5 Different Zipper Applications | Tina Doyle | Skillshare

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5 Different Zipper Applications

teacher avatar Tina Doyle, Sewing Instructor

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Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Lessons in This Class

7 Lessons (1h)
    • 1. Intro for Zipper Applications

      0:56
    • 2. Centered Zipper

      9:04
    • 3. Lapped Zipper

      7:49
    • 4. Decorative Zipper

      11:50
    • 5. Invisible Zipper

      12:53
    • 6. Fly Front Zipper Part 1

      10:28
    • 7. Fly Front Zipper Part 2

      7:36
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About This Class

This class is designed to take away any uncertainty or apprehension in sewing in a zipper.

I will walk you through each step slowly with additional tips I’ve learned along the way to help execute your project with ease and professionalism.

 

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Tina Doyle

Sewing Instructor

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Transcripts

1. Intro for Zipper Applications: Welcome. My name is Tina dial and I had been selling garments for many years. In this classical initially how to execute five difference if applications, which are most common with gama and construction, I've included tips that will help give you a better understanding and also make the task a little easier. The class project is to pick one of the applications and to have a go yourself. I think the decorative SIP is the easiest. So if you'd like to start there, I've attached as a download the half scale trials, a patent I used for the fly friends HIPAA, if he'd like to try that one. Also included in the download is a sheet that explains the different types of SIP. Is he combined, um, whether different applications would be used on a garment. Any questions you may have, please contact me and I can help you out. 2. Centered Zipper: I'm starting with two pieces of fabric together and I mocked up my seam allowance. I want to bring to your attention here where the zip is going. I've added more seam allowance. You can see where I cut and came out. So this area is three courses, seven-inch. And this area is the standard 5-8 seven-inch. Now on a patent, they're not going to tell you this, but I think it's helpful to have an extra seam allowance when you're inserting a zip. I'm measuring myself. I'm marking just above the little metal stopper. I'm doing this with pencil so you can see, but I would usually do it with Taylor's talk. I'm going to pin my pieces together. I'm starting out with my stitch length being our number five because this is a temporary stitch. So we want to make it easy to get out even though this is temporary and they won't tell you this in a book. But I always do a tiny reverse at the beginning of my temporary stitch when I'm sewing as EPA. Because otherwise it comes loose and the zip ahead starts poking out. And that's not really what you want. I'll do my tiny reverse. When I get to this area that I've marked right here, I'm going to change my stitch length to 2.5. Obviously this is in black. So you can see, go ahead and press the seam open. We're ready to mark where we're going to stitch on the right side of the fabric prepare over. I'm looking here where my temporary stitch started. And I'm just going to put a pin there. So I know from down here, this is my permanent stitch. The zip I'm using is a standard SIP, but there are plenty of other sizes of zippers. And this is a good way to find out where you can stitch. I'm going to line up one of the inch marks on my ruler with the center of the zip. I've put masking tape and just so you can see what I'm doing, it's showing me once I line up the inch mark that I could stitch kosher for an inch away from the center of the zip. I'm going to mark that on to my fabric. What's crazy about this ruler is that it has the inch indicated length twice and crosswise. So you can line up the quarter inch mark with the scene and draw on the stitch line. Use the end of the ruler to mark the buxom. Openness zip. Flip it over so that the zip ahead is face down and line up the teeth of the zip with the same. Held this zip and lift the seam allowance and pen the zipper tape to the seam allowance. So you don't want to go through the body of the fabric. Let's head over to the machine. And so this side down, you can see up switched my machine for two-step efforts. And I've got my needle position to the left, which means the bulk of the first is to the right. Because we want the foot to be out the way of the zipper. I'm going to reverse at the beginning. As you stitch, just keep checking the coils of the separate teeth are lined up with that seam. Reverse at the end. Sometimes see the machine wants to gobble up the fabric. If that's the case, just lift up your first spin a fabric around. Go forward a few stitches. Made the needle down, lift up the foot spinning around again. I'm finish off the reverse. Close the safe and make sure the pole is a puts, lay the zip down. And again, we're going to pin that, set the tape to just the seam