3D Modeling & 3D Printing for Beginners using Sketchup! | Steamaker Studio | Skillshare

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3D Modeling & 3D Printing for Beginners using Sketchup!

teacher avatar Steamaker Studio, Maker, Teacher, STEAM Enthusiast

Watch this class and thousands more

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Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Lessons in This Class

17 Lessons (2h 40m)
    • 1. Sketchup 01 Course Introduction

      2:08
    • 2. Sketchup 02 Signing Up & Getting Started 1

      3:45
    • 3. Sketchup 03 Navigation In 3D Space 1

      7:38
    • 4. Sketchup 04 Selection, Erase, Paint, And Line Tools 1

      10:22
    • 5. Sketchup 05 Arc, Circle, Polygon, And Push Pull Tool 1

      13:31
    • 6. Sketchup 06 Follow Me And Grouping Tool 1

      8:02
    • 7. Sketchup 07 Extra Keychain, Tape Measure, & Rotation Tool 1

      15:44
    • 8. Sketchup 08 Move Tool, Offset Tool, & Building A Home 1

      8:25
    • 9. Sketchup 09 Nametag & Downloading 1

      13:27
    • 10. Sketchup 10 Designing Your Home 1

      10:55
    • 11. Sketchup 11 Designing Your Home, Paint Bucket, And Scale Tool 1

      16:57
    • 12. Sketchup 12 Paint Bucket & Scale Tool 1

      6:01
    • 13. Sketchup 13 Slicers (Slic3r & Cura) Installation & Setup 1

      11:13
    • 14. Sketchup 14 More Follow Me And Free Practice 1

      8:05
    • 15. Sketchup 15 Final Project Phone Stand 1

      11:47
    • 16. Sketchup 16 Final Project Chip Clip 1

      10:49
    • 17. Sketchup 17 Congratulations!

      0:55
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About This Class

Are you interested in STEM/STEAM related courses?  This introductory course is designed for those who are interested in learning about 3D modeling and 3D printing! The 3D modeling and 3D printing industry is a key future technology that has been used by engineering, aerospace, consulting, and many other industries and companies.

This beginners course is a easy to follow and engaging course that will allow you to create and make!  Not only will you learn valuable knowledge and develop 3D modeling skills, you will be using this knowledge to take ideas that were once in your head and to transform them into physical objects!

What We'll Cover In The Course

In this 2 hour course, you will learn how to sign up for a Sketchup account, learn how to 3D model, see a 3D printer in action, and learn valuable skills that will take you to the next level. 

  • Introduction.¬†Learn what 3D modeling and 3D printing is. We will sign up for a free account so we can do 3D modeling anywhere.¬†

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  • Lessons.¬†Each lesson will have clear, step by step instructions to help¬†learn 3D modeling.¬† Pause and rewind anytime.

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  • Activities and Projects.¬†Students will have ample opportunities to¬†apply and practice the skills they have learned throughout the videos!¬†¬†

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  • 3D Printers & Slicers.¬†Learn about how digital 3D models are 'sliced' using slicers to create files that can be sent to 3D printers and be 3D printed!

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This is one of my favorite courses to teach since you have so much creative freedom to design whatever you'd like!  I hope you enjoy the course and please post your projects!  If you have any questions or input on how I can improve the course experience, please feel free to let me know!  I want my students to come into my course eager to learn and leave excited about what they have learned!

Meet Your Teacher

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Steamaker Studio

Maker, Teacher, STEAM Enthusiast

Teacher

Richard Rho is the founder of Steamaker Studio, a company focused on promoting STEM/STEAM education as well as educational technology.  He has served as the Director of Educational Technology and Innovation at multiple schools and has created numerous award winning STEM Programs.  He has received national recognition for his programs which include course tracks in robotics, engineering, 3D modeling & 3D printing, physical computing (Raspberry Pi, Arduino), architecture, and entrepreneurship.  He has also sponsored clubs such as Girls Who Code as well as Lego and VEX robotics teams. 

As a teacher, he wants to be able to share what he thinks is really neat with his students.  He loves exploring and learning new technologies.  C... See full profile

