ASL | 32 Essential Phrases | American Sign Language | Able Lingo ASL | Skillshare

ASL | 32 Essential Phrases | American Sign Language

Able Lingo ASL, American Sign Language (ASL)

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59 Lessons (3h 39m) View My Notes
    • 1. Course Introduction

      0:57
    • 2. Explore | Group 1 Phrases

      1:13
    • 3. Learn | Hello. How are you?

      5:32
    • 4. Learn | Hey, what’s your name?

      4:50
    • 5. Learn | It’s nice to meet you.

      4:11
    • 6. Learn | Take care. See you later.

      4:26
    • 7. Learn | Tell me how you're feeling.

      3:56
    • 8. Learn | Yes or no. What do you think?

      5:42
    • 9. Learn | May I go with you?

      3:15
    • 10. Learn | Where is the restroom?

      3:08
    • 11. Practice | Testing Group 1

      2:53
    • 12. Sign | Group 1 Phrases ⏲ 5s

      3:01
    • 13. Understand | Group 1 Phrases

      2:32
    • 14. Explore | Group 2 Phrases

      1:20
    • 15. Learn | Do you have a car?

      4:46
    • 16. Learn | Where did you go before?

      4:01
    • 17. Learn | Do you live here?

      4:00
    • 18. Learn | Do you enjoy traveling?

      4:39
    • 19. Learn | I’m learning sign language.

      3:28
    • 20. Learn | Sign slowly, please.

      4:15
    • 21. Learn | I’m sorry. I don't understand.

      4:12
    • 22. Learn | Please sign again, slowly.

      3:35
    • 23. Practice | Testing Group 2

      1:45
    • 24. Sign | Group 2 Phrases ⏲ 5s

      3:16
    • 25. Understand | Group 2 Phrases

      2:29
    • 26. Practice | Testing Groups 1-2

      1:37
    • 27. Sign | Groups 1-2 Phrases ⏲ 5s

      6:05
    • 28. Understand | Groups 1-2 Phrases

      4:35
    • 29. Explore | Group 3 Phrases

      1:20
    • 30. Learn | I can’t fingerspell well.

      4:22
    • 31. Learn | How do you sign CAT?

      5:10
    • 32. Learn | You have to fingerspell it.

      3:25
    • 33. Learn | What does the sign “bug” mean?

      5:18
    • 34. Learn | My teacher signs fast!

      6:24
    • 35. Learn | Are your parents deaf?

      4:58
    • 36. Learn | I’m a hearing person.

      1:30
    • 37. Learn | I can sign a little bit.

      1:57
    • 38. Practice | Testing Group 3

      1:39
    • 39. Sign | Group 3 Phrases ⏲ 5s

      3:00
    • 40. Understand | Group 3 Phrases

      2:29
    • 41. Explore | Group 4 Phrases

      1:27
    • 42. Learn | Come here please.

      3:54
    • 43. Learn | Where are you from?

      3:49
    • 44. Learn | Don't trust him. He's lying.

      6:47
    • 45. Learn | What do you do for work?

      3:19
    • 46. Learn | Are you married? Do you have kids?

      4:21
    • 47. Learn | Can you teach me sign language?

      3:59
    • 48. Learn | Which do you like: tea or soda?

      6:02
    • 49. Learn | What’s your favorite movie?

      3:20
    • 50. Practice | Testing Group 4

      1:28
    • 51. Sign | Group 4 Phrases ⏲ 5s

      2:59
    • 52. Understand | Group 4 Phrases

      2:36
    • 53. Practice | Testing Groups 3-4

      1:30
    • 54. Sign | Groups 3-4 Phrases ⏲ 5s

      5:59
    • 55. Understand | Groups 3-4 Phrases

      4:25
    • 56. Practice | Testing All Phrases

      2:20
    • 57. Sign | All Phrases ⏲ 5s

      11:14
    • 58. Understand | All Phrases

      8:23
    • 59. Conclusion & Thank You

      0:10
20 students are watching this class

About This Class

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IN THIS COURSE, you’re going to learn thirty-two (32) useful and essential phrases in ASL. The phrases are divided into four (4) groups and we’ll learn each phrase individually. The phrases will be dissected further as we go step by step to study concepts and explore the unique signs. Throughout the course, we’ll do lots of review to guarantee your ability to sign the phrases correctly and understand when they are signed to you.

*** This course is designed for complete beginners without any prior knowledge of ASL. Previous ASL skills are welcome but NOT required.

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IN THIS COURSE:

  • Students will learn to sign and understand thirty-two (32) essential phrases in ASL.
  • Students will learn the signs in each phrase individually to ensure correct hand shape and hand position.
  • Students will learn how to use facial expressions for communicating “YES/NO” and “WH” questions in ASL.
  • Students will see all of the English phrases translated into ASL using ASL grammar rules.
  • Students will race a timer to help improve their proficiency as they sign the complete phrases.
  • Students will be tested on their ability to sign and recognize ALL material taught in the course.

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 AFTER TAKING THIS COURSE:

  • Students will have learned to sign and understand thirty-two (32) essential ASL phrases.
  • Students will have a larger vocabulary and thorough understanding of facial expressions.
  • Students will have a strong understanding of how to communicate “YES/NO” and “WH” questions.
  • Students will feel more confident as they continue improving their ASL skills.

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REQUIREMENTS:

  • A desire to learn, improve, and be more confident signing in ASL
  • A desire to enrich ASL vocabulary and communication skills
  • A computer, tablet, or smartphone to access the study material

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QUESTIONS:

What is the main focus of this course?

  • This course focuses on learning the necessary skills to sign thirty-two (32) useful and essential ASL phrases. Students will learn useful concepts, sign complete phrases, and communicate questions in ASL with correct facial expressions.

Do I need to have prior knowledge or experience with ASL before taking this class?

  • No. This course is designed for complete beginners without any prior knowledge of ASL. All necessary signs are taught step by step in the course.

Will this course test me on what is taught?

  • Yes. This course contains multiple review and testing sections where students have the opportunity to demonstrate their ASL signing and recognition skills.

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ABOUT THE INSTRUCTOR:

  • Hello! My name is Michael. When I was three years old, my younger brother became sick with spinal meningitis. In the process, my brother became deaf with an almost complete hearing loss. This difficult situation provided a unique opportunity for my family and I to become fluent in American Sign Language (ASL). Unlike some deaf children, my brother was not sent away to a deaf or hard of hearing school. He grew up with us, his hearing family, and we were active in the deaf community.
  • As a police officer and federal investigator, I often used ASL to communicate with and interpret for witnesses, victims, and perpetrators. I decided to create ASL courses because it’s a useful and practical skill to have. Like learning any language, it opens your mind and creates the ability to communicate with a whole new group of people.

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CLICK HERE FOR ALL OUR CLASSES