allowance. See this area. This is always a little tricky. The zipper tape is going to want to splay out, keep it straight. Again. We're going to stitch that down to just the seam allowance. We're almost at the finishing point. This is our stitch line. And I can feel here at the bottom of the CYP, that little metal stopper. And it's right on the pencil line. So I'm just going to move that line up above the stopper. Just a smidge. Otherwise that will break the needle when I'm stitching. Place the pins are new stitch line. I've changed my needle position to the right side. Because when I start sewing, I'm starting on the left align. And I want the bulk of the foot to be away from the zip position you fabric under the machine. Take out the pin, put the foot down, hold onto those threads to start off with. I'm not going to reverse. Once you get past that zip ahead. It's a lot easier. Once I reached the bottom, I'm going to leave the needle down, lift up my shirt, and pivot the fabric around. I like to do the bottom part manually. So if you turn the hand we'll towards you and keep turning. That's creating the stitches. This just eliminates the needle beam broken by the bottom of the zip. So once you've finished the bottom, leave the needle down and pivot the fabric around. Continue on the other side. Here we have finished centered zip. All I need to do is to remove that temporary stage. How this app wrap it around your finger and you should be able to see the stitches, UCSC wrapper and take out one of the stitches. And then it should be easy to wiggle the fabric and stop pulling out the other statues where I reversed can be tricky to go slow and don't pull on the threats. I've taken out the temporary statues, and here we have unfinished Sepah. 3. Lapped Zipper: I'm starting with two pieces of fabric together. And I marked on my seam allowance. I want to bring to your attention here where they zip is going. I've added more seam allowance. You can see where I cut and came out. So this area is three courses, seven-inch. And this area is the standard 5-8 seven-inch. Now on a patent, they're not going to tell you this, but I think it's helpful to have an extra seam allowance when you're inserting a zip. I'm measuring myself. I'm marking just above the little metal stopper. I'm doing this with pencil so you can see, but I would usually do it with Taylor's talk. I'm going to pin my pieces together. I'm starting out with my stitch length being our number five because this is a temporary stitch. So we want to make it easy to get out even though this is temporary and they won't tell you this in a book. But I always do a tiny reverse at the beginning of my temporary stitch when I'm selling the ZOPA because otherwise it comes loose and the zip ahead starts poking out. And that's not really what you want. I'll do my tiny reverse. When I get to this area that I've marked right here, I'm going to change my stitch length to 2.5. Obviously this is in black. So you can see, go ahead and press the same open. Let's look at this from the right side. The SIP is generally used on the left side of a garment such as a scarce or pants. So if you envision this issue left side and this would be the front of the garment and this would be the back. So therefore the lamp is going to go on this side. I'm just placing a pen here. As a reminder. We're starting off sewing the zipper to this side, flip it over. Take the zip folder, same allowance back leaving from the same line about 1 eighth of an inch or three millimeters. Finger press the fault so it's quite flat. Then place the fabric fold along the side of this EPA coils and pen. I have this zip of Foster on with the needle position to the rice. So the foot is away from the zippity, stitch it down, refinancing at the beginning. When you get to hear stock leap the needle down, lift up the foot. Openness set, moving away from the first, drop the first and continue sewing. Felt the fabric back so the right side of the fabric is facing up. You can feel the zipper teeth. We are stitching on this side, but we need to be away from the teeth. And also from this EPA had the top of the zipper tape. The pole is going to want to splay out, keep it strays. Feel whether zip ahead is and press down next to it to gauge where you can stitch. Mock that area with the dots. Measure from the dot to the SIM and mock that measurement down the length of the fabric where the safest growing field for the stopper at the bottom and place the pen just past the stopper. It's measuring slightly over half an inch. Lineup your ruler with the CMB. And using the rule is guide, draw the stitch line on by this EPA head. It's starting to go a little wonky. So be careful in my area. On the bottom. I like to stitch here at an angle because I think it looks better than straight. Here's the stitch line. And now I'll pin it together. Flip it over and check you've pinned the tape. Also, check that top area and adjust if necessary. Place the fabric under the machine. 