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Transcripts

1. Sketchup 01 Course Introduction: Hi folks and welcome to steam Maker Studios course on 3D modeling and 3D printing for beginners using SketchUp. My name is Richard and I'll be your instructor for this course. I've been teaching for over 18 years. And during that time, I've designed and taught numerous steam and stem related courses. I apply pedagogical approaches, best practices, and learning science principles to create interactive and engaging experiences for you all. I'm really proud of a lot of the work my students have created and I hope to see what you guys can come up with. So who is this course intended for? Well, it's really intended for beginners. And for those intermediate, we want a bit of a refresher. It's for those who are interested in learning how to use SketchUp. And for those who wanted to be able to take their 3D models and to 3D print them. Throughout the course, we'll be exploring a lot of SketchUp from the very beginnings of getting signed up, to getting your mouth, setup, to navigation and an orientation. And then through the various menus and tools that we'll use as we learn to 3D model will also learn about slicers, what they are, how to use them, and which one you use. I'll even guide you through the installation process of two free options, and Y1 will be better than the other. We'll also look at 3D printing, what it is, how it works, and what it looks like. I've designed this course to be engaging and to have a lot of hands-on practice. So as we learned in the various tools, you'll be creating lots of different objects. We'll start simple with simple geometric shapes. And we'll progress, we'll build our own home. And then for final projects, you can create either a phone stand, a chip clip, or anything that might be useful for a friend or family member. Anyways, I hope you guys are excited to learn about SketchUp and how you can use it to 3D model and 3D print your ideas. I hope to see you guys in the course. I'll see you guys in the next one. 2. Sketchup 02 Signing Up & Getting Started 1: Hi folks and welcome to the SketchUp tutorials. In this video, we're going to get set up with an account on the SketchUp website and we're going to be using the web browser version. So the first thing we're gonna do is we're gonna go to Google and we can type sketch up here, SketchUp. And you're gonna see a couple of different links. We're gonna go to Sketch Up.com. Now, there is the free, the free 3D modeling software. But I just want to show what it looks like when we go to the website. So alternatively, we can just go to Sketch Up.com. And once we're there, your page might be updated. It might look a little bit different than what you're seeing here, but generally it will be the same steps. So the first thing we're gonna do is we're gonna go to Plans and Pricing. And you're gonna see personal. And we're going to click on that. And then you're going to come down here and you will see SketchUp free. So this says Web only, which is why we'll be doing it so that everyone has access to it. And we're going to click sign up. And it's going to ask us for our email. Now if you'd like, you can sign in with your Apple ID or Google account. This will make it like a one-step kind of thing. But for the sake of this video, I'm going to choose my e-mail address, the Maker Studio.com at gmail.com. Click Next and then my first name is Richard OR and then a password. All righty. So now that we've signed up, I do not want to remember and we're gonna go to sign in. We're going to click Next. We're going to activate it. And so we're going to click to activate it. So make sure your email and you'll see your activation already. So now that I've activated, it's going to ask me for my password and it's going to allow us in. Yes, we're going to click through all these and read them all. Once you've done reviewing all of the documents, click Agree. And let's get going. All right. So once we've accepted, we're going to see a little pop-up message that pops up here and it says start modelling. And if you'd like, you can feel free to take a tour. But for the sake of this tutorial, we're going to get right into it. So the first thing you'll notice, and we'll talk about the layout first, is what it looks like. So on the top-left corner you'll have your menu button. Once you open it, you'll see that you have a number of different options. And we'll explore these as we go through the course. We have untitled, which is the title of our project. And for the sake of what we're doing, we're gonna come up here and give it a second to load. And we're going to call it the projects. And we're going to call this first project. I'm going to click Save. And then on the left side we have some menus. These are a lot of our shapes and basic tools that we'll be using throughout the course. And on the right side are other options and other menus. So I just wanted to cover basically how to get signed up, how to name our first project. And that was pretty much it. And to explore the layout in the next video, what we're gonna do is we're gonna get started with 3D modeling. And we're going to start exploring the different palettes that we have here for our use. Anyways, I hope this video was helpful. I'll see you guys in the next one. 3. Sketchup 03 Navigation In 3D Space 1: Hi folks and welcome back to the SketchUp tutorials. In the last video, we finished signing up for an account and naming our first project. In this video, we're going to explore these menus a little bit more in depth and in particular, start using some of these tools to work with our 3D models. But before we get to that, one of the most important things with 3D modeling is navigation. And so one of the focuses of this video will be on helping you to navigate. So the first thing I'd like us to do is come over here to the left side, choose this arrow, which is called the selection tool. You'll notice as I put my mouse over it, it says Select. And what the selection tool allows us to do is to select an object. So I'll come over to this icon. I'll select this, this dude. Now, when I said navigation is important, one of the things that's going to be apparent as we start 3D modelling is that navigation allows us to pinpoint areas of our 3D model that we'll want to edit or modify. And for right now this is just a scale model and this model is inserted or this dude is inserted into our 3D model to give us some scale in terms of what we're building. Now. What we're going to be doing is, I want you to understand that navigation is very important in 3D modelling because it allows us to maneuver in 3D space. So instead of talking through it, what I wanna do is I want to show you. So if everyone could press R on the keyboard, what you'll notice is that you'll see this little blue rectangle that follows this pencil. I would like everyone to move their mouse to the origin. And once you here, just click, let go of your mouse and then move your mouse key over here, and then click again somewhere else. And what this allows us to do is to build a rectangular plane. Now I'm just going to show that one more time. You're going to press R. Once you do, you can either click and hold your mouse key and drag it. And it doesn't matter, don't make it too massive or large. You'll notice is depending on where my mouse is, it'll think I'm in a certain or orientation. So for example, you'll see that it's right now, has a green outline. It thinks that it's going between the red and blue axis. So it kinda like height-wise versus if I push it out into this flat plane that things, it's along the x and y, or the red, which is the x and y, which is the green. And so what I wanna do is I want to just build something moderately large but not too big, and then let go of the mouse key. So there's two ways to do it. So again, our key, click, let go of the mouse and then you drag the mouse wherever you want it and then click again and that will create your rectangle or R, and then just click and hold. It depends whatever you'd like. I prefer the first method. And the reason why is because later on when we need to create more exact dimensions, doing it the first way will allow us to enter the measurements down here in this bottom left hand corner. But that's a little bit more advanced, so we'll talk about that in the next one. The next thing I'd like everyone to do is to press the play button. And you'll notice when you press the play button. And is that you now can go to a surface and it turns the shaded color. And when you click and you let go, you'll see that it allows us to build up whatever surface we have there. And it has to be a surface so it can't be anything curved. But once I let go of the mouse key or a click again, it'll build that surface. Now I'm going to press space bar, which will default me back to the selection tool. And the reason why I wanted to do all of this is one, to get you guys to start 3D modeling your first shape. And we'll explore some of the menu tools that we covered by pressing R and P. But most importantly, I wanted us to start navigating. And so right now we have our left mouse key, which has been allowing us to do most of what we've been doing, which is selecting objects. So we come over here, select him, come over here, select the front face, the top face. But what happens if we wanted to select the right face or the left face or the bottom face or the one all the way on the backside. Well, this is where the orbit button comes into play. So if you have a three button mouse with most of you probably do. If you press the scroll wheel and you push in on it, would it allow you to do is once you push in and you move your mouse key, it will allow you to orbit around your object. Now you'll notice that the dude doesn't rotate the same way and that's because he's meant to be put in there to give you scale and not to be 3D modeled object. But this way you can kinda get a gauge of the size scale of your model. And so you can see here that this is much wider than it is, or I guess deeper than it is wide. And so you can see how big this object is. An orbit all the way around so you can see what it looks like. I can look from the bottom. I can look from the back side now from what was originally the left side. And Reagan come back full circle back to the front. Now, this key or this shortcut using the wheel is very important because it gives us accessibility to all sides of our 3D model. But let's say I wanted to modify this corner. Well, if I move my mouse key over and I start using the scroll wheel, you can see me zooming in on this corner, but it's not exactly centered. And so the next tool we're going to learn is called the Pen tool and that's holding Shift. And then using the mouse wheel and pushing that in. And you'll see that it turns into the hand. And that allows me to shift my object so that I can get closer to the center of the object that I'm trying to look at. So now that we've covered at all, what I wanna do is I want us to pan back and then scroll out and center the cube or the rectangular solid and the dude right there. And so we've just covered a number of different tools that allow us to orbit around our object. Also that allows us to pan so that we can move our object so that we can center it or move it to wherever we need to in order to help us 3D model. We learned about Zoom, which is just the scroll wheel in and out. And I think that's going to cover most of the navigation tools that we really need to know. And the final thing is, I'm going to select this guy right-click. And you'll notice is that we have a secondary menu. So the right-click is going to be important later on as we start learning about solid objects and the importance of entity Info and some of these other ones like explode once we start grouping items. But for the sake of this video, we're going to keep it pretty simple. What I'd like everyone to do now is just take some time, kind of play around, building some more rectangles. You can maybe pan over a little bit, press R, and build some rectangles in a different plane. So you can see this way. I've just built it on the x and z-axis. I can press P and I will push, pull that. And then if I want to, I can even push pull this even more if I'd like or this one. And kind of play around. Practice orbiting and kind of shifting around in 3D space so that you feel more comfortable just navigating in a 3D modelling environment. And once you're done, I will catch you guys in the next video. I hope this video was helpful. I'll see you guys in the next one. 4. Sketchup 04 Selection, Erase, Paint, And Line Tools 1: Hi folks and welcome back. In this video, what we're gonna do is we're going to start exploring some of these other tools that we have covered. Some of them were, for example, the rectangle tool. We're going to explore how to navigate these venues and what they are. But for today's video, we're going to cover pretty much up to the drawing tool. And then in the next videos we'll cover the arc, the rectangle, the push pull tool, and the other kind of shelling tools. So the first thing I'd like everyone to do is, oops, I was him. The rectangle tool is to click on the Selection tool. Now the selection tool is very unique in that it allows us to select objects. So for example, the dude, right, it selects him. He's unique because he's a group and we'll learn about groups later. But for the sake of the objects we've created, you'll notice that when I click the object, it doesn't do the same thing. It doesn't highlight the entire object. And we'll talk about that later when we start talking about grouping. But for the sake of this video, I just want to instruct you on how the selection tool works. When I single click any item in 3D space. What it'll do is it'll select that surface or that edge. So I can easily select this edge right there. And I'll zoom in so you can see a little bit easier. And so you can see that I can select surfaces and edges. Now if I double-click, it'll collect on that surface and then it will also highlight anything that's touching that surface. And then if I triple-click, it'll highlight anything that touches that surface and it's connecting edges or surfaces. So if I triple-click, you want you three, you can see that it's now highlighted this entire object. This is very helpful because the next tool we're going to use is called the eraser tool. And instead of having to use the eraser tool, which I will show you in 1 second, I just click on race and it'll delete the object for me. Now the eraser tool is basically a way to, and I'm just going to use the Pen tool, which is shift and the scroll wheel just to center up over here. It allows me to delete edges. So you'll see that once I delete that face or that edge, it deletes the front face and the top phase. Likewise, if I click on this edge, it deletes this surface because in order for our face to exist, it has to have a closed surface and it was not because I deleted that. I can get rid of this. This. And so you can see why having the selection tool is useful because instead of having to just kind of click 12 or 16 times or however many times for a polygon, I just need a double or triple click, click Erase, and that object is gone. Now I'm going to use the next shortcut which is going to be very valuable for us, which is on a PC Control Z, on a Mac Command Z. And I'm going to present just a couple of times to bring back our rectangular solid. And the reason why is because the next tool I'd like us to explore is the Paint tool. So when I click on it and you'll notice that any of these tools, if they have a little arrow to the right, it has a sub-menu. So I'm gonna click on it and click on paint. And then if I choose a certain pink color, let's say this blue, I can go to a surface and I can go and drop that color on it. So if I wanted to, and this one orange, and then let's say this side green. You can see where I'm going with this. It's basically our way of kind of coloring in our 3D models. Now if we're going to 3D print this, just remember that the model will not be represented the same when we 3D print it, because most likely our 3D printers have only one color. And so over here you can see that as I select the different colors, it gives us the the name up here. And then the second part of that is the dropper tool or sample material. And what that allows me to do is, for example, if I like this red over here, I can just come over here, click it and you can see that it says high red. And then I can actually go and then use the paint bucket and paint this front side red. And so that's the Paint Bucket Tool. Feel free to explore. But for right now, just hold off for 1 second because we're going to explore something a little bit more. And then I'm gonna kinda give you guys some free time to explore as you please. So I'm just going to come over here, click on this X button and it will get rid of that. All right, so the last tool of this video is our line tool. And when we click on it, there's two things there. There's the actual line tool and then the free-form tool or the Freehand tool. Now, the line tool, as it sounds, creates geometric lines perfectly straight. And the smallest polygon we can create is a triangle, and we can go infinitely however large we'd like generally. And then the Freehand tool will try to capture our mouse movements as we try to create an enclosed shape if that's what we're seeking. So for the sake of the video, I'm going to keep it pretty simple, but the two things I want to highlight with the line tool, and I'm going to just. Pan over here so it's a little bit clear, are two things. One is when you're trying to draw in 3D space, It's easy for the computer program to misinterpret what you're trying to draw. So if we try to remember how we drew this rectangular solid first we drew a rectangle that was in the red and green plane. So if you imagine the red thing going across the screen and the green plane going into the screen, like, you know, into it and a blue going up the screen. We want to be on the green and the red and green plane. So I'm going to try to draw it freehand, but this doesn't always work. And you can see, I'm trying to see if I can get a green line. And the reason why you see the red line there. And then I'll see you in getting a green line. And I hope that this closes and it does. And luckily this closed perfectly. And you can see here I have that surface. And now I can just use the push pull tool P. And it will create a similar shape to what we had here. Now the reason why I was trying to talk about 3D spaces because of this, I'm going to command Z. It is. I'm gonna choose the line tool again. I'm using shortcuts and we'll talk about that later. But basically it allows us to prevent us from having to come over each time to the menu bar, which will take longer. And shortcuts also big 3D modeling, more efficient. It's not the topic of this video, but and I'll just call it out as I go through, I'm going to press the L button for the line tool. And what I'm going to try to do is I'm going to try to create a hexagon. So I'm gonna try the same thing I did before. I try to line it up. And I'll try to go over here. And here. And you can see that there's some little icons that pop up which tells me I'm doing the best I can. So I can see. I think that's good. Okay. So you can see the blue I just want you to notice that there was a blue dotted line. And that's going to be important because of one thing. And that one thing is this surface did not fill in. And the reason why it didn't fill in is because it's not an enclosed surface. In fact, it's six lines that are not on the same plane. And that dotted blue line means that it lined up with our blue axis, which is odd because that's saying that this point and this point are on a similar plane. So what we will do is as we orbit, you'll notice that the program decided to choose this arbitrary point that lined up with this point. For this. And you can see that blue line being drawn as we try to move from 1, the other one. And it was trying to approximate where we wanted to put it. It didn't know because this program is not artificial intelligence. It's just trying to approximate where your mouse pointer is. But because it's trying to estimate in 3D space, it doesn't have any idea where it wants to go, so it uses these reference points. And that's why sometimes when I draw a line, you'll see it becoming red. So you can see here trying to