Part of the magic of sketching is its ease: Grab a sketchbook and a pencil or two, and you’re ready to go. But if you’ve been creating simple sketches for a while, you may be ready for some beyond-the-basics lessons to take your drawing practice to the next level.

Here, we’ll share expert tips from artists on how to improve your sketching practice, plus showcase 50 cool sketches you can use for future drawing inspiration.

15 Tips That’ll Improve Your Pencil Sketches

1. Get the Right Setup

“A good drawing begins with a good drawing setup,” says Skillshare instructor Brent Eviston in his course, 3D Drawing and Perspective. First, he recommends investing in a drawing board that is larger than the paper you’ll be working with. Got it? Now, make sure that before you start sketching, your line of sight is perpendicular to the drawing board. “If the drawing board is at any angle other than perpendicular to our line of sight, the drawing will become distorted, because one section of the paper will be closer to the eye than another,” he says. To get the correct angle, try resting your drawing board on your knees and propping it up against the edge of a table.

2. Break Subjects Down Into Shapes

Any object, big or small, can be broken down into basic shapes. 
Any object, big or small, can be broken down into basic shapes. 

Many drawing books show you how complex objects can be formed from basic shapes, and that’s for a reason. “Shapes can really help us break down subjects into simpler parts, making them less intimidating to draw,” says Skillshare instructor Gabrielle Brickey in her course, Learn to Draw: Daily Practices to Improve Your Drawing Skills. So if you’re looking to improve your drawing, observe images closely to understand the shapes that make them up. “Learning to see like this will be essential if you want to make something like stylized illustrations. If you’re more interested in realistic representations, this will be important for arranging your subject on your canvas,” she adds.

3. And Practice Drawing Them

You’ve likely drawn the simple shapes above since you were a child. But according to Eviston, you really can’t get enough practice with easy sketches of shapes. “I still make it a regular practice to draw circles, ovals, and straight lines, just because they are so common in drawing,” he says. “Over the course of my career, I have literally drawn tens of thousands… and will most likely draw tens of thousands more just because they are so important to continue to practice.”

4. Draw What You See, Not What You Know

When we set out to draw a familiar object, we often draw from our memories rather than the actual object in front of us. So, if you’re sketching, say, an apple or a toy elephant, don’t look at the object as itself, but as an amalgamation of its parts. “Once we name those objects, what happens is that we stop looking very consciously at the object. We draw what we know rather than what we see,” says Skillshare instructor Mandar Marathe. “Don’t try to name the objects. Just look at them as the shapes and lines and the angles. We want to look at the objects very carefully and then draw accordingly.”

5. Try Sketching Upside Down

Drawing upside down can help you see things differently—literally.
Drawing upside down can help you see things differently—literally.

If you’re struggling with the previous tip, try this exercise from Brickey’s course: Take an image, turn it upside down, and try drawing it from that perspective, which will “help you rely less on symbols and more on what’s really in front of you,” she notes. The exercise is particularly helpful before starting a new piece or when you’ve been looking at one for a while and need a fresh perspective. “This will help you make the brain shift to your creative right brain mode,” she says. 

6. Draw the Negative Space

Drawing the space around the chair—not the chair itself—can improve your accuracy.
Drawing the space around the chair—not the chair itself—can improve your accuracy.

A final tip from Brickley on drawing what you see in front of you: Draw the negative space around an object instead of the object itself. “Drawing the negative space is one of my favorite tricks for drawing accurately,” she says. “When we draw the negative space or the negative shape, our left brain doesn’t have any preconceived symbol for this. So it checks out, allowing our creative right brain to take the wheel.”

7. Bring Emotion In

Is a line just a line? No, according to Eviston, who teaches a tutorial that challenges students to draw lines with different emotions—angry, sad, calm, and more. “Starting off with the specific and lofty intention of what you want to communicate is a wonderful way to stimulate your imagination and creativity,” he says. Plus, it can create a whole new element to your pencil sketches. “Although we can never fully control or predict how the viewer will interpret a line, we have far more control than we often realize,” he adds. 

