Acrylic Painting Techniques: Flawless Blending | Kacie Woeber | Skillshare

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Acrylic Painting Techniques: Flawless Blending

teacher avatar Kacie Woeber

Watch this class and thousands more

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Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Lessons in This Class

11 Lessons (1h 5m)
    • 1. Introduction

      1:05
    • 2. Best Brushes for Blending

      3:09
    • 3. Color Theory and Blending

      3:52
    • 4. Linear Blending Part 1

      9:59
    • 5. Linear Blending Part 2

      9:03
    • 6. Radial blending part 1

      7:22
    • 7. Radial blending part 2

      7:18
    • 8. Troubleshooting Common Mistakes Part 1

      9:05
    • 9. Troubleshooting Common Mistakes Part 2

      6:12
    • 10. Troubleshooting Common Mistakes Part 3

      7:07
    • 11. Class Project

      0:49
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About This Class

In this course, we will take a deep dive into the technique behind blending acrylic paints. We will learn how to paint ombres, sunsets, rainbow blends, and moonlight glows with acrylic paints. Blending can be challenging when starting out and it can be as simple or as detailed as you'd like. This class will go over basic and intermediate techniques. This is a great class if you are just starting out with acrylic painting or if you are looking to improve your blending skills.

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Kacie Woeber

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Transcripts

1. Introduction: Hello, welcome to my acrylic painting class all about blending. My name is Casey. I have been acrylic painting for over ten years and I've taught painting for over six years. Blending is usually the first skill that my students want to learn when they're starting out in acrylic painting. And it is one of those painting skills that can be a bit tricky for beginners, but results in beautiful effects in your paintings. You can achieve sunsets, braise, rainbow fades, and more fun effects for your paintings with blending. In this class, we will go over the supplies needed to get started. Which colors blend well with one another, and which brushes work well for blending. And then we will learn how to do linear blending and radial blending. We will also go over some common mistakes beginners space when learning how to blend. And finally, we will do a blending project together. In this class, we will go over basic to more intermediate techniques. So whether you are a complete beginner or looking to expand your skill set a bit more. This is the class for you. Alright, so let's get started with our painting. 2. Best Brushes for Blending: When you are choosing brushes for blending, you want to make sure that you have a couple available that you can play with while you are beginning your blending practice. My favorite type of brush to use when blending is a Hilbert brush. This is going to be a flat brush with a rounded top. And I just prefer to blend with this brush because I find that it helps me get a nice, seamless blend. This is a three quarter inch Filburn brush, and this is going to work really well for both linear blending and radial blending. Another brush that I reach for a lot is the one inch flat brush. This brush is going to lay down a lot of color really quickly. And when we are blending, we need to make sure that we are moving pretty quick. So having a brush like this on hand is very helpful, especially if you are painting on a larger canvas. If you were painting on a smaller canvas, you could go for more of a 1.5 inch flat brush. This one actually I think is a three-quarter inch flat brush. And if you notice with all of these brushes, the bristles are pretty firm. They're not so firm that they don't bend it all, but they are also not so soft that they don't bounce back when I bend them. So these are the perfect brushes for acrylic painting. They're just firm enough to the point where they will bounce back if I bend to them, but not so hard to the point that I can't bend them pretty easily. So that's about the firmness that you need your brush to be. Some other brushes that are fun to have on hand when you are blending is a regular chip brush. This brush is literally about 50 to $0.75 at the art store. And it has really bristly boar hair bristles. So this is going to lay down really fun textures. It's really fun to use this brush to paint in some highlights, which we'll talk about a little bit later. I'm more so going to use these brushes for that. But this is another brush that you can play with when adding an highlights. And finally, a really, really great brush to have when you are doing circular or radial blending is going to be a nice, big, fluffy acrylic brush. And you do want to make sure that you get a brush that is specifically for acrylic painting. I know that this kind of looks like a makeup brush, but trust me, I've tried using makeup brushes with acrylic paint before. It doesn't work that well, you're going to want to get a fluffy brush that is for acrylic painting. And this is going to be really helpful for smoothing out and finishing or blending. You don't really need to have that many brushes. You can even start with just one brush. I would recommend this brush if you have just one brush. And that is all you are going to need for rushes. 3. Color Theory and Blending: Before we get too deep into the blending, I first want to talk about which colors are going to blend well together and which colors are going to muddy up. If you pull up a picture of the color wheel, you can see which colors sit next to each other and which colors are across from each other on the color wheel. So those colors that are next to each other are going to blend together very easily. And the colors that are sitting a crust from each other on the color wheel are going to muddy up pretty quickly. It's going to turn a grayish brown color that usually nobody wants or likes in their painting. So that is usually something that you want to avoid. And I want to demonstrate some colors that go together and some colors that do not. So, for instance, purple and red are going to be next to each other on the color wheel. So I have some purple here and some red. And I'm going to kind of show you what happens. I'm going to add a little bit of white in order to lighten up the colors a little bit. And usually I like to start with the lighter color first, so I'm just going to dip into the red and layout some of that red color here. And then we will mix a little bit of the purple into the white just to brighten it up a little bit more so it's more easy to see. And then notice that as I lay down that purple and start to brush it into the red, that it really doesn't take that much brushing. And those two colors are starting to blend into each other pretty seamlessly. Okay, so that is an example of a blend that you want to see. And purple and yellow are across from each other on the color wheel. Meaning in theory, two colors are not going to blend well. So I