10 Easy Ways to Use Google Analytics: A Course for Consultants, Small Businesses & Entrepreneurs | Sandra Noonan | Skillshare

10 Easy Ways to Use Google Analytics: A Course for Consultants, Small Businesses & Entrepreneurs

Sandra Noonan, Digital Marketer

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11 Lessons (33m)
    • 1. Introduction

      1:40
    • 2. Where are my visitors coming from?

      3:29
    • 3. What’s performing well and what’s not?

      4:41
    • 4. Am I getting anything out of social media?

      2:18
    • 5. What does a typical visit look like?

      3:35
    • 6. What actions are customers taking?

      4:50
    • 7. Is my site speed helping or hurting my business?

      1:37
    • 8. What is my customer’s path to purchase?

      2:53
    • 9. What's happening on my site RIGHT NOW?

      1:34
    • 10. How is my site doing in search?

      3:29
    • 11. How do I make analytics easy?

      3:14
14 students are watching this class

About This Class

How do you know if your online marketing efforts are working? Are your blogging and social media posts a waste of time, or are they actually effective? What parts of your website are customers visiting? What parts are they ignoring? How are people finding your website, and once they’re there, what are they doing -- and thinking? Was it worth hiring that marketing or social media strategist?

Google Analytics can help you answer all of these questions -- and save you time and money in the process. With just 10 simple techniques, you can go from analytics novice to ninja and develop a smart, no-nonsense marketing strategy. You’ll never look at your website in the same way again..

 

Who this class is for:

You’re a business owner, entrepreneur or employee who wants to maximize the performance of your website. You use your website to build your brand, attract clients or business partners, and communicate with your community.