8. Practice Different Shading Techniques

Practice a variety of shading techniques to find your favorite.
Practice a variety of shading techniques to find your favorite.

“Shading techniques are very important,” says Skillshare instructor Antonia Dewey. “They could easily define your artistic style.” But with so many different types of shading—hatching, cross-hatching, blending, stippling and so many more—which type is for you? Dewey recommends practicing all of them in order to find your favorite. Try drawing one object, such as a tree, several times, then practicing multiple different shading techniques to fill it in. 

9. Understand Light and Shadow

Start to understand how light works by practicing with a desk lamp.
Start to understand how light works by practicing with a desk lamp.

Of course, shading can only look realistic if you have an understanding of light and shadow, which Eviston covers in detail in his course, Shading Fundamentals: Drawing With Dramatic Light and Shadow. While learning from other drawings can be helpful, he recommends a real-life approach: Set up an object on a table, point a lamp at it, and observe the result. “You want to start to experiment and observe the effects of light on an object and see what happens when you move the light around to see how it changes the appearance,” he says.

10. Get Comfortable With Volumetric Drawing

Skillshare student Babi W. practices volumetric drawing with a simple coffee cup.
Skillshare student Babi W. practices volumetric drawing with a simple coffee cup.

“Volumetric drawing is a critical shift that you’re going to make as an artist,” says Eviston. “Learning how to look at objects, to analyze how they’re operating in space, and to put those volumes down on the page is one of the most powerful techniques you can learn that will really help your drawings have the illusion that they are actual three-dimensional objects existing in deep space.” His course on 3D drawing and perspective provides plenty of exercises to master this skill.

11. Master Simple Objects Before Moving On

“Finding subjects that are challenging to you, but not absolutely bewildering is the best way to quickly improve your drawings,” says Eviston. “If you go to a complex form before you’re ready, you will most likely develop bad drawing habits. Once you have bad habits in your drawing process, they’re very difficult to get rid of.”

12. Draw Quickly

While improving your drawing may seem like something that takes hours and hours, illustrator Ohn Mar Win advocates the opposite approach. “It may sound odd but committing to sketch in three-minute bursts takes away some of the pressure and overwhelm associated with producing drawings,” she says. “It really focuses your mind on just getting on with the actual drawing rather than worrying too much about the outcome.” She’s created a course that’ll walk you through the process, but a DIY approach works too: Just observe the object you’d like to draw, set a timer for three minutes, and get going! 

13. Copy the Masters

Copying the techniques of other artists is a powerful tool for your own learning.
Copying the techniques of other artists is a powerful tool for your own learning.

“Copying a piece by one of your favorite artists can be an amazing way to study,” says Brickey. “Instead of struggling through certain decisions yourself, you can see what the artist did and then hopefully bring those learned solutions into your own drawings. You’ll learn new techniques and methods from art making that you can then add to your list of skills too. You’ll also learn good composition. Instead of just looking at a piece for a few minutes and observing it, copying forces you to physically go through the motions, helping you gain muscle memory and knowledge.”

14. Incorporate Color

Skillshare instructor Emmy Kalia teaches students how to blend color with the color wheel.
Skillshare instructor Emmy Kalia teaches students how to blend color with the color wheel.

Once you have a handle on the basics, you may want to start incorporating color in your pencil drawings. A good place to start is Emmy Kalia’s course, which uses the color wheel as a sketching exercise. “It’s a great way to learn how these colors work together while improving your blending skills. It takes a little time, but it is definitely worth it,” she says.

15. Just Keep Practicing

“One of the most important lessons I’ve learned from my daily art practice is that taking action is truly the secret ingredient to becoming a better artist,” says Skillshare instructor Ria Sharon. “So I encourage you to do just that!” 

50 Pencil Sketches You Can Use for Inspiration

Ready to get drawing? Whether you’re looking for easy sketches you can do in a few minutes or pencil sketches that will challenge your skills, these drawings will provide plenty of inspiration.