want to show you what happens when I blend together yellow and purple. So we will start with some yellow here on my brush and just lay out some yellow. And then I'm going to rinse off my brush and dip into some of the purple. And I'll show you what happens if you've never blended before. This will be helpful to C. So notice that when I start to brush that purple into the yellow, see how it's pulling that brownish, grayish color in. As I blend the purple and the yellow here. And it's not that aesthetically pleasing, right? It's pretty muddy looking. Kind of getting a brown color. If that's what you're going for on your painting, that's great. But like I said previously, Usually this is what we are trying to avoid. So the colors that blend well with one another are going to be purple and red. Red and orange. Red and yellow. Yellow and green. Green and blue, and blue and purple. Colors that are also close to each other on the chart, at least not across from each other on the chart are going to blend well. So red and yellow are going to blend well. Yellow and blue, and blue and red will blend well. Only the colors that are across from each other on the color wheel are going to become muddy like this color here. So that is a little bit of color theory for you. And let's go ahead and get started with some basic linear blending. 4. Linear Blending Part 1: Okay, so let's get started with a linear rainbow blend. A linear blend involves a stripes of color blended in one direction. So you can apply those stripes of color horizontally. You can apply them vertically. You can even apply them diagonally. It's up to you. But before you start blending, you do want to prepare your palate a little bit. As I mentioned previously, you do have to move pretty quickly with acrylics because they drive so quickly. So it does help to have all of the colors ready to go on your palette before you even start, so that you're not scrambling to get those colours prepared while your canvas is drying on you. And if you do let the colors kind of dry on you before you try to blend them into one another. They are not going to blend at all. And you will know, and that happens because the colors are going to refuse to blend. All right, so I am going to try to make this a rainbow blend. And I need to mix myself up a little bit of orange, because as I mentioned previously, you really only need to have the three primary colors. To do this project. You can mix your oranges, your purples, and your greens. It is helpful to have those colors already mixed up for you. But you can always mix them up yourself. Like I just mix some yellow and red into one another and it was really quick and easy. And I do also have a little bit of white on my palette just to kind of lighten up some of my colors because I want this to be a very vibrant rainbows. So always remember that you have your white available to lighten up colors if you so desire. So let's talk about the brush a little bit before we get started. I notice that my brush is very, very clean and I'm making sure that there is no dirty water or paint in this area where the brass meets the bristles because that is where dirty water and dirty paint likes to hide and then it will come out onto your canvas and muddy up your colors. So when you are rinsing out your brush, you really want to make sure that when you dividend to your water, I know my Waters kind of dirty, but it's not that it's not so bad that I need to change it. But you do really want to keep your water clean more often than not. Anyway. So when you are rinsing out your brush, you really want to move your brush around in the water a lot. You want to rub the bristles across the bottom of the cup and get it nice and clean. And it also helps if you do this squeegee motion on the side of your cup to get out all of that extra water so that you don't get drips of dirty water into your paint. So that is how you clean your brush. You wanna make sure it's nice and clean. You can even take it and tap it off on a napkin a little bit, but not too much because you want your brick bristles to stay somewhat wet so that when you're blending, the color blends more easily. And ask for making your paints themselves more easily, more easy to blend. You can also pick up some of this blending medium, like I was mentioning in the previous lesson. And this is going to help your paint blend very, very well. If you do not have any, that's OK. You can also use some water and it's going to work pretty much just the same. The only difference is that this blending medium isn't going to thin out your paint as much as water will. And if you thin out your paint a little bit too much, you can lose the structure of the paints and it will kind of flake off the canvas, but that is very rare. So if you only have water, that's okay, just mix a little bit of water into your paint instead. And that is going to make your paint fluid enough to blend onto the canvas because we want our patients to stay nice and wet and fluid here. So I'm gonna start out with some yellow because I always start out with the lightest color first, right? Always start out with the lightest color first. That is one of those rules of blending because if you start with the darkest color first, it is very easy to accidentally take over the entire canvas with dark paints. And if you do that, it is very difficult to cover those dark areas with lighter paints. But if you start out with a lighter color and you accidentally take over too much of the canvas with your lighter color, it's going to be extremely easy to fix that issue by covering it with dark paint. So I always tell my students, start out with the lightest color first. And that is going to make your life a lot easier. So I'm gonna start with yellow. And I'm going to use nice light feathery brushstrokes. So i'm not using a lot of pressure here, and I'm also using nice broad brushstrokes. Ok, so all the way to the left, all the way to the rights. And that way I don't get any what I call stop and go mark. So if you kind of place your brush down in the middle of the canvas Or you lift up your brush in the middle of the canvas, instead of brushing all the way to the edges, you will get these weird marks in your paint. It's not showing up very well with this color, but I'll show you what the next color. Ok, so you always want to make sure that you clean up your brush extremely well in-between colors. So I just rinsed out my brush. And then I'm going to move onto my next color, which is going to be the next color in the color wheel. And that is orange. So it is always helpful to have the color wheel up and available for you to look at. Alright, so I'm going to kind of show you what it looks like if I place my brush down and then lift it up in the middle of the canvas. You can kind of see I get these stop and go Marks is what I call them. It just creates a not very smooth looking texture in that area where I lifted up on, off of the canvas. So what you wanna do is you want to make sure that you're brushing all the way to the edges of your canvas. And as I start to brush