Transcripts

1. Introduction: Hi, I'm Sandra. I'm a marketing consultant certified in Google Analytics, and I designed this class for Google analytics, beginners and novices. This class assumes that you're maybe a consultant or a small business owner who wants to use Google Analytics to improve the performance of your business online and attract more customers. So it created a class that asks 10 key questions that a business owner would want to know about their business and their website. You can skip around because the course is divided into those 10 questions. I hope you enjoy the class on Let's get Started. These were the 10 questions we'll ask an answer. Number one Where my visitors coming from Number two, What's performing well and what's not Number three and then getting anything out of my social media posts that I work so hard on. Number four. What does the typical visit to my site look like? Number five. What actions Air customers taking on my website? Are they converting? Number six is my site speed helping or hurting my business? Seven. What is my customers path to purchase? How many different online Touchpoints does my customer visit before making that purchase number eight. How could I know what is happening on my site this very moment? It's very second number nine. How do I see how well my site is doing and search results and number 10? How do I make analytics as easy as possible? 2. Where are my visitors coming from?: Hi, I'm Sandra. I'm a marketing consultant certified in Google Analytics, and I designed this class for Google analytics, beginners and novices. This class assumes that you're maybe a consultant or a small business owner who wants to use Google Analytics to improve the performance of your business online and attract more customers. So it created a class that asks 10 key questions that a business owner would want to know about their business and their website. You can skip around because the course is divided into those 10 questions. I hope you enjoy the class on Let's get Started. These were the 10 questions we'll ask an answer. Number one Where my visitors coming from Number two, What's performing well and what's not Number three and then getting anything out of my social media posts that I work so hard on. Number four. What does the typical visit to my site look like? Number five. What actions Air customers taking on my website? Are they converting? Number six is my site speed helping or hurting my business? Seven. What is my customers path to purchase? How many different online Touchpoints does my customer visit before making that purchase number eight. How could I know what is happening on my site this very moment? It's very second number nine. How do I see how well my site is doing and search results and number 10? How do I make analytics as easy as possible? Don't rely on customers. Tell you how your business gets found online. Instead, rely on Google analytics. So the first question we're gonna ask is Are they finding me through social media through Google searches or something else? Let's try to answer that question now and Google Analytics. So we're going to go toe acquisition all traffic channels. Okay, so here you're seeing your top sources of traffic listed in descending order. So we're getting a good amount of traffic from pretty much all of these channels except email. Go into your Google analytics dashboard, pause this video and do what we just did on the previous slide. Remember its acquisitions, all traffic channels. See what you find. I'll be right back here when you're done, try something new. We're gonna save that information. We were just looking at Google analytics to a short cut so we can find it very easily again . Here's how we do it, so we go to the top of the screen. Where we're viewing are results. We click on short cut and then we type a name for the shortcut, which I'm not going to do here. But you can do this on your own. Then when you want to go back to that, shortcuts is, say that you were clicking around. All you have to do is go to customization shortcuts, and that's why you, where you'll find the shortcut you just created. 3. What’s performing well and what’s not? : question two. What's performing well and what's not okay to see what's performing? Well, what's not. Let's go back to our side panel here and we're going to click on behavior site content. And among these options were gonna click on all cages. So you're gonna get a list here of your websites pages with a bunch of metrics shown at the top. Now you can sort by these metrics. So, for instance, if I want to see the average time that website visitors spent on a particular page, I can sort to get a descending list. Okay, so say that you sort by average time on page, and this is the first page that comes up. This slash usually just refers Teoh your home page. So your visitors air spending an average of 46 seconds on your home page. And the question is, how do you think about that number? So the way I would think about it is that there's content that you want your visitors to spend a lot of time on on your website, and then there's content where you want them to not spend a lot of time where you want them to get in and get out really quickly. So, for example, you want your visitors to spend time reading your blob. Your case studies your portfolio. That's where you want to see this number. Uh, be high, right? But you don't want your visitors to spend a lot of time on your sign up page or a transactional page, because those pages should be really quick, seamless experiences. So think about that number, the average time on page metric in relation to engagement. How much time should the visitor be spending on that content? A lot or a little. It depends on your business. Then there's another really important metric on this table, and that's bounce. Serie bounce rate is the percent of sessions on your website that are single page sessions . So that means a user came to your site and they left after viewing a single page. So the idea is, the lower your bounce straight, the better the engagement on your website because people are viewing more than one page session. So why don't we sort our pages by bounce rate and we can sort in order of highest to lowest . So we have one page here with the 100% bounce rate, and then we have one page with a 0% bounce rate. And so, on average, 30% of our visitors spend time on one page before leaving your site. So if