say, Hey, your mouse cursor is about this far from the red line. So I'm going to line it up with the next point that you have that's nearest and you see it right there. Likewise, it's how I drew this point, right? So once I came over here and I started drawing this line, I move my mouse cursor over. I saw that red dotted line. I knew to drop it right there. So one of the important things you'll notice is as you create objects, it's important to understand that orbiting and using certain techniques. So for example, if I wanted to draw this, one of the best ways to draw a polygon if I were going to freehand it using the line tool, it's come from a top view. So there is no other surface I could be interfering with. And start from here. And you can see the green line using as a reference. And you'll see that there's a red line for reference. I don't want to see any blue lines, right? And there we go. So that seemed pretty easy, but I just wanted to show how depending on the perspective urine and kind of show me the importance of the navigation tools, how something that you create can go a bit askew and just so you can see that. But I'm gonna let you guys have some practice time just to create your own objects. But before we do, just going to show you this last tool, the free-form tool. And this one's kind of fun. Basically it allows you to just have fun and create your own objects. Kind of looks like a dude with a hexagonal dress, her pants. Anyways. I hope you guys learned a lot in this video. Feel free to just kind of play around and just experiment. What are the things you might notice as you're using this free hand tool is, let's say I intersect with other surfaces. Watch what happens when you push, pull these. When I go to P, it gets separated. And this will be interesting later on. But yeah, just kinda have fun with learning how to use 3D modelling. These tools that we just covered, have fun and play around. And yeah, I hope you guys had fun and I'll see you guys in the next one. 5. Sketchup 05 Arc, Circle, Polygon, And Push Pull Tool 1: Hey folks and welcome back to the SketchUp tutorials. In the last video, we explored the first four tools of our palette. I hope you guys had fun playing around with some of the different tools, like the line tool and the free hand tool. Now some of you may have noticed that the free hand tool is not the most accurate in terms of its ability to draw accurate curves. But it's not too bad. You know, it adds an element of personalization. Do your 3D models if you wanted to add that little bit of flair. But the next thing we're going to learn about the Arc tool and the rectangle tool as well as the push pull tool, which we've kind of explored already. These next few tools are going to help you build your skill sets even more. So like we did in the previous video. The first thing I'll ask everyone to do is to clear their palates. So in the last video, I showed you the selection tool. If you press space bar, which is the default for selection tool, triple-click, you'll notice that anything connected to this surface and all of its surfaces and edges are highlighted. And I right-click a race. Now don't worry, it's not the end of the world. Just get rid of them if you want to save them. Remember, you could have click Save, got to menu, click on new file. But for the sake of what we're doing, we don't really have to worry about it. So I'm just going to get rid of that endpoint because it thought I was still using the line tool, but I got rid of that. All right, so the first thing we're gonna do here is the arc tool, and there are a couple different arcs over here. You'll notice that it immediately chooses the planets is unlocked plane because it's trying to detect where I am on the object. But this is the Arc tool. We have the 2.3 arc and then the pie. So if we choose this first Arc tool, what it does is, and this is why also navigation is important, is that it's going to build it based off of the z-axis. So imagine if I'm drawing from up top, it'll draw it in the plane between the red and green axis. So if I click here and I click another point, and then let's say I click over here. What it will do is it'll draw that quarter plane. Likewise, if I come over here, I click here, and that's a move out twice as far. And then I want to draw a 180 degrees. I click on the other side and I have a half circle. Likewise, I come over here, I place it down. I then choose a certain distance. And you can see in the bottom right-hand corner that it's changing as I move my mouse. Once I click, I can actually just type in, let's say 20. Press enter. And what that did is it created a 0 at only 2000002020 inches, which is why it's so small versus 20 feet. So for the sake of this video, let's, let's go with it and let's make it 270 degrees. And then for the final one, what you'll notice is it says five foot, eight inches and I just typed in 20, chose 20 inches. I'll choose feed with just a single apostrophe. And you'll notice now it is much larger. And I can come over here and build out the full circle. Now, I'm not a huge fan of having intersecting circles, so I'm just going to use the eraser tool and just get rid of that. 20, injure their U-M. Zoom In, OOP. And there we go. And so you can see how drawing with these different tools or the different arcs allow us to create different size objects. Now one thing you'll notice as the objects get bigger is that they look more like polygons. And that's because by default, and even if you think about, let's say like video games, the 3D models you create are actually more complex polygons, which is why video games, when they first started off, you know, 30, 40 years ago, were very blocky. And then as technology improved and the ability for these graphics cards and processors to render them improved. We started a little more realistic and a lot more smoothed out, which is why the video games of today look way more realistic than the USA look 10, 20, 30 years ago. So that's why as the polygons or excuse me, as the arc skip larger for the Arc tool, you'll notice that it creates a default circle size that has sides of 12. Usually it's 12 or 16 in this case, you can tell that this one is a 12-sided polygon. And that's because what's trying to do is just try to simplify and create that object as easily as possible. Now the next tool is the two-point Arc tool. And so the way this works is basically you select two points. So again, from here, I choose here. And then it allows me to create arcs based off those two points. Now this particular tool is important because it allows us to round out corners, for example, when we build a rectangle and we wanted to have smoothed out edges. This is a very useful tool to have. So it's important to know. And yeah, I can come in handy when we try to connect different parts together. And so you'll see that once I reach a certain radius, it'll say half circle and it'll allow me to build that there. The next tool, three-point tool. So this one will choose three points. And it will allow me to build the base of that. So if I wanted to build something that was almost like, for example, like a Pac-Man. I'm just going to move over here. I would want to open the top of the mouth, the backside, and then somewhere around here for the opening of the mouth. And then I have to use a line tool l, come over here connected to the center of the circle and right there. So you can see how that pool is used. And finally, the last one, the PIE tool. We select a spot, move to a second one. And it'll allow us to build based on whatever degree we want. So if I wanted to type in 45, press Enter. That's a 45 degree slice of the circle that I would have normally created. So again, once I click, you can move to whatever designated radius. Once you click, you can then type in whatever angle you want. Let's say 270. I think that will intersect. Let's just go with 195. And there we go. All righty, So that was the Arc tool. It has a lot of important features. We're not gonna go too much into it. I just wanted to show you it. And so what we're gonna do now is show you another way to use the selection tool. And that is if I highlight, click and hold, it'll create this box and anything inside that box gets elected. And then I can right-click erase. But the benefit of something like that is if I select everything, everything gets highlighted. Right-click a race and it's gone. Alright, so now let's look. I'm going to just click on that, just get rid of that. My plane icon that was on there. And now let's look at the polygon tool. Actually it looks like a rectangle tool. And if you look here, it'll say rectangle tool and then rotated rectangle. And then we have the circle polygon and then lenders or 3D texts. Now, the reason why this is important is for the rectangle tool we're pretty familiar with, right? We use it to create any type of quadrilateral. So if I click on any point, I can then type in, let's say the dimensions, that's a 20 feet comma 30 feet Enter. And it'll create that loops. Is that 2030? Let's try that again. 2030 feet area. That's much better. So we have something like that there. Now. The next one is the rotated rectangle tool. So with the rotated rectangle tool, what it allows me to do is to create this rectangle based off of an angle that I have predesignated. Now this is useful to have when you're free handing something. But for the most part, when we want something rotated, what we're gonna do is we're actually going to reorient ourselves and create a pre-measured arc. So we're not going to play around too much with it. I just wanted to show you that you can use that for what we're doing. The next tool, the circle tool, this one's important. So like I mentioned before, if you create a circle, it, oops, I'm just going to proceed as soon as I press C. If you look down in the bottom right-hand corner, when you use the circle tool in particular, it defaults to 24 sides. Now what that means is if I draw it large enough, it'll be easier to see is that it has 24 separate segments that consists of the circle. Now, this is not really important if your 3D modeling something small or something that doesn't have to be perfectly to scale. But let's say you are trying to fit in. Let's say we were 3D modelling a fidget spinner that we needed a bearing to fit into. This would be really important because the distance from here to here, let's say would be true. But that wouldn't necessarily be true about the distance from here to here. And it's a ball bearing is truly circular. Well, we would actually need to do is press C and then type in something larger like 96. And then click on a point here on the plane and then build it. And what you'll notice is that the circle, oops, let's circle is not actually even 1906 sides. I mean, let me restart policy. Type in 1906. Enter. Okay, now it says 96 as you saw before. And now if you look at the circle, can you tell that it's not a circle? Not really because what it's done is 96 sides of the circle now looks really smooth. Now this is not meant to say that we can't detect it. And here's an example. Let's say I build a really large circle right here. Looks perfectly circular, right? Let's see, I now use the push pull tool and push it up. Still looks fantastic. Now let's use the selection tool, triple-click. And what you'll see here are all of the invisible lines that separate all the 96 faces of the circle. And it looks really good when it's rendered, which is why it looks really smooth. And this kind of relates back to the why video games look so good. But I just wanted to show you how to work that so that you can create more realistic and more accurate 3D models if that is important for what you're trying to create. So there's a circle tool. The polygon tool works pretty much the same way. If we wanted to create a hexagon, you can see that a defaults at six. Let's say we wanted to be 12. So I type in 12 plus Enter, and now it's a well cited object. And if I wanted to create it more like 24 or 36, you can do that as well. Obviously, the higher you go, the more circular it'll look. And then finally, the last one is 3D texts, pretty straightforward. This is also o. You can choose your font, how high you want your object. And we don't want it to be six inches, that's ridiculous. Let's say one. And so now since this is honestly just be one foot and one inch tall. There we go. All righty. So each of these letters in one-foot tall, which makes sense considering the scale of this third. And it's one inch tall, which is why it's so thin and so short in terms of his height. So you can tell that's the scale. And then finally we have our push-pull tool. So the push-pull tool is really awesome for when we need to take flat surfaces like we did before and elevate them. You've seen how that works. The PI button, the other ones are a little bit more unique. So this is the follow me tool and we're going to explore more of this later on when we create little statue or a bracelet. But the way this works is you take a surface and it will follow a predefined curve you create. We're going to get into this in the next video, so we're not gonna go too much into it. And then finally we have the offset tool. This one's kind of unique and I'm just going to show you that real quick. So for example, over here, if I choose a surface and then I move my mouse, you'll notice that it allows me to offset from it. And the reason why that's important is that it allows us to predetermined something. So let's say I'm building some type of inter fitting component. This allows me to be more precise in my measurements and to offset it from the outside of an edge or from the inside of the surface outward. So that's what the offset tool does. And in the next video, what we'll do is we will look at how to use the Follow me tool. And I hope you guys are excited anyways, I hope this video was helpful. I'll see you guys in the next one. 6. Sketchup 06 Follow Me And Grouping Tool 1: Hi folks and welcome back. In the last video, we explored the Arc tool, the circle and polygon tool, and the, some of the tools from the push-pull. What we're gonna do is we're going to start selecting all of these objects that we've created and we're going to start getting rid of them again. Now, the purpose of this is so that we can explore the following me tool. And I don't want all this extra clutter to interfere with our learning, so we're just going to push it off to the side. Let's center backup on dude and let us get started. So the first thing I'd like everyone to do is kind of take that perspective so that we can build a nice circle on this red and green plane. So we're going to press the circle tool, click here somewhere in the center. And let's make this three feet and press Enter. All righty, So we have this three-foot circle here, radius. And what we're going to use your press L and we're going to choose the Line tool. And I'd like you to choose one of the endpoints, and I'm trying to choose one that aligns with the farthest rightmost point. And then I'm gonna draw that right back to the center and you can see that it highlights. And I'm going to draw that just like that. Now the next thing I'm gonna do is I'm going to orbit. So I'm going to orbit while I'm still using the line tool. And what I wanna do is I want it to go all the way up and make sure that it's on the blue axis. Now let's set this at five-foot. And then I'm going to use a line tool to complete this triangle. And I'm going to make sure our zoom in. So I'm not choosing an arbitrary point is if I choose here, watch what happens. It won't actually close off the surface and it's not actually a closed surface. So what I'm gonna do is I'm gonna go back here and I'm going to zoom in and I'm gonna make sure that that endpoint is lined up, low, lined up perfectly so that my surface closes. Now you might be wondering, what are you doing? And that would be a great question. The important thing that we've done here is we've created the first setup for our new tool that we're going to cover in this video, which is the tool. And the following me tool essentially is a tool that will allow you to take a surface and to follow a particular path. So I'm gonna show you two things with the following me tool. The first is select it. And you're going to select the surface. And it will allow you to follow that surface around a predesignated path. And so it sees the circle, so the program automatically detects it and it's like, hey, oh, okay, I see what you're doing. And let's go, go, go, go. And then if you want to stop there, you can see that I have the early makings of by little camping 10. I'm just kidding. So what you just notice was the free for, free hand version of the following me tool. I'm going to use Control Z on a PC or Command Z on a Mac to undo. And this time what we're gonna do is when you use a follow me tool to use it to follow the designated path of the circles outer edge. Now, this tool is very useful, for example, because there are certain tools that do not exist like the cone tool, There's no way for me to just be like, Oh, here's the cone tool. Let me just create it. In SketchUp. You have to be able to kind of figure out how to create certain objects. So for example, a cone or other geometric solids are not as easily created. There's no many for those. And so another object, for example, might be, let's say a sphere. There's no tool that allows us to just easily create a sphere, but we could use that by creating a semicircle and following the path around a circle to create a sphere. So what I'm gonna do is I first select the object, then I select the path. So if I want to select the path, I select the outside edge of the circle. And what I've just done is I have created this cone. Now you'll notice that it's deleted the bottom edge and that's fine. So one more time. Go to the object you select on the face. Then what you do is you want it to follow the entire perimeter, right? And we don't want just to choose that, so we select this. And then you can see that I can choose the endpoint, but because I want the endpoint to be backwards starts, I just move my mouse all the way over. Instead of having a followed all the way around, it knows what it's trying to do. And when I click, you'll notice that it's taken and built me this object. Now, the last thing we're gonna do is we're going to close off this bottom. And the way we're gonna do is we're going to press L. We're going to just choose any two points and we're going to select it. And then we're going to use a selection tool and we're going to get rid of it. And the reason why is because we're going to create something called our first solid group. And this is going to be one of the most important steps that we do when we try to convert our 3D models for 3D printing using SketchUp. And so now that this is a fully enclosed object, I'm going to triple-click it. So once we have everything highlighted, what we're gonna do is we are going to right-click and go to Make group. And what you'll notice is we now have this box that looks similar to what we notice with our dude. And here's what's going to be even more interesting if you right-click and you go to Entity Info, it should say solid group. Now, for the sake of this video, please do not follow along. I just want to show you what happens if we hadn't closed off this face. And I took all of this and try to make it a group. Group. It says that it's only a group and not a solid group. And this is important because when we convert our 3D models for 3D printing, this will cause errors when we try to slice our objects. So I just wanted to show you that there is a difference and what you should be striving to achieve when your 3D modeling in SketchUp. And that is that we want to be able to close off our objects so that they become solid groups. And with any surface, it doesn't matter where you draw it really. It's just that you draw them. And then what you're gonna do is Spacebar, triple-click command G or make group. Forgot you can do shortcuts. And there we go. So we now have our solid group here. If you guys have any questions, feel free to pause and or type it into the course page or two. Just rewind back to try to achieve the solid group. Some of the reasons why you might not have gotten the solid group, especially if your point is not perfect, is that when you created the first circle and you created it like that. When you created the line from this side, if you don't have the blue and the endpoint showing at