the yellow and the orange, I am using very, very light pressure. And I'm brushing right on this area where the orange and the yellow meat. So my brushes pretty much right in between those two colors. Half of it is kind of falling over into the yellow, and half of it is kind of falling over into the orange. And I am just going to keep on brushing that same area back and forth over and over again. The more brushstrokes that you make, the more blended it becomes. If it's still being somewhat stubborn like mine is, then you can always dip a little bit back into the lighter color, which is going to be yellow in this example. And you can go ahead and start to brush that lighter color into that same exact area we were brushing in. So see how I'm just kind of going over the same track over and over again. And that is going to get you a nice smooth blend here. So I'm gonna go ahead and add an add in a little bit more orange just because I ran out of orange while I was painting here. And you always want to make sure that you use that you use enough paint as well. If you don't use enough paint, it's going to look very like thin and you're going to be able to see the Canvas through it. And you also always want to make sure that you're using really light feathery brushstrokes and you will get a nice smooth blend. Alright, so let's move on to read. So we are going to make sure that we clean out our brushes extremely well in the water cup. Very clean brush. I have no dirty painter, dirty water hiding in this area where the breast meets the bristles. You always want to double check that. And then I'm going to start to mix a little bit of the water that was at my brush and also that pouring medium that I dropped into the red. And I'm going to mix it up really well. So see how I'm really working that port, that medium into the red by mixing it up with my brush. That's another thing that I see beginners kind of skip over sometimes and it's very important that you kind of work the paint into your brush on your palette before you start to brush it onto the canvas, I do see people kinda just quickly dip into their palate, like just one little dip and then try to blend. And it doesn't work for them because you have to kind of work your brush into the paint on the palate for awhile. And you'll notice because the paint will start to migrate up toward the brass and this is a nice loaded brush here. So you want your brush to kind of look like this. And then you can go ahead and brush those same nice broad brushstrokes all the way to one edge and then all the way to the next edge. And you want to remember to use very light pressure with your brush. I'm not pressing down very hard against the canvas and using nice feathery, light brush strokes. And remember the more brushstrokes that you make, the more blended it becomes the least brush strokes you make, the more that you're going to kind of see those stripes of color here. And I will say that it is very easy to over blend. So sometimes less is more. You really want to know when it is time to stop blending. 5. Linear Blending Part 2: Alright, so completely clean brush because we're moving on to our next color, we are going to pick up some of that purple. And I'll add a little bit of white and to the purple just to lighten it up a little bit, my purple is really dark, and that is going to make a nice bright vibrant purple. Alright, I love that. I kind of worked my brush into the palette for awhile and see how it's loaded exactly the same as the red was. I have the purple kind of migrating just up to right about there. That is a perfectly loaded brush. And then we wanna go ahead and start to brush the purple line. I'm trying to compensate for the fact that I know that I have two more colors coming in here, so I'm going to start to brush the purple on. Okay, so here's where things are going to get. Just a little, little tricky. So darker colors and lighter colors are not going to blend into each other as easily as these light colors blended into each other. When you are blending colors like purple and red together or like green and yellow. So a cool color or a darker color such as purple, blue or green, into a lighter color or a hot color such as red, orange, or yellow, you are always going to want to make sure that you have the lighter color on your brush. So in this case, the lighter color is red, and these two colors are not going to blend into each other very well until I have read on my brush. So what I'm gonna do is I'm going to rinse out my brush yet again very well in the water cup. It's actually nice to have more than one water cup sitting next to you when you're blending because that way you can always make sure that your water is clean and you don't have to constantly go back and rinse out your water COP. Okay. So I'm gonna go ahead and load my brush up with some red. And I'm going to find that track right where the purple meets the red. And I'm going to place my brush right onto the area where the red meats, the purple. And I'm going to start to glide my brush right across that line where the red meats, the purple. And I'm going to blend back and forth quite a bit here. And you do need to make sure that you have enough paint. Another thing that I see people do a lot is they tried to blend with, like just a tiny little bit of paint and it doesn't work. And that's what I was doing here. You can kinda see that the paint is ripping off of my canvas a little bit because your brushes job is to hold on to paints. And if you don't have enough paint on your brush, guess where the brush is going to take paint from your canvas. So make sure that you have enough paint. I just had to pull out some more red. I was running out because it was kind of ripping the paint off my canvas. And you are just going to want to brush that area where the red meats the purple. And it will start to blend the red and the purple little bit more. And you will get a nice blend. And I know I've said it a whole bunch of times, but I always have to repeat myself. The more brushstrokes that you make, the more blended it becomes. Always remember that. Ok. So now I'm going to clean out my brush really, really well again. And I'm going to move on to my next color, which is blue. This is a very pretty shade of blue here. And again, I'm working my brush into the paint really well here. And can be easy to forget steps like this when you're first learning because there's kind of a lot to remember when you are learning how to use a new medium, but you will get it as you practice. So we are again going to repeat the same steps. We're using nice broad brushstrokes all the way to the left and all the way to the right. So get a nice layer here. And what I'm going to do now is I'm actually going to add in a little bit more purple just because I'm noticing that there's a lot more space for my purple here. So I'm just going to pick up a little bit of purple and pull that into the blue. So purple in blue, those are going to blend into each other really easily. It doesn't matter which color you have on your brush because they're both