there's a really important page on your site where you want visitors to go and get engrossed in your website and click through to a bunch of content and you're seeing a high bounce rate that is a red flag for you. So there are two obvious instances that I'll give those examples of when you're bounce rate . Being high would be a bad sign. One is your home page. If you have a high bounce straight on your home page, say this number is 70% or, um, something in that neighborhood. You want to get that down. People are leaving your home page without engaging with any other part of your site and clicking through. That's not a good thing, right? So that might be a reason to redo your home page or fixed some content on your home page to make it more appealing. A second instance where a high bounce straight might be a bad thing is if you're getting a high down straight on your portfolio. If you want people to be clicking through your portfolio on there, just landing on your portfolio and leaving right away, that's kind of telling you that they're not getting what they're looking for. Um, they're not seeing what they're looking for. Same what may be a case studies page where you want your visitors to really be clicking through in reading. 4. Am I getting anything out of social media?: question three. Am I getting anything out of my social media posts? So there are a lot of ways to analyze what role social media is playing in driving traffic to your website. One way to look at it is through something called network referrals. So the way we get to network referrals is we click on acquisition, we go to Social, and then we cook here on network referrals and scrolling down. We're going to come to a list of social networks, and what we're looking at is that the top drivers, the traps, social network, drivers of traffic to your website. So for this particular website, Facebook is driving the most traffics in the most sessions, the most page views. But you know, when you look at average session duration, it's not necessarily driving the most engagement. People coming from Facebook to this website are spending an average of 29 seconds on page. So this is where you want to drill down and see if you're getting more engagement out of a different social network. That isn't driving as many sessions, but it's driving more engagement. So, for instance, we're seeing that Twitter is not driving nearly as many sessions, but the average user is spending one minute, eight seconds on the site. When they come from, Twitter read. It is also driving much, much less traffic but longer session activity as well. So this is really helpful in thinking about how you invest in social media and where you invest in social media. So I had a client, for instance, that was paying a social media manager to do a lot of Facebook posting. But when we went into Google Analytics, what we found was that linked in for that particular client was driving much more traffic. And so we shifted our investment to LinkedIn, so that's a great on screen toe look at. 5. What does a typical visit look like?: question for what does the typical visit to my site look like? What we're looking at now is a screen called behavior Flow. And this is a very powerful feature of Google analytics. So to get to behavior ful, you're gonna click on the Behavior tab here and then you're going to click under that on behavior flow. So what you're gonna see is this this path, this journey from left to right, and we're going to start it starts with the landing page. So where did your visitor enter your site from in this Web sites case, most of the visitors air entering from the home page. The slash refers to your home page. So the question is, what did they do once they got to your home page? Well, let's go to the second step here off the 906 people that went to your home page or started on your home page. We see this red arrow, and what that's telling us is that 706 people, or 65.1% of your total traffic at this point, left. They left the website. The remainder took different journeys, different path. So you see all these these lines, right? And so here you're seeing that 40 of the people who arrived on your home page actually went to your about me page and then from your about me page a certain number in this case, quite a small number went to your contact page. So nine people wanted to see how they could contact you. They clicked on that link, and from there you get a drop off, right? Those nine people aren't going anywhere else. So let's do another journey this block pose. So let's trace this turning back. This block pose drove a little bit more engagement. People went from that blonde post to your home page, so they wanted to see what other content you had. And so that's how you can really trace what journey people are taking. And sometimes you'll be really surprised by the results. So if you see that people are landing on your about me page, for instance, you might say to yourself, Well, when was the last time I updated my about me page on dso on right. So you can get a lot of great texture. Um, one thing I want to show you two is that you can trace journeys not just from the landing page, but from social networks. So what you can see here is the journey that visitors referred from Facebook or Twitter or Pinterest Take once they arrive on your site. So let's just take our Twitter audience. So our Twitter users go to the home page, A lot of them migrate to the home page and then from there, So actually we can We can click on this and highlight just traffic from Twitter, which is very cool, right? And so you can see that most of your Twitter audience went to the home page. Okay, but then what did they do from there? You can continue tracing the journeys and get some insight. Eso really a great feature to understand where your audience is going once they're on your Web site. 6. What actions are customers taking?: question five. What actions Air customers taking on my site. Are they converting? It's talk about website goals for a second. There are lots of things your website may be designed to do. Um, but your four simple examples maybe you want people to sign up for your newsletter, and maybe that's the metric for your website success. Or you want people to contact you via contact page or another example. You want to, uh, grow your social media following. So get people to follow you on lengthen or Twitter. Or maybe a big goal for your website is to