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Transcripts

1. Course Introduction: In this course, you're going to learn a lot of useful and essential phrases in American Sign Language, right? So what's our plan of attack? How are we going to do it? Well, we're going to group the phrases together. Then we're going to learn each phrase by itself. As we're focusing on a phrase, we're going to learn each individual's sign, each individual concept. And as we go we'll put the pieces back together, the puzzle pieces, the concepts, the signs in practice, the pole phrase, lots and lots of practice. As we're going. I have my glasses whenever I have my glasses on, that means we're going to do testing or review tests. That's right. We need to make sure that you can sign the phrases, sign what we've been learning, and also that you can understand when I'm signing them as well. Okay. Let's do it. Let's jump in. 2. Explore | Group 1 Phrases: Oh boy, it's Group1 phrases. This is what we're going to learn. Hello, how are you? Hey, what's your name? It's nice to me to take care. See you later. Tell me how you're feeling. Yes or no. What do you think? May I go with you? And where's the restroom? Okay, so let's jump in. Let's learn all of these phrases. We're going to look at each one individually. We're going to go step by step, learn the words as signs and do some practice. Here we go. 3. Learn | Hello. How are you?: In English we might say, hello, how are you? To get the equivalent in American Sign Language? We could sign Hello, how are you? You might notice there is a difference. Alright, the Azure studying Azure moving forward in American Sign Language, it becomes clear that what we say in English, how we formed the sentences in English is often different once we get to ASL, sometimes it's strikingly similar, almost word for word the same. Other times things are switched around, some words are different in its Ha, this is part of learning a new language, right? So in this specific example, it says in English, how are you? All right? Well, it's absent once we get to the signs because in ASL, They don't sign the small words like am, are, was, were, the AA and they throw them out. It's a very efficient language. It goes straight to the point. All right, so let's go step by step. Let's start signing. We're gonna learn word by word. How does sign this? Alright, here we go. Head low. Alright, this is what it looks like. Hello, right? The hand shape is like this, right? No gaps between your fingers, nice and tight right there. All right. The inside of your index finger, put it to the side of your forehead and go out. It's basically like a flamboyant solute, like in the military or whatever. Solute. It. Hello. From the side. Hello. Okay, good, good. Alright, let's go to how this is, what it looks like. This, what this sign looks like. How? Alright. How? So we have the hand shapes like this. All right. Kinda just they're just loose. Take the middle knuckles and put them together so they're lightly touching right now are flat. Now turn them forward. Alright. How, from the side? How other side? How? Alright, the hand shapes once again, You're like this. Turn them in fingers together. Now this curve down, right? Now, put the knuckles together and go how? Alright, how? Alright, good, good, good. Now let's move to you. Take your index finger like you're gonna point and you are going to point. So I'm talking to you. So I will go, you write just one movement in your direction. You now they might say it's rude to point. But if you don't point in American sign language are going to have a huge obstacle when you try to have clear communication. So just sign you. Alright? Okay, good, good. Now this is a question and we need to make sure that we communicate that it's a question. Now we're getting into facial expressions. Are faces in American sign language are so helpful for communicating what's happening. Alright? So this is a how question, alright? And when we get to how it's grouped in with the WH, question words like who, what, where, when, how, and why, right? So when we do these type of questions, we furrow our eyebrows. Now we kind of frown a little bit, but basically don't think of frowning. Think of that you're trying to investigate something. You're trying to get some information. So your faces kind of like this. Your chin might kind of go up a little bit, your eyebrows go down a little bit. That's how we communicate a WH question and it's how right, how is included in with the WH questions? Who, what, where, when, how, and why. Okay. So when we're signing, how you are. Eyebrows go down a little bit. Alright, so watch me. Here we go. How you alright, see My face is like I'm focused, I'm investigating. I want to know what you have to say. How are you? Okay, good, good. Let's do it all together. Alright, step-by-step. With me. Here we go. Hello. How are you? All right, let's do it again. Here we go. Hello. How are you? All right, so English, it's hello. How are you in sign language? It's hello. How are you? All right, remember to communicate the question. Use the facial expression. If you just go like this, you'll probably be understood, but they'll kinda think you like a robot. The point in American Sign Language is to use all of your tools and your face, or it's a magical tool for communicating, even in English, right? You can read someone's facial expression and get extra information about how they feel, what they're trying to communicate, or they deceiving me, are they telling the truth? Wow, so much we can do with our face. Okay. So remember when you're saying how you in American Sign Language make a face card like this. Alright? How you, alright, so once again, it's hello. How are you? All right, good, good. Let's move forward. 4. Learn | Hey, what’s your name?: In English we might say, Hey, what's your name to get the equivalent in American Sign Language, we would sign, hey, name you. Alright, so let's jump in and learn word for word, how to sign this, right? Let's start with, hey, it looks like this. Alright, you're just taking your kinda limp hand, write like this, put it like this, wave at a couple of times. You're trying to get someone's attention. So in English we would use an auditory hey, right? Hey, and then the person hears us and hopefully turn to look at us in American sign language, we're going to do something visual, right? So like that, you're going to notice the more you hang around with the deaf community, their visual ability is astounding. That's the best word I can find. Its incredible. Grown up with my brother, he would notice things that I would not notice, either small details, small movements, or just things that were there. Right. But I didn't pick up on. They say that deaf people are some of the best drivers out there because they're so visual, they take it all in and it's just, it's astounding. That's the best word I can come up with it. So to get someone's attention, just go like this. Go like this. Now please use your common sense. Don't go right up in someone's face and go, hey, right. So your hands i right in their face as his route, right. Just hang out and be like, hey, they'll most likely definitely, they're going to see your hand. Alright. Hey, alright, good, good. Let's move forward to name. Right here is the sign. Name. Here is the hand shape, is the letter you or how do we make the u? Well fold the pinkie ring finger down, index finger and middle finger come together, tuck your thumb in. That is a you like an alphabet you right? I'm right handed, so I'm gonna take my left-handed, you put it down here, so it's flat at the top is flapped. Take my right handed you and now I'm going to tap on top twice. Name, name from the side. It looks like this name. Alright. Other side name. Alright. I hope are signing with me. Name. Good, good. Alright, let's go to you. Use your index finger. Wait, we already talked about this. How do we assign you a few? And I are having a conversation. How would we sign you? Well, index finger end point, right? You just one single movement. You write if the person's over here and you're selling an attack to them, show some respect. Turn your body, you write, I'm talking to you know, aha, you. Alright? So we need to communicate that this is a question, right? And we're going to use our facial expressions. Now this type of question, we need some actual piece of information. And when I say that we don't start a question where we just need yes, no, or maybe we need a name, right? So name you. What's her name right, in English? So we're going to furrow our eyebrows when we ask this question. Now, furrowing our eyebrows communicates that we need a piece of information, you know, please give us this piece of information. We're asking for it. Alright? So when you get to name, you could go name, you write, you see how my face goes like that. It's a questioning kinda investigating a questioning look on your face. All right. Now you don't have to hold that like this through the whole sentence. You can do it once you get to the last part, you can even do it when it's name, you name, you are just our right. So let's do a little practice. Sign with me. Let's sign this. Alright, so I'm talking to you. I would say, hey, name, you write again, let's sign it again. Here we go. Hey, name you. Right here we go. Hey, name you. Alright? And when you're going like this, if it's not something as simple as a name for something more serious, you know, you can move your hand in relation to how serious the situation is, alright? If this is someone's name, you probably be relaxed. Hey, name you. Okay. All right, so let's do it one more time. I'm not going to talk. This is what it would look like without any sound. Alright, let's move forward. 5. Learn | It’s nice to meet you.: In English we might say, it's nice to meet two. In ASL we would sign. Okay, so let's break it down and let's learn how to sign this. Alright, nice, right here is the sign per Nice. Alright, we're going to use these hand shapes. I'm right-handed. Once again, tight fingers together, no gaps between the fingers. I'm right handed, so I'm gonna take my left hand and form a platform, nice and flat. Okay. With my right hand, I'm going to put it on top. Started back in, slide forward. Alright, lightly touching the bottom hand, right? So it looks like this. Nice. Nice from the side. Nice, other side. Nice. Okay, as an editor information, this also means clean, but it just depends on the context, what it means when we're assigning it. So here it is. Nice. So let's do it. Nice. Nice. Alright, here we go with me, meet you. And you're like, what the heck does this mean? Summer capital letters, small letters? Well, signs in American sign language are not always direct translations of a one word vocabulary word in English, signs are more up concepts. Think of concepts, right? So in English we say it's nice to meet you. So when we sign this part, where literally sign in that would be understood as me meet you. All right, so let's first break it down. The sign for meat, see its capital letters there. Now this is the generic sign for meat. Alright, let's do the hand shapes. Index fingers, right? Took everything else in, turn, your knuckles towards each other and they come together and then they lightly touch because there's two people meeting, right? Meat. So that's the generic sign. However, meat is what you could call a directional sign. It depends on the situation. So in this situation, you have me and you are you and I, right? And I'm gonna put this one here to represent you, my non-dominant hand. That's you. And this is me. So me meet you. Alright. If it was me made her I would be like over there this would represent her me me her him may meet him. Alright. Or given the situation, it could be he meet me. Right. He's come into me, me, or she's come into me, me. Right? In this situation. Me, Me, you. Ok. So this part right here would look like this. Alright, good, good, good promise side. Other side. Okay? Alright, lets take a look at the whole thing. So we have nice meet you. Literally, Nice me meet you. Alright. Let me do it from the side. So pretend you're watching me and I'm talking with the person over here and I'm saying, alright, don't forget your facial expressions. Your same nice to meet you showed in your face. You won't be like maybe well, you probably place to meet two. Ok. So sign with me. Let's sign this. Here we go. Okay, so English, once again, it's nice to me to the concept of sign languages. Nice, that's pretty straightforward. Then me meet you. So this is u, this is me, me meet you altogether. It's alright, good, good. 6. Learn | Take care. See you later.: In English we might say, take care, see you later. To sign that in ASL, we would do this. Alright, let's jump in and take a look. The first part, take care, looks like this. Alright, you might be wondering why is the take lowercase and uppercase. Well, take is understood as part of the concept. All right, take care, but you're not like taking something from someone. It's like take care. So take his part of the concept, but care, the sign for care or careful is like this. Now together this concept, we're going to go like this. Ok, so how do we do this? We're going to use the letters K, both hands, right? K from the alphabet. How do you make it k star with the open hand, put your pinky and your ring finger down. Leave these two up, index and middle finger. Take your thumb and stick it, place it between, right? Alright, so the bottom part of the thumb is kinda pushing against the side of the middle finger, but it's still in between the index and the middle finger. Alright, so that's a k. We're going to have K's with both hands. Now I'm right handed, so my left handed, I'm going to put that one down my left hand k. And that's going to be like the base, my right-hand K, I'm going to take the palm, the bottom part and go like this. All right. Take care. All right. Two times from the side. Other side. Take care right from the front. Make sure to sign with me. Here we go. Take care. Take care. All right. So that's the first part of the concept of Take care. Now let's move forward to the concept of See you later. Same thing, something similar here. U is not capitalized because literally we're not going to sign you, but we are going to sign similar to later end C. Alright, so first, the sign Percy is like this. Right? You have the letter v. You take the the tip of your middle finger, turn it towards yourself and put it alongside your nose. You can kinda touch the top part of your cheek and go see, alright, see, you don't have to touch your face. That's OK. See. Right. So let's see. Later the sign would actually be like this. Later. Hand like this. We have the L, stick it here and it goes down later. Alright, so we're going to use this part of later, and we're