1000, we'll towards you until the needle goes down, drop the thoughts. Take out that fest pin. Held onto the threats to start off. Follow this stitch line. When you get to hear leave the needle down, Lift appeal thought, and spin the fabric around. Continue stitching to the scene. Leave the needle down, spin the fabric around, and stitch a few stitches on top of your stitches. Again, leave the needle down and spin it around and stitch to the seam line on top of the stitches Again, we're almost finished. If you flip it over, you can see how useful that extra seam allowance was right there on the left side, all you have to do is to take out the temporary stitch holiday in your hand and wrap it around your finger? He should be able to see the temporary stitches. You just seem repair and pull out a stitch and then keep wiggling the fabric and gently removing the stitches. Where I reversed can be tricky. Go slow and be patient. Don't pull the threats. Continue until it's all removed. Here we have a finished step. You can see how it lapse over and heights that other stitch line. 4. Decorative Zipper: This would be your garments and this is the facing unnecessary Zip. I'm using all zips. A difference though I have to measure the zip and see where I'm going to stick with my ruler. I'm going to line up one of the inch lines with the center of the zip. Looking at this, I can see I'd want to stitch a quarter of an inch from the center of the zip on each side that will allow some space for the zip to be pulled down and also to show some of the zipper tape, which is why I want I put the masking tape on the ruler so you can see where the quarter inch ma, SCO. Now I'm going to focus on the facing. I've marked the center line. You can see I've marked the bottom of the zip on this line. Make sure you mark just past the bottom of this. If I'm going to use the guides are my ruler and mark a quarter-inch hours on each side from the center line. He used that end of the ruler to get a right angle at the bottom. That is my stitch line. So we're pretending this is our garments and misses the right side of the garments fabric. The facing is going to get stitched on the right side of the fabric. Before a stitcher on, I'm just reinforcing that area with some feasible interfacing purpose. I'm just folding my fabric and finger pressing and where the crease line is, that's where I'm placing my strip of interfacing centrally. The interfacing strip is 1.5 inches by 7.5 inches. Place the interfacing on top of the crease line, making sure diffusible side is face down. I have the ion sat on cotton. Place the cloth over and hold the ion on the area for ten to 15 seconds. Given it some steam. Check gets fused. I have the right side of my fabric facing God, his the interfacing We just did. I've marked that center line on with chalk so you can see take the facing folded in half along that center pencil line and lining up that crease with the chalk line. Held it down in place and flip it over. Pin on the stitch line. I'm starting sewing on the right line. My stitch length is 2.5. reverse at the beginning. Follow the line. When you get to the corner y12, leave the needle down, go slow and check your on the bottom line. I'm one stitch away a thing. So I'm going to do that stitch manually by tanning my hand. We'll towards me until a needle goes up and then down, lift the photo and spin it around. If he concerned about stitching past the corner, do these few stitches on the bottom manually. Leave the needle down and the spin the fabric around and continue to the end and reverse. Now we'll go into, put down the center to here, which is about 1 eighth of an inch from the stitch line. From that point snip out on an angle, stopping a smidgen away from the corner. So I'll just zoom in so you can see right here. And here is where we'll stop cutting, cut down the center. I'm stopping here and changing scissors. These tiny super sharp scissors are great for this. Both corners. We're back at the ironing board, press it flat first and give it some steam. Open the fabric on the cut line, fold one side of the facing forward and press it down, right up to the end of the stitches and give it some steam. Turn it around and move the press side out the way and do the same on the other side. So day forward and press. What we're going to do now is fold everything into the wrong side of the fabric. Makes sure that seam is right on the fold. Do it in small increments to make sure nothing shifts. See how the seam is on the edge. When she gets to here, bring the bottom facing inside. Ten over position your fabric and manipulate it until it's lying flat. If it looks like it's talking, it means you need to snip a little closer to the corners. But be careful here. Press it down. We're ready to put the zip and place it underneath the fabric, right side of the fabric facing you. I want the bottom of this IP to sit right up, close that little bottom edge. So that is where we're gonna start pinning. Check to see the zip looks even on both sides. Penny, the sides. When I get to hear openness zip and move it out the way and continue pinning. I'm going to base this in place because it could most probably move when you sewing on if it's wonky, it's not gonna look good. I have double thread