the same time. So for example, if I choose this point here and it's not showing, see the now though, right there, right? It's not showing the center point. That can sometimes be an issue. So all we wanna do is wherever you choose from, make sure you have the blue center point there so that you know that you can draw the line back to the center. And so that's purely center. And then the second thing is when you orbit makes sure that the line is blue, because if it's not blue, I won't draw it perfectly straight. And if it's not straight, then when it, when you rotate it, it'll wobble. And then likewise, Well, can't follow me without having a closed surface and you follow it around already. So that's going to wrap it up for this video. I just kinda wanted to show you how to get started. In the next video, we're going to start looking at some of these other ones. They're pretty straightforward. And some of them we won't explore until later on in the course. But I just wanted to show you guys how to use that follow me tool. Thanks for watching. I hope this video was helpful. I'll see you guys in the next one. 7. Sketchup 07 Extra Keychain, Tape Measure, & Rotation Tool 1: Hi folks and welcome back to the SketchUp tutorials. In this video, we're going to kind of play around with some more of the tools and give you guys some more free time to just kind of try out different name plates. So this video is somewhat optional. If you'd like to follow along, I think you'll still be able to practice some important skills. But if you'd like to skip on ahead to the next video, feel free to do so. In this video, I just wanted to kinda give you guys an idea of how to create different little trinkets and our key chains and just have a little bit more fun playing around in SketchUp. I think a lot of the fun in 3D modelling is the creativity we are afforded. And so yeah, let's just have some fun and play around in here. And hopefully you can glean something from the different approaches that we take to create our key chain. So the first thing I'm gonna do is I'm going to create a rectangle. So I'm going to press R for the rectangle tool. And I'm going to do something that's five inches by five inches. Generally, most 3D printers can print anywhere from around five inches or six inches, up to 10 inches, up to 18 inches, depending on whether it's a large format 3D printer. Generally the smaller ones and the ones that are in the cheaper side and the older ones have a smaller print bed, so five inches is a safe. Four inches is a little bit safer, but there's some beds are like four by eight. But for the sake of this video, I think we'll be okay using the five-by-five. Now. We've learned a number of tools and I think that it's fun to kinda just play around. And so feel free to just pause the video, try to look up some ideas that you might want to create. Right now, I'm in the middle of my fantasy football season, so I'm going to create a little football key chain. And so I'm using the 2 arc tool and using the midpoints and I'm going to move the bulge to a 1.5. And likewise I'm going to do the same thing on the other side to 1.5 right there. And it's looking good so far. So I'm just going to come in and delete these extra lines and several need them. And here we go. So you can see that we're starting off with the bass, similar like we did with our previous key chain. And what we can do here from here is we can do some more finesse type of things. So for example, if I want to come up here to here, and let's keep it on the inside. Let's see how close I can get this inside. Okay, so I'm going to delete this line and this line looks pretty good. And then I do the same thing here. Two-point Arc tool, I'm going to go to the last arc. And there we go. Delay slots at line. Awesome. Okay, So we're looking at, we're looking pretty good here. You can see that it's wider than my previous name tag. And I'm just using the pan, which is Shift and mouse 3 or your scroll wheel by pushing it in. And so now there's a couple of different things you can do. I just want to show you if I were gonna put stitching on here for example, I can. But what I would want to do before I did the stitching is to push or pull this. Now the reason for this is and I'll show you after I've pushed pull this up. And I'll say I'll push it up 1 eighth of an inch, which looks fine. Now if we imagined I hadn't push and pull code already, right? And I started to use the, let's say I use Perfect. Okay. So if I had started to just create stitching just like this, one of the groups, one of the issues I might have is that as I start creating this stitching groups. But the one on the blue axis right there, perfect. One of the issues I might have is this. So the reason why I'm creating my line like this is because I want to have something where I can then come in later and just delete these edges, delete these edges, and delete these edges. Now, if I had done this on the flat plane instead of push pulling it. Well, what happened is after I finished all my stitching across the football, if I try to push pull it at that would be possible still, and that would be fine. But one of the issues then underneath is that you can see here is oh, actually, I wouldn't need to close this off. Must have done it before. But if I try to push pull this down, can you see how it would not it would just have this hole there. So one of the issues that we have here is that we need to make sure that we are not. I'm just going to undo all of this because at some point I deleted that backside, bottom. Let's push, pull this up. One. Let's add, well, I guess we're going to have the closes off any two corners. And then rid of that Okey-dokey. So now the next question you all might have for me is, how do I make sure I center the stitching in the center? And that's a great question. One of the tools that we have at our disposal is called the tape measure tool. And so if I use this tape measure tool and you'll see that there's a number of other tools also available to us is that this tape measure tool will allow us to do a couple things. One is, it will allow me to take the measurements starting from this point. Let's say if I start here and you can see as I move it, it's giving me the distance. And it will tell me the distance all the way over here, which is three. That makes sense because the two arcs were 1.5 inches out from the center when we set them up. So we know that right here is the very center at 1.5. So now that that's at 1.5, what we can do is we can either connect from here to here and find out that that measurement is about 23 eighths. And so now what we have drawn is the the line of symmetry that goes along the football and then the mid point. Now from here, there's a number of things we can do. So the first thing we can do is we can use, let's say, the rectangle tool. And if we wanted to, we could build the two sides of the rectangle. So if you wanted to estimate and it's just kinda start here. And let's say we want it to be let's say one, Let's see, two inches. And I'm going to say two inches by 1 16th, do the same thing on this 12 inches by 1 16th. Then I can just basically come over here and starting from wherever I wanted to, I could start creating some stitches. So all I would do is use the Razor Tool races midpoint because that's not necessarily more. And then using the rectangle tool, I could start at this edge or down here. And then I could make sure I'm drawing on the surface, which is important. So let's say something like that. One-eighth by 1 16th. By 1 16th. Then I could draw a line here. And then I can move over. And this is where the tape measure tool can come in handy. So let's say I wanted to have it. The next one I had another that's a probably eighth inch way. And then I would built another rectangle up here. Like this. I'm just going to do the reverse his way around to draw those extra lines just like that. And then use a tape measure tool again. Move over 1 eighth of an inch and then use the rectangle tool are. And by going one-quarter and 1 16th down that way, they're just basically redrawing the center lines, which makes it easier for me later on. There we go. And so I could continue doing this all the way through. Just wanted to show you how you can make sure that your 3D model was fully symmetrical. And you just go afterwards, finish up, oops, the leading, all the unnecessary lines that you have here. And then you could push, pull it. But for the sake of this video, I'm not going to finish it off that way. What I'm going to do actually is I wanted to show you something else. So we've played around a little with the measuring tool. And let's say if I wanted to do something that said fantasy football, 21 for the year. And so what I could do is I could go to my shapes and then I would want to insert them in separate lines. So what I'm gonna do actually is write fantasy. Change the texts that Open Sans seven-eighths of an inch and 1 eighth is perfectly fine. And I'm going to put that here. It's a little bit big actually. So what I'm gonna do is press S, which is scale. And let's scale it down through some around the numbers so that we can do the other texts. Let's say 0.65. Here we go. All right, so we've placed it down here. Now we're going to press another button and it revolves around one of the tools that we have here. Is it here? No, where did it go? There it is. So we're actually going to press Q, which is our rotation tool. And what I'm gonna do is I'm going to just choose one corner here and then select any other point really on this object. Or it doesn't really matter because what we're doing is. We've just designated are rotational, our axis of rotation, which is going to be right here. And I'm just going to choose another spot right here. And it's going to allow me to basically start rotating my text. And this is going to be convenient. It's okay if it doesn't land perfectly on your object. But for the sake of what we're doing, if you could, if you placed your rotational axis and one of the corners, you should be fine. Feel free to just press Escape and then press Q again and reset. And yeah, so I've just rotated and now I'm going to press the M key for the Move button. Now when I move it, I just wanna make sure I'm grabbing the bottom edge because it's easier to grab the top edge and move it. And if we hadn't placed it on year, we would have some issues. But right now, we're fine because when we place the text, we placed it on the surface. But if you grab the bottom edge, then anytime I move it off the surface, then that bottom edge would go on to any surface. I designate just like when we inserted the 3D text and I'll show you in a second what that looks like. But so for right now, we have fantasy. And then I'm going to get another text box. And right, football. And I want to change that Open Sans. And then I'm going to put this not on this for ball. You can see that it's, it's on right now and then I'm off. I'm going to just move over. So you can see right now, see the text is actually intercepting or intersecting with the actual football 3D print. But if I move it over, you can see that anywhere that this pointer is, is where this X wants to be placed on. And so you can see right here it's placed on the object now it's placed on the plane. And so you can see that it's intersecting. But the first one I wanna do is I want to show you how to move it onto this surface if you don't already have the surface created. So first I'm going to scale it down like before. I'm gonna type in 0.65. Press Enter, and then if I try to move this and I grab this top edge, watch what happens. You can see that it inserts into the face. But if I grab this bottom edge and I bring it onto the surface, you can see that it's lifted up. And I just wanted to show you that there's a unique and kind of neat shortcut to know. So now that we have that, I'm now going to pan up, going to press Q. I'll put the axis of rotation here. And it's pretty good fantasy football. And then from here we can just kind of finish up. I'm going to just do 21. And there's a lot of different things that you can do. It doesn't have to be a football. Yeah. Actually looks pretty okay. Has a large text. Oops. So then obviously, I would want to maybe make a little hole for the key chain. Push pull this down. Whoops, not that one. I want to push pull this down. Now one thing to notice is as I push pull this down, you'll notice that there's a point where the, it almost looks like triangles if you notice that. So if you've really carefully and we were down right there when it's that whitish, yellowish or I mean the whitish bluish color. That means that it's intersecting with the bottom face. And when I click it, you'll notice that it disappears. So what it's doing is it's detecting the inside face of this plane, which is why it gets the hues of dark blue and that white in there. So yeah, and that's pretty much it. And we do the same thing as we did before we go in and we group everything. So I will take this, oops, then go to make group already. So what we're gonna do is we're going to make sure everything is a solid group entity Info. They are also at groups or components, which is exactly what we want. I'm just going to highlight everything. Whoops, I get everything in the box. That's why including this guy, just press shift and clicked. And then I'm going to go to our button. And there we go. It's just combined. All these different items. Cancel and we've grouped everything now. So there we go. We have our object. It's a solid group. And kinda feel free to take what you've learned in this video to apply it to anything else you're wanting to create. So don't feel limited, you don't have to create, let's say text on there. If you wanted to create an icon from a show or anything like that. I just finished watching the, the show squid gains. And that was crazy. But there are a lot of different little key chains you can make from there, like the little helmets. So yeah, anyways, I hope you guys all enjoyed this video. I hope it was helpful. I'll see you guys in the next one. 8. Sketchup 08 Move Tool, Offset Tool, & Building A Home 1: Hi folks and welcome back to the SketchUp tutorials. In this video, we're going to be looking at some new tools and some tools that we've used before, but just using them in a different way. So the first thing I'm going to ask everyone to do is to either save this or to clear off their their work plain. And now that I have those gone, we're gonna get started already. So now that they're gone, what we're gonna do is we're going to first start off by creating a rectangle, 10 inches by 10 inches, and press Enter. And here we go. So we have our rectangular base and then we're gonna push, pull this up about eight inches. So what we're gonna do is we're going to build something that looks similar to like a basic little kind of, you know, many home. And what we're gonna do is we're going to use this because it's a simple way to kind of learn these next tools. And now I'm going to let you guys have some time playing around with it. So the first thing we're gonna do is, Let's say on this top side I draw a line. So if everyone can follow along with me, we're going to draw a line. Now, you might ask, well, why did we draw that? And you might speculate that, oh, we're just gonna push, pull one of these sides up and that's possible if you wanted to have a double decker on the backside or the front side. But for the sake of this video, what we're gonna do is we're gonna go over to the selection tool, which is also Spacebar. And we're going to select this line. Now we're going to learn the move tool which is right here. You can come up here or the M button for move. And we're going to click em and then click on the edge. Now if you start moving the mouse, you'll notice that I can move it kind of in a bunch of different directions. And if I use the arrow keys, so if I press up, it will lock it in the z-axis. If I press left, it locks it in the red axis or the x. And if I press left it a locket in the green axis. So that's a way for you to be able to use it so that you could drag these in different directions. But for the sake of this video, we're going to press up and lock it in the blue. And we're going to type in, let's say four inches. Alrighty. So you can see we have something that could be the beginnings of our own mini home. And you see that we have what resembles a roof. And there are a couple of things we can do from here. One of the fun things is, and I'm not going to keep this, but I just want to show you that you can use the different skills you've learned. I press the space bar for the select shouldn't tool, which is over here. I'm going to press F for the offset tool. And I'm going to offset it, let's say about half an inch. Let's say, there we go. And it doesn't have to be perfect, mainly because I'm not going to be keeping this. But if I do that, watch what happens if I push, pull this up. It helps to create kind of that top of the roof, that lens to allowing you to step outside and not get hit by the rating immediately. And for the rain to not dribble down the side of your house. And so you have that ledge there. And I just wanted to show you that you could do little things to help accentuate the details. But for the sake of this video, I'm just going to press Control Z or Command Z on a Mac to undo it. And then the next thing I wanted to show you was how you can use the same tools that we've just learned for different purposes. So the next thing we can do is, let's say we wanted to build a door. So to build the door, let's say three feet by seven feet. So three feet or three inches by seven inches. And then on the side, or let's say on the backside, we wanted to have a mirror or a large window, excuse me. And and then on the back side, Let's say we wanted a large kind of window and obviously we'd have a much larger I'm back yard. But for the sake of this video, I wanted to show you something interesting. And that is, I'm going to just draw a rectangle right here. It doesn't have to be perfectly centered or anything because I'm not sure how it's going to look, but I just wanted to show you what's possible. Just like with the roof spline that we did here, which was grabbing that light and moving it. We can do the same thing with surfaces on other surfaces. So if I press the Move Tool M, I click on it. And then you can see right now I'm kind of locked in the plane. If I press left or right, I get moving the z-axis. If I move left or press left, you can see that now I have the ability to move it locked in the green axis or the y-axis, which is what I want. And so since I want this window kinda facing outwards, I can leave it here. And I've just created, let's say the backside of that window. Now it looks a little funny, so I'm not going to keep it, but I just wanted to show you that it is possible. And likewise, if you wanted to change the roof to have something that looks like this, you could. So if I go back in time, Control Z, all the way back, and then let's say I offset this roof. Like buy that. I couldn't do the same thing where I press on this and I can press up and I can set my roof so that my roof looks more boxes. All righty. And so this is one way to get started on building, let's say, a small model home. I'm not gonna go into too much detail here, but know that you can change the layout. So for example, let's say we started off with this by ten by ten, you could also add to this. So if I came over here and then I wanted to come over here and let's say I wanted to do something that was 24 by 24 inches by 10 inches. And I could basically just continue to make this house really large. And let's say add another 10 inches by 24 inches. Well, actually 24 by 10, Let's see, 24 inches by 10 inches. All right. And then I'll just come in and out, get rid of these lines. I'm just using the backspace for it. And now that I have one solid surface, I could then push, pull this ten inches. There we go. And then I can kinda do the same thing where if I use the line tool, I could build a long roof. And this is where it gets a little bit challenging because what's going to happen is, I know that this is ten width because this was 24 by ten. But what I'd have to do is use a measuring tool, M. And I'm going to have to own, I mean, the tape measurement tool. I'm going to have to measure five feet N, so five inches. And now I can draw a line from here to here along the green axis, and that will give me what