gonna use this part of C, But it combines to go like this. Right? Take a look from this side. Alright, so si's going forward than it pops into the l and points kind of like you're like, hey man, right? Just do it a little bit higher, right? See you later. See you later. Right from the side. I'll do a slowly other side. Right. So you're transitioning from the sea, which is the V turned into wards, you transition to the l, which is part of later. Alright, this is the l, right? So see you later. Three later, right? So all together, let's take a look at it. So take care once again was just two tabs. Now, see you later. Remember it ends like you're like, hey man, Right? But it's just a little bit higher. Alright. Altogether. Take care. See you later from the side. Other side. All right. Remember the facial expression maybe I should say, Don't forget the facial expression. This is, you know, it's positive. Take care, see later you probably want to see them again and you're wishing them good energy, take care, right? So maybe even smile. Right here we go a couple more times. Alright, let's move on. 7. Learn | Tell me how you're feeling.: In English, we might say, tell me how you're feeling. Well in American Sign Language would look something like this. Alright, let's jump in. Let's learn how to sign. There's Alright, we have tell, we have me, there are two separate signs, but here they're connected and we're going to make a hybrid of the signs. So first, if we just take the sign, tell it's something like this. Alright. Tell if we wanted to sign me, we go like this, me, me. So if we did each sines separately, it would be tell me. Now there's a much easier way to do it in ASL does this, it goes like this. Tell me, alright, from the side it looks like this. They're just dropping down right from the chin, index finger on the chin, straight down to me. In other words, tell me from the other side. Tell me right from the front. Tell me very efficient. Tell me. Okay. Alright, let's move forward to how right here's the handshape, right? Like this. Bring the knuckles together and go how how? From the side, how other side, how? Okay, so we have how? Now we're going to go to you. Rate forward index finger, you single motion, right? You I'm talking with you so you feel alright. Open your hand, turn it, put down the middle finger. Only bend down the middle finger only. Now take the tip of the middle finger, bring it here and you're gonna go 12, right? That works here for feel, right. Notice our attorney communicate. Tell me how you're feeling. Right. So we're going to do two swipes. In other circumstances, if you're just like if it was Tell me how you feel. Alright. We were focusing on the word or I feel happy, feel something like that. We could just go once. But since here we're focusing on and tell me how you're feeling. We're gonna go twice. 12. All right. There may be variations in how your deaf community signs it. I would urge you to follow them. This is how I learned. Okay. Alright. So we have feel from the side feel, other side feel right from the front. Members sign with me. Here we go. Feel feel. Now you don't actually have to touch your shirt or your chest. I do it. I like to friction because it tells me one and then I need to do it again too. But if you just want to get close, feel that's alright too. Alright, let's do it all together. Alright, let's go slow is signed with me. Here we go. Tell me how you feel. Let's do it again. Hearing oh, tell me how you feel. Alright. So we have how in there but this time we're not asking a question, so we don't have to worry about communicating with our face steadies a question. It's just a statement, right? Tell me how you feel. Right. Again. Here we go. Okay. So this Wi's, tell me how you feel. 8. Learn | Yes or no. What do you think?: In English we might say yes or no. What do you think? Well, in sign language would be something like this. Alright, let's jump painless. Learn how to sign this. Right here we go. Let's start with the sign for yes. And I were going to use the letter S from the alphabet like St, U is basically a fist. Go like this. Make a face, put your thumb in front. All right. Now as it's placed like this, the palms facing forward, we're gonna go. Yes. Alright. In some situations, perfectly appropriate to go? Yes. You're eager to affirm something. Yes. Right? Maybe it's a just a simple yes. Depends on the situation. Both of them work. Ok. So from the side we have yes. Other side we have yes. Okay. Let's go to no. Right here's what it looks like. No. So what we're doing is we're using these two fingers, putting them together, leaving the thumb out. And now it's like a crocodile kinda going like this. Now pointed at two towards whom you are, whoever, whomever you're talking with. Alright, so know, if I'm talking with you and I want to indicate to, you know, I'd go No. Right from the side. My person is here I'm trying to communicate with no. From the other side. No. Right? No. Okay. If you'll notice here, we have yes, no. Down here we have yes or no. So how do we communicate in sign language? The or basically have two options, right? Yes or no. Well, this is what it would look like. I'll show you and you try to figure out how it's communicated. Okay? What do you think? Let me do it one more time. Okay. It's pretty obvious that my body moved right. I didn't Springer spell or do a specific sign PR or but with my body first, I went over to this space. Yes. And then I went over here and sign no. And just doing the signs in two different spaces communicates that there are two options, right? And then we fill out the sentence, you know, you'd think what? Alright, so here again, once again, sign with me. Move your body. Yes or no. Alright, now this can work for multiple things. This could work for different objects. It doesn't have to be these words. It could be the house, it could be the car, could be like different things. House, car, alright. Whatever the situation is, where you have two options and you're trying to give the person a choice, right? So once again, for our situation, yes, no. Alright. Alright, there's moved forward. Next word is you, index finger. You, whoever you're talking with, you think, use the index finger again and go like this, I think makes sense because we use our brain to think right from the side. Think, other side. Think. Think. Right now the sign for what I'm just going to show you the hand motion, right? So the palms are up, fingers are loose and were just like, alright, we're trying to figure out something white, right? In this situation, we want to be clear that we are communicated it as a question, right? So when we're making the sign for what, what do we do with WH questions? Who, what, where, when, how, why? What do you think? What do you remember? Well, we need the furrow our eyebrows and we can raise her chin a little bit. So Omar's signing what In this sentence we'd go what? Right? Do you see how it's an inquisitive look on our face, something we're trying to find out here. Okay, so let's move forward. Let's try doing the whole sentence. Alright. So in English, yes or no, what do you think in sign language? Yes. No. You think what? Alright. Here we go. Sign with me. Yes. No. You think what? Right. Again, here we go. Okay. So when I'm furrow in my eyebrows at the end of the sentence, you could do it through the whole sentence, but it's kind of tiresome to be like. So I would recommend that just do the fraud eyebrows when you're trying to communicate, when you're trying to make it clear that it's a question. And here it is at the end of the sentence, right? So it'd be something like this. Yes, no youth think what? Right. So when I'm signing, yes. No. You think, you know, look, my eyebrows are not further night kind of frowning. There's nothing like that. It's just regular. But once I get to what? It's like that Yes, No. You think what? And suddenly it's crystal clear that you are expecting a response. You ask the question, alright, sign with me a gerund. Here we go. Okay. So we just learned? Yes, no. You think what? All right. Sounds good. 9. Learn | May I go with you?: In English, we might say, May I go with you or can I go with, can I go with you through all of those options in sign language, we can just sign. Okay, let's jump in and learn how to sign this. Here we go. Alright, first we have I, use your index finger and just point to yourself. All right. I, i right. When we're doing with OK, we're going to make these hand shapes is basically the letters a, thumbs up to the side, the fingers are down. Now turn them like this. So the knuckles are facing forward. Now put them together so they're touching. So you have them here and push together in a little, a little ways forward, alright, width. So you have like two people there at the other end. Width. All right, with from the sine, with from the other side with this like that. Okay, so we want to communicate that it's a question, alright? This type of question is what we would call a yes or no question. First, let's look at it. English. If I said to you, May I go with you? You have basically three options for answering. You could say yes, you'd say no, and you can maybe you could say maybe, right. So it's a yes, no question. It's not like a question. Like, what is the color of your house and why is it painted that way? Back question. I can't say yes or no. I need to give more details. So here we have a yes or no question when assigning American Sign Language is still a yes or no question. So when we communicate the question, we're going to raise her eyebrows, lean forward a little bit in razor chin. Hmm, let me show it to you. Here we go. Alright. I with i. So when you're signing with raise your eyebrows, lean forward a little bit. Raise up your chin. Those it's like you're you want to know is another inquisitive look on your face. And I'm like, what do you think? Yeah, good idea. Alright, so I alright, let's do the poll sentence. Okay, so in English, May I go with you? Sign language. Here we go. Right. The whole thing we could just sign. Because if you're going if you're asking this question, we're assuming there's some sort of context already in place where someone is leaving, someone's going shopping, someone's going to a movie. I don't know. But you're stepping in and you're asking if you can accompany them, right. So all you would need to say is all right? I will. Right. So remember, when you sign with to make search a question, raise your eyebrows, lean forward. Kind of inquisitive. I want to know, look on your face. Alright, here we go. Okay. So this was an English. May I go with you in sign language. Okay. 10. Learn | Where is the restroom?: In English we might say, where's the restroom? To sign the equivalent, we would do this. Alright, let's jump in and learn how to sign this. Here we go. First, we're going to start with restroom. Here is the sign for restroom. Alright, we're going to use the letter are like st or RST in the alphabet, right? How do we make it our, we'll get rid of your pinky, your ring finger. Now cross your fingers and put your thumb in front. Alright, so the middle finger goes behind the index finger, or you could say the index finger goes in front of the middle finger. Or you could just say make the hand shapes honey-like. Or I hope it happens. I hope it happens or, you know, I'm crossing my fingers behind my back or her. It's just that hand shape that is the r. Okay. So once again, our, alright, now when we do restroom, we're gonna use the letter R and we're going to start here. We're gonna go 12. All right. So 12, that is restroom from this side. Rest room. Other side rest room. Right. So sign with me here we go. Rest room. Rest room. Right. Moving forward. Let's sign where. Okay. So this is the sign for where? Just use your index finger and waving back and forth. Where see my palms facing towards you and my like this and like this, right? Where where now we need to make sure we're communicating it as a question. Aha, it's a WH question. So what do we do? Who, what, where, when, how we've pero the eyebrows, right. I have a little face like this. So where where where okay. Put it altogether. We have restroom where? Now you don't have to throw your eyebrows for the poll sentence. It's a short enough sentence that you could, it's not a big deal. You can also just go like this. Restroom, carbon-neutral restroom, where now the important thing is that once you get to wear and you're signing where you need demonstrating, show communicate that it's a question. Right. So where? All right. So this is restroom. You may have seen bathroom which is like toilet that is just making the tea and going like that. Bathroom. I would say bathroom is more informal evenness spoken English, when you say restroom, maybe you're in a restaurant or something. I don't know. Either way you have two options. You could say bathroom with the tea to shake it back and back and forth, or you can say restroom. So once again, we just learned how to sign restroom. Where very important question. 