dark colors. So those are gonna blend into each other really nicely. And then cleaned off my brush again. And I'm going to dip into some green. And this is going to be our final color. Again, working my brush into the paint really well to get a nice coat of paint on my brush. And I'm just going to place that green on the very edge of the canvas. Nice broad brushstrokes all the way to one edge and then all the way to the other edge. And I'm using very, very light pressure, nice light feathery brushstrokes here. If you press too hard, what it's going to do is it's going to kind of push the paint. And you're going to get these lines that kind of stick out. And it doesn't look like a nice smooth blend. So you really want to make sure that you are using nice light, feathery brushstrokes here. And there we go. We have a nice rainbow blend. One more thing while we are here is I want to show you how to add in some streaks of lighter color. So if you want to kind of take your painting into the next level and make it a little bit more dynamic. You can take your flat brush and I'm going to dip this into a little bit of white paint. So see how my flat brush kind of has a sharp edge that I can paint with. Normally we paint with the flat edge of the brush, but we can also turn our brush and paint with the sharp edge of the brush. And we can start to place some white streaks. And so the painting, wherever we want to kind of create some stripes of lighter color in our rainbow. And I know it looks a little strange right now, but we are going to then take our brush and rinse it off. And we are going to brush those lighter colors, those whites into the colors that we brushed the white into. And it's going to kind of bring out some lighter streaks of color into those areas. So I'm using the flat edge of my brush to blend those white streaks into the colors a little bit more. It does help if you have whatever color you are blending over on your brush. So because I'm blending over the orange right now, I am taking my brush and putting a little bit of the orange on my brush in order to kind of help that white blend into the orange a little bit more easily. And I'm making sure that my brushes always clean and between colors. So now we want to blend that white into the red a little bit. So I'm going to get some red on my brush and blended in to get some stripes of color. And the red that are a little bit more light and vibrant. And then I'm going to do the same with the purple. And this part is totally optional and it just kind of gives your painting a little bit, a little bit more of a dynamic feel. But if you're just starting out, don't worry about adding in the streets of color. You can make it as simple or as intricate as you, as you'd like. Alright, so then we're moving on to the blue. I got a little bit of blue on my brush and I'm just going to blend that blew in to the white streaks really well. And get those nice lighter pops of blue in there. And then moving on to the green, going to blend into the green a little bit and get those nice lighter pops of green to show. Sometimes they'd disappear because you might accidentally brush over it too many times like I just did. But you can always go back in and place them in again. And I'm always using those nice light feathery brush strokes to get my blending to happen. And that is how you can get a nice rainbow blend. Okay, so that is our linear blending. And next we are going to go over our radial blending. 6. Radial blending part 1: Okay, so our next lesson is going to be radial blending. I use radial blending a lot for painting things like the moon light glowing around the Moon. So radial blending is going to be one color in the middle. And it's going to be blended in a circular design moving out from the middle. So a really basic way to do this is going to be like painting the mid night sky. So what you might want to do for those colors, you can choose what colors you want. But if you want to paint kind of a moonlight like I'm going to demonstrate, you will want some white paint. We'll want blue, and then let's do some purple. So we are going to blend these three colors into each other for the radial blending, brushes that work very well for radial blending are going to be the Philbrick brush, which is this flat brush with the rounded top. And this fluffy paintbrush here really helps with getting a nice smooth blend with the circular or radial blending. So just like with any type of blending, you do want to make sure that your brushes nice and wet and you can make your paint more fluid with a blending medium. You can just mix water into your paint. Either method works, but if you are using this blending medium, you really only need a drop or two per color. And my brushes also pretty wet, so I'm going to make some water into my white paint as well. Again, you really need to work your brush into the paint and you need to mix your paint up so that it gets nice and creamy. That way it blends more easily. So I'm always working my brush into the paint really well. And I'm starting out with a Hilbert brush. And what you want to do is you want to start by brushing in a circular motion. So you can brush on just a little bit of white to start. And I'm going to move on to another color before I start to talk too much about this because I know you can't really see the white when I'm laying down, but I'm going to make a circle of white that's about the size of a saucer. And the next color that I'm going to use as the blue. So you do always want to make sure that you clean your brush in-between colors. Sorry, just rinsed out my brush. It's nice and clean. And I'm going to mix my brush that blending medium and a little bit of water. And it's my blue paint. And I'm really going to stir it up so that it's nice and creamy. That way, blends way more easily. And it does help if you kind of do what I'm doing here and sort of tap it on one side and then turn over your brush and tap it on the other side in order to get all of the excess water out of your brush as well. And then we'll, we're going to do is, I'll show you the brush strokes that we want to use here. So you want to be brushing in. Backwards, see shapes. Forwards see shapes. You can brush and kind of rainbow arc formations and like little smiley face formations. And it might take a little bit of practice and that's okay, but sooner or later you will be able to take all of these brushstrokes and use them to make nice circular blending. So in this instance, I do want to blend a little bit of the blue into the why. I made the white a little bit larger than I actually want it to appear on the canvas. Because what I'm going to do is brushed the blue into the white here a little bit and I'm going to show you what happens. So remember to always keep your brush wets. Always use nice light feathery brushstrokes. The more brushstrokes that you make, the more blended it's going to become. And I'm going to start to very lightly brushed the blue into the white here and see how that is kind of creating a nice circular Blend. I'm using very, very, very