download some kind of brochure or marketing material. Um, the great thing about Google Analytics is that you can track and measure these goals through a very simple process, and that's what I'm going to show right now to set up a goal in Google Analytics. We're gonna go to the admin tab here at the bottom, and then we're gonna go to goals. We're gonna set up a new goal by clicking on the red button, going to choose template, and then we're going to choose or click on. Continue. Then you want to type a name for your goal. So let's tight to this example. Newsletter sign ups. I would skip over this for now. Unless you're an advanced user, it's it's fine. Believe it does. Is let's talk about these choices here. All right, So you have a newsletter sign up, page. And, uh, how do you How do you track how many people signed up for your newsletter? What we're gonna do is click on destination. Why do we do that? All right. Well, to understand why we do that, let's go to a sample confirmation page for a newsletter. Sign up. So say that I was on this website, had signed up with my email address. I'd entered my email address and I arrived at this. Thank you. Confirmation page. This is how we're gonna track newsletter sign ups back and going on Google analytics. So we're gonna enter the part of the Earl of that newsletter, sign up page into Guillette, so you could continue and you get here. And what we're saying is OK, g a. When the visitor gets to a destination, who's your l equals something? Please count that as a newsletter. Sign up. So, for instance, if your newsletter sign up confirmation page. So again, this page, if the girl for this confirmation page his example dot com such thank you dot HTM Now you'll enter in everything after the slash and that will work, or it should work. So to make sure that works, we then go to verify this goal will click here and we'll ask Yea um to tell us how many times it would have counted, Um, a newsletter sign up in the past seven days if we had had that goal set up, and here we have 0% rate that this is an inactive. This isn't a real page, but you'll see an actual percentage here, and then you'll know that you had a whatever conversion rate for that goal, which is really great andan. You can save out of this and then we'll show you now how to see how to see this this trapped in your Google Analytics dashboard. So let's do that now. The track goals in your Google Analytics dashboard exit your admin section and click on the conversions tab on the left. Under conversions, you will see Gold's click on goals, and we'll keep it simple here and just click on Overview so you'll see a gold completion location where the goal completion occurred. In this case, it's the thank you or confirmation page for your email newsletter. Sign up and you have to hold completions. You can also see the referral sources for those gold completions. So in one case, the visitor who signed up for your newsletter came from Google Search. In this case, your visitor. Your sign up came from a visitor who was on Twitter originally. And there you go. 7. Is my site speed helping or hurting my business?: question six is my site speed helping or hurting my business? I find that page load time is something that can fall through the cracks when you're trying to analyze your website performance or optimized your website. So don't let that happen to you, and G A can help you keep that at the forefront. So, Teoh, analyze your page load time. Let's go to behavior and then cites speed and then overview. And so, before we go any further, um, Pedro time is really important because if your website he is working too slowly and it's not optimized for speed, you're gonna lose a lot of traffic. That's the simple reality. So here we clicked on site speed overview, and we're seeing that our average patient time is 5.16 seconds. That is not very good at all. And so when you see that, you probably want to talk to your Web developer or whoever is managing your website on the back end. And, um, a great thing here is that Gu analytics will give you suggestions on how Teoh optimize your page speed. So if I pull this up for example, um, it will give me page speed insights for this website, and it will tell me what I need to start fixing. And this is where you want to bring in probably someone with technical experience. But it's really great that they at least get you started. And so that's some that's page speed insights. 8. What is my customer’s path to purchase? : What does me customers path to purchase? How many different online Touchpoints does my customer visit before purchasing? Let's click over to conversions, multi channel funnels and top conversion pads. So here we're looking at the path that your customer is taking to convert. This is pretty fascinating screen. Let's take a simple example. So for, um, five of your conversions within this time period, your customer first visited your website. Three direct search they typed in your your own. Later on, they found you via an organic search, which means they typed in some kind of keyword. From there they got to your website and they finally converted. So in this case, there were two steps along the path to purchase or the paths to conversion. Let's take another example, Uh, in this case, your custom and four and four of your conversions, the customer clicked on to paid search advertisements that you placed until converting. Okay, let's go back to number one now that we've explained a couple of simpler examples in this case on and most of your conversion. So in in 18 cases, your customers simply typed in your website you Earl, and after two times After doing that twice, they converted. So a couple things here, you have to have a goal set up in order to do this kind of analysis, and we covered goals earlier in this course. But this is really insightful because it's telling you what's working and what's not so really your top driver. Here is direct search, which means you got very unaudited that's aware of your brand and knows what they're looking for. It's kind of what this is telling me here and then for your second largest contingent of converters. You've got people who are searching for something organically. They're going into a search engine and they're typing a keyword, and then they're finding you. And then later on, they're typing in your website. You are home and someone and so forth. So here you know you're seeing paid. Search is playing