ASL | Learn How to Sign | Introduction to ASL | Meredith Rathbone | Skillshare

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ASL | Learn How to Sign | Introduction to ASL

teacher avatar Meredith Rathbone, Learn How to Sign

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Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Lessons in This Class

29 Lessons (2h 24m)
    • 1. Introduction to ASL Course Intro - American Sign Language

      2:38
    • 2. 1.1 - Teaching - Alphabet/Fingerspelling

      6:49
    • 3. 1.2 - Receptive Quiz - Alphabet/Fingerspelling

      3:35
    • 4. 1.3 - Expressive Quiz - Alphabet/Fingerspelling

      5:43
    • 5. 2.1 - Teaching - Numbers

      6:58
    • 6. 2.2 - Receptive Quiz - Numbers

      1:30
    • 7. 2.3 - Expressive Quiz - Numbers

      2:27
    • 8. 3.1 - Teaching - Greetings and Farewells

      6:33
    • 9. 3.2 - Receptive Quiz - Greetings and Farewells

      1:12
    • 10. 3.3 - Expressive Quiz - Greetings and Farewells

      2:05
    • 11. 4.1 Teaching - Questions and Responses

      10:13
    • 12. 4.2 - Receptive Quiz - Questions and Responses

      1:01
    • 13. 4.3 - Expressive Quiz - Questions and Responses

      1:51
    • 14. 5.1 - Teaching - Exchanging Info

      9:43
    • 15. 5.2 - Receptive Quiz - Exchanging Info

      1:40
    • 16. 5.3 - Expressive Quiz - Exchanging Info

      2:51
    • 17. 6.1 - Teaching - Conversation Signs

      10:14
    • 18. 6.2 - Receptive Quiz - Conversational Signs

      1:50
    • 19. 6.3 - Expressive Quiz - Conversational Signs

      3:04
    • 20. 7.1 - Teaching - Common Signs

      11:54
    • 21. 7.2 - Receptive Quiz - Common Signs

      2:10
    • 22. 7.3 - Expressive Quiz - Common Signs

      2:50
    • 23. 8.1 - Vocabulary Review - Comprehensive

      10:00
    • 24. 8.2 - Receptive Quiz - Cumulative Conversation

      2:48
    • 25. 8.3 - Expressive Quiz - Cumulative

      5:44
    • 26. Resource - YouTube - 100 ASL Signs in 5 Minutes Review

      5:00
    • 27. Resource - YouTube - ASL Sentence Structure

      9:28
    • 28. Resource - YouTube - 10 Things You Need to Know About ASL

      7:23
    • 29. Resource - YouTube - Sign Language Around The World

      4:30
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About This Class

Course Description:

Welcome to Learn How to Sign's Introductory Course. In this class you will be taught by YouTube's fastest growing channel for learning ASL. By the end of this course, you will have the framework to carry on a basic conversation in ASL. You will have the opportunity to test your skills in the form of receptive quizzes and expressive prompts so you can feel confident in practical ways to use your newly acquired skill. This course is for beginner signers or those who need a refresher in all things ASL basics. So are you ready to learn how to sign?

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Teacher:

Your instructor, Meredith, has decades of experience to share. Meredith holds an Associate in Interpreting, a Bachelor of Arts in Interpreting with a double minor in Educational Interpreter and Speech Pathology and a Master in Education specializing in Deaf Education. She is a nationally certified educational interpreter and certified ASL teacher in Texas. Currently, she works as an ASL teacher at the secondary and collegiate level as well as interpreter at her local church.

She is lucky enough to work side by side with her husband who is the CEO, director and editor of all their Learn How to Sign content. His attention to detail allows for a seamless and professional production for you to enjoy. 

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What will you learn:

Each lesson includes teaching segments, vocabulary, a review, receptive quizzes, expressive quizzes and homework assignments.

  • Introduction
    • Learn this First (attached video link)
    • Parameters of Signs
  • ABCs
    • Alphabet
    • Fingerspelling words¬†
  • Numbers
    • Numbers 0-30
  • Greetings and Farewells
    • Introductory greetings and farewells signs
    • Common phrases
  • Questions and Responses
    • Wh word signs
    • Yes and No signs
    • Affirmations and Negations signs
    • Common phrases
  • Exchanging Information
    • Basic Informational Signs
    • Emotional Signs
    • Common phrases
  • Conversation Signs
    • Conversational Signs
    • Directional Signs
    • Common phrases
  • Common Signs
    • Pronoun Signs
    • Family and Pet Signs
    • Common Signs
    • Commons phrases
  • Cumulative Quiz (Class Project)
    • Receptive Quiz
    • Expressive Quiz
  • Conclusion
    • FSH!

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Meet Your Teacher

Teacher Profile Image

Meredith Rathbone

Learn How to Sign

Teacher

Hello, I'm Meredith and we're Learn How to Sign, a company made up of my Husband and I dedicated to making the most impactful learning content for ASL. 

 

I have decades of experience to share. I hold an Associate in Interpreting, a Bachelor of Arts in Interpreting with a double minor in Educational Interpreter and Speech Pathology and a Master in Education specializing in Deaf Education. I am a nationally certified educational interpreter and certified ASL teacher in Texas. Currently, I work as an ASL teacher at the secondary and collegiate level as well as interpreter at my local church.

 

I am lucky enough to work side by side with my husband who is the CEO, director and editor of all our Learn How to Sign ... See full profile