light pressure here. And with radial blending. I know that I mentioned with linear blending, but it's very easy to over blend. But with linear blending it's even easier to accidentally over blend. So once you have things looking pretty blended, you do want to go ahead and move on because if you keep going back like I am here, see how I'm recreating harsh edges right here where the white is meeting the blue because I'm going over it too many times. So that is what happens when you over blend. And this takes me back to another rule of blending, which is you usually, if not always want to have the lighter color on your brush. So I'm going to dip back into the White to kind of fix this a little bit. And I'm just going to brush white in a circular motion right on that area where the blue meets the white. And I'm gonna use very, very light pressure to sort of blend those two colors into one another using those brushstrokes that I was talking about, such as the backwards see brushstroke, the rainbow arc brushstroke, the C-shaped brushstroke, And the smiley face or U-shaped brush stroke. If you can brush around more like I am here, you can do that too. So what I'm doing once you get pretty good at this, is you can actually turn the brush in your hand. I don't know if you can see that, but what I'm doing is I am holding the brush in my hands and I'm kind of a rolling it like this while I'm brushing. And that is helping me keep the flat edge of the brush down on the canvas. So you always wanna make sure that you're blending with a flat edge of your brush and see how I'm kind of turning the brush and my hands with the flat edge of the brush is staying in contact with the canvas. One thing that I see students do a lot that ends up making their painting look a little messy, is they'll take the brush and we'll try to swirl it like this. And with the Filburn brush, it does get a pretty okay effects. If you're looking for more of kind of like a whirlpool effects. That's what it's going to create. But as you can see, there are some harsh lines in there. And if you are looking for more of a smooth blend, you're going to want to do more of these brushstrokes, always using the flat edge of your brush. And I'm just going to come in with a little bit more white paint here. And I'm going to lighten up the center of this just a tad. I'm okay with it being kind of a light blue color, but I want to kind of make it the lightest and the center moving out to darkest towards the edges because I want it to look like there's a moon glow in the center That's kind of radiating out into other colors on the edges. 7. Radial blending part 2: So the last color that we are going to use is going to be purple. And I did add a little bit of white into my purple again, just because my shade of purple is so dark, it's hard to see on camera. So I added just a little bit of white into my purple, and I also added some of that blending medium into my purple. And I'm blending everything together really well. I'm kind of doing that motion where I'd tap one edge of my brush down, turn it over and do the same thing on the other side. And especially when you get to the areas along the edges of your blending, you are really going to want some master, those C-shaped brushstrokes backwards, C-shaped brush strokes. Those U-shaped brushstrokes that I mentioned like this. And also those sort of rainbow arching brush strokes like this because it's going to get more and more difficult to kind of brush all the way around the circle in one motion as you start to make larger and larger rings around the center here. So if you kinda view this as a target and we're on the outer ring. Yada make nice broad brushstrokes. Also notice that I am making those nice broad brushstrokes. So I am not kind of, I'm not really doing this like very much because I want it to be nice and blended. So I'm trying to make my brush strokes nice and long. I'm not taking my brush off the canvas as long as I can help it. And we always want to have the lighter color on our brush, usually purple ones into blue pretty well, but I do want to have a little bit more blue represented in this painting right now. So I am going to pick up a little bit more blue here. I feel like I have enough purple. I want more blue. So I'm going to rinse my brush out really, really well. And now I'm tapping into that blue. And I'm going to find that area right where the purple meets the Blue. And I'm essentially laying the flat edge of my brush so that it is in between those two colors. And I'm going to start to brush right in between those two colors. I'm using really light pressure now it's a kind of helped the colors feather into each other. And that is how you can get some pretty basic radial lending if you are a beginner and even if you are more intermediate, It is extremely helpful to have one of these fluffy brushes on hand. Because what you can do is you can kind of finish up. You're blending your radio, blending with one of these fluffy brushes. And all you need to do that is to place the fluffy brush right in the middle of the painting and then start to use light pressure to swirl out from the center of the painting. And this is going to just kind of clean up any harsh lines that you might have and really give it a nice Beautiful blended finish. See how that kind of helps integrate all of the colors really, really well. I find that using the fluffy brush to paint the entire blend isn't very helpful. But finishing off the blend with this fluffy brush creates a very, very beautiful effects. And similar to our read, our linear blending, you can also make those little streaks of lighter colors into your radial blending painting. So remember we used the sharp edge of the brush to create nice thin streaks of white into our colors. So I'm going to kind of do that here. And this is just going to kind of make the blend a little bit more dynamic. And I am going to finish off everything with the fluffy brush just because it's so easy to do that. It's so quick and easy. It's like a little hacker, a little trick. I am just going to start out from the center and I'm going to slowly blend around. I'm picking up all of those streaks of white that I painted in previously. And they are blending into the purples and the blues very beautifully and creating some pockets of lighter color. And this ends up making it look a lot more dynamic. Another thing that you can do is you can take a darker version of whatever color you have laid out as your base and you can create some low lights. So if I have a darker purple, for instance, I can put that in. Okay, so I'm going to use a darker blue as well so I can kind of show you what will happen if we want to add in some low lights. And you can do this with linear blending two, there's so many different ways that you can blend so many different options. Okay, so I'm going to create some darker pockets of purple. And I just find that creating low lights and highlights makes such a beautiful dynamic painting. I usually like to do both. And using the fluffy brush does make life a lot easier when you're