11. Practice | Testing Group 1: Practice before the test. What? A test. Yes, that's right. Tests are half. In this course. We're going to do lots of review and testing them. You might want to pay attention because what I'm about to show you right now is the same format for the testing throughout the course. Alright? It comes in two parts. The first part, see the hand down there, you're going to sign. So I'm going to show you something. I'm going to start a timer. The timers for five seconds and you try to assign this and beat the timer. If you want to pause the video, freeze the timer, Take your time. That's up to you, your toys. So I'll show you something, start the timer. When the timer is finished, then I will sign it. Okay, let's take look. I'm gonna do a quick mini tests so you can see what the format is. Here we go. Okay, so that is the first part of the test with the timer and you see something, you sign it. The second part of the test, we're not going to have a timer, but you'll have me in that little guy down there with the glasses. So when you see him, there means you need to watch me. It's a recognition understanding exercise. So I'm going to sign, you're gonna watch high is doing something that was a ha you try to understand what I'm signing. Ok. Let's do a quick practice tests. Here we go. All right. So what did I sign? I'm only going to sign it once. So if you need to pause the video before I show you the answer, that's fine. If you want to rewind hemi repeat, it's up to you. Alright, so this is what I signed. Oh, okay. Good, good. So remember the first part. You sign, right. I'll show you something you sign. Second part, I will sign in. You try to understand what I'm signing, right? So when I'm testing throughout the whole course, whenever we're doing Review Testing, I'm aware these glasses and when I wear these glasses during testing, I'm not gonna say anything is going to be completely quiet and will communicate by signing. So right now in this immediate, this test insects, in this review section, we're only going to focus on group one phrases, stuff that we've already learned. What an opportunity to show your skills. Okay, let's do it. 14. Explore | Group 2 Phrases: Goodness me, it's group two for raises. Well, we're about to learn. Do you have a car? Where did you go before? Do you live here? Do you enjoy travelling? I'm learning sign language. Sine slowly, please. I'm sorry, I don't understand. And please sign again slowly. Okay. So we're going to learn all of these phrases one-by-one. And as we're learning, each one will divide it into words and learn each individual sign, put it back together and do practice. Ok, let's jump in. 15. Learn | Do you have a car?: In English we might say, do you have a car? Well, the equivalent in American Sign Language would be, OK, let's jump in and learn how to sign this, right? Let's start with car. Here is assigned for car. I think it's pretty straightforward. The hand shapes are the same. They're the letter s. You could also say their fists like pull up your dukes fists. So we have the S. Now we're going to use those and pretend that we're grabbing a steering wheel, the steering wheel of the car right? Now, just turn it a couple times. Alright, car. From the side car. Other side car. Okay, let's do it a couple of times. Here we go. Car. Car. Alright, good, good. Let's learn the sign. Pour half. Here's the sign. Alright, the hand shapes are the same. There's something like this. Okay. Hands up, curb them down. Now tilt them forward and we're going to move them like this. They're going to start out a little ways from your chess, then go in. Alright, so have, have, just think like you're taking possession of something, right? Have from the side, have, other side, have. Alright. Okay, so we need to make sure that we communicate this as a question. Alright, so we look at the English sentence. It says, do you have a car? Now, how could you answer this? It's a yes, no question, right? You could say yes. You could say no. And I suppose you could say maybe, Right? So in sign language we need to communicate that it's a yes, no question. Alright. So once we sign have we have the question mark there? Were going to raise our eyebrows, lean forward a little bit and have kind of an inquisitive look on her face like this. All right. We want to know something. Alright. We wanted to know, I want to know do you have a car? Okay, so this is what it would look like the whole sentence. Here we go. Alright? And in this situation, we are assuming that you and I are routing, communicating. We're already talking when we bend a little while. So there's no need for me to say You. Alright? Um, I'm talking to you. It's understood that I'm talking to you. I'm not referring to fret over there, Sally over there. So if I say if I sign to you, it's quite clear that I am communicating, you know, do you have a car? All right. Now it's, it's important to make sure that at the end of this sentence, eyebrows go up. We lean forward a little bit, maybe to note like that, because if we don't do it, then it actually is this. Alright? Like I have a car. All right, so here's what this would look like when it ends in a period, just a sentence, a statement. Alright. I just communicated to you that I have a car. Alright. If I go like this, I just communicated to you that I'm wondering if you have a car. Once again, here's the difference. All right, so you see it. Okay, so let's do some practice of this phrase, this sentence right here. Here we go. Sign with me. All right, one more time. Alright, this is a nice sweet short little sentence in this structure is very useful because once you learn other signs apart from car, you can just switch the words in this sentence. So you might say house, have, might say paper, have. Maybe you say pencil, have, right? Basically any object, anything in there you could even do a family have. Alright, you can use this sentence in this structure with whatever you're talking about is very useful. Alright, let's sign it one more time and then we'll move forward. Okay. Remember, eyebrows up, lean forward, inquisitive, look. You want to know. 16. Learn | Where did you go before?: In English we might say, where did you go before? In sign language would look like this. Ok, let's jump in and learn how to sign this. Here we go. Alright, you straightforward. We already learned it. Index finger, you, I'm talking to you so I point at you single motion, you alright, next, before it looks something like this. Alright? So think that you're trying to just kinda brushed the air past, past your body, right? We just indicating something is in the past, right. It's before, it's back there. Alright, so the handshape is kinda loose and you just go like this and you waft, waft the air past your head. Before, from the side, before, from the other side before. Right. If you're a lefty, I'm right handed, so I do it over here. If you're left aegis, go like that on the other side. Okay. So this was before? Before. Okay. Let's move to go. This is what it looks like. All right. Index fingers and we're just making the motion like you're going somewhere. Hence it's designed for go, go, right? So it's kinda like too little rockets, I guess in there shooting up and a point over there because you're going over there. Go, go right from the side. Go from the other side. Go. Alright, let's do it a couple of times. Here we go. Go. Go. Alright, the sign per Where do you remember? All right. Index finger nowadays? Shake it back and forth. That is where? Where? Alright, now it gets important, we need to make sure this is a question. And it's a WH question, right? Who, what, where, when we include how and why. So we're asking for more detailed information is not just an easy yes, no question, right? So yes, no questions. We raise our eyebrows. What do we do with WH questions? Well, we furrow our eyebrows, lower eyebrows. Right? So here once we get to the sign for where put down your eyebrows. Where where now you don't have to have a scowl on your face to the whole sentence. That would be an unnecessary use of energy. Just sign the first part of the sentence. And once you get to wear, then you can lower your eyebrows. Alright, so once again, alright, good. I'm already starting the practice. So let's do it. Let's sign with me and let's sign this sentence. Here we go. Again. Here we go. Alright, you before go, where? Right? Notice my eyebrows, my chin maybe goes up a little bit. I'm like having a gimme some information kinda look on my face. All right. Again, here we go. You before go. Where? Wherever you ban. Right? Again, your ego. You before go. Where? Ok, good, good, good. We just learned how to sign. Sounds good. 17. Learn | Do you live here?: In English, we might say, do you live here? In American Sign Language? The equivalent would be, alright, let's learn how to sign this. Here we go. Alright, you right index finger, just point single time I'm talking with you. You live. This sine looks like this, right? The hand shapes are the same. We're going to use the letters a, like an alphabet, a, b, c. Okay? So we take the AES, we turn the palms in towards ourselves and put them down here kind of above the abdomen, midway down the chest. And we're going to go like this, live, kinda like it's growing. That's where we're growing up. Maybe live. Live from the side, Live from the other side. Live. Okay, alright, so live. The sign for here. We're gonna make these hand shapes, bring them down to this level and goal here. Alright, we're kinda doing some circles here that in opposite directions or not together. They're opposite, right? They're coming in, one's coming in and then they go out, in and out here. Alright, let's make sure we communicate that this is a question. Now let's take a quick look. You'd say, Do you live here? How would we answer yes, no or possibly? We'd say maybe, but it's a yes, no question. So what does that mean? When we sign it, we're going to raise our eyebrows, right? So when you're signing here, raise those eyebrows, tune up. Inquisitive look was up what's happening? Alright, okay, good, good, good. If we don't raise our eyebrows, Guess what happens? It's something like this. The question just became an affirmative statement. Alright, I'm stating that you live here, right? It's no longer a question. So this one, remember, looks like write the opposite. The question would be T the difference? Once again, question. Alright, good, good. Let's do some practice. Here we go. Sign with mean. Now it's interesting how much our face can communicate. Alright, I'm gonna do two separate facial expressions, same signs, but you try to tell me what do you think is the difference in what I'm communicating? Alright, so here's the first one. Alright, now here's the second one. Did you notice the difference? The first one, which is kind of an innocent question, all you live here, alright? But the second one, the eyebrows are still upright, but you see my face is kind of like really you live here. I can't believe you live here. So the face is very powerful because it shows so much emotion and what we want to communicate. So at the very base, this question is just right, you live here. You want to add in the oh my god, I can't believe you live in this neighborhood type of thing. Put it in your face either way, your eyebrows are going up. Alright? So we just learned how to sign. Alright, sounds good. 18. Learn | Do you enjoy traveling?: In English we say, Do you enjoy travelling? Well, in American Sign Language, the equivalent would be, alright, let's learn how to sign this. You ever go? You very common word, index finger, I'm talking with you. You. Ok, here is the sign for Enjoy. Right? Once again, write the hand shapes are the same like this. Close up your fingers thumb alongside. I'm right handed, so I'm gonna put my right hand, a flat hand, palm, face it in right about here. I'm going to take my non-dominant hand, my left hand, put it about here. Now I am going to make opposite circles. Right? So circles in the opposite direction. Top ones going like this, bottom lines going like this. Alright, so together, enjoy, right? They're not going in the same direction, not just rubbing your belly. They're going to opposite directions one time. Enjoy. From the side. Enjoy. Other side, enjoy. And I lightly touch my chest so I'm touching my body. I suppose you don't have to. You could just get close and go enjoy as long as it's clear what the motion is, what the sign is. Okay. Once again, enjoy. The sign for travel is like this. Okay. The handshape, make the letter v. Now pretend it's a rabbit in the bunny ears go down, right? That is the handshape. Maybe you could say like a claw. Alright, turn it like this so the palms facing down, pretend this is your vehicle, you're playing your aircraft, whatever, and you're going to take a trip and then you come back, right? Travel. Travel from the side. Travel. Other side travel. Right. Once again from the front. Travel. Maybe again travel. Right. You don't have to go sue perform. Maybe for communicating is a really long trip or whatever, but we can just kinda go normal travel. Alright, here we go. Moving forward, we need to make sure that we communicate. This is what a yes, no question. So an English, do you enjoy travelling? Yes. No. Maybe sorta, right? It's a yes, no question. So how do we communicate a yes-no question? Do you remember? Hint the eyebrows, put those eyebrows up, raise those eyebrows. That means you're communicating a yes or no question. And when you're raising eyebrows, lean forward a little bit, maybe lift up your chin, have a facial expression like this. You want to know? Okay, so you enjoy travel. The question looks like this. Alright? Once again, alright, so when you're signing travel, you're making the eyebrows up, leaning forward, which you want to know something. It's very important if you're trying to communicate the question that you do the eyebrows and the body forward because if you don't, if you just stayed down, it's a statement, a positive statement, it would look like this. So now I'm just sharing information that I believe you enjoy travelling. Alright, so to make it, the question is going to look like this. The statement once again. And the question, alright, let's keep going and let's do a little bit more practice. Sign with me. Here we go. Okay. You enjoy travel? Yeah. Okay. So we learned. All right. Sounds good. 19. Learn | I’m learning sign language.: In English we would say, I'm learning sign language to do the equivalent in ASL we would sign. Alright, let's break it apart. Let's learn how to sign this. I, okay, we're going to have our index finger and just point at yourself. Alright, I, it also works for me. So I learn this sine looks like this. Ok, I'm right handed, so with my non-dominant hand for me, my left hand, I'm going to make this hand shape and make a platform, ok, with my right hand. I'm going to go like this, kinda like I'm picking up some sand or powder. I'm going to go like this, leave the handshape and put it in my brain. So touch over here on the side of your forehead. Learn, right, like you're picking up the information and y put in, in your brain and put it in your brain because you're learning, learn, learn from the side. Learn. Other side. Learn, right? Do it a couple of times with me. Here we go. Learn. Learn. Okay, good, good. The sign for sine is okay. And you notice in English we could say sign language. However, in sign language you just sign, sign in it's understood in this context that you mean Sign Language. There's no need to do a separate sign for language. Okay, so how do we do this sine? Well, it looks like this. We're going to use our index fingers and we're basically doing a backwards bicycle motion in front of us. I think that's a good way to explain it. Sign from the side, sign. From the other side sign. Alright, so we have one. When one's coming forward, the other one's kind of following behind. So they're not going like this. Now. It's going like this. Sine sine backwards bicycle motion. Perfect way to explain it. Sign. Okay, so let's practice of poles sentence we've learned all apart. Here we go. Sign with me. Here we go. I learn sign. So in English the equivalent is I'm learning sign language in ASL. You just sign. Okay, let's do it again. There we go. Alright, once more. Now this is a useful phrase, right? Because you could replace sine with other things. Alright? Like I'm learning to read or whatever. So it's a useful thing because we can learn many things. Learn, learn and learn. All right, let's do it one more time. Sounds pretty good. In English we learned, I'm learning sign language in ASL. It's alright. 