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Transcripts

1. Introduction to ASL Course Intro - American Sign Language: Hey signers, welcome to learn how to cite. This is introduction to ASL. Before we get started, let me share a little bit about myself. My name is Meredith, and you might know me from our YouTube channel. Learn how to sign. I'm also an ASL teacher at the high school and college level. I have my associates and interpreting, a Bachelor's of interpreting with a double minor in speech pathology and educational interpreting, and a master's in Deaf Education. I began learning sign language in middle school and then followed in my mom's footsteps in interpreting. And enough about me. Now, what will you be learning in this course? Well, we're going to be focusing on the basics. First, you're going to be learning the alphabet. Then numbers 0 through 30. After that, we're going to be jumping in to greetings and farewells and then continuing on with questions and responses and exchanging information. Then we'll continue on with conversational signs and common signs. In this course, you're going to be learning over a 150 signs. In addition to the lectures and vocabulary, we are also offering you the opportunity to take quizzes and do homework assignments from this course, you will gain the knowledge to feel comfortable to put your ASL skills to the test the next time you meet a deaf or hard of hearing person. Now, let's learn how to sign. Before we jump into the course, let's talk about the parameters of sine. What are the parameters of sine? Well, they encompass five different areas. Your handshape, palmar orientation, location, movement, and non-manual signals. Each sign that you are going to learn is going to incorporate at least the first four out of five. Non-manual signals is included for facial expression or body language. Let's take the sign, sad. For sad, we have the handshape fives, as you can see right here. Then we have the location which is in front of our body. The movement is going down. Then next, you have palmar orientation. The palm orientation is facing towards you. And then the last one, non-manual signals is the sad face. So as you can see, the signs sad incorporated all five. So whenever I'm teaching you these signs, make sure that you follow the five parameters of sine, so that way you can do the sign correctly. Alright, next up is less than one, where we're going to be learning the alphabet. 2. 1.1 - Teaching - Alphabet/Fingerspelling: Before we get started on the alphabet, here are a few things that you need to know. Whenever you are assigning the alphabet, you need a hold your arm correctly. It's going to be in a bent position just to your side. Whenever you're signing, you're not going to bounce and you're not going to push it in and out. Doing this is like you're yelling at somebody. Now, let's learn how to assign the alphabet. A, A, B. Sure, your thumb is at the site, not in front. A, B. B. Your thumb is in front to make the shape of the B, B, C, C. You're making the shape of the letter C, C, D, D. When you're looking at it, it looks like a lowercase D, D, E, E. Make sure your fingers are resting right on top of your thumb. E, F. F. You have three fingers up in your index and your thumb are making a small circle. F, g, g. Your index finger and thumb are pointed straight out. G, H. H. Got your two fingers going straight out. H, i, i. This looks like the lowercase I, just with your pinky, I, j, j. You're making the shape of the letter J. J, K. K. Put your two fingers together, split them apart, and put your thumb in between K, L, L. It's just like the shape of a capital letter L, L, M, M. Think of the cursive letter M with three humps him in. In. I like to think of these two fingers representing the two bumps and the cursive letter in, in 0, 0. It looks like the letter O, O, P, P. It's like the letter K, but it's upside down. P, q. Q is the letter G, but upside down. Q are Our, your fingers are twisted together. R, S, S. Make sure your thumb is in the very front. For S, S, T. T. Your thumb is in between your index and your middle finger. T you, you, your two fingers are squeezed together. U, v, v, It looks like a V. V W, W, it looks like a W. W X X. I like to think, Captain Hook. And X marks the spot x, y, y. Your pinky and your thumb are sticking out to make the letter y, y, z, z. Think of swishing it like Zorro, z. Now that we know the alphabet, how do we exactly use it? This is called finger spelling. You finger spell things like names and places. So whenever you're in a conversation and someone says my name, you know, the after that, it's going to be somebody's name. So this narrows down all the words in the English language to just names. So for example, if I was signing about my name, I would sign my name. And then I'm going to finger spell it. M E, R, E, D I, T, H. And that's how you would insert your name and saying My name is, let's take the word cup. So we're first gonna do see. Then move it to you. Pee, cup. So let's take the word ball. Well, you're going to finger spell be a, L. L. Did you see that slight movement just over? You're not going to bounce it because we don't bounce. You're not going to push it out because that would be yelling and you're not going to bring it up and down like that because that would look like an extra letter. So you just make a slight movement to the side. If you're using your left hand, that would just move to the outside of your other arm. So again, it would look like be a L, L. Now let's jump to our receptive quiz. 3. 1.2 - Receptive Quiz - Alphabet/Fingerspelling: Alright, let's get started on our very first receptive quiz. Now, this is what you'll expect each time we do these. What I'm gonna do is I am going to either fingerspell or sign something to you and you are going to write it down. You can watch it as many times as you want. So that way you felt comfortable with this new language. Now for this receptive quiz, I am going to finger spell the category of animals. That way, we don't have all the words in the English language and we've narrowed it down to just one small category. So think of the animals that you know, and that way you'll be better prepared for whenever I am finger spelling these words. Number one, number two. Number three. Number four. Number 5. Number 6, number 7. This is number 8. Number 9, number 10. Alright, now let's see how you did. Number one. Let's cat. Number 2. Dog like number 3. Number 4. Number 5, fair. Number 6, lie in. Number 7. Number 8, seal. Them are nine, whale. And number ten. Now let's move on to our expressive quiz. 4. 1.3 - Expressive Quiz - Alphabet/Fingerspelling: All right, Now it's time for expressive section. In this section, what you will do is we will give you a word or phrase and then you are going to sign it or fingerspell it. Then after you're done, I will sign it or fingerspell it back to you. So that way you can get immediate feedback on how you did. For this finger spelling category, we're going to focus on food. So here we go. Eg, left ti, ti, ti, milk, milk, milk. Su, su, su, The jello blue. Jello, jello, one, yogurt. Yogurt. Yogurt. Great, great, great. Cheese, cheese, cheese. Tough. Query. Query. Great job. You just finished lesson one. Before you move on to the next section, Here's your homework assignment. What I want you to do is finger spell your name, record yourself, and watch it back and make sure it looks clear. Now, let's move on to lesson 2, 0 330. 5. 2.1 - Teaching - Numbers: Alright, now let's jump into lesson two numbers. We're going to focus on numbers 0 through 30 in this lesson. The same rules apply whenever you're signing numbers, just like when you did finger spelling. You hold your arm at a bent position to your side, make sure that it doesn't bounce and make sure that it doesn't balance out. Now let's learn how to sign 0 through 3000, making the shape of a 001. One. It's just the number 1, 1, 2, 2. It's just the number 2, 2, 3, 3. It's not like our typical number three because that is number 6, 3, 4, 4. It's the number four. You just flip it backwards whenever it's by itself. 455. It's the number five. Just flipped back. 56, six. Now, remember, whenever you're counting up, you're going from the smallest finger up to the biggest finger, 677. Your ring finger and your thumb are touching each other. 