a really important role as well. It's not your talk driver. It's not, um, you know, Number one. But it's also a key part of your customers path to purchase so really good insights 9. What's happening on my site RIGHT NOW?: How can I know what is happening on my website? This very second, we're gonna look at a feature that's very valuable when in situations when you send out an email newsletter or you post something to social media and you really, really want to know within, like the first a few minutes or the first hour, how many people are responding? So you want to see real time reaction to your post. So say that I posted this blob to social media, and I want to see if anyone is clicking on it within a few seconds. So what I'm doing, which you can see on the screen. But on my phone, I am visiting my website right now and clicking on that block post just as an example. And when I go into real time overview, I see that I have visitor, and that's be because this is doesn't example, and I'm using my mobile phone so it shows you the device and I live in New York, and it's showing that that user is in New York. So that's me. If you can then dig a little deeper and look at, uh, this by traffic source. Medium So I went directly to my website. If I had come from Twitter, it would show Twitter so on so forth. You can really get a sense of who's looking at that piece of content right now. That could be very gratifying if you've been working really hard on getting something out. 10. How is my site doing in search?: How do I see how well my site is doing in search results in this module? I'm going to show you how to find out what search queries are driving traffic to your page . This help you understand how well your site is doing in search. And this is important because if you know what people are searching for to find your website, you can create more content information on your website that addresses those search queries directly. So we're going to go outside of Google analytics for this module, and the first you are we're going to go to is Google Web Masters type in www dot google dot com slash web masters and you will arrive at this page. Just use your Google Analytics credentials to sign in, which I've already done. What you wanted to hear is add your website so I would have done this. But you would click on out of property and simply type in your website URL click, add and you'll, um, you'll get something like this now because I've already done this. You're not gonna see this here, but you're gonna be passed before you can do anything else. You're going to be asked to verify your website. Google Analytics needs to know that that this website is actually yours. Way You can get some help doing that. If the instructions aren't clear is go to a website. Your URL that I've put in here for you so you can take a note of that and this is gonna things. Page gives you a good tutorial on different ways. You can verify website. It's not difficult. It's just a couple of steps you need to follow. But sometimes people get tripped up on it. But these instructions are pretty clear. Once your website is verified, you can click on your property. That's their fancy term for for your website. And you're gonna get a lot of interesting information. But what We're most interested in this search traffic. And so, um, you're going to see here a lot of interesting stuff, including queries that people are using to get to your website. So, um, for my website, this is kind of a sample website. I haven't really been maintaining this one very well, but the most common search query for this period of time was my name. And that makes a lot of sense, But you can see a bunch of other search queries here, and you can do a lot of filtering. So you can, um you know, you can say, Well, just the United States. What? Search queries on my getting do my search queries differ by device, which might be interesting. Um, you can compare different pages. You can obviously change the date range on. You can filter queries. So there's a lot of analysis you can dio, and this is this is gonna really help you optimize your site. 11. How do I make analytics easy?: 10. How do we make analytics as easy as possible? The purpose of this module is to show you how to do Google Analytics on the go so that you don't have to sign into your Web your G a your Google analytics every single day. That could be incredibly time consuming. Instead, we're going to set up some email and text message alerts to track what's important to you. So what did I just dio? I clicked on customization custom alerts, and then I click on this gray box, manage custom alerts, and I click on had a new alert right here. All right, let's say we want to track newsletter sign ups using that example already, and we want to track them on a Let's say they want to track them on a weekly basis and say We want to get email every time this occurs. So we hear about all traffic in this case. But keep in mind that if you want an alert about a specific segment of users, for instance, you could track how Maney alerts you're getting from a country. How maney alerts you're getting, you know, by geographical parameters, you can go a little crazy here, so I'm going to keep it simple for now. But on DSO we're gonna go back to all traffic. So say I care about all traffic for my alert. I want to know when they are signing up for my newsletter and because we already set that up as a goal in an earlier module, It's gonna be here for me. So I want to track every time any type of visitor clicks on my contact form page and successfully submits their email address and then I want to track. So I want to get an alert every week whenever that, uh, that goal or that event occurs more than zero times I cared that it just happened. I just want to know what happened. But say that you, um, see that you care that increased by a certain percentage, you can enter that, um, percentage. Say that you care that it decreased. Say you want an alert that it's you know, So you know when there's a red flag on your website, for instance, and you can really get pretty granular. And so again, I'm gonna keep it pretty simple and just say is greater than zero here, and I'm gonna save my alert. And there we go. And so I'll get an email every time every week, letting me nominee alerts I or Hominy newsletter sign ups I got. That's a really good way to keep it nice and simple when you're doing your G A reporting.