blending here. So I'm cleaning off my fluffy brush. And this fluffy brush is going to make life so much easier. I'm just going to start in the center. And I am going to lightly brush all the way around, moving away from the center of the painting in a sort of spiral motion. I's going to blend those low lights in as well. So see how that kind of creates some little pockets of low lights. And I'm going to kind of come in and finish blending. And a couple of areas here. If there's ever areas that are looking like the edges a little bit too harsh, it's not blended enough. You can always come in and brush over it a little bit because as you have probably memorized by now, the more brushstrokes you make, the more blended it becomes. So if you need to blend some areas out a little bit more and you can always come in and brush over them a little bit more. And this time what I'm doing, I'm just going to finish it off one more time by dipping my fluffy brush into a little bit of white paint. And I'm going to try to be right in the center of the painting. And I'm going to brush out of where I want the center of my painting to be in a circular motion. And that is going to finish up my radial blend. So it kind of creates a sort of moon glow effect. And there you go. So that is a sort of simple way to do circular or radial blending. 8. Troubleshooting Common Mistakes Part 1: One area that I notice beginners struggle and quite a bit is understanding which colors blend well together and which colors do not blend well together. So I'm going to do a bit of a deeper dive on blending contrasting colors and to one another. And I'm going to show what happens if we do this. So on my palette, I have all of the contrasting colors next to each other so you can see them. So yellow and purple are not going to blend well. Orange and blue will not blend well, and red and green will not blend well. And I'm going to demonstrate what will happen if I tried to blend these two colors together. So I'm going to start out by laying out some yellow and then move on to laying out some purple right next to that. And I'm going to try to blend those two colors into one another and see how they kind of make a really muddy sort of brownish color here. Some painters might be going for that look and that's fine. But generally if you're trying to make a more vibrant blend like a rainbow blend, you're going to want to avoid that. So I want to demonstrate what happens when you mix orange and blue. While these two colors look very beautiful together. If you blend them in to one another, you are going to get kind of like a greenish, muddy sort of color here. And if you blend red and green, you're going to get a very similar effect. So you got the red and we're gonna mix it into the green. Well, as you can see, it kinda makes a little bit of a purpley color, but if you continue to blend it, it starts to make a brownish grey color. So that is what happens when you mix contrasting colors in with one another. And I'm going to show you how to avoid this. Obviously one way to avoid this as going to be not blending these colors into each other. But if you really want to get the effect of blending these two colors into one another, I'm going to show you some ways to do that. So one way to do that is going to be adding in white and between the two colors. So what you can do, put some white on your palette. And you can start out with whatever color you are trying to blend into its contrasting colors. So in this example, I'm going to use the orange and blue. And if I lay down the orange and then I clean up my brush really well, remember you always need to clean out your brush in-between colors. And then I pick up some blue and I laid on the blue. I am going to leave a little bit of space in between the two colors right here. Because that is where I'm going to use some white to help blend these two colors together. So I'm just going to take my brush and I cleaned it off really well. And Loaded up with some white paints. And I'm going to find that area right in between the blue and the orange here. And with the white on my brush, I can start to very carefully blend these two colors into one another. You do have to clean your brush off a lot when you're doing this technique. So every couple of brushstrokes, take your brush and clean it. So I'm actually coming in now with a completely clean brush after a couple of brushstrokes. And I am going to continue to blend the blue and the orange just a little bit without white in between as a buffer. So it kind of makes a little bit of like a nautical sort of color palette here when you use the white in between. And it does really help blend. I can kind of go over it a little bit more and show you what will happen if I do that. So kind of blend the orange a little bit more here. As you can see, it does sometimes get muddied up when you use this technique. So you do want to make sure that you don't blend too much. Again, it is easy to over blend. So you always want to know when to stop. Sometimes less is more. But that is one option for blending these types of colors into one another. Another option is going to be using a color that both of the colors on the color wheel blend well into. So for example, if you're trying to blend red and green into each other, you can use blue as a buffer in between those two colours because we know when we mix blue and red, it makes purple. So we know that those two colors blend well. And we know that when that blue and green are right next to each other on the color wheel. So those colors are going to blend in well with one another. When we're trying to mix blue and orange, we can use red in between because we know that red and blue make purple. And we know that red and orange are next to each other on the color. We'll be also could do yellow in-between these two colors because yellow and blue make green, meaning they mix well together. And yellow and orange are right next to each other on the color wheel. And if we want to mix purple and yellow, we can put red in between those two colours because we know that right mix, mixes well with purple because it's right next to purple on the color wheel. And we know that if we mix red and yellow, it makes orange, meaning it mixes well. So if you want to blend two contrasting colors together and you can always use one of the colours that is in-between those two colors on the color wheel. So you always want to reference back to your color wheel when doing this. But I'm going to kind of give you an example of what will happen if we do this. So I'm going to start out with some red paint. And I'm going to place a line of the red. And I am going to place some green paint next to that red paint. Really working my brush into the paint in order to get it nice and mixed up, nice and creamy so it blends well. And I'm going to place some green next to that red. Clean out my brush again. And as I mentioned previously, blue is going to make a good buffer for those two colors. So I'm going to pick up some blue and put that right in the middle. And I'm using very light brush