788, your middle finger is touching your thumb. 8, 9, 9. You're using your index finger and your thumb to touch each other. Nine, 10, 10. Your thumb is up and you're moving it back and forth. 10 1111. It's just the index finger flicking 11, 11, 12, 12. It's the flicking of the 2121313. It's the number three. Squeeze together, moving in towards yourself. 13, 14, 14. You've got your four fingers together and pulling them in towards yourself. 14, 15. 15 is the number 5, moving in towards yourself. 15, 16, 16. There are also other ways to sign it. 16 or 16161717. You can also sign 17 or 17171818. It can also be signed 18 or 18. 18, 19, 19. It's the number nine, shaking back and forth. 192020. It's your two fingers put together to to a 0202121. Think of like the 21 gun salute. Twenty one. Twenty two. Twenty two. You're doing the number 2. 2 and bouncing it. 22, 23, 23. It's like the number 20 and three being put together. 23, 24, 24. It's like the number 20 and 4 put together 24, 25, 25. You've got two fingers and then five together for 25. 26, 2626, put together 26, 27, 27. It's two fingers and the seven together. Twenty seven. Twenty eight. Twenty eight. Twenty and eight together. Twenty eight. Twenty nine. Twenty nine is assigned for 20 and 9, put together 29, 3030. It's the number 30, but together 30. Now you may have noticed 12345 are signed backwards. And that is the rule that whenever they are signed by itself, the hand is facing backwards. But when the numbers are incorporated in a sign, it's going to be facing outwards, but that will be covered in future courses. Now it's time to move on to your receptive quiz. If you don't feel ready, go back through this course until you feel more competent. 6. 2.2 - Receptive Quiz - Numbers: Okay, it's time for your receptive quiz for numbers. Number one. Number two, number three. Number four, number five. Number 6, number 7. Okay, now here are the answers for the numbers. Quiz. Number one. Number two. Number three. Number four. Number 517. There were 621. And in verse 7, 23. Now let's move on to our expressive quiz. 7. 2.3 - Expressive Quiz - Numbers: All right, Now it's time for expressive section. 222999101010121212161616202020, 27. 27. 27. Now, before you move on to the next lesson, your homework assignment is to assign zeros, one 330, but record yourself, watch it back and make sure that your numbers are clear and understandable. Okay, now that we're done with less than two, Let's move on to lesson 3, greetings and farewells. 8. 3.1 - Teaching - Greetings and Farewells: All right, let's jump in to lesson three, readings and farewells. This section is going to be broken down into two parts, greetings and then farewells. So at the beginning of every conversation, we start with the greeting. So let's learn how to assign greetings. Hi, hi. This is used really informally. Hi, hello. Hello. Your dominant hand is coming out from your forehead. Hello. What's up? What's up? Your middle fingers are put on the chest and they're going upwards. And you put an attitude like, what's up? What's up, how or how you're doing the sign, how that makes sure that your eyebrows or down because it's a WH question. How how you you you're using your index finger and pointing to you. You How are you How are you? You're making the sign, how and you're pointing to somebody with your eyebrows down. How are you? How are you? Good or well, your dominant hand is coming from your chin down to your non-dominant. Good or well, Morning. Morning because the sun is coming up in the morning. Morning, afternoon, afternoon. Think of where the sun is in the afternoon. Afternoon, night, night. Think of where the sun is at night. Night. My my you have a flat hand that goes right on your chest. My your your your flat hand is pushing towards somebody. Your name name. Got your two fingers close together and bounce on top of each other. Name. Your name, your name. Just asking whenever you're asking a name for their order, your name. Okay, next step, we're going to be focusing on farewells. So let's learn how to sign farewells. Goodbye, goodbye. It's just like you're waving goodbye. Goodbye. Later. Later. It's the letter L, hand flicking forward into the future. Later. See, see. Your fingers are representing your eyes. Looking at something. See, See you later. See you later. You're doing the sign for C and flipping it to later. See you later. See you later. Tomorrow. Tomorrow. Your thumb flicks forward into the future. Tomorrow. Meat. Meat. These are two people meeting each other. Meet. Nice to meet you. Nice to meet you. The sign, nice with your people, meeting each other and pointing to the person. Nice to meet you. Love or I love you. But when you shake it back and forth, this is showing love, love, love, love, love as the net. Goodbye, love you all. Love. Same here. Same here. You're using your y hand for your thumb pointing to you and your pinky pointing to somebody else. Same here. Take care. Take care. You're doing the letter V, hands sideways on top of each other. Take care. Now that we've learned some of our very first signs, Let's practice them and let me show you how to put some of them in phrases. First we have, hey, what's up? So they'll go, Hey, what's up? You're gonna put that sign together. Hey, what's up? Next? Good morning. How are you? So we're going to do that fine. Good morning. How are you How you you're not going to assign that are in there. You're just going to go how you So good morning. How are you? All right. Now let's try Take care. See you tomorrow. Take care. And then there's that. See you because the C is moving towards the person. So it's See you tomorrow. Tomorrow. So take care. See you tomorrow. Now it's time to move to your receptive quiz. 9. 3.2 - Receptive Quiz - Greetings and Farewells: Now let's jump into our receptive quiz. Number one. Number two. Number three. Number four. Okay, Let's check your answers. Number 1, hello. How are you? Number 2, See you later. Love, love, love, love, love. Number 3, Me too. Take care. Number four. Nice to meet you. Now, let's move on to our expressive quiz. 10. 3.3 - Expressive Quiz - Greetings and Farewells: Now let's move on to our expressive quiz. What's up? What's up? What's up? Good evening. Good evening. Good evening. See you tomorrow. Bye. See you tomorrow. Bye. See you tomorrow. Bye. Good afternoon. How are you? Good afternoon. How are you? Good afternoon. How are you? Before we move on to the next lesson, Here's your homework assignment. You are going to teach someone else. Good night. Take care in sign language. Now you're going to focus on explaining the signs and ways you remember whenever you learned it. Now when you can actually teach somebody, it really shows that you can grasp the concept. Once you've finished that, we'll move on to lesson 4, all about questions and responses. 11. 4.1 Teaching - Questions and Responses: Here's less than four questions and responses. Now that we know how to start and into conversation. What about basic questions and conversation? So in this section, we're going to focus on WH questions which are who, what, when, where, why, how, witch, and yes, no questions, along with simple responses. Once we learn the vocabulary and structure of questions, then in the next section, we are going to use those questions and then learn how to sign more meaningful responses. Once we get started and learning how to sign wh vocabulary, I really want you to notice a corresponding theme with each one of these sites. When you're signing WH words, you need to make sure that your eyebrows go down. This is essential with wh words. You also are going to be signing with it leaning forward. And the WH word is going to go at the end of the sentence whenever you're signing it in a complete sentence, for instance, what is your name? You would sign you name. What? You notice that my eyebrows are down and I'm leaning forward and I'm ending with the what at the end of the sentence. Now, let's learn how to sign WH words. Who or who. I like to think of an outgoing who, who, who, or who. What? What your five hands are kind of Vinton together, moving in and out. What? When? When I think of the hand of a clock moving around. When where? Where your index finger is searching like a compass. Where's north? Where? Why, or why? You're wiggling, or it's pulling out to a y hand. Y or Y. Which