I need. I'm going to press space bar selection tool to select these extra bits I don't need. And then I'm going to highlight this line holding the shift key and selecting each of these objects. Oops, I'm going to use click it again, just the unhighlight it. And then if I press the Move key AM and I press up, you can see that I can get it to lock into the plane. And there we go. So you can see that this is the beginnings of how we can start to work on a model. And if you wanted to build a model home or small buildings for whatever it is, maybe an architecture project. This is the way we would do it. And then like in all of our videos with anything we want to 3D print, we would triple click. And then we would make group. And just make sure that it is a solid group already. Well, I hope this video was helpful. I just kinda wanted to show you how to get started on creating 3D models. In the next video, we'll look at some other tools and kind of play around a little bit more and I'll give you some free time that kind of play around with the tools that we've learned so far. Anyways, I hope that video was helpful. I'll see you guys in the next one. 9. Sketchup 09 Nametag & Downloading 1: Hi folks and welcome back to the SketchUp tutorials. Thanks for joining me on this episode where we are going to be learning how to use a lot of the skills we've learned over the past couple of episodes for creating our first mini-project. And that is going to be creating a little key chain or a nameplate or whatever little gadget you'd like, using the skills that we've learned and making it so that it is 3D printable. All right, so the first thing we're gonna do is I'm going to take that Comey built from last time. I'll press space bar or you can choose the selection tool. The space bar is the shortcut, right-click and erase. So again, as a reminder, you can always go to the Menu, go to New and start a new project. But for the sake of what we're doing, I'm just going to start with a new or start with the same file and just erasing what we've created. So the first thing I'd like to do, and for the sake of this video is we're going to be creating a small key chain, nothing too large. I would say. We're gonna start with a rectangle tool. And we're going to go, and I'm going to say that we would create a key chain that, you know, and obviously you can make it larger or smaller. Most 3D printed plates are around six by six by six. And obviously they do get larger. So for the sake of this video, what I'm going to do is I'm going to create one that is five inches. So five inches, oops, that's five feet, five inches by one inch. And the reason why I'm doing that is because I want it to be slightly longer than it is, or decently longer because it's going to have my name on there. And what we're gonna do is we're gonna start applying some of the different kind of skills and tools that we've learned over the past couple of episodes. And so the first thing we're gonna do is we, so we have our foundation and it's going to hold our name here. It's not going to be too large because you don't want anything too big, attached your keys, but you want something long enough so that it'll be able to continue your whole name depending on how long your name is. If it's longer, like if you have a name like Alexander or Alexandra might want this to be a little bit longer, like six inches or seven inches reveal shorter name. You can always bring it down to about four inches. I'm gonna use my name, which is Richard. And so the first thing we're gonna do is we're going to use the Arc tool. And instead of just using the Arc tool, we're gonna go with the two-point it Arc tool. Now the two-point Arc tool is useful because what it's gonna do is it's going to allow us to 2s, to choose two points and then build out from there. So I'd like everyone to go to the right side, click on the midpoint and you'll see that it will highlight that. And what you'll notice as you bring it over to the next edge is you'll see that you can start it off here. So if you want a less rounded corner, you can start here, click here. But what I wanna do is I want to show you some of the neat tools that SketchUp has. And when you see that magenta line, it means that that is equally distant from this point as it is to this point. And so what happens here is if I click here, remember how the arc, this two-point Arc tool is. You set the two points first and then you can create the arc afterwards. Now, for the sake of this video, I'm going to create a slight arc to this outside edge inside the rectangle. So I'm going to leave it inside so it doesn't go outside like this and created like bubbles. But what I want you to notice is you'll notice that as I come over here, you'll see me create it and says tangent to edge. And this is what I'd like. So I'm going to create it right there. And you'll see that now I've created this arc that connects right here. And I'm gonna do the same thing on the other side and come over here. And you'll notice that I've created this. Then I can go over here, use the eraser tool to erase this outside edge. And I've now created the end, rounded end to my, let's call it my key chain. So I'm actually going to do this to both sides. But what I want to show you is a shortcut and this one's really neat because it saves you a step. And that is if you watch on this side as I do it here, if you see that magenta line and that's where you want that line to form. If you double-click, what it'll do is it understands that you want to make that your new outside edge between those two points, and it'll automatically delete the other parts. Likewise, if I come over here and I bring it over here and I double-click, it will also delete those points. And the reason why I want to do that is that it sees me the step of after creating that arc, having to now go to the eraser tool or the selection tool and highlight all the different parts. And so that saves us a step and that's a pretty convenient thing that SketchUp has built in. Now the next thing I'm going to want to do is I'm going to want to give it some depth now that I've created the generic kind of layout and foundation for the nameplate or in my case, a key chain. I want to give it some depth. Now, if you'd like to, you can always use maybe the line tool, the free hand tool, or some of the other tools to create your own key chain. Whether you want to make a star or hard or whatever it is that you'd like. But for the sake of this video, I'm just going to move on and we're going to start extruding or push polling. So I'm going to press P for push pull. And we're gonna push pull this and we're gonna make it about 1 eighth of an inch. So you can see here as I pull it up, first it'll be 1 16th. And the second click, it'll be about 1 eighth. That's about right. I don't want it too thick, so I don't want it very bulky, but it's thick enough that it won't break instantly in my pocket. So I'm going to click right there, and there we go. We now have the base foundation for my name plate. The next thing we're gonna do is we're going to start bringing our name in. So we are going to click on. So the next thing we're gonna do is we're going to bring our name in. We're going to click on the arc tube, not the Arc tool. So the next thing we're gonna do is we're going to put our name on here and we're going to click on the Shape tool. And down here you have the name. And here I can enter my text, Richard and font. It's okay, Laura's okay. Or actually let's see, Open Sans actually would be better. And the reason why I say this is because with the Laura, The you'll notice that well, I'll leave it Laura now and then I will also print out a separate version a little bit later. But for the height, since the thickness is one inch, I could leave it one inch, but I'm going to actually make it 0.9 inches. So I have a little space up top and below and the text extrusion. I do not want it 111 eighth of an inch already. Know I looked at one foot. Okay. I actually, this is perfect because it helps me highlight the elements that I wanted to mention about the font. So when you're printing with a 3D printer, this text actually will only be an inch tall, and that's not very large. And so what happens with a 3D printer is that because this thickness in reality, or with a 3D printer will only be fractions of a millimeter thick. Usually this text letter will consist of two or three, maybe layers of plastic, which makes this very hard to 3D print because it's so thin that 3D printer wouldn't be able to actually come over here and retract back and print all this. And so what happens oftentimes is if you try to 3D print a font that has little fine little pieces to the text. It doesn't print out nicely. And so I would refrain from doing that. So I'm going to just erase this right-click race and go back to our shape tool and go here. And so what I'd like everyone to choose is to choose a font that makes a little bit more sense in terms of being more rounded and Open. Sans accomplishes that for us. And so for the height, I'd like it to be one inch, 0.9 inches, excuse me. 0.9 inches. And it already looks good. Now what you'll notice is if I move it over the surface, do you notice that it goes vertical and if I bring it over to this curve surface, it starts getting curved. And then if I just bring it onto here, it'll just go into the surface. We don't want that. We want to make sure it's on top of the surface. So I'm going to bring it over here and I'll place it somewhere centered but a little off center to the right because I don't want a whole for my key chain to go through. So I'm going to choose right around there and obviously feel free to orbit as you're doing this. So you can see where you're placing this. I'm not going to be too particular about it. I'm going to place it right there. And that looks good so far. So we are doing a pretty nicely here. We have our name and I'm going to press Escape because I clicked it and I am moving it. And that looks pretty good. So the next thing we're gonna do is I'm going to use the circle tool. So I'm gonna press C. Likewise, you can just come over here and then choose the circle tool. And I'm going to create a two millimeter, or about 1 eighth. Yeah, it's about 1 eighth of a whole 1 eighth of an inch. Oh, I see. And we're gonna push pull that down. All the way down is just telling me that I had, since I had 96 entered from our previous video, it just reduce that number for the sake of what we're trying to do. And there we go. So now I've just punch that hole through and I have kind of all of these elements here. So the next thing I'm gonna do is I'm gonna press the space bar and I'm going to triple-click all of this and I'm going to make that a group. So I'm gonna come over here and make group. And there we go. So now we're going to right-click and make sure the solid group, Perfect. So as we can see, we have our solid group here. I'm just going to click on this to reassess it. And what we're gonna do now to finalize it is now we have two groups. We have the name and then the name plate. And so this is where we are now going to combine them. Now the important thing is to make sure that both of these are solid groups. The name will always be a solid component and that's fine as long as it says solid component and we have a solid group. Now to combine them, we can do two things. The first thing or the way I recommend doing it is click on an object first, making sure that they're both solid groups or components going here, clicking on union, oops. And then clicking on the second item right here. And by doing that, what it does is it'll combine both items into one. And we now have a, what we call a solid group. And that's what we want. We want to make sure that we have a solid group. And sometimes with a fancier texts, we have some issues. And that's where on this right side you have something called solid inspector. In order to use solid inspector, you need to upgrade. But for the sake of this video, I just wanted to kinda get everyone started with a very simple version of how to use SketchUp for 3D printing. And so, you know, I'm not gonna go too much into solid inspector right now, but basically, solid inspector would allow you to find any geometric irregularities with this that would cause it not to be a solid group, but instead just be a regular group, which means that there's some faces that might be missing. And that can cause some irregularities when you're trying to 3D printing. But for the sake of this video, what we're doing with just texts and using very simple geometric shapes, we shouldn't have too many issues with it. And so now that we're done, we have our solid group here. I'm going to just pan over a little bit. Yeah, we're done with our first name tag or name plate, and that's pretty much it. The next step in this 3D printing process would be to export it as an STL. And the way we would do it is we come over here, go to Export, and you can export it up, download, excuse me. So the next step would be to export it. And so under exports you have different 3D modeling formats, but we're gonna go to download, get it, and you can download it as an escapade, KP, which is the sketch of file a PNG, which is an image or an STL, which is what we can use the slice it. And so this is what we're going to be using. And you can see a little pop-up window. Click on that. And you'll see that your first project has been downloaded. In a follow-up video, we'll be looking at how to take that STL to 3D print. But I hope you guys enjoyed this video. I hope you guys had fun creating your first 3D printable name tag or nameplate or key chain. Feel free to just kind of play around. And I hope you guys enjoyed this video. Anyways, I hope this video was helpful. I'll see you guys in the next one. 10. Sketchup 10 Designing Your Home 1: Hi folks and welcome back to the SketchUp tutorials. In this video, we're gonna go and break the designer house a little bit. And this is more for aesthetic purposes. For example, if you're going to be taking your project and using them for demonstrations or for a presentation. This would be a great way to make your designs a little bit more realistic. Again, this won't affect your 3D model if you print it out because the 3D printer usually has only one or two schools that it can use for multi printing unless you send it off to a special company. So let's get started. So light in the last video, we took our model and as you can see, it's solid group. What we're going to do in order to make it editable again, because right now if I try to edit it, if I let say I build a rectangle here for window, what happens is it's actually just building it in empty space because it's not attached to this group. So the group kind of consolidates all of the surfaces and edges into its own component. And so I'm going to Command Z to undo all of this. And what I'm gonna do is there's two ways to do it. The first one is to do Edit Group. Now the issue with edit group is if it was just gonna be one tiny change I make, I wouldn't do explode, which is the one we're going to be doing. But edit group allows me to now, as you can see with the dotted line, to make some edits. So if I wanted to edit something on this window and build a rectangle here, I could do so. And then once I press space bar and click outside of that object, you can now see that this is now part of the group among going to undo that just so we have it. And the second way to do it is is to use the explode. And explode is meant to take a group and to separate all of its components into its individual parts. And so that you have the ability to select whatever you'd like. The benefit of this is that if you're going to be doing a decent amount of work, instead of having an off click off the object and then right-click and go to Edit Group constantly. This is a simple way to separate everything while you edit. And then it allows you to group everything back together at the end. So that's what we're gonna do with our explode. And now we're gonna get started on some of the other items. So like I mentioned in the previous video, first I'm going to let say, offset this bottom of the house by pretty small amount. Let's say about half an inch or so. Nothing too crazy. And we're gonna push, pull this up. And it should stop automatically as it reaches near the top, you can leave a little, as you can see here, I left just a little bit off the edge. That's completely up to you what you'd like to do. And we'll leave that just like it is. The next thing we're gonna do is we're going to start thinking about how you want to design this house. So let's say we wanted this to be the front side of our house. And this is completely arbitrary. You feel free to do whatever you'd like. I'm going to make let's say our front door somewhere around here. So I'm going to use the rectangle tool. I'm going to press R. And I'm going to make the door about three feet by seven feet tall. So three inches by seven inches. All righty. Now there's a couple of things I can do to make this a little bit more realistic. So for example, if I want to add a frame to this, I can do it. And I'm gonna show you a neat way to do it. I'm going to just select these three, holding the Shift key and using the Selection button, I can press on these three. And if I press F, whatever allows me to do is to push or to create an offset around these three sides. If I tried to do it off the entire rectangle, it would push down into kind of non-existent space. And so what it exists, but it would just look really funny on the bottom of my things. So if you select the sides, you can choose which sides get offset. So this is a neat feature. And what I'm gonna do now is I'm going to use the selection tool spacebar. And then I'm gonna push, pull this out just the bit. So I would say less than that 1 16th of an inch. Perfect. And then if you wanted to go a little bit further, feel free to do so. Let's say if you wanted to add a door knob here, you could. And I'm just gonna push pull this one out. Just the teens might be to bunch. Yeah, there we go. And we're not gonna go into the particulars of making this absolutely realistic. We just wanted something that helps us to imagine what our house could start to look like. Now let's say, and this front side of the house, we wanted to have a very large window. Now. I don't think floor to ceiling windows would be particularly necessary, but let's say we wanted something rather large. So let's say we're going to do something that takes up most of it, but not all of the space. So something like this. Maybe a little bit longer, That's the earth go 11 feet, 11 feet by six feet, or 11 inches by six inches. And what we're gonna do is kind of the same thing. So on this window, what we can do is we can create an offset pressing F after selecting it. And then you're just going to click and bring it inward this time. And I would say maybe a little less. I don't want the window frame to be too thick. Song say about quarter inch. And then I'm going to push, pull that out. And there we go. We have our first window. Now on the right side here. Let's say if we wanted to have a garage, we could. So if I wanted to start somewhere near to the edge and the about eight feet sounds about right. Let's get 288 inches. I'm going to type it in just because it's easier. Go and feel free to make this a little bit pronounced whether you wanted to do an offset on it again or not. I'm not going to for this video and I don't want to attach any videos tomorrow or Windows to my garage on the right side. But then on the backside I may want to add some windows. So again, let's add a door somewhere around here. So let's say three feet by seven feet. And then I'm gonna do the same offset. Oops, I've just selected one too many faces. I press F or offset. And three-eighths is good. And then I'll use the space bar. And I'm going to just orbit a little bit so I can see that the amount on push pulling it by, we go and then add a small door knob. That's a quarter inch push pull that just the teens. So orbit. Using the mouse three, put out by three-sixteenths analytics, fine. Alrighty. Now, one thing we're gonna do here is let's say I create another large window and leave it like that. So that's 12 by 5. Now, actually, I'm going to do groups who are 11 by six. Let me restart that. Oh, we'll have six. Okay. This looks a little bit high for me, which is completely fine because what I can do is just use the M Tool, select it, and then I can move it. Move tool. Here we go. I'm just going to move it down a little bit. And once I have it here, what I'm gonna do is do the offset again. So once I have it selected or at least insulate, let's say three-eighths. And now here's something interesting that we can do before I pushed, pulled this frame out. Let's say for example, I wanted to create some bordered windows. So let's say I wanted these to be intersected into four lines. So what I've just done is I've created a, using the midpoints have basically created across. Now there's a couple of things I can do from here to make this a little bit easier for us. So what I can do here is I can take, let's say the space, use the selection tool. I'm going to select this and then I'm going to offset it. So I'm going to use the F tool. And if I offset it, you'll notice that it creates an extra space on top of what we've already done. And that's okay. It just looks a little funny. And so if you remember what we did with the door frame, if I select Oops. I'm not sure why my space-bar as not being responsive today. And I offset just these two. You'll notice I could offset it. So if I let's say one of the setup by 1 eighth of an inch, I could do the same thing here and offset it by 1 eighth of an inch. And likewise, I come over here, I select these two offset, 1 eighth of an inch. I select these two. Here we go. Yeah, they're offset and 1 eighth of an inch. Now what I can do then is just delete these inner portions. I can delete these edges. And what that's gonna do is it's going to allow me to have one solid border over here. So you'll notice that once you delete this, this is one solid border. And then I can press, push, pull, and I can pull it out. And now I've just created a bordered window. So it has multiple windows, window panes that are all bordered. Yeah. That looks pretty nice. And I'm going to pause just the general exterior design for right now, just so you guys can take some time to kind of create whatever you'd like. So feel free to pause the video here and design whatever you'd like. The next thing we're gonna do is we're actually going to start to paint this. And so we're going to be using the paint bucket tool. So please pause the video here and when you're ready, we'll resume. 