Add Confident Drawing To Your Art | Robert Joyner | Skillshare

Add Confident Drawing To Your Art

Robert Joyner, Making Art Fun

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4 Lessons (4m)
    • 1. Intro

      1:00
    • 2. Part One

      2:08
    • 3. Part Two

      12:38
    • 4. Too Timid HD 720p

      3:23

About This Class

This is part one of the draw loose to paint loose series. If you are like me you love to create expressive paintings and there's no better way to do this than adding some drawing.

What You Will Learn

Being timid is the number one reason why many artist's fail to get this right. When it comes time to really let go many will tighten up. This can be attributed to experience and easily cured with understanding the physical aspects of learning to paint freely.

To help you understand this lesson I will demonstrate two versions of adding drawing to a painting. The side-by-side comparison will give a good visual of how to overcome being timid.

Transcripts

1. Intro: Hi, I'm Robert Joiner. In this class, I will teach you how to add confident drawing to your artwork. In this instance, I will use acrylics and charcoal in a simple, still life composition. So that can better illustrate the main focus which is teaching you how to properly use your charcoal and drawing so that it plays a key role in your heart work. You want your drawing to create an impact on. That's what I will teach you in this short and concise class. Here on skill share, this class is suited for all level of painters and for anyone that just wants to branch out , try something new and exciting. So if you're ready to get started and roll today and I'll see you on the inside again, I'm Robert Joyner. I love the paint loose and I love the ad confident drawing to my heart. See you on the inside 2. Part One: Hi there. Welcome back. And this lesson. I want to cover another issue that a lot of artists have when using lines. Tim, it okay, Tim, And happens for a variety of reasons. Sometimes you're so confident and what you're creating sometimes you're just not familiar enough with the medium. Um, so if you're using charcoal, crayon, whatever seen just you have it gain the experience. You need to really, really apply it with some authority and to go for it. So what I will do here is I'm not going to bore you in this lesson with kind of painting on base. So a lot of what you know, I mentioned earlier about this Siri's being about, um, incorporating drawing, and in this case, charcoal crayon. I'll get get into drawing with pain as well into your work. Then there needs to be some sort of base of a painting down. And this Siri's that I'm gonna go ahead and kind of put chunkin Ah, a piece of the subject and then show you how incorporating these mediums and solving these issues can certainly help your artwork. Okay. So again, I'm not getting back to I was mentioning. I'm not going to bore you with showing painting every showing every single minute in every single stroke of Chungking in my subject on go ahead and get those things done. Um, getting kind of give you one example in less than one of how to chunk things in and then what was going on? But just to speed things up a little bit and to really did forget to the point, I will avoid that here and then. That way we can go ahead and dive into the lesson and have some fun with it. 3. Part Two: welcome back. So I've created these basic wine bottles here. Pretty drive to the touch. I mean, there's a couple of patches, maybe here and there that are wet. But it's not going to deter you from this lesson. It all. But I do find you get more prominent lines when you use charcoal with dry acrylics. But we're going to talk a little more about stuff like that in future lessons. So on this side, I'll go ahead and go with the teme It first. Okay. Now, timid, of course, is confidence, you know, and experience. And I think now those to go kind of hand in hand. So as you become more experience with using charcoal and you practice it correctly and when I say correctly, I mean, if you you know, I have to assume all of you are here to paint loose. You know, we're not here to create no perfect foot, a representational art here. We're here to do things very loosely, very expressively. Okay, Um, but Timon is really It's the attitude, Um, and and I think you know, if your if your new with charcoal, you know, I would encourage you just says spend days, it could play him with it and really kind of get back to that early lesson that I had about , you know, using pressure because pressure alone when you have a range of motion. So you go from here to some intensity that that alone can re very confidently in your art. If everything is here in that Rees very we very soft in our terms. Okay, So the results are not very aesthetically pleasing that they don't really grab your attention. I think you know what I want to teach you guys is to when you use your line, whether it be charcoal painting with a brush crayon. I want he guys to be able to use it with confidence. And I want your art to jump out. I want those lines to reach, reach out and grab that viewer by the collar, pool a man and say boo Here I am. I mean needs to be strong. Okay, on doesn't need I wanted to be passive. So I don't want the viewer to block by your art and not even really see the lines or see where it has any impact or any aesthetic value to it. So it's not really adding anything interesting. Okay, so I'm gonna go ahead and do it here and again. Tim, it is just an attitude. You know, It is how you approach it. I'm going to trying to put that energy into this as I do it. Okay, someone zoom in on here to the side, so you kind of get a better feel for what's going on. But notice as I do it that the energy Barry saw. Okay, So let's say you even understand the idea of having on entry point at this stage. You're like, Oh, yeah, like, will be the way, Robert, No. Use those darks to introduce a dark medium, which is still charcoal. So let's say you start in here like, Oh, yeah, like those scribbles you did. I'm not going to outline everything, cause he told me not to outline. So I'm trying to put some interesting strokes down here, but notice the energy that notice how cautious. Yes, everything is. Okay, So Paul is right here. And then when I really go for the next one, all right, before I get into this one, just No, I really want you to see the impact there. Now, you can probably see some of these lines, but it doesn't. Right. The doesn't, like take you, grab you and shake you and demand your attention. And sometimes, you know you need a little bit of that grabbing energy. You need a little bit of this, and but you can certainly balance it with this to you Don't want to sit there and shout in the person. So I sat there and did everything, Uh, you know, it's gonna become too heavy, and then this will become mawr important than the art itself in the subject. And we don't want that. We don't want to compete with our subject. We just simply want to add linear interest that would enhance it. Okay, So be