which it's like you're balancing which one you prefer, which how or how you're doing the sign, how that makes sure that your eyebrows or down because it's a WH question. How how how much, how much your hands are throwing up into the air? How much? For, for for, for an English. This would mean What's that four or y 444. Now that we've learned these WH words, let's talk about how to put them in sentences. Like I mentioned before, we have the sentence, What is your name? How the correct ASL structure would be? Is you name what? You the what is going at the end. My eyebrows are down and I'm leaning forward. And this u at the end is what we call a closing signal. And we'll talk about that in another lesson. Let's take another sentence. Where's the book? Well, you're going to ask where? Notice again my eyebrows or down. I'm leaning forward. And then I have this at the end of the sentence. So book where. So you might have noticed before, whenever I taught, how are you in the last lesson? Well, whenever you're doing, how are you? You're still doing the house with the eyebrows down and leaning forward. And then this closing signal that we'll talk about in a later lesson. So how are you? Well, we'll find out how to sign that response soon. Okay. Now let's learn how to sign the few signs for yes-no vocabulary. Yes. Yes. Your hand is representing your head? Nodding? Yes. No. No. It's like the letter N and O put together. No. Okay. Okay. It's just 0 and K put together. Okay. Now that we know the vocabulary for responses for yes-no questions, how do we sign a yes, no question? Let's look at the sentence. Do you like ice cream? The correct ASL structure would be, you like ice cream. You noticed my eyebrows are going up. This is a key indicator of a yes, no question. I also end it with you because I'm asking the person, do you like ice cream? Your response could be yes. No. And as you noticed when I signed yes, my head went up and down for an affirmation or no, shaking my head back and forth or negation. Now, that leaves us right in to learning affirmation and negation signs. Before we get started, you're going to notice with affirmation, your head is going to knot up and down. It's that non-manual signal that we talked about in the perimeters of signs. You need to make sure that an affirmation signs your head nods up and down. With negation signs, it's going to shake back and forth again. So important because of those non-manual signals apart of the five parameters of sight. So let's learn how to find affirmation and negation signs. Can can, your fists are just moving forward. Can, can't. Can't. Your finger is clicking down on your other one? Can't. No. No. You're tapping your forehead like you know, that something's in there. But people who know sign language sometimes do this. I know down here. No. Don't know. Don't know. You're flicking your hand away because you don't know something. Don't know. Understand. Understand. It's like the light bulb is coming on. Understand. Don't understand. I don't understand. You do the sign. Understand. But shaking your head back and forth. Don't understand. I or me. You're just pointing with your index finger towards yourself? I or me? Not me. Not me. You're pointing to yourself and shaking your head. Not me. Like like you're using your thumb and your middle finger and pulling it out from your body. Like don't like, don't like it's the sine like but flicking it out. Don't like. Once you have bent five hands, bringing it in towards yourself, what don't want? Don't want. You flick your hands down because you don't want it. Don't want NOT don't doesn't. Your thumb is just flicking out from your chin. Not don't, doesn't. Now that you've learned some affirmation and negation signs, let's put them into sentences. For instance, do you understand this is how you would sign? If you understand, you notice The understand. My head is going up and down affirming understanding. And then this is a yes-no question. So I'm leaning forward, my eyebrows are up and I'm ending with you. Let's take another one. I can't find the book. Can you? The correct ASL structure would be book. Can't find you. I'm saying the book. I can't find that negation showing that I can't. And then I'm asking, but what about you? Can you find it? Again? Eyebrows are up, pointing forward and leaning forward. Now it's time to move to your receptive quiz. 12. 4.2 - Receptive Quiz - Questions and Responses: Now let's jump into our receptive quiz. Number one. Number two, number three, number 4. Number 5. All right. Let's see how you did number one. Number two. Number three. Number four. Understand. Number five. No. Now let's move on to our expressive quiz. 13. 4.3 - Expressive Quiz - Questions and Responses: Now let's move on to our expressive quiz. Where we're where no, no, no. Light. Light. Like what? What? What don't want. Don't want, don't want. Now, your homework assignment before moving on to the next lesson, get a mirror and the list of these words, sign each word with the correct non-manual signal. See how your facial expression is. Alright, let's move on to lesson 5, exchanging information. 14. 5.1 - Teaching - Exchanging Info: Here we are, and less than five, exchanging information. Now that you've learned the framework for asking questions, Let's learn additional vocabulary and put to practice asking complete questions along with complete responses in ASL structure. In the last lesson, you heard me talk about the closing signal. Now this is very important in ASL structure. Whenever you're asking a question or completed with a thought, you notice that I pointed back you for wh questions with my eyebrows down or yes, no questions with my eyebrows up. This u at the end is a closing signal. I've asked my question and now I've asked it to you and one, a response from you. Whenever you're signing a closing signal that just has a response about yourself, you're going to end it with me. This is showing that you're done with your thoughts. Think of when we're talking in a normal conversation and somebody's voice trails off, that they're done with speaking. This is showing that the next person can then respond. This is the same thing for closing signal. This. And this is showing I am done with my thought or my question and I want you to respond. Now, let's learn how to assign vocabulary for exchanging information. Hearing, hearing. This is referencing that hearing people talk a lot. Hearing deaf or deaf. It can go either way. It's just pointing to your mouth and your ear. Deaf. Hard of hearing. Hard of hearing. It's H. H for hard of hearing. Friend, friend. Think of you and your friend giving each other a hug. Friend. Introduce, introduce. It's like you're bringing two people together to introduce them. Introduce meat. Meat. These are two people meeting each other. Meet I or me. You're just pointing with your index finger towards yourself? I or me. My my you have a flat hand that goes right on your chest. My u. U. You're using your index finger and pointing to you. You your your, your flat hand is pushing towards somebody. Your need need for doing an X hand and bouncing it a couple times. Need nothing. Nothing much. You're oh, hands are shaking back and forth. Nothing, nothing much. Now this next section of vocabulary is focusing on your feelings and you're going to notice that these signs are always going to include that last parameter of sight, those non-manual signals. So make sure that you produce those correctly so that way you can emote how you're actually feeling. So let's learn how to sign feelings. Happy, happy. Your hands are flat and they're on your chest. Moving up. Happy. Excited, excited. Your feeler fingers are moving up on your chest. Excited. Good or well, your dominant hand is coming from your chin down to your non-dominant. Good or well, fine. Fine. Your five hand is coming right up to your chest. Fine. Bad, bad. It's the opposite of good. Just flips around. Bad board. Board. So you're so bored that you're picking your nose. Board. Busy, busy. Now, if you're really busy, you go to show you're really busy. Busy, confused or confused. You're pointing to your head and showing that something's messed up, confused, confused, mad, or angry. Your hand is coming in, showing how your face is matter, angry, mad, or angry. Sad, sad. Your hands are bringing your sadness