20. Learn | Sign slowly, please.: In English we would say sign slowly please. In ASL the equivalent would be, all right, let's jump in and learn how to sign this. Okay, sign we're using our index finger's going to be backwards bicycle motion, right? Sign, sign from the sine, sine, from the other side. Sign. Remember they're not going in the same motion, they're not together. They're alternating. Sign, backwards bicycle motion, sign. Alright. Here is the sign, poor, slow. The hand shapes are going to be the same, right? Like this. Tighten up your fingers DMS alongside. Now I'm right handed, so with my non-dominant hand, my left hand, I'm going to put my hand here, this handshape palm facing down. Now with my right hand, I'm just going to use the tips and I'm going to slide up my arm just a little ways. Slow, slow. Right now how fast you do it and how far you go can depend on the situation. It uses regular slow, slow. It's like excruciatingly slow. Alright, notice I put it in a facial expression, added all in. If you dislike, you look like a robot, doesn't make sense to add the face, you're feeling it already. So express it with the face. Are taking forever. Or maybe it's just slow. But good. Resigned for please is like this. Right? I'm right-handed. Here is the handshape. Turn it towards your body palm facing in, started about here and do a circle. You might even do two. Alright, if it's quick, it's in the sentence you might assign, please. If you're begging in your play, please come on, please. Please write it from the side. Please. Other side, please. All right. Let's put it all together. Sign with me. Here we go. Sign slow. Please. Sign slow, please. Alright. Take a look from the side. This is what it is. Sign slow, please. Other sine. Sine, slow, please. All right. A little bit quicker. Right? You might want to add something in your face, especially if you feel a little bit awkward because he didn't understand what they've said. No. Like I you know, I don't want to ask them to repeat, but I need to know what they said because we're carbon a conversation. So put a kind face on your kind expression on your face, right? If you like. The likelihood of them windy continue communicating with you suddenly drops, right? So just have a nice neutral or who's kind expression on your face. Because you are communicating basically through kindness that you want to understand, right? And they understand that not everybody signs. So ask them nicely. Alright, this practice again. Here we go. Alright, the English equivalent is sine slowly, please, in ASL it is. Okay. 21. Learn | I’m sorry. I don't understand.: In English we could say, I'm sorry, I don't understand. The equivalent in American Sign Language is. Alright, let's learn how to sign this. Here we go. The first word is sorry, it looks like this. Right? We could sign i sorry. But it's kind of unnecessary design. I because if I'm going like this, it's kinda obvious that it's me. Who's, sorry. Sorry. So the hand shape is the letter a, right? How remake the fingers down, thumb along the side, just leave it like that palm facing in. Now make a circle. You, if you're really saw you need the overemphasize, keep going, keep being sorry for you or are just okay from the side, sorry, other side, sorry. Alright. Some people's signs saw using an S in the alphabet, sorry. In this course to be consistent, we're going to stick with the a. Sorry. Alright, sorry. Alright, good, good, good. Moving forward. Don't understand. Notice how it's up here. Understand is capital letters, that's a sign we're going to be using and don't over there is lowercase letters, but it's connected to understand. So let me show it to you in this is what it is. Alright. Don't understand. Alright. So we're not doing a separate sign per don't but we're communicating with our head that something's not right. Right. Okay. So the sign per understand is like this. Use your index finger and you're just making a flicking motion up palm facing towards you. Understand? Understand from the side, understand. Other sigh. Understand from the front again. Understand. Now in this situation we are trying to convey the message that we don't understand. So answer going like this, shake your head. Kind of a useful a universal signal for us now making sense. Understand. At the same time you can put a confused expression on your, on your face. Now contrast that with the robot expression where you have no expression at all. You'll be understood. It just looks a little strange because humans is partially deaf people. They use facial expressions like crazy because it is such an efficient way of communicating the situation, right? Okay. So don't understand don't understand. From this side. Other side. Okay, good, good. Let's do the whole sentence. Here we go. Alright, again, from the side, here's what it looks like. Other side. Alright, here we go a couple more times. Okay. So in English, I'm sorry, I don't understand. Even in English we put a facial expression. We're not like I'm sorry, I don't understand. We put in flexion in our voice. So think of inflection in spoken English, like facial expressions in sign language, they're essential for clear communication. Alright? So English, I'm sorry, I don't understand in American sign language. Alright. 22. Learn | Please sign again, slowly.: In English we would say, please sign again slowly. The equivalent in American Sign Language is pretty close. Alright, it's alright, let's break it down. Let's learn how to sign this. Here we go. Alright, please, I'm right-handed. The hand shape is like this. Fingers together, Tom alongside palm facing in. Make a circle on your test. Please. From the side. Please. From the other side, please. Okay. So please, The next one is sign index fingers. Now backward bicycle motion, not together, no. Alternating sign from the sine, sine from the other side. Sign. Okay, sign. Here is assigned pore again. Once again. Once again, I'm signing again. We're going to use both hands. I'm right handed, so with my left hand, my non-dominant hand, this hand shape. And put it over here. It is slightly tilted, right face, palm facing up my dominant hand, same handshape. But this time is going to go like this. Kinda like a rocket crashing into a wall or maybe like a dead end. So that means again, from the side, again, from the other side. Again. Alright, here we go. Again. Again. A good, good sign for slow, looks like this. Same hand shapes. Bombs alongside. I'm right-handed, non-dominant hand permease lefties who I'll put a right there, palm facing down, same hand-shaped right there. This one, my right hand. I'm going to go up slow making I'm touching the back of my hand. Slow. Slow from the side. Slow from the other side. Slow, slow. Good, good. Alright, we have the pieces. Now let's put them together like a puzzle. Here we go. Sign with me. We'll go nice and slow. Here we go. Please sign again. Slow. Alright, let's do it. All right, here we go. Please sign again. Slow. Please sign again. Slow. Right again. Here we go. Please sign again. Slow. From the side. From the other side. Alright, so in English, please sign again slowly. American Sign Language is pretty similar. Sounds pretty good. 23. Practice | Testing Group 2: Alright, practice before the test, ok, this time and these two parts for review, we're only going to focus on group two phrases, alright, Group two sentences, stuff we've already learned. Okay, the first part, there's a hand down there which means you sign. So use sign what you see and race the timer. I'm gonna put it up over here and use sign. Let's do a quick little practice test. Here we go. Okay, the timers for five seconds, that's the first part. So you raise a time or if you want to pause the video, that's alright too. No worries. After that, we're going to go to the next part where you see the little guy down there with the glasses. That means I'm gonna sign. You're gonna take a look at me, what's happening. You try to understand what I'm signing. Alright. I'm just going to sign it one time. So if you need to pause the video and have me repeat. No worries. Okay. Here we go. Okay. So what did I sign? I signed signs slow, please. Okay. So the first part, use sign. You see the little hand down their second part, I'm going to sign and of course I'm gonna have my glasses on for the testing. So I'll be quiet. Let's jump right in. 26. Practice | Testing Groups 1-2: Practice before the test. All right, we're going to be focusing on all of the phrases from groups 12, alright, altogether in random order. The first part, you're going to sign, there's a 5 second timer. Alright, let's do a quick little practice test. See how it works. Here we go. Alright, so that's the first part where you're going to sign what you seen. Alright, with the hand down there. The second part, we're going to do an understanding, an exercise or recognition exercise where you have me, I'm going to sign something, something that we've already learned and you try to figure out what am I doing? All right, let's do it. Alright, so what did I sign? Well, I signed Nice me, me you. In other words, nice to meet you. Ok. So first part, use sine, second part, I sign, put on the glasses. Alright, remember this is all about groups one, N2 phrases, all of them random order. What an opportunity. 29. Explore | Group 3 Phrases: Group three phrases you, here's what we're about to learn. I can finger spell. Well, how do you sign cat? You have to finger spell it. What does this sign bug mean? My teacher signs vast. Are your parents death? I'm a hearing person and I can sign a little bit. Okay, so let's jump in. We're going to learn each praise, each sentence individually. Then we're gonna divide into separate words and learn how to assign each word, put it back together, do some practice, have a good time, and boost our skills. Here we go. 30. Learn | I can’t fingerspell well.: In English we might say, I can't finger spell well, well, the equivalent in ASL is, alright, let's learn how to sign this. Here we go. The first word is finger spell. Here's this sign. We're going to make this handshape, right? The fingers are apart, they're not together like that. Alright, so we have that, put it over here. Palm facing forward, fingers are straight out pointing forward and now flutter. And as you flutter, move to this side. Fingers bell. Fingers bell. If you're left D Just dude over here and moved to that side. Fingers bell. Ready for me? Fingers bell, fingers, both from the side. Fingers bell. Other side. Fingers bow. Let's do it a couple of times. Fingers, bell. Fingers bell. The next word is good. Here's the sign. Good. The hand shapes are the same, right? Tighten up your fingers. Flat hand bombs alongside. I'm right-handed with my non-dominant hand. I'm going to put it a boat here with the palm facing towards me. Write with my right hand, I'm going to touch my lips and then with the back of the hand, go like that. Good. Good. From the side. Other side. Good. Alright, let's do it a couple times from the front. Here we go. Good. Good. And if you're wondering, bad is bad, both a darker complexion, Right? So good. You might have more of an, at least a neutral complex in a neutral facial expression. And it is really good. Yeah, it's good, good, good. Okay, let's see what else we have. Let's see the sign for Kant is like this. Can't. The hand shapes are the same. Index fingers, pointer fingers. I'm right-handed. My non-dominant hand. I'm gonna put it down here. Alright, kinda flat. Palm facing down with my dominant hand. I'm gonna take the tip of the finger and flick the top of this finger, the back, the fingernail part, right. Can't can't. At the same time that we're going like this, we're going to be shaking her head in the negative, right? Because it's cannot negative word. Can't tint from the side. Can't. Other side, can't. Alright. Here we go a couple of times. Can't. Can't. Okay, good, good. Next word is me. Nice and straightforward. Index finger. Just point to yourself, me, me to same thing as I write. So I or me. We've learned the puzzle pieces. Let's put them all together. Here we go. Fingers bell, good. Can't me. There we go again. Fingers bell. Good. Can't MY fingers bell. Good. Can't me. Alright, from the side. Fingers bell, good. Can't mean other side. Fingers spill. Good. Can't mean. Alright, let's do it a little bit quicker now, here we go. Fingers bell. Good. Can't mean. Alright, so English version is I can't finger spell well, in sign language the same word, similar, but moved around a little bit. So we just learned how to sign. Alright. 31. Learn | How do you sign CAT?: In English we would say, how do you sign cat? The equivalent in ASL would be. Alright, let's learn how to sign this. Here we go. The first part is finger spelling, right? We're just going to spell the word CAT, CAT, right? So we're gonna go C, a, T, right? How do we make a C? Well, hand like this. Curve it together, fingers together curves. So it looks, literally looks like I see nice. See a fingers together, fingers down, thumb alongside there is an a. So, so far we have C, a, now a t. Well, it's pretty close to an a, but you're going to talk your thumb under your index finger. That is a t, right? T. So we have C a T for cat. Alright. C a T. C a T. But good. Moving forward. Resigned for how? Put her hands together like this. Knuckles coming together. How how from the side how right hand shaped lake then knuckles coming together. Put it about here. How so you're turning it up. How good? Sign for sign the sign for sign. Index fingers now rotate backwards like you're pedaling backwards on a bicycle, right? Index fingers there not going together. They're going alternately. Ones come in India than the other one follows sign from the side sign. Other side sign. Okay, now we need to communicate that this is a question. So it's a how question, right? How questions get grouped in with the WH questions like who, what, where, when and why, right? So who, what, where, when, how, why? How do we communicate? Do you remember how do we communicate that? It's this kind of question. What do we do? Do the eyebrows go up or the eyebrows go down? Well, they go down, furrow your eyebrows, have an inquisitive look, something like this when you're signing, how sign, right? So it will look like this. The face just expresses, You know, I'd like to know something about what's happening. Alright, so once again, this highlighted part here would be n That eyebrows down in phase like that clearly communicates that you want to know something. Alright, good. So we have learned the parts. Let's put them all together. What's goes slow? Sign with me. C a T. How sign? Alright, again, see a t. How sign? Alright, a little bit quicker. From the side you go see a t. I'll sign other side c a t. How sign? Right from the front. Once again, sign with me. Here we go. Alright, I hope you realize how useful this sentence is right now, specifically the CAT, but the structure of this sentence. So basically we can replace CAT with any word that we want to know the sign for. Whether it's truck, whether it's paper, whatever it is, you can finger spell it, put it in there, and then go how sign. And the person that you're communicating with understands. You want to know how to sign whatever you just finger spell. And before I forget, in case you're wondering cat, What's the sign for cat? It's like this. Right? Just like you're pinching One of the whiskers or your tugging on it, you're pulling on it. Alright, cat. Alright, good, good. So in English you would say, how do you sign cat? Now it could be, how do you sign? Happy. How do you sign food? Whatever your word is, alright, replace as necessary. So in this specific instance, the signing is alright. 