strokes and I'm starting to blend these colors altogether. When I'm blending blue and red, I always want to have the lighter color on my brush, which in this case is going to be red. So I'm gonna pick up some red and I'm going to use light pressure to help blend the red and blue into one another and see how that makes a nice linear bland. And between all three of those colors, I'm going to show you what you can do with orange and blue. So you can lay out some orange and then you can move on to lay out some blue. And a good colour in between these two colors is going to be red. Let's do red. You could also do a yellow for this example. I'll, I'll just do read. You could do pink as well, but I'm just going to brush some read into the orange a little bit and get it to blend. And then brush some red or the blue a little bit. And that is going to create some purple there. And it's also going to help blend those colors into one and others that you can still have that orange and blue represented, but you have a buffer color in the middle to help them blend more easily. I'm also going to show us what we can do with yellow and purple. So I'm going to start out by laying down some yellow and then I'm going to move on to some purple. And a good color to use in-between, yellow and purple is going to be blue. So you can pick up some blue on your brush. And you can brush that in between those two colors. It does help if you kind of brush them in a linear direction like this. So I'm gonna do that and I'm going to blend the blue into the purple really well. And then I always want to have the lighter color on my brush. So I'm going to grab some yellow paints. And I'm going to start to brush the yellow into the blue. And it is going to make a little bit of a Teal or a green color, but that is what happens when you use a buffer color to blend those colors together. 9. Troubleshooting Common Mistakes Part 2: Another area that I see beginner struggle with sometimes when learning how to blend is blending whites or lighter colors into darker colors. It is very easy to muddy up your colors when you're doing this. So I just want to demonstrate how to do this carefully. So it does help to always start with a lighter color. So in this case, I'm going to start to demonstrate how to blend white into any other color. So I'm going to start out with the lighter color, which in this case is of course White. And I'm going to just create a little section of white paint. And then I'm going to clean out my brush. And in this example I am going to blend the white into some blue. So I'm just going to brush that blue right up next to the white. And when you're doing this, you will find that the blue is going to start to take over the YE a lot more quickly than you might want it to. So what you're going to want to do is take your brush at this point and clean it out really well in your water cup. So you wanna make sure that it is very, very clean. And then you actually want to switch back to the lighter color, which is going to be white. And you can blend the white into the blue using those nice light feathery brushstrokes that we learned about. And when you have the white on your brush, that helps you blend white and blue really easily. So a common mistake that I see people make is they will start to brush the blue too far into the whites. And once you do this, you will not be able to bring back any of the white paint here unless you let it dry and come back in with another layer. If you are looking for a kind of like an Combray from a sort of darker blue to a lighter blue. That is fine. That's what you're going to get. But if you are looking for and Combray from a blue into a white, you're going to want to avoid brushing any blue into the white whatsoever. So if there's any blue on your brush at any point and you want to start to brush into the white. And you don't wanna make that white or light blue, you have to clean off your brush. Otherwise, the blue is going to take over the white and there's nothing you can do from there except let this paint dry and then come back in with another layer of white to bring that white back. And that's the same for any color. So even if I'm trying to blend a lighter color like yellow into white, it is going to help. If I have white on my brush when I'm trying to blend these two colors into each other. Otherwise, what's going to happen is I'm going to start to blend a lighter yellow color into the white. And if that is what you want, you're gonna get a beautiful Ambari. So this is also how you can make an Andre from a lighter color to a darker color. You always want to start out with placing the white first and then come in with your darker color, whatever that is. And you can brush it using those nice linear brushstrokes, slowly moving into the white. And that is going to create your own brain. And another thing that I see and begin our struggle with is mixing lighter colors into darker colors. I already kind of went over this a little bit, but just to review, you always want to have the lighter color on your brush. So if I'm trying to mix red into purple, the purple is going to take over the red really quickly if I have purple on my brush. But if I make sure that my brush is clean and I make sure that I have the lighter color on my brush, which in this case is red. And I come in with some red, I'm going to be able to have that nice vibrant red represented and My Blend instead of the purple taking over a lot. So I see beginner struggle a lot with this and they start to drag colors like purple, really foreign to the red, and eventually lose the red altogether. Another issue that is occurring when that happens is over a blending. So remember, I mentioned that you always want to stop while you're ahead if you keep going over something and going over something, and eventually it will just kind of turn all into the same color like here. If I keep on kind of going back and forth and back and forth, which I see beginners do. Because we give blend happy, which fine, because it's really fun, it's easy to do. But as you can see, you start to lose that Andre altogether. And it does start to kind of old turn into like the same blue color, especially if you blend in the opposite direction and then come in. It all sort of turns into the same color. So these are some common mistakes that people make that can also be turned into on purpose mistakes. So if you're trying to make a Bray with a lighter yellow moving into a darker yellow, then you can drag the yellow into the white a little bit more. But if you are trying to do kind of like a fade from Lincoln, nice white sky into a sky blue color. You don't want to drag that blew into the white too far because you are trying to keep the white, right? So this is also a really beautiful effect that people are often going for. And you just want to make sure that you're not painting any of whatever color your blending into your white into the white. Otherwise that white is going to become when I recolor, you're blending into it. So those are some common mistakes that people make when blending and ways that you can avoid them. Also a way that you can create an easy Combray. I'm just going to go over a few more common mistakes that beginners make. And then we will move on to our projects. 