down. Sad. Same ol, or the usual. You got y hand shapes. Going in circles. Same old or usual. Scared or afraid or terrified. You're putting your body in like you're hiding yourself awake, scared, sick, sick. When people get sick, it's typically with their head and their stomach. Sick. Sleepy. Sleepy. It's like your head is nodding off. Sleepy, tired, tired. It's showing your body slumped over when you're tired. Tired. So, so so, so your hand is flipping back and forth. So, so now that we've learned the vocabulary for exchanging information, and we've also learned about the closing signal. Let's practice this and put it in a few phrases. What is your name? You name what you so in response, I would say My name is Meredith. My name him, E, R, E, D, I, T, H. And then that closing signal that I'm done, then we would sign. How are you? How you eyebrows down, leaning forward, you how are you? Then you might respond, I'm excited. So you would sign me excited. That facial expression. Meet that closing signal at the end that you're done with your thought. Now, you might want to ask a question. Are you deaf? So you would cite you death. You I'm pointing to the person. My eyebrows are up, and then I'm ending with that closing signal. Leaning forward. You deaf. You. Then you might respond. No, I'm hearing, you know, me, hearing me with that closing signal at the end. Know that negation. Shaking your head, me, hearing me. Now let's look at this sentence. I want to introduce my friend. So you would sign me. One. Introduce my friend. Again. Me. What? Introduce my friend. Now, if I want to tell them my friend's name, I would just say my friend name. Brian. All right, great job. Now you know a few basic phrases in ASL. Now let's jump to our receptive quiz. 15. 5.2 - Receptive Quiz - Exchanging Info: Now let's jump into our receptive quiz. Number one. Number two. Well, number three. Number four. Number five. All right. Let's see how you did. Number one. Are you scared? Number two, no, I'm tired. Number 3, there's my friend. Number four. I don't understand. Number five, my name is Kate. Now let's move on to our expressive quiz. 16. 5.3 - Expressive Quiz - Exchanging Info: In this expressive section, you're going to take this English sentence and change it into ASL. 17. 6.1 - Teaching - Conversation Signs: Now we're in lesson six, conversation site. And you guys are rocking this. In the past several lessons, you have developed a solid framework of basic ASL structure and vocabulary. Now, we're going to take it even further with more conversational signs and how to incorporate those signs into conversations. This next section is focusing on basic conversation signs. So let's learn how to signs conversations. I am. Thank you. Thank you. Your dominant hand is coming out from your chin. Thank you. Please. Police. It's a flat hand making a circle on your chest. Police. Sorry. Sorry. It's an S-shaped hand moving in a circular motion on your chest. Sorry. Right. As in correct. Your index fingers go right on top of each other, right? Wrong. Wrong. A y hand is coming up to your chin. Wrong. Mean as in, what do you mean? Your non-dominant hand is flat and your dominant hand is a two finger. And you twist it on its side. Mean? Learn. Learn. You're picking up something and putting it in your head. Learn student, student. It's a person who's learning. Student. Study, study. Imagine this is the paper that you're studying and you want all eyes on it. Study. Teacher, teacher. Teachers give information. And this is a person. Teacher, teach, teach. These are flat O hands coming from the brain to the person that you're teaching because it's giving information to someone else. Teach. Have have you have been tans coming towards your chest? Like you're in possession of something. Half. Take. Take. This is like you're taking a class, take a ASL or American Sign Language. Asl. Sign or signing. You're moving your hands in towards yourself when you're doing it. Sign or signing again or repeat. Your dominant hand is coming into the middle of your hand again, or repeat, solo, or slow down. Now, if you need something super slow, just move it slowly up your arm. Slow. This next section of signs are what we call directional signs. That means that you can move this sign in the direction of the person that you're talking to. We're talking about. So let's look at the sign help. The basic sign for help is this. But when you move it forward, I can help you bring it to me. You can help me move it around. I can help everybody or help people to the site of me. Now, let's learn how to sign. Directional signs. Go to go to your index fingers, are going to the place that you're going to end. You can come and go. As you please. Go to arrive. Arrive. You have your non-dominant hand and your dominant is moving towards your non-dominant. And you can arrive here and a right over there, or arrived here. Arrive, visit. Visit. You have V hands moving in a circular motion. And you can visit all around. Visit. Move. Move. You have flat O hands that are put upside down and they can move in all different directions. Mooc, I am walking or somebody else's walking. This is showing your feet walking and they can walk all around. Or somebody else is walking by or walking around? I am walking. Somebody else's walking. R1. R1. You have two L-shaped hands with the dominant in front, pulling forward. Run. And you can run this way, that way. Or run around. Run. Ask. Ask it's an index finger moving to a bent finger, kind of like a question mark. And I can ask you, You can ask me. I can ask everybody or tons of people can ask me. Ask explain. Explain. You have f hands that are on their side and the move back and forth. You can explain somebody over here or explained to this person. Explain help, help. This used to be the old sign for help. Like you were helping somebody across the street and then it changed in to this. You can also do this directionally. Helping you. Helping me are helping everybody for helping somebody else. Help. Give. Give. This is a flat O hand and it's moving toward the person you're giving. You can give to you, give to me, hand out to everybody, or give to someone else. Gif. Alright, let's look at this sentence. Sorry, I don't understand. We're gonna do sorry, I don't understand that. Negation me with that closing signal. Sorry. I don't understand. Yes. I'm learning ASL. Yes. Me. Learn a es el me. Yes, I am learning ASL. What about this next one? Please slow down. Pulleys. Solo. Please slow down. Okay. Let's take I don't know the sign. Can you please help me? So we'll sign sign. Don't know. Helped me, please. So psi don't know. Helped me please. All right, and now for our last race, My ASL teacher is Myrtilus. So you're going to assign my, a teacher named M, E R, E, D, I, T, H, My ASL teacher name. Meredith. Now let's jump to our receptive quiz. 18. 6.2 - Receptive Quiz - Conversational Signs: For this receptive quiz, I'm going to be signing an ASL and you are going to write it down in an English sentence. Number one. Number two, number three. Number four, number five. Okay, let's see how you did. I want to learn ASL. Number two. What do you mean? Number 3? I teach ASL. Number 4. Thank you for helping me study. Number five, slow down, I'm learning ASL. Now let's move on to our expressive quiz. 19. 6.3 - Expressive Quiz - Conversational Signs: In this expressive section, you're going to take this English sentence and change it into ASL and sign it. I'm learning ASL. I'm learning ASL. I'm learning ASL. Thank you. I understand. Thank you. I understand. Thank you. I understand. Okay. I don't understand that sign. If I don't understand that site. I don't understand that site. Sorry. Can you please explain again? Sorry. Can you please explain again? Sorry. Can you please explain again? I'm a student studying ASL. I'm a student studying ASL. I'm a student studying ASL. Before we move on to the next lesson, your homework assignment is to review and practice all 10 directional verbs. And then once you feel comfortable with them, I want you to assign all 10 of them with their directional variations. Alright, let's move on to lesson number seven, common signs. 20. 