very, very important to know that it's that combination of energy and then back in all, Okay? Because that is where you get balance. That's where you get Oh, look at that. That's cool. Oh, nice. He balanced it out. Okay, so I'm gonna zoom in. We'll get into this one. I'll try to create the same feeling. I did hear similar lines. It's not gonna be perfect. Just so you kind of get that comparison. Okay. All right. Here we go. Noticed a nice point. I keep on these two. That's really important. I haven't mentioned that yet, but, um, you know, if you start to get really rounded edges or around and and it gets real smooth, you can't get these kind of fine lines. And you want the The idea here is to balance everything. So I want to balance the energy. So I want to create energy and intensity with my pressure and then the balance that out. But I also want to create some thick lines of somethin lines, and it helps to certainly have that point. So I always keep a decent point when you're ready to kind of go for it and use this in your art. Okay, so here's my I want to use this is my entry point very, very similar. Um, I'm gonna go intense, because that's what I feel when I look at that. Now I can back off that. I'll go intense back off of that and I'll go intense on your back off of that. Go intense. Well, that's working. Good. Find me. I can put a feeling of some letters here. Whatever little design fun he was make that a little more energetic, right? Will back away from it. All right. Some were backed off of both of them. Now you can kind of see how these lines now pale in comparison to this and, um and but But this has enough, you know, variation. You know that of these light lines and dark lines that you know, it's not like totally screaming at you. It just adds some energy and personality variety to this piece and it We're over here. Yeah, you can see the line, it's there. But it just doesn't have that same confidence, that same comfort level that you feel an artist has with their medium as this. And I'm not saying like, this is the finished piece and I would take this and sell it, and it's like the ultimate masterpiece. But in terms of using line effectively going for it and not being too timid, I think there's a drastic difference between the two of, um, OK. And like I said before early on in this lesson, it's about building familiarity. It's about being comfortable and having the experience to get you There is key, and you don't get that in 10 minutes. Okay, So you think you can pick up this and just start making some lines on a piece of doing paper and go? Oh, I got this. I mean, I'm using my energy now, and I've I've got this now that's going to the next lesson. It doesn't quite work that way. You this is a technique, and you have to respect it as a big part of your art. And you never become so confident with it that you're not a student of it anymore. Because using line, he's an energy. And you know this feeling in your work, um, has different degrees of effectiveness. Okay, Has you never stop learning with it? You just become more comfortable with it, become more confident with it. You start leaving this behind, Okay? Now, my point tall, that was is put yourself in a position where you constantly practised these things. Um, practice means just simply spend Tom doing and creating sketches and and put aside the thought finished work. As you become more confident and comfortable, the finished work will happen that anything that's something that as you get this comfort level and then you decide. Hey, no. Today and I've spent three or four days, five days or 80% of my time the last month, just, you know, experimenting with my medium. And And I feel comfortable in our with this, you know, it's not new. And then then fall back and do a painting and try to bring that same energy, that same confidence into it And that sometimes, because where artists will have another block, right, we we get to this finish painting masterpiece. We've got to create something beautiful when and then we lock up, you know? And then we end up here. So, uh, you're always a student. I'm always a student of art. Don't ever fool yourself into thinking you got it. You just simply understand it better. You become more confident with it. And if you're smart And if you're, um you really want to take your art to the next level all the time and continue to grow practice with it, work more than you think you need. Whether it I spend a lot of time experimenting, doodling, take reject paintings, work with it, find those entry points put that intensity in it as much as you can and then make it part of your routine. Okay, All the time. Spend time experimenting, practicing, and it will benefit you. Big time. All right. I'll see you the next lesson. 4. Too Timid HD 720p: so on this side. I'll go ahead and go with the Temin first. Okay, Tim, it is just an attitude, You know, It is how you approach it. I'm going to try to put that energy into this as I do it. Okay, someone zoom in on here to the side, so you kind of get a bit better feel for what's going on. So let's say you even understand the idea of having an entry point at this stage. You're like, Oh, yeah, like well, the way Robert, No. Use those darks to introduce a dark medium, which is still charcoal. So let's say you start in here like, Oh, yeah, like those scribbles you did. So I'm trying to put some interesting strokes down here, but noticed the energy that notice how cautious everything is. Okay, so Paul is right here. You know, I really want you to see the impact there. Now, you can probably see some of these lines, but it doesn't. Right. The doesn't like take you, grab you and shake you and demand your attention. So here's my I want to use this is my entry point. Very, very similar. I'm gonna go intense because that's what I feel when I look at that. Now I can back off that. I'll go intense back off of that and I'll go intense on your back off of that. Go intense. That's working good in five me. I can put a feeling of some letters here. Whatever little design he was. Make that a little more energetic, right? Well, back away from it. You can kind of see how these lines now pale in comparison to this, but But this has enough variation. You know, the of these light lines and dark lines that you know. It's not like totally screaming at you. It just adds some energy and personality variety to this piece, and we're over here. Yeah, you can see the line, it's there. But it just doesn't have that same confidence, that same comfort level that you feel an artist has with their medium as this, in terms of using line, effectively going for it and not being too timid. I think there's a drastic difference between the two of um, it's about building familiarity. It's about being comfortable and having the experience to get you. There is key, and you don't get that in 10 minutes. Put yourself in a position where you constantly practised these things work more than you think you need with it, and it will benefit you big time. All right. I'll see you the next lesson.