10. Troubleshooting Common Mistakes Part 3: Now I'm going to go over some more common mistakes that I see when people are learning how to blend so that you can figure out how to avoid them. One really common mistake is using the brush either too wet or too dry. This brush that I have in my hand is going to be too dry. I dried it off on a napkin, a lots and the bristles are just pretty dry. And my paint is also pretty dry. So I'm going to dip into a little bit of paints and start to paint on some canvas paper and see how those brushstrokes are kind of rough looking. And you can see a lot of the canvas showing through. That is what it looks like when your brush is a little bit too dry. Now if your brushes to dry and you try to blend two colors into each other, it's going to take a lot of time to blend them. And it's going to look really rough and just not very smooth. And you're going to have those really rough brushstrokes. And another common mistake that people make as the exact opposite problem there, brush is too wet. So if your brush is too wet and you are painting on an easel, you are going to get drips down your canvas. So that is one thing that you want to avoid. When your brushes to wet the paint is going to go on kind of shear. And you can see how the water is kind of pooling and certain areas so that you can see the canvas showing through as well. So if you're using the paint to wet, first off, if it was on an easel, you would have a drip running down your Canvas at this point, which for a lot of painters means panic. If that happens, just wipe it off with a napkin real quick. It's okay. This is what happens when you start to blend really watered-down paints and two other really watered-down paints. So this is what happens when your brushes to wet and it is a somewhat cool effect. But the problem with this is that because the paint has now been broken down so much by water, it's not going to hold up on the canvas for a very long. So eventually what it might do on your canvas is start to slowly flake off. So you do want to avoid this as well. Another thing that I see beginners do pretty often as they will press too hard when trying to blend two colors into one another. What this is going to do is it's going to kind of make streaks in areas that you want to be more blended and smooth. So I'm going to demonstrate this. I laid down some blue and I'm going to try to blend it into some yellow. But I'm going to push really hard instead of doing those nice feathery light brush strokes that I was telling you about. So normally we like to use really late pressure, but this time I'm going to push all the way down and try to blend and see how, no matter how many brushstrokes I make, it's going to leave kind of like a little harsh edge. The edges of my brushstrokes where my brush was kind of pushing the paint out to the edges. So what happens when you push too hard is it pushes the paint out toward the edges of your brush when you're painting. And then you get these little streaks in your blending such as the streak right here. The streak here, all of these kind of harsh streaks that are in your blend, that's going to happen for him pressing too hard. And now if I come in with that very nice, light feathery brushstroke, I can actually clean this up a bit and make it look more airbrushed and blended. So pressing too hard is a pretty common mistake that beginners make. Another mistake that beginners make is not blending the water into their paint enough. What happens when you don't blend the water into your paint enough is it's going to be very, very runny. And you're going to get this really water down payments when you paint on your canvas and it's going to kind of pool in areas. So I kind of demonstrated this previously when I was talking about what happens when your brushes to wet. It's the same sort of effect if you don't mix the water into your paint enough. So whenever you are mixing your blending medium or your water into your paint, you really need to make sure that you spend some time mixing it up like I'm doing here. And then if you come in, you're gonna get a nice solid, a swatch of color. So you see the difference here between the paint that was mixed up properly and the paint that wasn't mixed up enough. So you do have to really mix the paint in really well. Another common mistake that I see beginners make is trying to blend colors into paint that is already drying on the canvas. So I am going to demonstrate what happens when you try to do that. Of course, only wet paint is going to blend in with wet paint. If the paint is drying on the canvas, it's not going to blend. And acrylic paint can dry very quickly. If you are in a dry room, it can dry in about two minutes. So you do have to move pretty quickly. So what I'm going to do is I'm going to let this swash of blue become dry and tacky. And then I'm going to show you what it looks like when you try to blend a color into it. Okay. So now my blue paint is pretty dry and tacky. And what I'm going to do is I'm going to try to blend some read into it and I'm going to demonstrate what happens. So see how that is blending really rough and the colors are really mixing together fully. It's even kind of ripping some of the paint off of the canvas from below. This paint is drying, so it's somewhat tacky, meaning it's a little bit wet, but it's too dry to blend. If you're starting to see this effect where you can kind of see rough brushstrokes coming in. And it's not really picking up that previous color in order to get that nice airbrushed blend, what you need to do is you need to read Wet whatever color is drawing on your canvas. So in this case it's the blue. So I'm going to load my brush up with blue. And I'm going to brush right over those areas that I was trying to blend. And you can see how that is blending a lot more seamlessly and a lot more smoothly, which is what we're going for here. So that is the last really common issue that I see people have when blending. So the next thing that we are going to do is start talking about our class project. 11. Class Project: For our class project, we will paint a rainbow blend painting. You can use all six colors of the rainbow or you can pick and choose a few colors that you like. Just make sure that you choose colors that blend well together, so colors that are close to each other on the color wheel. This project will help you get a better feel as to how colors blend together and which colors blend well versus which colors do not blend well. Once you are done with your project, please upload it into the class projects sections so that other people can see your work and get inspired. And if you have any questions, please leave them in the comment section. I will get back to them as soon as I can. If you liked this class, please consider sharing it with your friends and i will see you in the next class. Thanks, bye.