7.1 - Teaching - Common Signs: Here we are in our seventh lesson, common signs. We have learned so much, but we aren't done. This last section focuses on common science. This vocabulary will allow you to tie in previous segments to create a full conversation. So let's learn how to sign common signs. Okay, Before we get started on common signs, I want to talk to you about singular and plural nouns. So we have this index finger that we've been using for me and you. But it can be a lot more than that. It can be the week you all bay. And then he she or it wherever the person is or wherever we might place a person. And we'll talk about that in a future course. Then we have this hand, which would be possessive for my your or yours. Ours. Theirs. It's hers. His. As you can see, this finger, and this finger can represent a lot of different nouns. Dog, dog. It's just like you're getting a dog. Dog, cat, cat. It's the cat's whiskers. Cat. Fish. Fish. Your hands like a fish going through the water. Fish, bird, bird. It's just like the beak of a bird. Bird. School. School. I like to think of a teacher clapping to get the classes Attention. School, class, class. It's the letter C, hands in the shape of a group. Class. Home. Home. It's a flat o going across the side of your face. Home. House, house. Make the roof and the walls of the house. House. Work. Work. Your two fists are pounding right on top of each other. Work. Restaurant. Restaurant. You have an R hand moving on either side of your mouth because it's a place that you eat. Fresh drugged bathroom. Bathroom. You have a t hand shaking it back and forth. Like for the sign toilets, bathroom, favorite. Favorite. You're using this feeler finger and putting it right here on your chin, meaning like you prefer something. Favorite. Eat food. Eat food. When you're eating, it goes in and food goes twice. Eat food. Hungry, hungry. You have a C-shaped hand hooping down your chest for hungry. And if you're really hungry, you just do this. With emphasis. Hungry, thirsty, thirsty. You have your index finger coming from your chin down to your chest. Because you're so thirsty. Thirsty. More, more. They're flat O hands touching together. More. Practice. Practice. Your non-dominant hand is an index finger and your dominant is moving back and forth on top of it. Practice. See, see. Your fingers are representing your eyes. Looking at something. See chat, chat. You're moving your hands back and forth like deaf people, chat, Chat. Book, book. It's just like you're opening up the book, book. Car, car. It's just like you're driving a car. Car. Homework, home, work. It's the side. Home. And work. Put together. Homework. Fun, fun. You have two U-shaped hands, your non-dominant down and your dominant to your nose, coming down to your fingertips. Fun. Job. Job. Job is a finger spell loan sine tj flipped back to be a finger spell loan sign has been finger spelled so many times that it's turned into its own sign. Job. Live. Live. If you have a shaped hands moving up against your body, because when you're living your breathing live movie, movie, your dominant hand is moving back and forth like a movie reel, moving. Movie. Number or numbers. You have flat O hands that are twisting. Number or numbers. Party. Party. You have P hands moving back and forth, like you're at a party party time. Time. You're just pointing to your watch time. Today or now. You have Y-shaped hands flipped upside down, pushing down today or now, finish or done. And also when you sign it, you go ssh, finish. In this next section, or common signs focusing on masculine and feminine sites such as man, woman. What I want you guys to notice is masculine science go above the head and feminine signs go below. So just like I showed you before, man here up at the top, going down to the chest. But woman coming from the chin down to the chest. This way, it will help you to remember how to group masculine and feminine signs. Husband, husband. It's the man that you're married to. Husband, wife. Wife. Because it's the woman that you're married to, a wife, father. Father. It's the five hand, but the top of the head, where the masculine part is father, mother, mother. It's the five hand on your chin. Mother, son. Son. You put your index finger up to your forehead and bring it down to a baby son, daughter. Daughter. You have an index finger coming from your chin down to a baby daughter. Family. Family. It's the letter F's in a group of people, family ties. Okay. Okay. There were a lot of signs that we learned. So let's put some into phrases. Let's look at where do you live? So you live where you, again, we're having that wh sentence that where at the very end along with you and I'm leaning forward and my eyebrows are down. You live where you Let's look at this next sentence. What time is the party? Party? Time? What? Again, that W-H word at the very end, I browser down leaning forward. Party time. Let's look at a yes-no question. I'm hungry. Are you me hungry? You again, that you eyebrows are up, leaning forward that asking, Are you hungry? Maybe you are right now. Maybe you need a Sinek. I'm hungry. You. My son is tired. My son tired. My son. And then this tired right here is saying what he is. My son tired. All right. This last one. I'm finished with my work and I'm headed home. Work. Finish that. She home. Go. Work. Home, go. Now it's time to move on to your receptive quiz. If you don't feel ready, go back through this course until you feel more competent. 21. 7.2 - Receptive Quiz - Common Signs: For this receptive quiz, I'm going to sign an ASL sentence and you're going to write it in English word order. Number one. Number two, number three. Number four. Number five. Okay. Let's see how you did. Number one, do you live in a house or an apartment? Number two, my job is teaching ASL. Number 3. My favorite movie is l. Number four. Where does your family live? Number five, my son's name is length. If you feel like you need more practice, go back and watch this over. And so that way you can feel more comfortable with your signs. Now, let's move on to our expressive quiz. 22. 7.3 - Expressive Quiz - Common Signs: In this quiz, I am giving you an English sentence and you need to change it into ASL order and sign it. Where's the bathroom? Where's the bathroom? Where's the bathroom? My favorite class is ASL. My favorite class is ASL. My favorite class is ASL. Do you want to study together tonight? Do you want to study together tonight? Do you want study together tonight? My daughter is sad. My daughter is sad. My daughter is sad. My favorite restaurant is my favorite restaurant is my favorite restaurant is sonic. Great job. You finished all seven lessons. Now, here is a list of all the vocabulary you have learned in this course. So what you need to do is review each sign. If there are ones that you're struggling with, you need to go back to the corresponding lesson so that way you can review it. 23. 8.1 - Vocabulary Review - Comprehensive: All right. Hello. Hello. Hello. Good day. All right. Right. Hello. The next topic and things like that. All right, in this lecture and the public sector, hello. 24. 8.2 - Receptive Quiz - Cumulative Conversation: Okay, Now we're going to be doing our cumulative quiz. In this. It's going to be a conversation. I'm going to sign an ASL order. And what I want you to do is write down the answers in an English sentence from what each person is saying in the conversation. And remember, whenever I give you the answers at the end, it does not have to be exactly word for word as I tell you. As long as it has the same meaning, you've got the gist. Okay. Good morning. How are you? I'm busy. Why if you've been busy? I've been practicing ASL. Yes. Asl is hard work. Do you like ASL? Yes. Where did you learn ASL? At school. My teacher is depth. I finished study. Do you want to go to a restaurant? Sorry, I can't have work. Okay. The later. Take care. Bye. 25. 