32. Learn | You have to fingerspell it.: In English, we would say you have to finger spell it. In American Sign Language we would sign. Alright, let's learn how to sign this. Here we go. The sign for finger spelled Do you remember? It looks like this. Here's the handshape. Right? Put it back here. Palm facing forward, fingers out. Now flooded the fingers and move away a little bit. Finger spell, no need to go like this. Way off into oblivion. Go like this a little bit. Finger spell if you lefty fingers bow. So I'm right-handed. Finger spell from the sine fingers bell, from the other side, fingers bell. All right. Most here is assigned per must. We're going to use the hand shape of the letter x in the alphabet like x, y, z, x. Now we can take a shortcut and say just pretend you're Captain Hook up your hook right index finger and make a hook. That's all you gotta do. If you wanna go slowly, we can say get rid of these three fingers, put your thumb in front. Now curve the index finger down and make a hook. Hook. Captain Hook, there's your x. Ok. Now we're going to assign mosque. So take your ex, turn it so the polymers Bayesian forward, the tip of the index fingers facing forward, put it about here. And now just tilted down. Must, must. It's all in the wrist. Must, from the side. Must other side. Must. Couple more times. Here we go. Mst must, you could even put in a head of primitive that, yeah, it's important. Must. Alright, let's see. All right, let's put the two parts together. Here we go. Fingers, bell, must. Finger spell, must. From the side. Other side. Right. A couple more times. There we go. Okay. So what situation In what situation you think someone might sign this to you or you might sign this to someone, what do you think? Well, this is in response to someone asking, how do you sign the finger, spelled something or they wrote something down the road, a word down maybe with a finger spelled it. And they said, how do you sign it, right? Well, in American sign language, there is not a sign for every word in English. So it's common, especially when it's more technical terms, names is very common. Proper noun and stuff like that. Names of buildings, schools, whatever is very common to finger spell. So if you ask them, how do you sign that word and there's no sign or they don't know sign for those. Say finger, spell, must, fingers, bell must. In other words, you have to finger spell it. Alright, so English, you have to finger spell it. American Sign Language, fingers bell, must. Good, good. 33. Learn | What does the sign “bug” mean?: In English we'd say, what does this sign bug me, right, to communicate the equivalent in ASL we would sign. Alright, let's jump in and let's learn how to sign this. There we go. All right, the first one sign to SQL-like this. Index fingers backwards, bicycle motion, right? Not together, alternating her sine. Sine. Sine. Good, good. Okay. Here is the sign for bug. All right, you're gonna do is straight on from the side. You can see a little bit easier that the hand shape is the number three, right? Three. We're gonna take the tip of the thumb around the tip of the nose and go down twice with the index finger and the middle finger. Right. So straight on, sign it bug. From the sine bug, other side bug. Bug. Okay. The sign for the word mean or the concept, the sign mean in American Sign Language, is this. Ok, I'm right-handed with my left hand, my non-dominant hand. I'm gonna make this handshape, tighten up the fingers, thumb alongside. Now I'm going to tilt forward and put it down here. Alright. With the flat of the hand, the bottom part facing out that way. Okay. With my right hand, I'm going to make the number two or we can say the V, that's fine. Okay, we're gonna take the tips and we're going to poke it into the bottom of the hand, the open part of the hand. And we're going to u1 now Twisted and poke again, right altogether. Mean? Mean. Mean, right. I mean, sometimes I see this hand when people sign it, it it moves a little bit, right? Other times it doesn't move at all. So I mean, from the side here, really see much there. Let's go to the other side. Mean mean from the front once again, mean. So you're going flat. Poke when you twist forward, poke again. Mean, OK, good, good. Now let's figure out how to do this. We're not gonna do a separate sign for what? That would be like this, but it's lowercase here, so we're going to make a high red wax. You were just going to sign mean kind of a hybrid because we're going to add in facial expressions from WH questions. Alright, how do we make the facial expression hint? For wh questions? Do you remember? Right? Pero the eyebrows kinda have a face like this. What do you got there? Trying to tell me something or how are they need? Right? That's the facial expression. We're going to use that same facial expression as we sign mean, mean, mean. So as we combine the facial expression with the sine, it becomes like a super sign communicating multiple things because we want to know. And then when it's an unnecessary to sign what? So to sign this, we would go mean right here's a sign, mean, add in the facial, put it all together. Mean, mean. Alright, good, good. Question. Whole sentence Here we go. From the other side. Alright, let's do the end with me. Okay? Hopefully you appreciate how useful this sentence structure is. Because we can replace the word bug, in this case the sign for bug, right? So this situation, imagine you're signing and you saw someone make a sign that you don't understand, but you saw it, right? So you can probably reproduce it. So stick it in this sentence, right? So you can do a bug, could be whatever sign it is. In this situation, we would pretend that we didn't know what this meant and we saw and we're like, you know, what does that mean? So whenever you see a sign that you don't recognize, you could ask this question, put the word in there, put the sign in there and figure out what it means. Ok, so in English, what does assign bug mean? In American Sign Language would be sine bug mean. What mean? Okay. 34. Learn | My teacher signs fast!: In English we would say, my teachers sines fast. The equivalent in American Sign Language would be, OK, let's learn how to sign this. Here we go. My Here's the sign. Pour my my I'm right-handed. I'm gonna make this handshape, fingers together, thumb alongside, turn it in and go mine. So I start out a little bit and then press in my from this side, my, from the front. My, my. The next word is next sign is teacher. Teacher is a two part sign. Literally it is teach, person, alright, together, that is, teach her. Alright, let's break it apart. Resigned pre-teach is like this. We're gonna take owes, squish them down. Now put them here on both sides of your head, out forward from your head a little bit and just go forward. Teach. Teat. Think of the idea. Your mind is full of wisdom and knowledge and you're projecting it. You're giving it to the teacher, the students, whoever you're teaching, teach from the sine. Teach. Other side. Td. Okay. So teacher is teach person, right? Teacher to sign person. We just basically form the sides of a box and set it down. Person, person, hand shapes like this. Same person, person, other side person. Okay, so let's put it together for teacher, which is teach person, teach person, teacher, teacher, from the side. Teacher, other side. T TR. Okay. Okay. Sign index fingers, backwards, bicycle motion. Remember not together, backwards. Sine. Sine. Sine. Okay, good. Let's go too fast. Here is the sign for fast. Alright, we're going to use the l hand-shaped for both hands. All right. How do you make an L? Well, go like this. Put the last three down there is your L. You ever seen someone go like this for loser? That's a noun. Perfect example. Okay, now put them together, pointing a little bit off to the side like their guns. Guns. Alright. And you are going to pull in as we pulled the triggers passed, right? So when we're pulling in, pulling the triggers were also tilting back. Just pretend the recoil, the kickback from the gun is alright. That is fast, fast, fast. Other side, fast, fast, fast. Okay, good. This sentence is an exclamation, right? So in English, we would say, my teachers sines fast. How did you know as exclamation? Well, you heard in my voice, right. Probably also started my eyes, my face, and my body movements. Wow, you know, it's so fast that our, alright, so an American Sign Language, we add in the same staff, right? Put in the facial expression, the excitement, the eyes rope and it's like, wow, you know, it's so fast. All right. So with the exclamation, it would look like this, right? Maybe something like this. Alright, see how alive my faces. If you just sit and just observe deaf people, alright, just observe, even if you don't understand what they're saying, watch their faces. Holy cow. It's just a myriad of facial expressions, excitement, telling a story. Mckee, basically painting a visual picture of what they're trying to communicate. And when you put in the facial expressions, wow, suddenly becomes even more crystal clear. Okay. So we did the exclamation. Let me sign it as if it was just a regular sentence with the period. Okay. All right. So we did the same signs. We did a little bit less body motion, the eyes burned up. We were, we didn't look that excited, which is sharing, you know, my teacher sines fast. Once again with the period. Alright, let's boost it. Boosts the energy mode two and exclamation. Here we go. Alright, let's do some practice. Alright, so sign with me. We'll go slow little bit. We'll speed it up. Remember, just throw it in the facial expressions. It's just a great way to communicate. Okay. Again, here we go. Right? Open those eyes, convey the meaning. Okay. Okay, one more time. Here we go. Okay, so in English, my teachers signs Vast, right? We even have some facial expressions. We have the boys making a sound, Oh, you know, I understand this guy's pretty excited about something in American sign language. Use the body, use your face. Okay. 35. Learn | Are your parents deaf?: In English we would say, are your parents death. In American Sign Language we would sign. Alright, let's learn how to sign this question. Here we go. The sign for your is like this. Here's the handshape. Fingers tight together, thumb alongside. I'm right handed, so that's what I'm going to use. And I go your I'm talking with you. You and I are having a conversation. So you're if I'm talking with bread, he's over here. I would go your your the sign for parents looks like this. Literally. It's mom, dad. Mom, dad. Now the hand shape is like the number five, open hand. Use the thumb. This is mom on the chin. Mom and dad. So together, Mom, Dad, that means parents. Let's take a look from the sine mom, dad, In other words, parents from this side, parents from the front. Parents. Alright, let's move forward to deaf. Use your index finger, your pointer finger. We're going to use this side right here. This, the tip is going to be in two parts. We're going to go one in front of your ear, close to your ear, to down by your mouth. Alright. So it's def def from the side. Deaf, other side. Deaf her. Alright. So when you're using the index finger, don't stick it in your year. There's no need actually to touch your ear. Just get close right about there. No need to touch your mouth. Just get close. Alright, so deaf. Alright. Let's see here. You will notice that some people's sign it the opposite way. They go. Deaf. Alright? The touching spots, the places where you make contact to the same. They just start the mouth and go to the ER, alright, deaf. To be consistent in this course, we're going to stick with ear to mouth. Alright, so deaf. Once again, this course, deaf. All right, good. We need to communicate that this is a question. So let's take a look at the English part, or your parents death. What are our choices? Our option? Well, we could say yes. The SDR, No, they aren't in. We probably wouldn't say maybe because it's an either or type thing. Alright. So are your parents death? Yes or no? So this is a yes or no question, Which means, what do we do with our eyebrows? All right. They're gonna go up, right. So when we signed deaf or eyebrows would go up, lean forward a little bit, have this basic aha. Aha. I want to know what you're gonna tell me. Alright, so deaf. Deaf. Deaf. Alright. If you don't raise your eyebrows, you don't make it into a question using your facial expressions, then it's just regular resistor statement. Alright, so let me show you the full sentence in the question and the statement. All right. So here I'm just telling you what it is. Here. I'm asking the question in both of them, you can have neutral facial expressions when you're signing the first two parts. So here's the question. Alright. Did you notice the first two signs, your and parents? Just regular. But once I got to def I have to communicate that it's a question. I lean forward, raise your eyebrows. Death. Okay. Let's do some practice here. E0 sine with me. Okay. Your parents deaf. Your parents death from the side. Other side. Okay. So in English or your parents death in sign language would be all right, good, good. 36. Learn | I’m a hearing person.: In English we would say, I'm a hearing person or I'm hearing in American Sign Language, we would sign. Okay. Let's jump in. Here we go. The sign for I use the index finger pointed yourself. I i i okay. The sign for hearing looks like this. We're also going to use the index finger, lay it flat, palm facing in, put it close to your mouth in front and due to circular motions. Hearing. Hearing. Hearing. Hearing. Okay. So imagine like a water fall of words coming out or something like that and its role in out. Hearing. Good, good. Let's put it all together. I hearing from the psi, i hearing, other side, eye hearing. So if someone had signed to you, Are you deaf? You could just sign back. I