within, not the Boston. And I'm starting out at the bottom of one side and stitching along that side. Do the same on the other side. I have my zipper on and the needle is positioned to the right. I'm opening this before sewing and RB stitching on the left side. I'm going to stitch quite close to the edge of the fabric. So that's what I'll be looking at when I'm stitching where the needle is in relation to the edge of the fabric. Hold onto the threads when you start sewing. So my thought is actually lined up with the edge of that fabric, which is helpful. When I get to here, make sure the needle's down. Will lift up the first and close this. If put the foot down and carry on. When you get to the bottom, spin the fabric around and see if you're in the right position. They think I'm less than one stitch away, so I'm going to do half a stitch to do that. Ten the hand wheel to watch you. And as the needle is descending, stop and lift up the foot and scoot the fabric back slightly. Leave a needle down and spin the fabric around and stitch across the bottom. Spin again. Stop midway, needle down, lift up the phone and open this in. Foot down and continue to the end. Take out the base and give it a price. Here's the finish step. 5. Invisible Zipper: When sewing and invisible zipper, it's generally suggested to purchase a special foot for your machine. This technique is to show you how you can use a regular zip Erfurt. I'm starting out with two pieces of fabric. I've marked 587 inch or 1.5 centimeters seam allowance on. I'm going to be doing a seven-inch CIP for E can see mine is 20 inches, 222 inches, which obviously is way too long. I recommend buying a longer zip. Doesn't have to be this long. But if you're doing a seven inch step, get the one that's longer than 79 inches. It's just a tad bit chars. The reason being it stops puckering at the bottom of the zip. If it's longer when you stitching. I'm lining up my zip, leaving room at the top and measuring down. And you can see I've already marked the seven-inch point. Before I sew the pieces together, I'm going to put diffusible interfacing either side where they zip is going. That's why I mark this seam allowance on the interfacing is going to sit just over the stitch line and extend about an inch or so beyond the seven inch mark. I'm putting it on either sides. The interfacing is an inch in width. The interfacing over the stitch line, making sure diffusible side is face down. I have the ions that on cotton has a cloth over the top and press held the iron on the area for about ten to 15 seconds and give it some steam. Check it's fused, do the same on the other side. Pin YouTube pieces together. This will be my temporary stitch. And this will be my permanent stitch. I'm starting out with my stitch length at number five. Hold onto those threads to stop. When I get to here, I'm changing my stitch land to 2.5. stitch, a few stitches then reverse. Continue stitching and reverse at the bottom. Go ahead and press that seem open. I met the ironing board and I have my say and it's a little crumpled. So first off and go into flatten it out a little. This Sippar is polyester, so make sure you have the right settings on your ion. Open it out. Flip it over. This is the wrong side now and I have the zippity facing. The idea is you want to press the teeth down, flattening the tape. Cia, the teeth are rolling over. The tip of the ion comes in really handy. Use the tip, push the teeth forward and press, keep going down the length of the zip. Zoom in so you can see the difference. Go ahead and press the other side. Once you've pressed both sides, close the zed. Let's go into one to fold in half. That's fine. Right now. I have my fabric pressed and ready and my incredibly lungs EPA placed this it face down. So as it sits central over this seam, pin the top of the tape either side just through the seam allowance. So what we're gonna do now is to roll the zip back and make sure the center here is lined up with the center here. I do this in small increments by rolling the zip down and pinning either side just to the seam allowance. It's going to one to pop up because we pressed it, push it down, continue all the way down to about one inch, pass the seven inch mark, and go into base them together. I have terrible threat that's noted at the end. Now we need to take out this temporary stitch here. This is what it looks like from the right side. This is just a little technique to get the zipper pull out the way when you see the little link here. And a zipper pull using some embroidery thread or anything that's a little stronger than regular thread. Thread it through the pole and then thread it through the bottom of a safety pin or use a longer than average safety pen. Not the thread tight, leaving some slack. Homeless fopen. At the bottom thread the safety pin through the fabric and scoop the safety pin down. Make sure the pole is tucked in. And then pull on the safety pin, opening the zipper up and getting it out the way for stitching. Heavier zipper on and the needle position to the left. I'm starting out sewing. Well, if you look at it from the right side