8.3 - Expressive Quiz - Cumulative: All right, Now let's put your expressive skills to the test. I'm going to give you five different sentences. You put them in ASL structure and then sign them. Hello. My name is I am hearing, deaf or hard of hearing. I'm learning ASL. What's your name? Hello. My name is I am hearing. Deaf or hard of hearing. I'm learning ASL. What's your name? Hello. My name is Meredith. I'm hearing I'm learning ASL. What's your name? Why? I want to introduce my friend. His or her name is he or she is learning ASL 2. I want to introduce my friend. His or her name. Is he or she is learning ASL 2. I want to introduce my friend. Her name is Kara. She is learning ASL 2. Do you want to go to the movies? I want to see? Do you want to go to the movies? I went to see. Do you want to go to the movies? I went to see Amy. I need help with my ASL class. I will ask for a teacher. I need help with my ASL class. I will ask grade teacher, I need help with my ASL class. I will ask great teacher. I'm tired. I've studied for my ESL class. Now I'm finished. I'm tired. I've studied for my ESL class. Now I'm finished. I'm tired. I've been studying for my ESL class. Now I finished. Congratulations. You've completed an entire ASL course. Just look how far you have come. We truly believe that the knowledge and skills you have gained in this course will make you feel comfortable in putting your ASL skills to the test. The next time you meet a deaf person, come back to this course as often as you like or refresher, be on the lookout for future courses and until next time, keep learning how to sign. 26. Resource - YouTube - 100 ASL Signs in 5 Minutes Review: So this day, now that you see here. And so what we see, right? To finish up this chapter. In this section. Yeah. Right. Hello. 27. Resource - YouTube - ASL Sentence Structure: Today we are focusing on the basics of ASL sentence structure. I'm going to show you the differences between English and ASL sentence structure. And towards the end of the video, I'm going to quiz you. So be sure to have something to write with handy to learn even more vocabulary to put into ASL sentence structure. Be sure to subscribe and be notified because we're making videos like this every week. So let's learn how to sign ASL sentence structure. Today we're going to be focusing on four main areas. Topic comment, rhetorical questions, yes, no questions and WH questions. This video is just scratching the surface of ASL structure. Let us know down in the comments if you want more videos like this. So we can dive deeper into ASL sentence structure. In topic comments structure, this is the basic of ASL structure. Now when you think of topic comment, It's literally just that you are going to take the topic of the sentence and then comment about it. For instance, we have the English sentence, I sleep in on the weekends. What is the topic of the sentence? The topic is weakened. And then you comment about what you're doing on the weekend and that is sleeping in. So the sentence structure would be Weekend, me, sleepin me. Let's look at another sentence. My son is hungry. What is the topic of the sentence? The topic would be sun. So this is how you would sign it. My son, hungry. Now, you might have noticed whenever I am signing the topic, I am going to pause before I comment, such as my son, hungry. And when I'm commenting about it, I nod my head down affirming That's what he is. So let's take a negation. For instance, the sentence, I don't like ice cream. What is the topic? Ice cream? But I don't like doesn't negation with it. So this is how we'd sign the sentence. Ice cream. I don't like in that case, we wouldn't not our head, we would shake it because it's a negation. But the sentence structure is still the same. You take the topic, pause and then end it with a comment, either affirming it, like my son is hungry or negating it like, I don't like something. Now notice in a few of these sentences, when I'm talking about myself, I'm pointing back to myself at the end. This is called a closing signal. You can either point back to yourself or to somebody else when asking a question. This closing signal shows that you are done with your thought. Think of a closing signal when our voice trails off and we're done with the sentence, you know that somebody's done when their voice inflection changes at the end of a sentence. This is the same for ASL. Pointing back to yourself is showing that you are done with that thought or pointing back to somebody shows that you're done with asking them a question, which we'll cover in just a second. Next, let's talk about rhetorical questions. As we know, rhetorical questions do not require an answer. The person who is giving the information is then going to give the answer. So in ASL, a rhetorical question is going to use one of our WH words. Wh words are who, what, when, where, why, which, and how those words are going to act as a bridge in the sentence. But typically, you're going to see why used as the bridge for the word because. So let's take this sentence. I'm not going to the party because I have to study for a test. So in ASL, it would be signed. Me not going. We're using the sign go but shaking her head no, to negate it. Party y. And this y is replacing the word because test a, study me. And that me at the end is that closing signal. So when we're looking at this sentence, you use that word why to replace? Because, like we just talked about. Now this can be used for all of those WH words. But when you're doing it, you must sign the sign. Lean forward and eyebrows go up. This is important in all rhetorical questions. So let's take another sentence. I got to work on time because I drove fast me arrive, work on time. How? Drive fast me. Notice in that rhetorical question, even though I didn't use the sign, why I used a W-H word. I leaned forward and put my eyebrows up. Then I completed this sentence and then ended it with a closing signal. Me, arrive, work on time. How? Drive fast me. Now let's look at a yes-no question when signing yes-no questions, there are a few important features. You need to make sure that your eyebrows go up. You're ending it with you and you are leaning forward. For example, the English sentence, do you like ice cream? First you're going to sign you. And notice I'm already leaning forward and my eyebrows are going up. Ice cream, like you. In that sentence, my eyebrows went up. I leaned forward and ended with the sign you because I'm asking somebody a yes no question. Here's another yes-no question. Are you hearing in this sentence, you would sign you hearing you. As you can see, yes-no questions are very simple in its form. Make sure that your eyebrows go up, you sign you, and you're leaning forward. Let's look at WH questions. Wh questions incorporate who, what, when, where, why, which, and how into their sentences. When you're signing this, your eyebrows go down and the WH word goes at the end of the sentence. Let's look at some examples. Is your favorite season, summer or winter. In this sentence, you will sign. You prefer summer, winter, which you notice my eyebrows are going down and I'm ending it with a WH question as well as a closing signal because I'm asking that person a question. Another example is, what is your name? You name, what you again are W-H word is at the end of the sentence with our eyebrows going down. Now, I'm going to sign a few sentences for you and you decide which kind of sentence structure it is. Sentence number 1. If you chose a rhetorical question, You're correct. Sentence number 2. If you chose WH questions for a job. Sentence number 3. If you guess topic comments, you've got sentence number 4. If you chose yes-no question. Great job. 28. Resource - YouTube - 10 Things You Need to Know About ASL: Hey signers, welcome to learn how to cite. If you are trying to learn how to sign, you found the right video today, I'm going to share ten things that you need to know before you even start learning ASL. I repeat, learn this first. Now, before you even start learning a language, it's good to understand the big picture of why you're wanting to learn this and what is truly important. After you watch this video, you don't have to go anywhere else because we have made and are making tons of ASL videos. A great starting point is our series of videos called a 150 essential ASL sign. I'll put the link in the description to that playlist. Be sure to like subscribe and be notified. So let's get to the good stuff. Number one, why ASL? Asl, American Sign Language is a visual language used by deaf people and their community in America. It is not universal, hence the name American Sign Language. And yes, it is a language complete with grammar. Asl is not English. Okay, now I wish I had time to share the story of how American sign language was created. But this video would be about an hour long. And so I'm just gonna give you the 30-second version and get straight to the