11. Sketchup 11 Designing Your Home, Paint Bucket, And Scale Tool 1: Hi folks and welcome back to the SketchUp tutorials. In this video, we're gonna go and break the designer house a little bit. And this is more for aesthetic purposes. For example, if you're going to be taking your project and using them for demonstrations or for a presentation. This would be a great way to make your designs a little bit more realistic. Again, this won't affect your 3D model if you print it out because the 3D printer usually has only one or two schools that it can use for reprinting unless you send it off to a special company. So let's get started. So light in the last video, we took our model and as you can see, it's solid group. What we're going to do in order to make it editable again, because right now if I try to edit it, if I let say I build a rectangle here for window, what happens is it's actually just building it in empty space because it's not attached to this group. So the group kind of consolidates all of the surfaces and edges into its own component. And so I'm going to Command Z to undo all of this. And what I'm gonna do is there's two ways to do it. The first one is to do Edit Group. Now the issue with edit group is if it was just gonna be one tiny change I make, I wouldn't do explode, which is the one we're going to be doing. But edit group allows me to now, as you can see with the dotted line, to make some edits. So if I wanted to edit something on this window and build a rectangle here, I could do so. And then once I press space bar and click outside of that object, you can now see that this is now part of the group among going to undo that just so we have it. And the second way to do it is is to use the explode. And explode is meant to take a group and to separate all of its components into its individual parts. And so that you have the ability to select whatever you'd like. The benefit of this is that if you're going to be doing a decent amount of work, instead of having an off click off the object and then right-click and go to Edit Group constantly. This is a simple way to separate everything while you edit. And then it allows you to group everything back together at the end. So that's what we're gonna do with our explode. And now we're gonna get started on some of the other items. So like I mentioned in the previous video, first I'm going to, let say, offset this bottom of the house by pretty small amount. Let's say about half an inch or so. Nothing too crazy. And we're gonna push, pull this up. And it should stop automatically as it reaches near the top, you can leave a little, as you can see here, I left just a little bit off the edge. That's completely up to you what you'd like to do. And we'll leave that just like it is. The next thing we're gonna do is we're going to start thinking about how you want to design this house. So let's say we wanted this to be the front side of our house. And this is completely arbitrary. You feel free to do whatever you'd like. I'm going to make let's say our front door somewhere around here. So I'm going to use the rectangle tool. I'm going to press R. And I'm going to make the door about three feet by seven feet tall. So three inches by seven inches. Alrighty. Now there's a couple of things I can do to make this a little bit more realistic. So for example, if I want to add a frame to this, I can do it. And I'm going to show you a neat way to do it. I'm going to just select these three, holding the Shift key and using the Selection button, I can press on these three. And if I press F, whatever allows me to do is to push or to create an offset around these three sides. If I try to do it off the entire rectangle, it would push down into kind of non-existent space. And so what it exists, but it would just look really funny on the bottom of my things. So if you select the sides, you can choose which sides get offset. So this is a neat feature. And what I'm gonna do now is I'm going to use the selection tool spacebar. And then I'm gonna push, pull this out just the bit. So I would say less than that 1 16th of an inch. Perfect. And then if you wanted to go a little bit further, feel free to do so. Let's say if you wanted to add a door knob here, you could. And I'm just gonna push pull this one out. Just the teens might be too much. And we go, and we're not gonna go into the particulars of making this absolutely realistic, but we just wanted something that helps us to imagine what our house could start to look like. Now, let's say, and this front side of the house, we wanted to have a very large window. Now. I don't think floor to ceiling windows would be particularly necessary, but let's say we wanted something rather large. So let's say we're gonna do something that takes up most of it, but not all of the space. So something like this. Maybe a little bit longer. Yeah, let's go 11 feet. 11 feet by six feet, or 11 inches by six inches. And what we're gonna do is kind of the same thing. So on this window, what we can do is we can create an offset pressing F. After selecting it and then you're just going to click and bring it inward this time. And I would say maybe a little less. I don't want the window frame to be to fix on say about quarter inch. And then I'm going to push, pull that out. And there we go. We have our first window. Now on the right side here, let's say if we wanted to have a garage, we could. So if I wanted to start somewhere near to the edge and the about eight feet sounds about right. Let's get to eight eight inches. I'm going to type it in just because it's easier. Go and feel free to make this a little bit pronounced whether you wanna do an offset on it again or not. I'm not gonna for this video. And I don't want to attach any videos to my windows, to my garage on the right side. But then on the backside I may want to add some windows. So again, let's add a door somewhere around here. So let's say three feet by seven feet. And then I'm gonna do the same offset. Oops, I just selected one-to-many feces at press F or offset. And three A's is good. And then I'll use the space bar. And I'm going to just orbit a little bit so I can see that the amount I'm postponing it by, there we go. And then add a small door knob. That's a quarter inch push pull that just the teens. So orbit. Using the mouse three, pull it out by three-sixteenths, and that looks fine already. Now, one thing I'm gonna do here is let's say I create another large window and there like that. So that's 12 by 5. Now, actually, I'm going to do groups who are 11 by six. Let me restart that. Live in six. Okay. This looks a little bit high for me, which is completely fine because what I can do is just use the m tool selected and then I can move it. Moved to, here we go. I'm just going to move it down a little bit. And once I have it here, what I'm gonna do is do the offset again. So once I have it selected, release, let's say three-eighths. And now here's something interesting that we can do before I pushed, pulled this frame out. Let's say for example, I wanted to create some bordered windows. So let's say I wanted these to be intersected into four lines. So what I've just done is I've created a, using the midpoints have basically created across. Now there's a couple of things I can do from here to make this a little bit easier for us. So what I can do here is I can take, let's say the space, use the selection tool. I'm going to select this and then I'm going to offset it. So I'm going to use the F tool. And if I offset it, you'll notice that it creates an extra space on top of what we've already done. And that's okay. It just looks a little funny. And so if you remember what we did with the door frame, if I select whoops. I'm not sure why my space-bar as not being responsive today. And I offset just these two. You'll notice I could offset it. So if I, let's say one at a setup by 1 eighth of an inch, I could do the same thing here and offset it by 1 eighth of an inch. And likewise, I come over here, I select these two offset, 1 eighth of an inch. I selected these two. Are here we go. Yeah, there we go. Offset and 1 eighth of an inch. Now what I can do then is just delete these inner portions. I can delete these edges. And what that's gonna do is it's going to allow me to have one solid border over here. So you'll notice that once you delete this, this is one solid border. And then I can press, push, pull, and I can pull it out. And now I've just created a bordered window. So it has multiple windows, window panes that are all bordered. Yeah. That looks pretty nice. And I'm going to pause just the general exterior design for right now, just so you guys can take some time to kind of create whatever you'd like. So feel free to pause the video here and design whatever you'd like. The next thing we're gonna do is we're actually going to start to paint this. And so we're going to be using the paint bucket tool. So please pause the video here. And when you're ready, we'll resume. All right, So welcome back. I hope you guys had fun designing your 3D models. We're going to use the paint bucket tool. And for the sake of what we're doing, We're gonna make sure that we choose the paint bucket because that's going to allow us to start the process. And what we're gonna do is we're going to start painting using the colors that are given to us. All right, so let's say you just wanted to start off with some basic, let's say I wanted to paint my house this kind of like almost like a shale gray. What I'll want to do is come around and select the gray on all the edges. Just be careful just not to mistake some of the shading in SketchUp for the gray. You can see it looks like the house roof is gray. That's just taking some lighting into accounting. So make sure that you're getting all your sides to get the look that you're trying to go for. Alrighty, So that looks good enough right now. Now on the paint bucket, you will notice that you have a second little button to the right of the home, and that's going to give you a number of different objects. Now this is really helpful, especially if you're trying to decorate anything that's architecturally based. So for the sake of what we're doing, Let's say I want to go to, let's say the roof. So they give us a number of different roofing options. I'm gonna go with this. And if I paid my roof, you can see that it looks like that. Now part of the reason why it looks a little funny is as we were designing, we were designing in inches. And so basically everything should be representative, represented in feet. And so if we actually try to design this roof, you'll notice that it looks really odd and that each roofing panel, it looks like a single tile. And that's true. And that's because I was designing a small-scale model, but that's where we're going to learn one of our next tools that will help us. So in this next portion, what we're gonna do is we're going to triple-click this entire object. And we're going to use the scale tool. And you'll see the scale tool under the movement you, you have the Move orbit and then your view scale. And if you press S, This is which is a tool we've used before, we're actually going to scale this and we're going to go until one of the corners. It doesn't matter which corner, but I'm going to choose this corner so it scales outward from the origin. And I'm going to multiply it by 12. So I'm gonna just comprise 12 and enter. And what that's done is it's multiplied everything by 12. And since everything we had was already set in inches, if I multiply something that seven inches by 12, it will become seven feet. And so that's why now if you look at the roofing, it looks a lot more representative of what a normal roof should look like. And so that's the scale tool. You'll notice that I didn't have to group anything. I just needed a select everything. And so now we have our roof looking a lot better. So generally when you're dealing with any of these patterns that are created based on a particular scale size. That will be very helpful for you already. So now we've created our roof and you'll notice that now our door, let's say is seven feet tall. This line right here is going to be seven feet tall. So if I use the words of measuring tool, the dimensions of this, right? It should be seven feet tall. You can see it right there, seven feet. All righty. The next thing we're gonna do, I'm gonna go back to selection tool to get out of there. And let's go to where's our glass for windows, glass and mirrors. All righty. So if you come over here, you'll notice we have a number of different options. And I'm going to choose this one translucent glass blue. And I'm going to take this window blue. And what you'll notice is that it now allows us to look through the house. Likewise with anything else. We can look through the backside as well because it is a translucent color. And then you can come over here and let's say you want to look at, Let's say, some wood and you want to use that for your door. Let's try this one. Let's see what other options we have here that looks okay. And then the outside border. I am no designer, so please forgive me for my choices for what I'm doing, but actually I'll put it out. Exterior border a little bit darker. Let's see. Here we go. Oh, now much darker. Colors. Something like black. Yeah. Okay. That's better. And then you can do the same thing for the front and then color the door, whatever you'd like. I'm just going to keep it consistent with that dark green and then metal door knob. Here we go. And yeah, so now you start to see that what started to design starts to look a little bit more realistic. And feel free to come in and kind of color even in these little extra edges. So for example, if I wanted to finish that off, I will just come in here just like that to really round out these edges. And Here we go. We'll do much of zoom out already. So that's pretty much going to wrap it up for the design portion of the 3D modeling for the house. I hope this video was helpful and I hope you guys enjoyed designing your house. I'm going to leave my garage door white because by garages bite. But yeah, feel free to kinda play around and have fun with SketchUp and I'll see you guys in the next one. Take care. 12. Sketchup 12 Paint Bucket & Scale Tool 1: All right, So welcome back. I hope you guys had fun designing your 3D models. We're going to use the paint bucket tool. And for the sake of what we're doing, We're gonna make sure that we choose the paint bucket because that's going to allow us to start the process. And what we're gonna do is we're going to start painting using the colors that are given to us. All right, so let's say you just wanted to start off with some basic, let's say I wanted to paint my house this kind of like almost like a shale gray. What I'll want to do is come around and select the gray on all the edges. Just be careful just not to mistake some of the shading in SketchUp for the gray. You can see it looks like the house roof is gray. That's just taking some lighting into accounting. So make sure that you're getting all your sides to get the look that you're trying to go for. Alrighty, So that looks good enough right now. Now on the paint bucket, you will notice that you have a second little button to the right of the home, and that's going to give you a number of different objects. Now this is really helpful, especially if you're trying to decorate anything that's architecturally based. So for the sake of what we're doing, Let's say I want to go to, let's say the roof. So they give us a number of different roofing options. I'm gonna go with this. And if I paint my roof, you can see that it looks like that. Now part of the reason why it looks a little funny is as we were designing, we were designing in inches. And so basically everything should be representative, represented in feet. And so if we actually try to design this roof, you'll notice that it looks really odd and that each roofing panel, it looks like a single tile. And that's true. And that's because as designing a small-scale model, but that's where we're going to learn one of our next tools that will help us. So in this next portion, what we're gonna do is we're going to triple-click this entire object. And we're going to use the scale tool. And you'll see the scale tool under the movement you, you have the Move orbit and then your view scale. And if you press S, This is which is a tool we've used before, we're actually going to scale this and we're going to go until one of the corners. It doesn't matter which corner, but I'm gonna choose this corner so it scales outward from the origin. And I'm going to multiply it by 12. So I'm just comprise 12 and enter. And what that's done is it's multiplied everything by 12. And since everything we had was already set in inches, if I multiply something that's seven inches by 12, it will become seven feet. And so that's why now if you look at the roofing, it looks a lot more representative of what our normal roof should look like. And so that's the scale tool. You'll notice that I didn't have to group anything. I just needed a select everything. And so now we have our roof looking a lot better. So generally when you're dealing with any of these patterns that are created based on a particular scale size, that will be very helpful for you already. So now we've created our roof and you'll notice that now our door, let's say is seven feet tall. This line right here is going to be seven feet tall. So if I use the words, the measuring tool, the dimensions of this, right? It should be seven feet tall. You can see it right there, seven feet. All righty. The next thing we're gonna do, I'm gonna go back to selection tool to get out of there. And let's go to where's our glass for windows, glass and mirrors. All righty. So if you come over here, you'll notice we have a number of different options. And I'm going to choose this one translucent glass blue. And I'm going to take this window blue. And what you'll notice is that it now allows us to look through the house. Likewise with anything else. We can look through the backside as well because it is a translucent color. And then you can come over here and let's say you want to look at, Let's say, some wood and you want to use that for your door. Let's try this one. Let's see what other options we have here that looks okay. And then the outside border. I am no designer, so please forgive me for my choices for what I'm doing, but actually I'll put an x here, your board a little bit darker. Let's see. Here we go. Oh, now much darker. Colors. Something like black. Yeah. Okay. That's better. And then you can do the same thing for the front and then color the door, whatever you'd like. I'm just going to keep it consistent with that dark green. And then let's do metal. The door knob. Here we go. And yeah, so now you start to see that what started to design starts to look a little bit more realistic. And feel free to come in and kind of color even in these little extra edges. So for example, if I wanted to finish that off, I will just come in here just like that. Really ran out these edges. And Here we go. Little, too much of a zoom out already. So that's pretty much going to wrap it up for the design portion of the 3D modeling for the house. I hope this video was helpful and I hope you guys enjoyed designing your house. I'm going to leave my garage door. Why? Because by garages bite. But yeah, feel free to kind of play around and have fun with SketchUp and I'll see you guys in the next one. Take care. 13. Sketchup 13 Slicers (Slic3r & Cura) Installation & Setup 1: Hi folks and welcome back to the SketchUp tutorials. In this video, we're going to take a break from some of the 3D modelling and we're going to take a look at slicing on particular slicing in terms of what programs we can use to take our 3D models and convert them into languages. 