of the fabric, it's the left side. So the seam allowance hours. And the idea is to stitch right there in that crease. It's the point where the zip teeth meet the tape put onto the threads when you start sewing and guide your fabric so you're staying on that crease line. When you get to where the opening and carry on for about three quarters of an inch to an inch and reverse the other side. Only this time you'll be starting at the bottom of the zip, start around the same place as where he finished on the other side, three-quarters of an inch to an inch down from the opening. Ten hangry we'll toward you until the needless positioned in increased line. Reverse at the beginning. See how close the fabric is to the zipper teeth. Take out the base sting. Flip it over to the right side, folded fabric back and close the Zeff as far as she can. So if it back and bring this safety pin are held onto the Basu of the zip and pull the tape closed. See how the pole is up. Flip it over. I'm finished closing. You can see I've got this really long set that's of no use hanging down. This is why I'm going to do, I have a little piece of bias tape. This part is folded down, but this part is the Rorschach thought the sides in. I'm going to stitch across here where I've mocked pin in place. I've now got my regular thought on. The machine has a tendency to get stuck when doing something small and oh, quit like this. So I'm going to start in the middle. Stitch to the end, leave the needle down and spin it around. And stitch to the other end. Leave the needle down and stitch back to the middle. Trim all the loose threats, cook the extras their path. Then this piece of the fabric can fold over, make sure the sides are tucked in nicely. Then we can stitch that down. Pin fest starts off with a piece of tissue paper, puts it all the way under the thoughts, making sure the paper extends at the back of the thoughts. Placed the zip under the thought. Take out the pin holding area FEM. Ten, the hand wheel to watch you until a needle goes down into the starship, the zipper tape held onto the threads and the tissue paper at the back and slightly took on the paper. When you start sewing. Go slowly, race across and go in to check it looks OK and then go over it a second time with off the tissue paper. This is what it looks like on the wrong side, fetch just prevent the cut Sepah from scratching the wearer, hits the front view. 6. Fly Front Zipper Part 1: This is my half scale pans pattern. Well, just the front where really just focusing on the fly front area. And this is my fly from facing, this line here is the center front line. And this is going to be the stitch line just on one side. First off, I'm going to snap into the top of the stitch line and the top of the center front. It's a tiny snip. Then I'm going to mark on the stitch line with a continuous tail attack and tail attack on the large dots. The smaller dot will cover when we mark the stitch line. I'm also going to tail attack the center front line. If you're not sure what tail attacking is, it's stitched you use to transfer any patent markings onto your fabric. And liked to use this method over using carbon paper, which I'll show you shortly. Because I need the markings to be on the right side of the fabric. And I don't like using carbon paper on the right side of my fabric. You want to start off with double threat or new needle know naughts. Stitch in hours and leave a tale. And in and out again, and this time leave a loop. Continue down the center front line to that small dots at the bottom. Certainly the tail. The stitch line is often called the J tail attack along the j. Finish off on that small dots. I just have that 1.So now I'll single tail attack it. Double threat again, no, not stitch in an hour around the side of the dots. Leave a tail. Then in and out again, leave a loop, costs and leave a tail. Now we've got the tail, a text done. We can take the patent office. First. I have to cut each loop, take the pins out and gently take the patent off and hold onto the stitches in case you've missed questing a loop. We have to separate the two pieces, gently pull them apart. So you have about the same amount of thread on each side and cross in the middle, these little pieces of thread will start coming out. But the idea is to get that area stitched before that happens. The next step is to stitch between the two dots. We can mark that with carbon LB On the inside of the garments. Put the pan back on. When you're using a tracing wheel, it's helpful to have something underneath so the surface is not so hard. This is my Tracing. We'll pin the patent close to the area and put the carbon face down between the fabric and the pattern. Using my Tracing, we'll, I'm marking from this dot to this start. This is where I'll stitch. I have my stitch length a 2.5. placed the fabric underneath the force and lined the needle up with the dots. Ten the hand we'll towards you until the needle goes into the dots. Dropped. And so a few stitches reverse. Continue to the other dot following the carbon line. With us at the end. Take out that single Taylor's tag. Going back to my