. The other option is to go into publish and export, change your file format to an Illustrator file PDF, whatever you'd like, hit Export and it's going to give you the same options. So that's how you can easily export your files. Now if you click out of it, it's automatically going to save it to your cloud documents so you should see it in Illustrator or Photoshop, whatever is tied to your cloud subscription with Adobe. 14. The Class Project & Thank you!: So we are at the end of class, and I hope that the lessons that you've learned here will give you the head start that you need to explore Adobe Illustrator for iPad even more on your own and go on to create more complex illustrations. Your class project will be to create three floral illustrations on your own using the methods that you learned in the class. I would love it if you would share your projects to the class project section, as it's always helpful for potential students to see what they might learn when taking the class. If you share your work on social media, please tell me so that I can share your beautiful creations with my own feed. If you love combining texture with digital illustrations as much as I do, come join me in my Facebook group where you can share your work, learn tips and tricks, share your own as well as ask questions in a friendly environment. As Adobe adds more to this application, I'll be creating more new classes to give you the lowdown on how everything works. Be sure to hit follow on my Skillshare profile page so that you'll always know when something is posted. Thank you so much for sharing your time with me by taking this class, and I hope to see you in future classes as well. Happy creating.