3d printers understand and know what to do with. So with that, we're gonna get started with Google. And they're coupled free slicing programs out there. One is called slicer with the three. So you can see here that's what it's called slicer. And then the other one is called Cura ICURA. I like here more than I like slicer just because it's a little bit user, more user-friendly. So we're gonna go there and we're going to click on ultimaker.com. Who is the sure is the owner of cure. They bought out cure a little while back. And I'm going to click download for free. Now it's going to ask you which operating system I am on Windows and there we go. I do not need a new 3D printer thing. You, the reason why Cura is a little bit nicer is because it is a little bit more user friendly in terms of being able to set it up. And you'll see what I mean in a second. I'm also going to download slicer just so you can see what it looks like. Go to Slicer and click Download and click on Windows. You'll see what I'm talking about. So there we go. So we have both slicer and the cure file. So I'm going to open up a cure right now. Yes. Go through next. Yes, I agree. Sure. Yes. Stl files. That looks good. All right. So that's going through and I also need to extract this one. So I'm going to go to downloads and I'm going to extract all Yes, Super. So that'll go through. And in the meantime, let's go back to the cure installer. Okay, so it's asking us to install these Arduino drivers. We're going to click Yes, and that's through the QR thing. And so now it's saying I can run a cure. So I'm going to click Finish and wanted to run. And then also the slicer installation has finished or the unzipping of it because it was compressed file and we'll say allow access. And so here's slicer. So let me show you both of them and we'll get started shortly. Okay. So here's Cura. And so with Cura, what you're going to want to do is click get started. Yes. Next, I'm going to skip. All right, So now when it says add a printer, I can click Add a non-network printer. And I'm using a printer called the X1, which is made by artillery. So I'm gonna see if it exists here. Sometimes they do, sometimes they don't. There we go. Artillery, side Winder X1, that's my printer. Click Next. And it's going to set all of my parameters for me, which is really nice. Now this is something that you might have to change depending on what you're using. And if you've changed anything out of the box, generally everything looks good to me. So I'm going to accept all of these and click Next. Okay, We can skip this and finish. All right, so this is what my printer looks like and you'll see an actual clip of it running in a little bit. But I just wanted to show you what it looks like in terms of what we're trying to do with the slicer. So I've just finished setting up with Cura. And now I'm going to show you what it looks like using the slicer program. So for this, I'd have to come up here to my settings. And this is where you'd have to enter everything manually. So if you are more technically inclined and you have a custom 3D printer, slicer might be the software for you. Basically, it allows you to set a lot of the settings manually. So layer height, first layer height, which is, and this is more for, as you start to use more 3D printers, is sometimes you might want to change the first layer height versus the actual layer height. This infill is how dense your material is. And so you can see that slicer offers a lot more manual control over what you'd be doing. And then you have your platter here where you would then take your objects and put them inside. So for example, if I go to File Open STL first project, you can see that I have my 3D file there. Think it's scaled a little off because it looks extremely tiny. So I'm going to actually click on it. And let's go to scale. I think 1500% should be about right. There we go. And that looks about right. So we have our name tag. And you can see that this one is a little less bells and whistles. And it has some elements that are similar to other ones. So for example, we have our layers here. It will show us all our layers as we start to 3D print. And it keeps going and then it starts layering down. And it shows us basically the tool path of how the 3D printer is going to lay down all of our material. So it's nice to be able to see all that and how it all gets put together. However, for the sake of what we're doing, I think it's probably easier for most of you to use Cura, So I'm going to recommend that, but I just wanted to show you what slicer looked like. So you understood that that's your other free option that you can use. So over here I'm going to go to File and I am going to open files. I'm going to go to downloads where my first project is. And it's going to say over here, first project, and I want to slice it, the preview. And you can see it's right there. It actually is too small, to be honest. And that's because just like in the past, pass the slicer, I realized that it's scaled down in properly, and we'll talk more about that in the, in the, in the later part of this video. But I'm gonna take this object and I'm going to have to scale it. So I'm going to scale it and I'm gonna type in 1500%. And I think it's should be uniform scaling and presenter everything scales within a 100 percent on Friday. There we go. That looks a lot better and I think that's a lot closer to the actual scaled size so that 75 millimeters actually add wanted a little bit bigger. So maybe you almost 2000. Yeah, a 100 millimeters by five millimeters. Perfect. Already. So we have oops, sorry, I clicked the right key there. All right, So there we go. We are looking good on our bed plate, so that's about the right size. And now when I go to slice, it will slice the object and I'm gonna go to preview. And this is where it's kinda neat. And these are a little bit more of the features that I was talking about that this is printer has and you can see this is the final layer. I can control each layer on this side over here, so you can see it being printed all the way from the very beginning layer. So as I start moving up, it'll start going through each of the layers. And as I go through each layer, it'll allow me to see the path that it starts off at. So it starts off at the age, goes outward and then it goes across. So it looks pretty good. I think I'm ready to save this to my disk and then I can insert this to my 3D printer. There are some settings you can change, and if you're a beginner, I would recommend not changing these settings. But as you start getting a little bit more depth with using the slicer program, you can start to play around with the settings. So up here we have some settings here. You'll see that it gives us the different profiles for our thickness of our 3D printing filament are infile, which is like the density if we want support, which is, for example, if we had something that was overhanging. So for example, if if I took out the bottom, if I wanted this around the ring hole to be a little bit thinner and retracted it a little off the bottom. We'd have to have something there underneath it to support the ring on top. And so that's where support comes in. So it's really for things where as you start to 3D print and you have something that's hanging over like an arch or something like that, you'll need support. And adhesion is like if you want to enable something called like a raft, which would generally come into play when you have something that's thinner and larger and flatter like a big disk. Generally those tend to curl up on 3D prints and so having adhesion helps. But these are all topics for later on. And then if you click on custom, you can go into a lot of the same settings that we saw in Slicer. But for right now we're not gonna go too much into this because it's going to dive in and be a little confusing. So we're going to just stay with the current setting. We're going to click save to disc. And I'm going to save this to my downloads folder and I'm going to call it first project. First project G-code. Now I don't need to name it G-code because it's going to become a G-code file. But I just wanted to name it just for the sake of this video so that everyone understands that there's a first project STL file, which is what the slicer reads and then the G code is what our 3D printer will read. And so I'm going to click Save and it's saved it, perfect. So all I'm gonna do is now save that to my little USB drive, which I'm going to stick into my 3D printer. And I'm going to be able to print out my name tag. And so the way it's gonna work is just the way it looks. So when the 3D printer first starts, as you'll see in the video, is it will start with the outside layers, which is basically just ensuring that the 3D printer is printing properly. And then it'll proceed to print this base layer of my name tag. And then as I go through, it'll print the next layer, and it'll start layering up and it'll do about three to four layers of solid layers. And then it will start the crosshatching, which is basically saying, we don't need this entire thing to be solid plastic. So we'll inset in infile of 20 percent, which is what we said. Oops, which is what we set it up here as. And that's pretty much it. I hope this video was helpful in terms of just instructing you on how a slicer works and how to get it installed and setup. Once we're done. Moving this over, my 3D printer will show you some clips of it. 3d printing. And yeah, that's pretty much it. And that's how a slicer works. If you'd like to see more, please leave a comment below and ask me for whatever you'd like to learn about. But I hope this video was helpful. I hope you learned a bit about how slicers work and how to get yours working. I hope to see you guys in the next video. Bye bye. 14. Sketchup 14 More Follow Me And Free Practice 1: Hi folks and welcome back to the SketchUp tutorials. In this video, we're going to play around with SketchUp and kind of play around with the tools that we looked at before. This is more of a free design portion of this course where you guys can kind of play around. What I'm gonna do is I'll actually be helping you guys design a couple of things and then give you guys a little bit of time to kinda just play around a little bit more. We did that a little bit with the house, but now Just wanted to work on some of the other shapes. So what I'm gonna do is I will be getting rid of this house if you want to keep it again, remember you can save it, start a new project. But for the sake of our tutorial, I will be deleting this or I can save it by grouping it. So I'm going to make group. And then I can just move this all the way over to the right side somewhere there and leave that there and then I can come back here. The only issue with that that I have is that sometimes if you start to have too many objects in a 3D space, it can start to cause some glitching because there's too many models in your workspace. And so I just wanted to give you guys a heads up about that. Um, so what I'm gonna do is I'm just zooming out and trying to get a good orientation. There we go. All ready. So now that we're back here, what are we going to do is, I'm going to show you a couple of different things. The first thing I want to show you is how to create a sphere. So let's say I create something that's 10 feet. And now what I wanna do is I want to create another sphere. And what I wanna do is I want to make sure I'm getting the center of the circle. So what I'm gonna do is I'm going to pick a point out here on the edge, hopefully along the red axis or the x-axis. And what I'm gonna do now is I'm going to create a circle, except I want the circle to be drawn in the blue axis. So what I need to do is I need to change my perspective. And I want it to be drawn vertically, which is why it's being drawn in the green axis. But what I wanted to do is basically do the same thing as I did in the previous video. Except now I'm going to be drawing this semicircle. And why I want to do that is because in order to create a sphere, I need this half of the sphere to be rotated or to follow me. So now I'm going to choose the eraser tool and I'm going to erase all the unnecessary parts. I don't need this center fees either, so I can get rid of that pressing the Delete key, and I don't need this either. So I have that already. So I'm going to choose this surface I want rotated around. I'm going to come here to the Follow me tool and I'm going to choose this. Oops. Go back. Click, and then I'm going to just basically click here. And there we go. I've just clicked the endpoint right where the starting point was, which is how I did it. So right now I have my sphere here. And that looks pretty cool. And you can do the same thing if you don't want a sphere, I'm just going to Control Z. And let's say I wanted just to build a semi, like a semicircle sphere. So basically just half a sphere, I can just erase these other points and then just rotate that around. So I come over here, choose this again. And I'm just going to zoom in so you guys can see this a little bit better so I can start, whoops, click it. Oops, I don't want this right here. And then I come over here. And I wanted to go around, oh, what's happening? And just wanted to end right there. Perfect. Already. So you can see now I've just built half a sphere. And there's other objects that we can do the same thing for. So for example, if I wanted to take, let's say this circle, and again try to draw it on the red axis and we'll leave it at 10 again just so it's a round number. There's other things we can do where if I come over and I orbit to this plane, I can come over here and draw a circle. It's a three feet. I can do the same thing kind of in the sense that I delete that center. I click on this and I go to Follow me. And I can create something like a torus. So if I click on this and Here we go, press Enter, and there we go. So you can see here that now I've finished both mitosis or donut, and then I also have my sphere. Now what I'm going to show you is that it doesn't have to be a circle. There's other things you can do. So for example, if you want to build another, let's say 10 by, oops, a ten foot by ten foot. You're going to come in here. And then let's say we wanted to build something rectangular. So I'm gonna come up to this end point and start up vertically. And likewise, I can use the follow me and have this go all the way around the entire edge of the square. So that's one way to kind of go about doing it. And you can see that it's followed itself around the square, come inside, delete that. And so you have that, so you have a lot of freedom to kind of play around. And the final thing I'm going to show you, and this is kind of going to lead us to our final project where we'll be designing a phone stand, is that we can use the orbit tool to also do some of our measurements. So what I'm gonna do is I'm just going to build a ten by ten. And I'm going to push, pull this up 20. And the reason why I want to do that is because if, let's say I wanted to draw a line, so for example, I have this line right here and I'm going to use it for the backside of my phone stand and either press Space Bar to select out of it. Now if I have this line, there's things I can do to it which will help me. And so I'm going to go to my orbit tool, which is right here, rotate. And I'm going to make sure that I am on using the red axis because I want to rotate in that axis. So I'm going to change my view a little bit, so it's a little bit more inclined to do that. And I select my first, which is the axis of rotation. And then I select my endpoint, which is going to be where I rotate. And what you're going to see in the bottom right-hand corner is the degrees at which I could move it two. And so on. My protractor that I have with my phone, I have measured the angle that I have Approximately want to be about 17 degrees. And so I can come over here, type in 17 and just press Enter. So I can type in 17 and enter. And what that does is it now tells me that this line is 17 degrees. I can take that line, copy paste it, and I now have a second line that I can move over. And the reason why that's important is because now that I have these lines that are parallel, I now can connect them and use this as the beginnings of what could become my phone Stan. And I'm just not using any measurements just for the sake of this video, since this is just for you guys to practice. And so now that we have this, we can just take this, highlight it, moving over to the side, paste it, and then push, pull it. And we have the beginnings of our phone stand. Now this isn't exactly our phone sad because our phone, even if it rests here, will slightly slip. And so we need to build a little lip, but this gives you an idea of where we can get started. Anyways, I just wanted to give you guys a glimpse into how to kinda get started playing around with some of the other tools. And how having this knowledge and practice of using these different tools can help you come up with your own ideas. I hope this video was helpful. In the next video, we'll be looking at ways to create our final project, which is a phone stand. I'll see you guys in the next one. 15. Sketchup 15 Final Project Phone Stand 1: Hi folks and welcome back to the SketchUp tutorials. In this video, we're going to do two things. The first thing is I'd like everyone to go to app settings and make sure that your default template is set to millimeters. And I think it's generally said two feet and inches, but since that gave our slicer some issues, this should fix that issue. So we're gonna go to this meter millimeters and then we're going to X out. And now we're going to create a new project. And we're going to call it our final projects. So appear. We want to save it to sketch up and we're going to call it Final Project, click Save. And here we go. So now what we're going to start off by doing is we're going to start off by creating. And you can see in the bottom right-hand corner that now we're working with millimeters. Now this isn't always the easiest thing to do when we're switching from feet to inches to millimeters. It was something that I had difficulty doing when I first started working with 3D modeling software. But for the most part, it is something that really helps, especially with our slicers. So for the sake of this video, I will be converting our, I will be telling you what the exact measurements are in both inches and in millimeters. So let's get to it. So the first thing we're gonna do is we're going to design a phone stand. And I don't want to limit you to a phone stand. But I do want to say that it should be something that you're designing for someone like a friend or family member. Something that might be useful whether they got new AirPods or perhaps a need something for the kitchen like a magnet and