hearing. So the equivalent in English, I'm a hearing person in American sign language. Okay. 37. Learn | I can sign a little bit.: In English we might say, I can sign a little bit. The equivalent in American Sign Language is, alright, let's jump in and learn this. Here we go. I, index finger pointing yourself and go in. I, i, sine looks like this. We use an index fingers, same handshape right? Now it's a backwards bicycle pedaling motion, right? They're not going together. We're going alternating sine, sine, sine, right? Beside for a little bit. Just go like this. Like you're measuring something from the other side. Ok. Let's put it all together. Here we go. I sign a little bit. I sign a little bit from the side. Okay. So how you sign little bit plus the facial expression. Can he give even more details, right. Like maybe you sign a little bit more than a little bit and not enough to say alignment or medium whatever. So you could be like now let's say you just know like two words and you know how to smile. You might say, git add tiny bed, right? Okay. English, I can sign a little bit in American sign language. Okay. 38. Practice | Testing Group 3: Practice before the test. That's right. We're going to have two parts. First part will be used signing. Second power will be u watching and trying to understand, okay, first part, with the hand down there, the timer means you sign, right. So you look at what HHS up there and use sign. Okay, let's do a quick practice test. Here we go. Okay, so that's the format for the first part. In the second part, we're not going to have a timer. And you're going to see that little guy down there with the glasses. Alright, so this means you are going to look at me. I'm gonna be signing. You're watching what's happening a half, you try to understand what I'm signing. All right. Let's do a little practice. Here we go. Alright, what did I sign? I'm just going to sign it once. So if you need to repeat, go back and have me repeat sign in it, that's fine. Alright, here we go. I signed your parents deaf. Okay. So the first part, use sine. Second part, i sine and you try to understand what I'm doing. Let me get the glasses. We are just going to be focusing on group three phrases. That's it for this section. All right, let's do it. 41. Explore | Group 4 Phrases: Whoa, boy is group four phrases. Here's what we're about to learn. Come here, please. Where you from? Don't trust him. He is line. What do you do for work? Are you married? Do you have kids? Can you teach me sign language? Which do you like? Tea or soda. And what's your favorite movie? Okay, so we're gonna jump in. We're going to look at each individual phrase and go even further. We're going to dissect it and learn each individual sine n concept. Then we'll put it back together and practice, practice. Ok, let's do it. 42. Learn | Come here please.: In English, we would say, come here please. In American Sign Language the equivalent would be, alright, let's learn how to sign this. Here we go. Okay, we have a two part concept here. Alright, the motion's going to be all in one movement. Come here. Here's what it looks like. Ok, the sine four km, the capital letter ones come is like this. Index fingers, all right, pointer fingers like this. Now you appoint forward and then you come back and then you end up pointing at yourself. Come from the side, come other side, cone. So come. Now, we want to get in the concept of here. The actual signed for here is this. But we don't need a sign that here because we could just keep going with our fingers and indicate here r hat. So we're pointing down at the end instead of pointing towards ourself. So we take this sine Km and we just keep turning down. So it looks like this. Come here, come here, come here from the side, come here, other side, come here. Alright, let's do it a couple times. Here we go. Alright, so remember, come the sign come by itself is right where you end pointed at yourself. Now we want to get the concept of come here, just keep going down. So you're pointing like in your location. Come here. This might be common with kids or someone across the room. All right. You need them over in your area? Okay. All right, please. Here's the sign for please. Alright. I'm right-handed. We're going to use the hand shape like this, whether you're left to your righty. Okay. I'm right-handed. Tighten up the fingers, thumb alongside palm facing you lightly on your chest and go on a circle. All right. Please. From the side. Please. From the other side. Please. All right. Please. Let's put it together. Here we go. Alright, come here. Please. Come here, please. From the side. Other side. Come here, please. Alright. Now your facial expression can add a lot to this, right? If it's just some person who is a ways away need maybe show them something that's close or whatever reason you want them to change their physical location to you, you'd have more of a neutral look on your face, right? Right. Maybe you can even indicate extra, you mean right here. Now if it's a kid or your child and you're upset, it might show on your face, right? If you're upset, it might be strange to say please. But maybe if you're battling with their inner devil and you're upset, but you still want to end it with something nice. Okay? So just the basic signs by itself, our alright, so we're rotating fingers. Come, point down. Please. Come here please. All right, so in English, come here, please. American Sign Language, quite similar. 43. Learn | Where are you from?: In English we would say, Where are you from in American Sign Language we would sign. Alright, let's learn how to sign this. Here we go. You index finger, I'm talking with you. So I point to you, you single motion u. Here is the sign for from. Alright, we're going to use our index fingers. Okay, I'm right handed, so with my non-dominant hand, I'm going for my left-hand, a boat here. Alright, just sticking it out. Their index finger pointing up. Now I'm gonna take my right hand, that's my dominant hand. I'm gonna take the index finger and go like this. All right, so I'm touching the tip of this index finger with the tip of this one, and then I'm pulling back. And when I finished my hand shape is in the shape of an x. I have. So you're just going like this. If we look at it would be like this for right here. So from from, from the side, from, from the other side, from a hub, you can kind of pretend this is like a string or something in your plucking the string, maybe something like that from, right, let's do it a couple times. From from from. All right. Let's go to where the sign per Where is index finger again? Just wiggle it back and forth. Palm facing forward, right. So I'm right-handed. I'll put it about here. Where where if you left D where? Right. So we have where. We need to make sure that it's communicated as a question. So what do you think? It's a WH question? What do we do with the eyebrows? And we put them down, right? We furrow our eyebrows. Inquisitive, look what's happening, something's going on. So I'm resigning where we go like this with our phase. Where inquisitive look where. All right, let's take a look at the whole thing. So let's sign it together. Here we go. You from where you, from, where you are, from, where? Now you can furrow your eyebrows when you sign you, that's fine. You can infer your eyebrows when you sign from make sure that you would throw your eyebrows when you sign where? Now you also have the option of not furrowing, not doing the eyebrow thing when you sign you from. But once you get to where you need to do the eyebrows. So here are a few different ways of doing it. Alright, so the second time I kept my eyebrows pro the whole time, that's up to you, right? Main thing is remember once you get to the sign where for the eyebrows, right here we go. Let's sign again from the side. Other side. Okay. So in English, where are you from? Asl? Pretty close. We just switch around some of the words. Get rid of R because remember those small words. Amr is, was where throw him out. They don't sign them. Okay. So we just learned how to sign. Okay. 44. Learn | Don't trust him. He's lying.: In English we could say, Don't trust him, he's lying. In American Sign Language, the equivalent would be, alright, let's learn how to sign this. Here we go. The sign for trust, looks like this. Alright, once again, trust, basically we have been open hand shapes and we go down two fists were just closing up our office maybe moving down just a little bit. Trust. I'm right handed. So I'm gonna put my right hand on here on top, kind of a loose open hand. You're getting ready to grab something, alright. Now, with my left hand, my non-dominant hand, I'll put it down here. You can kind of pretend there's an imaginary rope, alright? And you're waiting to grab it, and then when you sign trust, you squeeze it. Alright. Trust. Trust, from the side, trust, other side, trust. Alright, let's do it from the front a couple times. Here we go. Trust. Trust. Good, good. The sign for him. Just use your index finger wherever the person is. Let's say it's Pete. He's over there. We would just point at him. Him if he's over there, we pointed him him. Alright. If he's not here, he is not present. Just point off to the side, pick a little space here and point, alright, him. Or if you want to point over here, that's fine to him. Just be consistent where you point referring to him, but he's not here. If he's here, wow, it's easy. Just point, Adam. Now they might say it's rude to point. It makes people feel bad. Well, that might be true, especially if you're getting in their face and you're like, well, no one likes that, right? No matter what language you speak, no one likes that. But in American sign language, think of it more as referring to someone, right? We need to point at them to indicate, to show, to refer to them. That means communication. What are we just gonna go like this all day long? No. Use your index finger and point him. Him, Pete. Yeah. Here. Okay. Good, good. We need to communicate that it's a question. Now let me ask you, is it a WH question or a yes, no question? This will decide what we do with our eyebrows. What do you think? Trust him. How would you answer? Well, you have a couple options. Yes, no, maybe. So it's a yes-no question. So eyebrows go up, right? So many questions. Small question, trust him. Makes sure your eyebrows go up when you sign him. Him. Right. So the first sentence would be trust him right here. Okay. In this situation, we're going to sign no, like this. Right? One way to sign no. It would be like this this is a regular one. No. Right? No. However, in this situation, it's like dangerous. Don't do it is bad, right? No. Right. We could do that even if you don't speak sign language, people communicate. Hey, don't go there, right? No. Okay. Good. So o Open hand and wave a little bit down there. But more Earth-like, jerky movements, right? It's not like no. It's like adding the facial expression. No. Okay. He good news. He is the same sign as him. Index finger in point wherever he is. Hmm. So if a person's not here to still sign up to the side, he, he, alright, the sign for LEI looks like this. Here's my hand shape. I'm right handed, so I am closing on my fingers, tilting it down and now I'm just rubbing my chin just a little bit. Lie, lie. And since lie, you know, it's not really seen as a positive thing. It's now like Lai, nice and smooth. It's more of a jerky quick motion. Lie, lie. Now I've seen lie signed in multiple different ways. Alright, I've seen it with this hand shape and they put it more in front of the face. Lie. I've seen it with a finger, one finger, they go and lie. There are multiple ways in this course, we're going to keep this handshape and go like this lie lie to be consistent. Okay. So lie from the side, lie from the other side lie. Lie, you lie. Okay, so let's do it all together step-by-step. We actually have multiple sentences here. There is a small but let's do them. Okay. Trust him. Eyebrows up. No, he lie right altogether. Right. Once again, notice how the more like emotionally we are, the more kind of full of disdain maybe we are the more jerky movements become and our facial expression reflects what the situation is showing what's happening, right? So in this situation we're gonna pretend, you know, it's a little bit more serious. We're not just like now, we're now like wishy-washy. We're more direct and to the point we know this guy. Trust him. Now, he lie. If you really want to add extra, extra information, extra, you could do lie multiple times. Ly, you're just emphasizing that he is really a liar. Lie. Alright? So in this course we're just doing ones will go lie. But it gives you the option, if you really wanna lay it in there, a liar. Okay, so let's do it. Trust him, know he lie. Alright, so in English, Don't trust him. His line in American sign language. Okay. 45. Learn | What do you do for work?: In English we say, what do you do for work? While the equivalent in ASL is, alright, let's learn how to sign this. Here we go. Here is the sign for work. Alright, we're using fists. Or you can say the letter S or you can say, you know, put up your dukes. Those are the hand shapes. Ok, I'm right handed, so I'm gonna hold down with this one, my left hand, my non-dominant hand, I'm gonna put down here. Okay, so the top of the side of the face is facing up polymers in. Alright, so with my right hand, my dominant hand, I'm gonna use this part, the bottom part of the poem and go like this. All right, so work, right just here on the side of the fish over here. Work from the side. Work, from the other side. Work. Work. Once again, work. Alright, the sign for you, index finger, I'm talking to you. You, alright. If I'm talking to fret over there, I will be respectful in point myself, my body motion towards him. You were having a conversation. You are right. What do first it looks like this. What do we have? What in there? It's lowercase who were not actually signing what the sign for what we're going to just do, do. Alright? And it is a question, we'll get to the question in a moment. But the hand movement is just like this. Our doing is pinching and unpin seen our fingers. So from this side it will look like this where we tilt it. So like this, palms facing up, use index finger and the thumb and just go like this from the other side. What do what do? Okay. Now we need to make sure it's a question. What do you think? What do we do with the eyebrows? The eyebrows, facial expression, so important when we're communicating questions. Okay. So it's a WH question, who, what, where, when, how, and why eyebrows go down, down. Now you have this look, what's happening, what's going on over there. You want to know. So when you're signing, what do make sure your eyebrows are down? You can raise up your chin a little bit. What do? What