pattern. And I've used this little area here to cut out a piece of usable interfacing. That size. Diffusible side is underneath. This is for a pair of pants that fascinates right over left. If you're doing leftover, right? Huge reversed everything. His my fabric with the stitching, opening hours and fold back the right side along the center front. The left side is going to fold back 1 eighth of an inch from the center front line. You can use the transparent ruler to measure if you're not sure. Plenty in place. It's similar to a lot safer, a mathy ironing board. And I'm going to press down the areas I just pinned. The two center front lines of tail attacks we can take out. Now. Also this tail attacking on the right side can come out. So all we're left with is the stitch line. Today over unfold the facing back and move everything else out the way. Lineup, the interfacing right on that crystalline. Make sure the interface isn't hanging over the edge of the fabric. Or I'll stick to the ironing board. Put your cloth over it. You can see I'm lining up the edge of my cloth with the crease line because I don't want to lose that crease line. The INS sat on cotton, press down and hold the iron on that area for ten to 15 seconds and give it some steam. Check gets fused and repressed, that crease the interfacing up against it. We'll make it nice and crisp. I put the costumer underneath so you can see as I have a doc SIP fallback The left side. Place the zip underneath the fabric and line up the fold line close to the zipper teeth and pen. When you get to hear fold this back and continue painting to the end of the zipper tape. At the top, open the zip and pen. I have my Sepah on and the needle is positioned to the right. I'm starting out at the bottom of the zip. Makes sure everything is out of the way. The bottom part can be a little tricky as this potential to catch in other pieces from the other side. So be careful. Reverse at the beginning. When you get to about mid said, leave the needle down, Lift the thought. Openness it dropped the four and carry on sewing to the end. 7. Fly Front Zipper Part 2: We have half of the zip stitched and see how this slops over nicely because we extended the underside or an eighth of an inch. Pin law in place checking you're not overlapping too much pain on the stitch line and then I'll paste. Check before pasting. You've caught the zipper tape and take out the tailless tax just to make sure you stay straight. You can also mark the line with chalk. Take the pins out. I have the sip of four on and the needle is positioned to the rice. First off, openness. Hold onto the threat to begin stitching. When I get to here, leave the needle town, lift up the foot and close the zip. Drugs are first and continue stitching. When you get to the curve goes slow. I'm pivot the fabric around. When you get to the end, leave the needle down, spin the fabric around, and stitch on top of your previous stitch, about three or four stitches. And men do the same again, spin it back around and stitch to the end. Take out the base thing. I've taken the bursting out. Just a few more steps. We don't really need all this extra. This can be trimmed away and the edge of the fabric finished neatly. Now we have to work on the facing. My fabric is double because it's a thin fabric. Summit double and some are single. Going to stitch along this side. My stitched facing chimney edge and where the fabric curves nacelle tiny triangles to eliminate any bulk. Ten it the right way around and then press it flat. I've pressed the facing and now I want to trim off the seam allowance on that Raj, this pattern as half an inch seam allowance. So I'm measuring with my ruler and mock in half an inch and cosine away that access. Going to edge stitch that edge. The name of the stitch I'm using here is called double overlook, but you can use a zig-zag. Anything the finishes the edge. Giving a press. Again. This is where the facing sits. Turn it over and line up the facing edge with the edge of the tape. And pin ten and over to the right side and look at it from this side and transfer the pins onto this side as this is where you'll be stitching from. Going to be stitching on top of this stitch line as far down as I can. Got my zipper on with the needle position to the left and put in the fabric onto the foot. So as I'm starting about a quarter of an inch from the edge, the reason being is there's a lot of layers here, and I don't want the machine to get stuck in that starting position. Ten, the hand we'll toward you till the needle goes down into that previous stitch line. Hold onto the two threads and start stitching. When he got to here, leave a needle down, lift up the four and close the zip. Dropped to four and continue as far down as she can. Reverse that area at the top. I can go back and stitch it down. We have one more step to go. We're going to attach the two facings together. Right at the bottom. We're going to go back and forth. In that area. It'll be about half an inch in length. I'm stitching on an angle, stitch about half an inch and reverse and then follow it again. Here's the finished step.