Flower Pencil Sketches

Flower sketches by Skillshare student Lysified. 
Flower sketches by Skillshare student Lysified. 
Skillshare student Jessica D. sketches a variety of flowers.
Skillshare student Jessica D. sketches a variety of flowers.
In this pencil sketch, Skillshare student Annette B. uses a simple, pleasing color palette.
In this pencil sketch, Skillshare student Annette B. uses a simple, pleasing color palette.
Even beginners can draw this simple rose, based on a tutorial by Skillshare drawing teacher Emma Smith.
Even beginners can draw this simple rose, based on a tutorial by Skillshare drawing teacher Emma Smith.
A beautifully detailed peony by Skillshare student Brookelle J.
A beautifully detailed peony by Skillshare student Brookelle J.
Skillshare student Misty G. creates a dramatic colored pencil drawing of roses on a keyboard.
Skillshare student Misty G. creates a dramatic colored pencil drawing of roses on a keyboard.

Nature Pencil Sketches

Skillshare student Romona S. draws a variety of leaves.
Skillshare student Romona S. draws a variety of leaves.
Using graphite pencils in a variety of weights brings life and texture to this drawing by Skillshare instructor Diane Flick.
Using graphite pencils in a variety of weights brings life and texture to this drawing by Skillshare instructor Diane Flick.
This simple tree from Skillshare instructor Emma Smith showcases shading techniques.
This simple tree from Skillshare instructor Emma Smith showcases shading techniques.
Evergreen trees are easy to draw, and even simple sketches like these look stunning.
Evergreen trees are easy to draw, and even simple sketches like these look stunning.
This oak tree sketch by Skillshare instructor Suzanne Kurilla shows off its beauty and mystery.
This oak tree sketch by Skillshare instructor Suzanne Kurilla shows off its beauty and mystery.
A nature scene made with a variety of graphite pencils.
A nature scene made with a variety of graphite pencils.
Expert color and shading techniques bring these kiwis by Skillshare instructor Jasmina Susak to life. 
Expert color and shading techniques bring these kiwis by Skillshare instructor Jasmina Susak to life. 
Another Susak masterpiece, this mushroom pencil drawing is vivid and three-dimensional.
Another Susak masterpiece, this mushroom pencil drawing is vivid and three-dimensional.

Pencil Portraits

Texture brings pencil drawing portraits, like this one from Skillshare instructor Antonia Dewey, to life.
Texture brings pencil drawing portraits, like this one from Skillshare instructor Antonia Dewey, to life.
Even simple lines can create a compelling portrait.
Even simple lines can create a compelling portrait.
Pencil portraits are simple, yet still can show plenty of emotion.
Pencil portraits are simple, yet still can show plenty of emotion.
It’s hard to believe this realistic portrait by Skillshare instructor Gabrielle Brickey was done using just pencil.
It’s hard to believe this realistic portrait by Skillshare instructor Gabrielle Brickey was done using just pencil.
Hair and skin texture is key to Skillshare instructor Maryam Fakher’s portrait drawing.
Hair and skin texture is key to Skillshare instructor Maryam Fakher’s portrait drawing.
Skillshare student Елена P gets creative with color in this colored pencil portrait.
Skillshare student Елена P gets creative with color in this colored pencil portrait.
This image by Skillshare instructor Akhil B. shows just how much colored pencils can bring portraits to life. 
This image by Skillshare instructor Akhil B. shows just how much colored pencils can bring portraits to life. 
Create images like this lifelike masterpiece in Paul Fischer’s Skillshare course.
Create images like this lifelike masterpiece in Paul Fischer’s Skillshare course.
Portraits don’t have to be serious. Skillshare instructor Robert Marzullo shows how to make comic-style faces.
Portraits don’t have to be serious. Skillshare instructor Robert Marzullo shows how to make comic-style faces.