even our chip clip. There are a lot of easy things that you can design and we'll talk about some of those. But for the most part, what we're going to be focusing on here is a phones then. So another challenging thing that you might be noticing since we've switched over to millimeters is that now in the bottom right-hand corner, we have millimeters. Don't worry about that too much. I will be measuring out both the actual measurements in inches and in millimeters. And if you have a ruler, hopefully your ruler has both inches and millimeters on there. Otherwise, you can use Google and they will translate all of the measurements you need. For the sake of this video, I am going to continue to work with a 10 a, let's say a 100 millimeter by a 100 millimeter box, which is approximately four inches. And so once I have a 100 by a 100, and you can see that it's pretty small. And I'm gonna make this 800, which is eight inches. So 200. There we go. All ready. So you can tell that looks about the size of an iPhone box and that's kind of where I was going for. I want this to be able to fit my phone, not be too big and not be too small, but to be able to help me with holding up my phone. So the first thing I'm gonna do is I'm going to create that line I created in the last video. And I'm not going to be too worried about how close or far from this edge I am. I want to give it some space, but not in too much either. And that's because we can always build out the lip that holds my phone. So for example, you know, I can always build that the lip here to curl up and you'll see that later on in the video. But for the sake of what we're doing, I'm just going to start here. And the other measurement of my phone that I took is that it's about six inches tall. So I have it's about six. So the other measurement is that my phone is about six inches tall, which comes out to be about a 150 millimeters. So all I'm gonna do is measure at a 150 and I'm going to go straight up. So 150 and Enter. Now, I'm going to select it and then I'm going to press Q, which is my orbit tool. I'm going to make sure that my plane is red because I wanted to orbit along that angle. And then as I mentioned in a past video, I found out that 17 is about the number of degrees I like for the kind of the slant of my phone. Now because it's a 150 millimeters. What that's going to mean is that my phone will sit in your nicely, but because we have to build up a base so that the phone can rest on it. It'll actually let my phone sit a little bit higher, which is exactly what I want. Because when I went when I want to go and reach down to it, it'll allow me to pick it off the phone stand relatively easy. Now the next thing you're going to ask is all right, so we did this in the last video. We're going to press Control C, Control V. And I'll put it out here. And I'm just going to place it on the face. I don't want to connect it to an edge. I just want to put it out here. I'm not on a face. And the next question or the question I posed in the last video is how do we make sure we know the measurements? And so this is where the tape measure tool comes in handy. So for example, I'm going to press T for the tape measure tool. And let's say I wanted to make all the thicknesses of all the walls equal. I'll let say I want to make them about five millimeters. If I press F5, what it'll do is now you see this little markets really tiny, but if you notice this little speck and you've seen it before when we've done in other videos. Now I'm going to use the Move tool and move this line if it's not selected, just go select it again. And we're going to place it right down there. And that's really handy because now what that allows us to do is to know that this entire thickness is now five millimeters. And I'm going to close it off by creating these two endpoints or another thing that will add a little bit more. Some aesthetics n utility is using the arc tool. And what I wanna do is just spilled a little bit of an arc there. So we have this nicely rounded top that won't feel so sharp on the bottom and we are looking pretty good. Now the next thing we can do is use a tape measure tool again to measure from the bottom. And if we wanted to measure up, what do we wanna do is let's say we wanted to go up five millimeters. So I'm just going to orbit a little bit. So it's a little bit easier to see from the full profile. And if I type here, you'll see that I get five millimeters right there. I'm going to use the line tool and I'll draw it all the way back and get rid of this. And we are doing pretty good so far. So you can see that we are our working well with what we have here. This measurement, which we can use a tape measure tool to measure here, here is 88 millimeters. That's pretty good. That's about little more than three inches. That sounds about right. And this is sitting up the 150 millimeters. And so that also sounds about right. And so now we're doing pretty good. I like where we are and now you might be thinking, all right, so we got this far last video. Likewise, if I wanted to, I could create a little arc here. So if I wanted to come over here and somewhere around here, just create these two little arcs and create something like that. That's totally cool too. And we are on a roll. Now, if you wanted to strengthen that back a little bit. And especially this point right here, since we'll have some of the I should there won't be too much because it's just the phone. You're not leaning on it. But if you wanted to, you could always change an arc here. So if you wanted to build something like that, oops, just like that, and get rid of these inside faces. That's totally cool too. Now the reason why we're building this on a flat plane is because it's going to allow us to just make this job a lot easier. We're just going to push pull it like we did in the last video. And my phone is about three inches wide or about approximately 80 millimeters wide. So I'm going to or 75, but I'm just going to leave that like that. So now you might be thinking, all right, well let's build the lip and we can, and if you wanted to build with more space, pull this out a little bit more. And that'll give us a little bit more foundational work on. And what we're gonna do next is we're going to come and we're going to start thinking about, okay, let's think about the lip we want to build. Alright, so the next thing we're gonna do is now we're going to try to figure out where our phones going to sit. So I'm going to use the line tool. So just press L and I'm going to click here. And I'm just going to drag it to this point right here. And that's basically just going to draw a line that follows this line all the way through. And then from here, and my phone is about seven to eight millimeters thick, so I'm going to just make this 10 millimeters. So you can see here it's 10 millimeters. And I've just built that. So now that I have that and that's 10 millimeters, what I'm gonna do is I'm going to rotate that a little bit. So just like we did before, I'm gonna press Q for the rotation tool, set the access point right there, endpoint here. And I'm going to type in 17. And the reason why I want to do that is because that 17 millimeters represents the same rotation that I rotated this top line that was perfectly, perfectly perpendicular. And so now since they're both 17, this will form a right angle. So that looks good to me. And now what I can do here is I can take this same line, copy, pasted. And just like I did before with a tape measure tool and come up here, measure about five millimeters. And then all I need to do is move this line back to this point. And I have something that's about five millimeters thick. So, so far so good. And now what we wanna do is just build out a little bit more. So I'm going to take this line and I want to follow it. So it says extend edge five millimeters. Looks good. I go up and let's say I'm about to say about 13 millimeters. Looks about right to me. I'm going to come here perpendicular to edge and say five millimeters, which is perfect. And then down right here. And you're going to see that SketchUp has one of those really neat features because it's highly geometric. It will allow and it understands, it wants you to follow a certain path. And you saw how I finish that off. Now again, if you want to be a little bit fancy, we can to point arc this, right. We can also use the 2 arc here and here. Double-click right. And now we can start erasing some of these excess line so we don't need that, We don't need that. That's gone, that's gone. And our phones then starting to look pretty good. And so now what we're gonna do is I'm just going to copy and paste this on the side. And I am going to take this entire object. I'm going to move it out back here because this was useful. But now we're going to work with our model here. And I get rid of these little markers. And now I'm going to push, pull this over 80 songs. Just click, let go and type in 80. And here we go. We have just finished our phone stand for our friend, family member, or whoever. Yeah, so that's going to wrap it up for this video. And for this project. What I'm going to show you in the next video is a way to make a chip clip almost the same exact way. And yeah, that's pretty much it. So I hope this video was helpful. In the next video, we'll look at a chip clip which you can make. You can make different designs. I've seen ones that have looked like little sharks. And then you can make other ones that are a little bit more utilitarian and minimalist, that have spaces for magnets. But yeah, I hope this video was helpful. I'll see you guys in the next one. Take care. 16. Sketchup 16 Final Project Chip Clip 1: Hi folks and welcome back to the final project to video part 2. This video is only meant for those who are interested in creating a chip clip. I'm just going to copy and paste that original phase I had. And I'm gonna push, pull that and a 100, excuse me, millimeters. And so we're starting off with the same stuff we had before. I'm going to just group this. Oops, I make group. And then I'm going to move everything over to the side. A little bit more. Here we go. All righty, So we're back with that box. And what we're gonna do now is we're gonna start thinking about what a chip clip looks like. So generally the chip clip I use looks kind of like little pincers. And what I'm gonna do is I'm going to start off by creating a circle round here. I'm going to change a circle number size is 64, so it looks a little bit more respectable as a circle. And I'm going to make it about 20 millimeters. Now the reason why I chose it to be 20 millimeters is that's about, you know, this thickness and size I'd won That's almost about it's a little less than an inch. And what I'm gonna do then next is to draw the line to the center. Now the general outline, just so everyone understands what I'm going for here is I want to create a chip clip that it has enough thickness so that it won't break when I'm using it. So just so you have an idea. So basically what's going to happen is I'm going to have, this circle is going to have an outer diameter. So let me draw a little bit better. I'm basically going to create a inner circle. And I'm going to have two little prongs in the back that you pinch. And when you pinch them, there's going to be two problems in the front that will open up and it will clamp down on the chip bag itself. Now, that's on if that sounds a little far-fetched for you to understand, No worries. I'm going to start designing it right now. So what we have here is our 20 millimeter circle. We're going to offset it. And we're going to offset it about 10 millimeters. We want this part to be relatively thick because it's going to be it's going to get a lot of strain here because that's where the bending point is. And then the next thing I wanna do is I want to draw a line from the edge to the center. And then I'm going to build a rectangle on the top. Now one of the nice things about SketchUp, as I mentioned earlier, is, so I'm going to make this about 65 by 15. And that looks just about right, is that it's very geometric. And what I mean by that is that it's going to allow us to build just half of this object in this sketch. And then we're just going to flip it around using the rotation tool. Or you can use the scale tool, whichever one. And it'll allow us to build out the entire object. So this one's kinda neat. So the next thing I'm gonna do, just to kinda finish that off, I'm going to draw the line that finishes making, drawing this circle in half. And then what I'm gonna do is I'm now going to build another rectangle. Now the second rectangle is going to be on the inside. And this is basically the thickness that I'm going to have for my chip clip it. I'm going to set this about, let's say two millimeters, oops. T2. So whatever this thicknesses or 110, 110 comma two. Well, that's way too much. What's going on? So let me start that over again. Rectangle. Okay. So up to here. So let's just make it 56 by 256 comma two. All right. I just want to make sure I'm intersecting over here because this is where we're going to start cutting away pieces. So what this is essentially going to do now is it's going to allow me to start using my eraser tool. And I'm going to come in and I'm going to start erasing lines that I don't need anymore. So I don't need the center line. I don't need this, I don't need this. I don't need this piece, this piece, this piece. I really don't need anything on the bottom half. I'm just going to leave it there just so you can see what I'm trying to accomplish. And so what we have here is the beginnings of the top of our chip clip. And what we're gonna do now is we're going to build another rectangle. And again, it doesn't have to be perfectly symmetrical, but it'll give you an idea. So I'm going to build another one and I'm going to set it to about, let's say 20 by 10 up here. You just want it to be slightly offset from here. So it gives us some leverage when we're building something. So I'm just going to leave it like that. And what we're gonna do now is to start to make this a little nicer. So I'm going to use the 2 arc tool. And I'm going to come in here. And because we don't have to be super precise, it's totally fine if we don't do all the measurements. Essentially, I just want enough space between here and here. So this is two millimeters from the very center line of symmetry, let's say so that when it's totally done, it'll be four millimeters apart. And that's generally what I'd want so that, you know, a chip clip is meant to be put on an open bag of chips when you fold it over, It's got some thickness to it, so I don't want to break, but I want it to be thin enough so that I could just slide it onto the bag of chips. So you can see what I'm doing here. And likewise, I can start here and come over here and set a slight little arc. And if I go in, that's totally fine. So you can see here. And what I'd want to do then is if I do intersect, I can come over here and start deleting these outside lines. And if I want, I can also get rid of some of these incised lines. That's not a problem. Likewise, and even over here, if I wanted to, I could come in with a two-point Arc tool. Come in here and just, it was slight little modification. Just make sure you zoom in far enough so you can see things like this where it kind of goes in a little bit more. And you know, if you feel like you've done overdone it, like if you wanted to reduce this one a little bit, you can, it's not a big deal. Just go in and fill it in. You can even just create a line from here to here if that makes it a little bit easier for you. And that's more of what you're trying to go for. That's perfectly cool. Feel free to do it however you'd like. You can even do smaller arc. So like if you wanted to create that same arc on the inside over here, and just to really smooth it out, you could, I'm going to zoom in just so it's a little bit easier to see something like that. So feel free to just kinda play around and find the arg that you, that suits you best. So you can see here this is a lot more refined and you'll see it once we get close up or zoomed out. And so you can see that we have that there. So feel free to kind of play around and get the arc that suits you best. So let's say I even wanted to take it a little bit further over here and build a slight arc there. I think that looks a little bit better based on what I've done to the other arm. Get rid of that already. Now we're going to come over here and we're going to start erasing some of these other lines here. And this is kind of the same thing. Basically what this portion is going to do is this portion is meant for us to be able to pinch down. So it'll open up and basically apply some stress right here. So what I'm gonna do here is I'm actually going to build a little bit of a knob. So I'm going to make this, let's say about eight millimeters on the type and eight. And what that allows me to do now is to come in here and start deleting lines I don't need. And this again is an area where you can choose to finesse it. I'm not going to finesse it just because I think it looks okay. What I will do is I will actually finesse this part here, adding a two-point arc. And the reason why I'd want to do that is just because it's going to experience more stress. Number of sides. Let's change this six. Okay. There we go. Okay. So I just changed that just so it'll accommodate just saying that the ark was too small, so Alrighty, So that looks pretty good. And what I'm gonna do now is I'm going to erase the rest of this. And so this is kind of the beauty for our chip clip that we have here is that we can do something like this, copy paste. So control C, control V. And now what I'm gonna do is I'm going to use There's two ways to do it. The easiest way is just press the scale tool S, grab the center, and you're just going to type in negative one. And then I'm going to press the Move tool and we're going to grab this corner, just drag it right here to this side. I delete this line and we are done. And so what we have here is our chip clip. So now if we want, we pinch these two sides. It should add some stress here. It'll open up these two prongs and these prompts are curves. So your chip clip can just kind of slide in there. And then all we're going to do copy paste, so Control C, Control V. And then we're going to bring it over here. And then we're going to raise this just a little bit. I would say probably around 20 millimeters. And we go I'm just going to get rid of this for the sake of what we're doing. And we're pretty much done here. Now there's a number of things you could do if you wanted to. You could write someone's name using the 3D Text tool. So from here, you can come up to the, Wasn't that one, it is the polygon tool. And down here we have our text tool. And you can add some text here saying this is so and so's chip clip or whatnot. And yeah, that's pretty much how you design a chip clip. And if you wanted to create a, let's say, insert for magnets, you could do that here. All we would need to do, find the size of the magnet, create the circle size for that, and then just push, pull it in so that when it prints, Let's say we want to put one here. And we push, pull this. Let's say however many millimeters the thickness of the magnet. You can do that for both of these. And yeah, that'll let your chip clips stick to the refrigerator and be easily accessible for whoever is using it. Anyways, I hope this video was helpful. I hope you guys enjoyed this course. And if you guys have any other questions or requests, feel free to leave a comment below. All right. I hope that video was helpful. I'll see you guys on that X1. 17. Sketchup 17 Congratulations!: Congratulations on finishing your course on SketchUp. I hope you guys had fun with this course. I look forward to seeing some of your posts on what you created. It would be great if you could share them. If you have any questions or ideas or comments, please feel free to reach out or leave a message below. I hope you guys enjoyed this course. Please check out some of my other courses. I have a couple out now and I'll be releasing more on other steam and stem related courses, such as physical computing devices like Arduinos and Raspberry Pi's, some programming courses on Python and Java, and other courses related to 3D modelling. I'll be releasing a Fusion 360 chorus and a little bit. So anyways, thank you guys so much. I'll see you guys in the next one.