do? Ok, let's put it all together. Here we go. Nice and slow. Work. You what dill work you what do? Alright, you're signing with me right? From the side. Other side. Remember that inquisitive look, eyebrows down, alright, in English we say, what do you do for work in ASL, we would sign. Okay. Sounds good. 46. Learn | Are you married? Do you have kids?: In English we say, are you married? Do you have kids? To sign the equivalent in ASL? We'd go like this. Ok, let's learn how to sign this. Here we go. Alright, the sign for married is this. Married? Here are the hand shapes. Alright, so we have the hands tied together now kinda curve them down. They're not seize that are like this. Dumps out to the side. I'm right handed. So with my non-dominant hand, my lefty left-hand, I'm gonna put it down here, face up, righthand, palm down, going like this. Okay. We're making a union because it's married, right? Married from the side. Married. Other side. Married. Married. Good, good. Next word. You so comment. Index finger. You do not have any conversation. My body's turned towards you. Single motion. You Okay. Aha, our first little sentence, we need to make sure it's a question that we're communicating it as a question. So are you married? What do you think? Well, it's a yes, no question. Yes, no. Be kinda weird to say Maybe yes or no question for sure, right? So what do we do with the eyebrows? Hint. Alright, yes, no questions. Eyebrows go up. Alright, so when you're signing this sentence, When you sign, you put your eyebrows up, lean forward, you have a little inquisitive look. You want to know, right? So that first sentence would look like this. Married, you. Married you. Okay. Good. Kids. Hear is assigned for kids. Kids. Alright. Here's the handshape. I'm right handed, so I'm gonna use my dominant hand. Right? Kinda like you're rocking out, right? Rocking out. So the index finger in the pinkie finger are up, right? All of the other fingers are down, the thumbs in front now tilted like this. You're gonna take the inside of the index finger, put it under your chin, and then you're going to waive the pinky kids. Kids from the side, kid from the other side. Kids. Alright. Just a few times, kids. Just wave at a couple of times, kids. Okay. Let's see. The next sign is have this is the handshape, right? Kinda like this together. Bend the fingers down a bit, start out here and go in. Have, have from the side I have from the other side. Have like you're taking possession of something, have hair. Alright. We're to the question, how do we communicate that as a question is very similar to the first one up there. Well, do you have kids? Yes. No question. All right. So we're going to raise the eyebrows. Inquisitive look, when you sign half like that, you can even lean forward a little bit. Have, alright, so that second sentence there would look like this. Kids have. Alright, so we have too many questions here. Let's sign them. Here we go. Let's do it again. Here we go. Married you kids have it from the side. Other side. Alright, let's do it again from the front side and with me here we go. So in English, are you married? Do you have any kids in American Sign Language? Married. You kids have okay. 47. Learn | Can you teach me sign language?: In English we would say, Can you teach me sign language in ASL, the equivalent would look like this. Alright, let's learn how to sign this. Here we go. Alright. First thing we're going to notice is that we have concepts here that are actually single signs in American sign language. But in English we would need multiple words to communicate them. But in American Sign Language, it's very simplified, it's very efficient. Okay, so the sign for do you mind is this index finger tip on your nose and pointed whoever you're talking to. Do you mind, right. I'm talking to you. I will point at you been talking to Pete. Do you mind? I'm talking to Sally. Do you mind? Do you mind? Pretty straightforward. Do you mind her? Good good. Sign for th is like this. Teach we have always, we squish them down. We start here we go, teach it. However, we want to sign the concept of Teach Me. Now the regular teacher is like, I'm the teacher, I got the information and I've given it to you, write td. However, I'm asking you to teach me. So let's switch the directions and make it a little bit different. We're going to go like this. Teach me. The hand shapes are the same, but we're going to tilt them. So they start out and then they come in to me like you're the one with the information that I wanted to come into me. Teach me from the side, teach me. Other side, teach me. So teach me. Let's move to sign the sign pour sign is like this. Index fingers. Right now it's a backwards bicycle motion like you're pedaling backwards. Sign together, right? They're alternating, alternating sign. Sign. Alright, we need to make sure it's a question. So let's go back to the English. What do you think? Yes, no question or a wh question. Kinda obvious. Can you teach me sign language? Well, we can answer. Yes, no, maybe. So it's a yes, no question. There are means the eyebrows go up, right? So when you sign this last word, this last concept, sign eyebrows up, lean forward, inquisitive, look what's happening. Yeah, ha ha, sign. Good. Let's put it all together. Here we go. Do you mind teach me sign? Do you mind teach me sign? Alright. From the other side. Alright. Once again, straight down with you, I'm talking to you. I'm asking you, can you teach me sign language? Now? You can have your eyebrows up for the full sentence if you want. Looks like this. That's fine. If you want to conserve your eyebrow energy, you can hold out until you get to sign. The main thing is that you, once you get to this sign sign, you need to have eyebrows up to communicate a question. Yes, no question. So alright, in English, can you teach me sign language? In American sign language, we just go like this. All right. 48. Learn | Which do you like: tea or soda?: In English we might say, Which do you like tea or soda? In American Sign Language the equivalent would be, alright, let's jump in and sign this. Here we go. Here is the sign for tea. All right, first we need a cup with your non-dominant hand for me lefty, I'm gonna make an O tilted down. So it's like I'm holding a cup, my dominant hand, I'm going to make the letter F. How do you make the F? Index finger, thumb. Put them together. These three fingers stay out straight, right? Now use the tip of the thumb and the index finger and go around the rim of the cup of u times, right? It's like you're stirring your tea. Aha. Okay. T sine, t from the other side. T. T. Okay, soda, looks like this. Alright, we're going to have that same cup which is just an, oh, put it down there. Now go like this. Middle finger coming down. Dip the middle finger in, take it back out and go back down. Soda, soda. Soda. Alright, so this sign soda works for a pop. Soda pop. However you referred to soda. Soda from the side. Soda. From the other side. Soda. All right. You index finger, you like, here is the sign for like like, okay, we're going to be making this movement. Right thumb going to the middle finger, like that. So starts apart, incomes together, but we're gonna do it right here on your test. So a starts apart. Like if you're looking from above that would be like this. Like okay. So like from the side, like other side, like we have like like here is assigned for which this put up your thumbs, like thumbs up right now, alternate because you have two options, right? You're going which? Which from the side, which other side? Which? Now we need to make it a question. Haha. So this is also considered a WH question, right? Usually we think of who, what, where, when, and how and why, but which is also a W questions. So what do we do with eyebrows? A WH question, Excuse me, right? What do we do with our eyebrows with WH questions? I'm down right? We're going to follow the eyebrows, have an inquisitive look. What's happening over there. Yeah. Yeah. That kinda look on your face. So when you're signing which to communicate that it's a question. Which which? Which? Alright, let's sign the whole thing. Now watch me the first time because you're going to notice some body movement that I haven't yet talked about, but we're going to explore. Okay, here we go. T, soda, you like, wit. Ha, so did you notice what I did when I sine t and soda? Because in English we have or, you know, or two options, which one or in sign language, we don't need to have a separate sign for, or we're just going to shift our body, right? We're literally showing two options. We're painting the picture of visual picture up two options. So in this case we have t over here shifting to my right, and then we have soda over here. So you could kind of imagine there are two sauces or plates. One has t, The other has soda. And I'm showing you the options, right? So let me sign the whole thing again and watch how I do it. T soda, you like. Which? Okay. So just body shipped. You could call it the ore body shift. But when you have two options, show them one, show them the other one, and then you, you like which? Ah, so this can work for other things too. It just doesn't have to be t and the soda, hopefully you realize that maybe we have apple, orange. Apple orange, you like, which? In our case it's t. Soda, you like which? Alright, so sign with me. Let's do some practice. Sign width b, t, soda, knew like which? From this side it looks like this other side. Okay. Once again. Ok. In English, which do you like tea or soda in American Sign Language. Good, good. 49. Learn | What’s your favorite movie?: In English, we'd say, what's your favorite movie? In American Sign Language, the equivalent would be, alright, let's learn how to sign this. Here we go. Movie, the first sign, here's movie. Alright, we're going to use both hands. I'm right handed. So the right hand is shape is going to be like this. The number five with my non-dominant hand, my left hand. I'm going to go like this, right? And I'm going to put it down here, take the palm, put it alongside in Fannie back and fourth waver back and fourth movie. Movie from the side, movie, from the other side. Movie. Alright, here we go again. Movie, movie. Good. The next sign is your, looks like this. Here's the handshape with your dominant hand. I'm right-handed. Like that, dumb alongside now I'm talking to you. So a single motion in your direction. Your your Here is a sign for favorite. Favorite. We're going to bend down our middle finger, alright. The tip of the middle finger and touch her chin. That means favorite from the sign, favorite from the other side. Favorite favorite design per what we're going to use, the number 555. Now put them down here, palms facing up and just go back and forth. What what from the side? What other sign? What OK. We have a question we needed communicated as a question. It's a WH question. What do we do with the eyebrows? Put him down. That's right. Okay. So when we're signing, what go like this. All right. Are look the look on her face. What's happening over there has some things going. That's the face. What what what. Let's put it all together. Here we go. Sign with me. Movie your favorite. What? Alright, again, here we go. Movie. Your favorite, what? A little bit quicker? Movie your favorite what? Right again, here we go. From the side, it looks like this. Other side. Right from the front once again. Ok. So in English, what's your favorite movie in American Sign Language. All right, sounds good. 50. Practice | Testing Group 4: I'll write practice before the test. This time we're only going to focus on group four phrases. That's what we've just learned. Let's do some testing. First part, see the hand you're going to sign, right? I'm going to show you something. Timers for five seconds. You raised the timer or pause the video, it's up to you. Okay, let's do a quick practice tests. Here we go. Okay. So that's the first part. You sign what you see, right? The second part, we won't have a timer, but you'll have me and I'm going to sign something and you're gonna take a look. What's he doing? I had tried to figure out what I'm signing. Ok. Let's do a quick practice. Here we go. Alright. What did I sign? Well, I signed. Okay, good, good. So once the end first part, use sine, second part, I will sign it. Try to figure out what's happening. Alright, take off my glasses, let's do it. 53. Practice | Testing Groups 3-4: Practice before the test, okay, in these two testing parts, we're going to focus on phrases from groups 3434, that's right. All of those phrases in random order. 5, second timer, use sign, you raise the timer a positive video. That's up to you. Alright, let's do a quick little test. Here we go. Okay, good. That is the first part. Where use sign, you'll have the timer. Second part, no timer. We got my little guy down there, which means you're gonna watch me, I'm signing and you're like, I tried to understand what I'm signing. Okay. Here we go. Little test. Right. What did I sign? Well, I signed. Ok, good, good. Remember first part, use sine, raised the timer. Second part, I will sign. And in this testing, these two testing parts, we're only focusing on groups, 34 phrases. Alright, let's do it. 56. Practice | Testing All Phrases: Okay, practice before the big test. That's right. This time I'm going to be testing you on groups 1234. That means all of the phrases that we've learned in this course. Alright, first section, you will sign same timer, five seconds. I'll show you something. All of the phrases, one-by-one, random order, her use sign, you raise the timer. Okay, let's take a look. Quick little test. Okay, so that's the format for the first part. If you need to go back, you need to review. No problem. Alright. So the first part is where you sign, you have that little hand down there. Next part is where I sign in. There will be no timer timers gone. You'll have me understanding and recognition testing part. Okay. So you take a look at me. I'm going to be signing. You're like, what's happening? Aha, you try to figure out what I'm signing. All right, same thing. All the phrases from groups 1234, one-by-one random order. Alright, let's do a quick little test. Here we go. Okay, what did I sign? Well, I signed That's right. Okay. Once again, you sign in the first section, right. Raised the timer, pause the video if you need to know problem. After that, I'll be signing. Take a look at what I'm doing. If you need to pause and have me repeat and repeat the video to watch me sign it again. That's fine. Okay. So this is the big test, everything we've been studying for. We're going to review all of the phrases, that's phrases from groups 1234. All right, feeling good, good energy. Let's do it. 59. Conclusion & Thank You: Thank you for studying and learning with me. Have a wonderful day. See you later.