Cute Sketches of Animals

Sketch your own dog based on a photograph.
Sketch your own dog based on a photograph.
Skillshare student Mercedes M. adds expert texture to this sweet cow drawing.
Skillshare student Mercedes M. adds expert texture to this sweet cow drawing.
This cute raccoon by illustrator Dream Chen is more creative than realistic—but we love him all the same.
This cute raccoon by illustrator Dream Chen is more creative than realistic—but we love him all the same.
With this dog portrait, Skillshare instructor Laura Williams shows that it’s amazing what pencils can create.
With this dog portrait, Skillshare instructor Laura Williams shows that it’s amazing what pencils can create.
A pencil drawing of a lovable lab by Skillshare student Hector C. 
A pencil drawing of a lovable lab by Skillshare student Hector C. 
This cat sketch is based on a beautiful, expressive black and white photo.
This cat sketch is based on a beautiful, expressive black and white photo.
With so many details on their tiny bodies, birds are excellent subjects for pencil drawing.
With so many details on their tiny bodies, birds are excellent subjects for pencil drawing.
Detail and color brings this bee to life.
Detail and color brings this bee to life.
Drawing instructor Jasmina Susak brings vivid color to this hunting tiger drawing.
Drawing instructor Jasmina Susak brings vivid color to this hunting tiger drawing.

Cool Sketches of Buildings and Architecture

Emma Smith’s Skillshare course teaches perspective with this simple lighthouse drawing.
Emma Smith’s Skillshare course teaches perspective with this simple lighthouse drawing.
Instructor Maryam Fakher uses texture to create the intricate stone work in this drawing.
Instructor Maryam Fakher uses texture to create the intricate stone work in this drawing.
See how Skillshare instructor Elwira Pawlikowska goes from simple sketch to detailed masterpiece.
See how Skillshare instructor Elwira Pawlikowska goes from simple sketch to detailed masterpiece.
This grand cathedral is another Pawlikowska creation.
This grand cathedral is another Pawlikowska creation.
Drawing Gothic castles is all about the details.
Drawing Gothic castles is all about the details.
A church in Turkey by @markpoulierart.
A church in Turkey by @markpoulierart.

Still Life Drawings

Simple spheres are great practice for more complex still life drawings.
Simple spheres are great practice for more complex still life drawings.
A coffee pot and cup pair makes an excellent still life subject.
A coffee pot and cup pair makes an excellent still life subject.
The texture of this vase and fruit still life by Skillshare student Ellen B. is almost palpable.
The texture of this vase and fruit still life by Skillshare student Ellen B. is almost palpable.
Sometimes simple shading is all you need in a still life.
Sometimes simple shading is all you need in a still life.
Skillshare student Corinna M. uses shading to add depth to these shapes.
Skillshare student Corinna M. uses shading to add depth to these shapes.
Skillshare student Jessi I. explores 3D fruit and vegetables.
Skillshare student Jessi I. explores 3D fruit and vegetables.

Simple Sketches Anyone Can Do

Using simple lines and shading, Skillshare instructor John Anderson shows how anyone can learn how to draw mountains.
Using simple lines and shading, Skillshare instructor John Anderson shows how anyone can learn how to draw mountains.
With step-by-step instructions and simple shapes, Emma Smith shows how even beginners can draw this galloping horse. 
With step-by-step instructions and simple shapes, Emma Smith shows how even beginners can draw this galloping horse. 
Different pencil weights help bring sophisticated texture to this easy drawing of an artichoke.
Different pencil weights help bring sophisticated texture to this easy drawing of an artichoke.
This simple wine glass is an exercise in perspective.
This simple wine glass is an exercise in perspective.
Even beginners can draw portraits using this abstract pixelated drawing technique.
Even beginners can draw portraits using this abstract pixelated drawing technique.
Abstract drawings, like this one from Skillshare student Johanna R., are a great way to practice shading and gradients. 
Abstract drawings, like this one from Skillshare student Johanna R., are a great way to practice shading and gradients. 

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