good stuff. So a hearing guy named Gallaudet and a deaf Frenchman set up the first school for the deaf in Hartford, connecticut, where they used home signs that deaf children had been using at the time, french Sign Language, plus deaf children from Martha's Vineyard, which was an island with a large amount of deaf people, took their Martha's Vineyard sign language to the school. And that's how ASL was born, guys, if I went through all the details of how this was created, it really should be made into a movie. Number two, it's not all about the hands. Okay? Yes, the hands are a very important part, but so is the facial expression. Don't be afraid to express yourself whenever you're signing something and don't hold back. Expression is so important and has so much meaning. For instance, if you have the sign, scared, if I did, that means I'm not scared. But if I did, that shows that I'm terrified. The facial expression is the only thing that changed and it changed the meaning completely. Number three, you're signing space. Whenever you're signing, you need to make sure that your signs are in a comfortable position within a box about this size. Now, some signs go above the head, but typically you're going to keep it in this space. Don't sign really small and don't sign really big. Keep it in a comfortable space for your body. Number 4, which hand do I use? Look at which is your dominant hand, and that's the hands that you're going to be using consistently. You do not switch back and forth because that can be really confusing. For instance, I'm right-handed. So whenever I'm signing assign, I use my right hand for the main part of the sign. For instance, the sign help my right hand, making the main part of the sign. And my non-dominant hand is the supportive part. But if you're left-handed, your sign would look like this. No. That difference whenever you are doing this and practice it consistently the same way. Number 5, the alphabet and specifically finger spelling. Finger spelling is a spelling that is used with the ASL alphabet. Now, do not rely on finger spelling when you don't know a word, first tried to act it out, but finger spelling is used all the time for names, places, titles. So it's essential to know and you can check out our alphabet video right here. Number 6, the parameters of sine. Now, parameters of sine is ASL lingo for how assign breaks down. There are five parts to this. There's the handshape, palm orientation, location, movement, and non-manual signals. First, we have Handshake. Whenever you're signing something, you need to know the correct handshape that you're using. For instance, me. And my the only thing that changes is the handshape, but the meaning is completely different. Then you have palm orientation. My and your, it's where the palm is facing. Again, completely different, meaning. The next one is location. You have mom and dad. Everything is the same except for the location. Mom and dad, completely different people. The next is movement, happy versus enjoy. Again, everything is the same except for the movement. And last is non-manual signals. This has everything to do with your facial expression and body language. For instance, understand, don't understand. Showing that you know something or you don't know something. All of these perimeters of sine are so important to know that you are making the sign correctly. Number 7, your first side. We have made a first signs, platelets that has a 150 of them. So here are a few to get you started. Hello. My name is Meredith. I can't wait for you guys to start practicing. Speaking of practice, number a, practice daily. If you were just getting started, remember, you don't have to know it all at once. Take your time and practice. Number 9, go to deaf events in your town, get involved in your local deaf church or contact the local interpreting agency. They have tons of information about how to get connected with deaf people in your area. And bonus tip. Notice I use the word death. This is an accurate term to use. Hearing impaired is actually considered rude, but more on that in another lesson. And number 10 resources, our YouTube channel, we have tons of ASL videos already and are releasing more all the time and shout out to the other ASL creators. We are all a family and everyone learns differently. There are many great videos on YouTube that teach ASL. Voice off learning is such a great method. Now we aren't doing it right now in our basic videos, but we certainly do. And we'll be doing voice off learning as well in future videos. Check out our website. We have an ASL dictionary. If you're wanting to learn a single word, it's a great place to go to easily search or browse to find the word you're after. If you're interested in baby signs, checkout, baby sign language.com, It's a great resource. You might even find someone familiar. That was a lot, but congratulations, you're done. You've mastered ASL. I mean, does getting, there's still so much to learn and we've got you covered. Be sure to subscribe so you can check out all of our future videos and until next time, keep learning how to sign. 29. Resource - YouTube - Sign Language Around The World: So I'm actually a universal language. A lot of people don't know that sign language isn't universal. Are you kidding me? In fact, there's somewhere between a 138 to 300 different types of sign languages used around the world today. My hope is that I can bring some awareness to this fact and show you some of the differences between all of those sign languages. Isn't it interesting the similarities yet differences between these sign languages. And here's another word, mother in ASL. This is the sign for mother. In British Sign Language. This is the sign for mother. Now in Indian Sign Language, this is the sign for mother. But in French Sign Language, this is how you signed mother. As I mentioned before, there are so many different versions of sign language. I know American Sign Language. Asl, is actually the seventh most popular sign language in the world. Starting in number one on the list is Indian Sign Language was 6 million, 300000 users. Indonesian sign language has just under a million. At 900 thousand, russian sign language has 715 thousand users. There are 600 thousand users of Brazilian sign language. Spanish Sign Language has around 523 thousand users. Egyptian sign language, just under 500000 users at 475. And finally, American sign language has 460 thousand users. Even American sign language itself is used around the globe. For instance, we have had comments from people that watch our American Sign Language channel, many different countries. Daniella, a preschool teacher in Costa Rica, is learning ASL herself. In fact, more than 30 percent of our channel views come from outside the United States. How crazy is that? There are multiple sign language families and clusters used around the world. For instance, a lot of sign languages are derivatives of French Sign Language. To name a few. Italian Sign Language, Quebec Sign Language, american Sign Language. I resigned language, russian sign language, Spanish Sign Language. Mexicans I language, Brazilians I language. Many more are all derived from French sign language. There are so many sign language families, like danish, Swedish, German, Arabic, and Japanese. To say the least, there are a lot of different types of sign languages used everywhere. It's important to note that although they are similar, each one of these versions of sign language or their very own independent language with very different parameters of sight. To exemplify this, we recently talked to some friends of ours over the whole pond in Great Britain who were kind enough to work with us and showing us how different ASL and BSL are. A, b, C, D, E, F, G 123456789. 10. Good, good night guys. How are you? Repeat? Or again? Again? Learn or learning. I thoroughly hope you enjoyed learning about BSL as much as I did. I personally had so much fun researching this for you. I found it fascinating that there are so many different sign languages and there are so many similarities and differences. I actually had to reign myself back from researching all the different types of sign language. If you found this video interesting and want to learn about American sign language, be sure to subscribe to our channel so you can learn everything ASL.